DiscoverDo you really know?
Do you really know?

Do you really know?

Author: Bababam

Subscribed: 10,236Played: 216,222
Share

Description

You’ve heard about it, but do you really know it? In 3 minutes, we help you understand the true meaning behind the trends, concepts and acronyms that are making headlines. After listening, you will really know for sure.

90 Episodes
Reverse
What is Snapchat dysmorphia? Thanks for asking! Snapchat dysmorphia is a mental health condition linked to the excessive use of filters and effects on social media apps. In extreme cases users become so accustomed to seeing a transformed version of their face through selfies, that they want to get surgery to look more like their virtual self. This phenomenon is causing concern among plastic surgeons around the world.  How did this phenomenon appear? The past decade has seen the democratisation of photo editing. That’s largely thanks to filters, which are easy to use and available to anyone with a smartphone. With just a few taps, you can give yourself cat ears or add flowers in your hair. And we don’t always realise it, but they often do more than that. They can make our skin look smoother, our noses look slimmer or eyes look bigger. Some handsets even have these functions integrated in their cameras, without the need for an app! So it’s like a kind of digital cosmetic surgery, isn't it? Will having a Snapchat filter face be the next big trend? In under 3 minutes, we answer your questions! To listen other episodes, you can click here: What is Kawasaki Disease? What is the welfare state? What is locavorism?  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
What is corona shaming? Thanks for asking! Corona shaming is one of many trends to emerge during the coronavirus pandemic. Many are frustrated by others apparently not respecting public health guidelines like social distancing, lockdown rules and wearing masks. Most people have had no trouble following the rules, but it seems to have been more difficult for some. It could be a neighbour, a random person or group of people seen out and about or on the news, or it could be a celebrity. Whatever the situation, this behaviour is perceived as selfish and inconsiderate, therefore deserving a good dose of corona shaming. The practice came about more or less the second lockdowns came into place, and has become a national pastime in many countries.One high-profile example was TV anchor George Stephanopoulos, who went into a local pharmacy, despite his wife having recently tested positive for COVID-19. The passer-by who spotted him was all the more exasperated as the pharmacy actually offered a free delivery service, making his visit unnecessary. Other stars to have been corona shamed include Jennifer Lopez for going to a gym in Miami, and Ivanka Trump, who travelled from Washington to New Jersey to celebrate Easter. Celebrities haven’t really been the best role models in the last few weeks, have they? In under 3 minutes, we answer your questions! Yo listen other episodes, you can click here: What is Kawasaki Disease? What is the welfare state? What is locavorism?  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
What is Kawasaki Disease? Thanks for asking! The general consensus was that children were relatively safe from COVID-19. But since late April, a number of coronavirus-positive children have been admitted to hospital with strange symptoms, resembling those of Kawasaki Disease. How and when Kawasaki Disease was discovered ? The condition was discovered by Tomisaku Kawasaki in late 1960s Japan. It affects young children and the resulting damage to blood vessels can lead to serious heart problems in the worst cases. The problem is we just don’t know how to explain the causes. Scientists believe it may be an autoimmune response due to a viral or bacterial infection, to which some children are genetically predisposed. The symptoms include a high fever, skin rashes, conjunctival injection and stomach pains. Children affected by Kawasaki disease are treated in hospital as there can be serious complications. Intravenous immunoglobulin is administered in high doses, usually improving symptoms within 36 hours. Full recovery can take up to six weeks, but lasting damage is uncommon. Not a lot of people knew about this disease, due to its relative rareness. That’s especially true in Europe, which less than one in 10,000 children are affected. But in April 2020, the British health minister warned that hospitals had admitted tens of children with similar symptoms. Elsewhere in Europe, hospital services in Italy, Spain and France observed clusters of similar cases. In the United States, three children died from an inflammatory disease in early May. So are we saying that Covid-19 could be bringing on Kawasaki disease? Regardless of whether it is in fact Kawasaki disease or not, is it caused by coronavirus? In under 3 minutes, we answer your questions! Yo listen other episodes, you can click here: What is the welfare state? What is locavorism? What is anosmia?  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
What is the welfare state? Thanks for asking! The term welfare state refers to measures taken by governments to promote the well-being of the population. This usually takes the form of grants, pensions and benefits, especially for those who have the greatest financial needs. In COVID-19 pandemic times, economies all around the world have been hit hard, and many people are asking whether states should intervene more in order to protect citizens.  When and where was the welfare state born? Towards the end of the 19th century, German Chancellor Bismarck needed to calm social unrest and secure support among the working classes. He introduced measures like pensions and employee health insurance, which formed the basis of the modern welfare state in Europe. The welfare state is a popular concept in times of austerity, such as in the USA or UK during the Great Depression. Wealth is systematically redistributed from rich to poor. France is well known for its social security system, but that only appeared in 1945 after the end of the Second World War. So, where does the money come from? And how is it redistributed? Will the global recession bring about an upscaling of welfare programmes? In under 3 minutes, we answer your questions! To listen other episodes, you can click here: What is anosmia? What is a webinar? What is zumping?  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
What is locavorism?

What is locavorism?

2020-05-2303:33

What is locavorism? Thanks for asking! Just like a carnivore eats meat and a frugivore feeds mainly on fruit, locavores are people who commit to a diet consisting only or principally of local food. The reasoning locavores give for their choice of lifestyle is that foods produced locally are healthier, as well as creating environmental, economic and community benefits. During coronavirus lockdowns, food supply chains have been greatly impacted on an unprecedented scale. Consumers have also adapted their eating patterns, with many choosing to eat local and seasonal as a result. So what makes local food healthier then? Local food has a shorter time from the moment it is harvested to being eaten at your dinner table. So it’s less likely to have lost nutrient values, compared to food which is imported from other regions or countries. What’s more, the potential for contamination is also much lower as there are fewer stages in the supply chain. Food produced far away could be subject to safety issues at the farming, washing, transportation or distribution steps. Your tastebuds will thank you too, as crops are picked when they’re at their ripest. Fruits which have to travel thousands of miles before being eaten are picked early and artificially ripened. Fresher food lasts longer too, meaning you’re less likely to waste it. And what about the environmental benefits? Should we all become locavores? In under 3 minutes, we answer your questions! To listen other episodes, you can click here: What is anosmia? What is a webinar? What is zumping?  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
What is anosmia?

What is anosmia?

2020-05-2103:35

What is anosmia? Thanks for asking! Anosmia is the clinical name for a complete loss of the sense of smell. Awareness of the disorder is somewhat low, and there is no known cure. But as many as 5% of people are impacted. With odor being intrinsically linked to taste, most sufferers also have some kind of alteration to their sense of taste. Permanent anosmia can be brought on by damage to olfactory neurons, or a brain injury. More rarely it is a congenital condition, which means the sufferer has no sense of smell from the day they are born. Temporary anosmia has been observed in a number of Covid-19 patients, drawing attention to the condition. It’s increasingly being recognized as an early symptom of the virus, with some countries like the USA and France adding it to public health guidelines. The World Health Organization also officially added it to its list of symptoms in mid-May. Should those who lose their sense of smell be worried then? Some data has shown that anosmia is most often experienced by those with less severe cases of the disease. Researchers from the US Department of Defense looked at a group of 169 Covid-19 patients and found that those who required hospitalization were far less likely to report a loss of smell or taste. The study’s summary went like this: “We and others have observed that anosmia manifests either early in the disease process or in patients with mild or no constitutional symptoms.” While that may sound reassuring, the authors warned that it was still too early to draw definitive conclusions.  So how does COVID-19 actually cause anosmia? And if I recover from Covid-19, will my anosmia go away? In under 3 minutes, we answer your questions! For other questions about the coronavirus pandemic, you can click here: What is zumping? What are coronabonds? What is tocilizumab?  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
What is a webinar?

What is a webinar?

2020-05-2004:06

What is a webinar? Thanks for asking! A webinar is a type of web conferencing, generally taking the form of a workshop, lecture or presentation. If office workers weren’t already familiar with webinars before the coronavirus pandemic, the overwhelming majority are now. That’s due to remote working practices brought on by lockdown measures in many countries. How the term webinar was born? The term is a portmanteau of web and seminar, which caused some controversy in linguistic spheres after first appearing. Lake Superior State University included it on its annual list of banished words in 2005. It did nevertheless make it into the dictionary the same year. There are several logistical advantages of webinars over in-person conferences. Users don’t need to travel in order to participate, and it’s more cost-effective.  Which platforms can be used for webinars? Are they safe for us? And are there safer alternatives to big platforms? In under 3 minutes, we answer your questions! For other questions about the coronavirus pandemic, you can click here: What is zumping? What are coronabonds? What is tocilizumab?  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
What is zumping?

What is zumping?

2020-05-1803:03

What is zumping? Thanks for asking! Zumping is one of many new words to be invented since the start of the Coronavirus pandemic. It refers to the practice of getting dumped, or dumping someone, on video call app Zoom. Perhaps the first to talk about American journalist Julia Moser. Her tweet from April 10th asked: “Am I the first person who’s been dumped via Zoom”? Since then her tweet has been retweeted over 60,000 times and many others have shared their stories of breakups on Zoom, Facetime or Skype. So, how "zumping" became a real word? The Guardian invented the term zumping in reaction to the story, and Julia Moser later wrote in greater length about her experience on the Buzzfeed News website. She said: “I’m no stranger to breakups...But there is something particularly bruising about this happening in the midst of a global public health crisis. Crying over FaceTime to your sister isn’t the same as getting to wipe your snot on her shoulder IRL.” Have every couples had a tough time being under lockdown ? Can we notice, for example, an increase of divorces since the lockdown? In under 3 minutes, we answer your questions! For other questions about the coronavirus pandemic, you can click here: What is tocilizumab? What is mass testing? What is an FFP2 mask?  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
What are corona bonds?

What are corona bonds?

2020-05-1604:05

What are corona bonds? Thanks for asking! A political crisis is currently emerging in Europe, and it’s down to Corona bonds. The term is derived from eurobonds, which were joint bonds issued during the debt crisis at the start of the last decade. The idea is that investors loan money to the entire Eurozone bloc, which is then forwarded to individual states. It’s been a divisive issue in the past, and it’s causing debate again in the context of the coronavirus pandemic. Old tensions are being exacerbated; some countries are calling for greater solidarity from their fellow members, while others feel they shouldn’t have to bail out less responsible neighbours. Europe Day is celebrated every year on 9th May, commemorating the date of the Schuman Declaration in 1950. But in 2020 Europe is far from a celebratory mood. While member states try to contain the Covid-19 epidemic, the EU itself can’t act directly. The scope for it to legislate in health policy is limited. But it holds greater influence in economics and finance.  So, what are the solutions to the recession that's already hitting now ? States are indeed going to have to invest large amounts of money in order to save their economies. To do so, they have to borrow from a wide range of domestic or international sources, like other states, banks and insurers. Kind of like someone taking out a mortgage at a bank, right? And what’s been decided then? In under 3 minutes, we answer your questions! For other questions about the coronavirus pandemic, you can click here: What is tocilizumab? What is mass testing? What is an FFP2 mask?  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
What is tocilizumab?

What is tocilizumab?

2020-05-1403:45

What is tocilizumab? Thanks for asking! Tocilizumab is a prescription drug used to treat rheumatoid arthritis patients in over 100 countries. It’s administered by intravenous infusion in medical centres and hospitals, or by subcutaneous injection, which patients can carry out at home. In some cases, it has shown potential effectiveness in treating critically ill covid-19 patients. What is the power of tocilizumab? Tocilizumab was developed in the early 2000s by Swiss pharmaceutical giant Hoffman-La Roche. Its trade names are Actemra and RoActemra and it is a humanized monoclonal antibody, which blocks the interleukin-6 receptor. Believe it or not, the main danger to critically ill patients isn’t the coronavirus itself, but the response the body has in trying to fight it. That’s because the immune system can sometimes harm healthy cells by overreacting to the threat of a disease. One such example is a cytokine storm, which can lead to excessive inflammation. Cytokines are proteins which are important in cell signaling. When an illness occurs, they are released to mobilize defensive forces in the infected part of the body. Cytokine signalling usually ceases once the infection threat fades. But in the case of a cytokine storm, the alarm continues to sound, calling more and more cells and molecules. These end up causing more harm than the disease itself. So, is there a chance that tocilizumab could work? Or is tocilizumab the new chloroquine? In under 3 minutes, we answer your questions! For other questions about the coronavirus pandemic, you can click here: What is an FFP2 mask? What is social distancing? What is herd immunity?  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
What is mass testing?

What is mass testing?

2020-05-1303:46

What is mass testing? Thanks for asking! The benefit of screening for diseases is to enable early diagnosis when a person is asymptomatic. That’s the case for a large proportion of those infected with COVID-19, which is why mass testing is being championed as a solution to slow the spread of the disease. With lockdown measures being eased in many places, there’s a risk of the coronavirus circulating more freely again. To combat this, governments are ramping up their screening capacities, in order to test more widely. But is the mass testing working in other countries? Several countries have seemingly handled the health crisis better than others due to mass testing. South Korea has carried out more tests than any other country since the start of the pandemic. At 10,000 per day, the country was able to react quickly to new waves of infection. Meanwhile in Europe, Germany was quick to react to the danger of the virus spreading. From the end of January, they began widespread testing of those returning from countries where the virus had already struck. On the other hand, certain countries have been criticised for not reacting quickly enough in this area, even after a global pandemic had been declared. The UK government set itself a target of 100,000 tests per day, which it’s so far struggling to meet. And in the United States, researchers believe that 20 million tests would be required every day, in order to safely reopen the economy.  So how exactly are these tests carried out? And what about antibody tests? In under 3 minutes, we answer your questions! For other questions about the coronavirus pandemic, you can click here: What is herd immunity? What is social distancing? What is an FFP2 mask?  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
What is an FFP2 mask?

What is an FFP2 mask?

2020-05-1103:24

What is an FFP2 mask? Thanks for asking! You likely hadn’t heard of FFP2 masks in pre-COVID-19 days, but they are in huge demand right now. The FFP abbreviation stands for filtering facepiece, which pretty much explains the purpose of such a mask. They are also known as respiratory protection masks and cover half of the face, specifically the chin, nose and mouth. FFP2 masks filter dust particles in the air, as well as viruses such as COVID-19. The spotlight is currently on care workers using them as personal protective equipment in hospitals. But they are commonly used by workers in many industries when they are exposed to fine particles. And what is the particularity of this mask? In the European Union, the EN149 standard is used to class FFP masks from 1 to 3 according to their efficiency. As you have likely surmised, the FFP2 mask is in the middle of the range. It has a minimum filtration of 94% and maximum 8% internal leak rate. Different criteria are used to classify masks depending on the jurisdiction. In the USA, the N95 mask is considered functionally equivalent to the FFP2 mask. In China, it’s the KN95 respirator and in Australia it’s the P2 mask. During the ongoing international health crisis, wearing a mask is recommended to limit airborne transmission of the virus. However, there are shortages of suitable surgical and respiratory masks in many countries, so they are being reserved primarily for frontline care workers.  Does wearing a mask really help stop coronavirus? And what about homemade masks then? In under 3 minutes, we answer your questions! For other questions about the coronavirus pandemic, you can click here: What is the World Health Organization? What are tracking app? What is care work?  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
What is social distancing? Thanks for asking! The term social distancing refers to measures taken to reduce physical contact between people to a minimum. The aim is to stop a contagious disease from spreading, in cases such as the ongoing COVID-19 crisis.  This can be done by ordering citizens to avoid shaking hands for example. Or in more extreme circumstances, people must stay a minimum distance away from others when in public, or remain under lockdown. One of the earliest instances of social distancing was introduced in October 1918, during the Spanish Flu pandemic. Max C. Starkloff, Health Commissioner in St Louis, Missouri, closed all public venues and banned gatherings of more than 20 people. At the official end of the lockdown, will we get back to normal? Do we risk further coronavirus peaks by coming out of lockdown? In under 3 minutes, we answer your questions! For other questions about the coronavirus pandemic, you can click here: What is the World Health Organization? What are tracking apps? What is care work?  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
What is herd immunity?

What is herd immunity?

2020-05-0704:07

What is herd immunity? Thanks for asking! Also known as community immunity, herd immunity is an indirect form of protection against an infectious disease. It occurs when a high enough percentage of the population has acquired immunity either naturally or through vaccination. This then prevents the spread of the disease, protecting those who are not yet immune. Herd immunity is generally beneficial for people who cannot be vaccinated due to their medical situation, for example if they have immunodeficiency or are waiting for a transplant. And what does it mean in the case of the COVID 19 pandemic ? In the case of the COVID 19 pandemic, this means allowing people to gain immunity by contracting the virus and of course recovering. Their organisms build their own defense system by developing the necessary antibodies. In other words, if you are not immunized yourself, but you only encounter people who are immunized, you aren’t at risk of being infected. The percentage of infected people varies by location, and there’s no way of having reliable data on this without widespread testing. Especially as infected people sometimes don’t show any symptoms. Experts have estimated that up to 10% of the population may have had coronavirus in some countries. In any case, the figure is a long way off the 66% required to make herd immunity effective. So why are so many of us in lockdown then? Aren’t these measures preventing us from reaching herd immunity? Wouldn’t countries be putting their citizens in danger through such a policy? And what about all the unknown factors? In under 3 minutes, we answer your questions! For other questions about the coronavirus pandemic, you can click here: What is a lockdown? What is care work? What are tracking app?  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
What is the World Health Organization? Thanks for asking! The World Health Organization is a United Nations agency that is responsible for international public health. In the case of a global health pandemic, such as the ongoing Coronavirus crisis, the WHO has a central role in coordinating the response plan. However, some people have called into question its effectiveness. When the World Health Organization was created? The United Nations created the WHO in the aftermath of the Second World War, on April 7th 1948 to be exact. Its headquarters are located close to Geneva, Switzerland, and the agency has 7,000 employees around the world. Ethiopian Tedros Adhanom has been Director General since 2017. Due to its role as an international leader, the organization has to increase public awareness on health threats, fight illnesses and improve access to healthcare, especially in the world’s poorer countries. One of the key principles in the WHO’s constitution reads as follows: “The enjoyment of the highest attainable standard of health is one of the fundamental rights of every human being without distinction of race, religion, political belief, economic or social condition.” In the case of emergencies, especially international epidemics, the WHO has to coordinate the action plan to prevent the illness from spreading. They do that by making official recommendations, based on the information they get from countries affected by the disease.  So is it down to the WHO that half the world’s population is under lockdown? In under 3 minutes, we answer your questions! For other questions about the coronavirus pandemic, you can click here: What is a lockdown? What is care work? What are tracking app?  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
What are tracking apps? Thanks for asking! Exceptional times call for exceptional measures, as they say. Tracking apps are now being used by governments to combat the ongoing Covid-19 pandemic. In several countries, they are already live, while elsewhere, the apps are still at the development stage. Despite the obvious importance of stemming the spread of the virus, there has been much debate about resulting privacy issues. Why do we need tracking apps then? Many people with coronavirus experience only mild symptoms, or none at all. The problem is they are still able to transmit the disease to other people unknowingly. If a person later experiences symptoms, contact tracing can be used to help others realise they are at risk. In turn, they can then self-isolate for the required amount of time to avoid potentially spreading the disease.  The smartphone is perhaps the one item that almost all of us have in our possession constantly. It will come as no surprise to younger generations that their geolocation data is regularly collected by smartphone apps. Manufacturers and app providers have access to information on our whereabouts all the time. The difference is at the moment apps are being designed specifically for tracking purposes.  What about governments then? Do they track us in the same way as brands? And do citizens have a say in the matter at all? In under 3 minutes, we answer your questions! For other questions about the coronavirus pandemic, you can click here: What is lockdown? What is chloroquine?  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
What is care work?

What is care work?

2020-05-0203:10

What is care work? Thanks for asking! This subcategory of the workforce includes jobs that provide services to other people. Despite doing work that is physically and emotionally demanding, care workers have long been underpaid and underappreciated in society.  But since the start of the covid-19 pandemic, they have been widely hailed as heroes. In many countries, citizens under lockdown have been holding a minute’s applause from their balconies on a daily basis, in honour of care workers. So, who exactly are we talking about? Of course, anyone in the healthcare sector is by definition a care worker. Through the nature of their work, people working in a hospital are at a greater risk of being infected. That’s especially true for those who have hands-on contact with infected patients, like nurses, doctors and their assistants. They are frequently referred to as being the “front line” in the fight against coronavirus. But sometimes they are being sent into battle without adequate protective equipment, like masks and gloves. The role of workers in care homes is just as important. The older a person infected with coronavirus is, the more likely they are to have serious symptoms. Anyone who looks after one or more dependent people can be considered a care worker. So that includes childcare workers, although schools and nurseries are closed in many places for the time being.  What are the demographics of care workers? And will care workers get greater recognition once the coronavirus pandemic calms down? In under 3 minutes, we answer your questions! For other questions about the coronavirus pandemic, you can click here: What is lockdown? What is chloroquine?  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
What is a lockdown?

What is a lockdown?

2020-04-3003:21

What is a lockdown? Thanks for asking! It’s estimated that up to 50% of the world’s population has been under some form of lockdown since the beginning of the COVID-19 outbreak. Governments have imposed these measures to reduce physical contact and stop the disease from spreading. The current lockdown in India, which has a population of 1.3 billion people, is reported to be the largest in human history.  Although restrictions vary from country to country, the general principles of a lockdown remain the same. Only essential businesses are allowed to remain open. People are being ordered or advised to stay in their homes all the time apart from certain exceptions. Those include going to work if remote work isn’t an option, buying essential supplies like food, and helping vulnerable people like elderly family members.  Some countries require their citizens to print and sign an official form any time they go out. Law enforcement officers can then carry out spot checks.   So schooling, exercise, watching movies and dining are all exclusively home-based activities for the time being. Towns and cities across the world are practically deserted.  So, what’s the best advice for those living in lockdown? It's best to not to let yourself go during the lockdown period. It’s important to maintain a healthy lifestyle, by getting regular exercise, sticking to a balanced diet and sleeping well. In most countries, citizens are allowed to do some daily exercise outdoors, as long as they avoid other people and don’t go too far from their homes. You also need to protect your mental health. Being in lockdown and aware of the Coronavirus threat is a stressful situation for many. It’s important to get the facts from a trustworthy source of information. But if you feel anxious, consider limiting the time you spend following media coverage, especially when you’re feeling anxious. And while we may not be able to see friends and loved ones in person, we can still stay in contact via social media and video calling apps.  When’s it all going to end then? And could we go back into lockdown mode at any time? In under 3 minutes, we answer your questions ! If you want to know what is lockdown in french : https://podcasts.ba-ba-bam.com/maintenant-vous-savez/202004060500-quest-ce-que-le-confinement.html  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
What is HouseParty?

What is HouseParty?

2020-04-2903:32

What is HouseParty? Thanks for asking HouseParty is a video chat app that was created in the United States in 2016 and became particularly popular among millennials. Those who download it use it for an average of 51 minutes per day. That’s comparable to Facebook and higher than other popular apps like Instagram, Messenger and Snapchat.  The current coronavirus-related lockdowns have led to a resurgence in the app’s popularity around the world. It was downloaded 50 million times in the space of just a month, which is 70 times more than usual. Other video chat services, like Zoom and Skype, are often used by companies for remote work, whereas HouseParty is mainly aimed at younger generations. That gives it more of a fun image than its rivals.  OK so what can I do with HouseParty then? It’s fairly basic compared to a lot of messaging apps, not having any emojis, stickers or filters. The main purpose of the app is to make video calls between up to 8 devices.  You can also play games and quizzes like Time Up and Trivial Pursuit. When one of your friends opens the app, you instantly get a notification. As you can imagine that can get pretty irritating if you have a lot of contacts, but thankfully you can turn notifications off for selected or all contacts. To download HouseParty, you need to set up a username and verify your cell phone number. The app accesses your phone contacts in order to find people you know. You also have the option to connect to Facebook or share your HouseParty profile link on Snapchat. One big difference with other social media apps is that friends of friends can join video chats and games. By default when you open the HouseParty app, your personal video room goes live and any of your contacts can join.  But, are there any privacy issues ? Should I avoid using HouseParty then? In under 3 minutes, we answer your questions ! If you want to know what is HouseParty in french : https://podcasts.ba-ba-bam.com/maintenant-vous-savez/202004080500-quest-ce-que-houseparty.html  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
What are neobanks?

What are neobanks?

2020-04-2703:37

What are neobanks? Neobanks are 100% digital. They run exclusively through mobile apps, with no brick-and-mortar premises. They offer customers a user-first design, and promise low cost banking operations. There are more and more neobanks around, drawing in millions of users and rivalling traditional banks, although they don’t technically hold the same status.  Don’t confuse neobanks with digital banks, which are usually the online-only arms of bigger players in the banking sector. You may have heard of the San Francisco based neobank Chime, which is the leader in the US at the moment. But brands like N26, Revolut and Monzo are also bringing over their expertise from Europe, where the online-only trend is further ahead. All were created in the late 2010s. Ease of use is one of the main advantages with neobanks. New customers just need to download an app and can open an account without too much hassle. Other services like fund transfers, online payments and cash withdrawals are similarly user-friendly and inexpensive. Most of the time, there aren’t any income requirements or monthly maintenance fees. The interfaces are simple and foreign exchange fees are low. Some even have features enabling users to monitor their spending in certain areas and set monthly limits. A recent neobank adoption study by Finder estimates that 54.4 million Americans already use digital-only banking services. falling coins That’s over 20% of the population. What’s more, a further 22.5 million intend to open a neobank account in the coming months. While the digital-only nature of neobanks may seem most suited to millennials, it’s actually Generation X who use them the most. 30% of Gen Xers have made the transition to neobanks, compared to 27.2% of millennials. Baby boomers are the least likely to have a neobank account, with an adoption rate of just 8.4%.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
loading
Comments (5)

Marjan Ak

It's the only podcast I don't want to miss!

Apr 22nd
Reply

Siavash Nikpoor

great information 😇😍

Feb 16th
Reply

Sherry

Very good podcast, knowledgeable and interesting. Please keep on:)

Jan 19th
Reply (1)

Greatgot Great

Hate loot boxes :/

Dec 28th
Reply
Download from Google Play
Download from App Store