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Thinking Nutrition

Thinking Nutrition

Author: Dr Tim Crowe

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Thinking Nutrition is all about presenting the latest nutrition research in plain language and then translating this into what it means for your health. Dr Tim Crowe is a career nutrition research scientist and an Advanced Accredited Practising Dietitian. Tim has over 25 years of research and teaching experience in the university and public health sectors, covering areas of basic laboratory research, clinical nutrition trials and public health nutrition. He now works chiefly as a freelance health and medical writer and science communicator.
69 Episodes
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Our thyroid gland plays a major role in the metabolism, growth and development of the human body. So when things go wrong with your thyroid gland, it can have systemic effects. Hypothyroidism is where the thyroid gland doesn’t make enough thyroid hormone. And the most common reason for this is an autoimmune disease called Hashimoto’s thyroiditis. The Internet is awash with all sorts of dietary advice for how a person with hypothyroidism should eat to treat and even cure this condition. In this podcast, I’ll explore the claims made about diet and hypothyroidism and see what diet changes, if any, someone with this condition should look at making.Links referred to in the podcastIs low carb bad for hypothyroidism?  https://www.dietvsdisease.org/low-carb-hypothyroidismEffect of soy on thyroid function https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/16571087 Selenium supplementation in the treatment of Hashimoto's thyroiditis https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/20883174Connect with meInstagram: doctimcroweFacebook: Thinking NutritionTwitter: CroweTim
Can keto cure cancer?

Can keto cure cancer?

2021-04-2614:161

Thanks to earlier detection and much better treatment options, cancer today is more survivable than ever. But we are still a long way from curing cancer across the board for all types of cancer with equal outcomes. If you caught my podcast from several episodes back on improving cancer survival with diet and lifestyle choices, I covered the broad lifestyle habits linked with improving cancer survival odds. I also touched briefly on many of the so-called ‘cancer cure’ diets that abound on the Internet. So, for this podcast, I’m going to home in on one that is getting a lot of attention: and that’s the ketogenic diet.Links referred to in the podcastPreclinical and clinical evidence for a ketogenic diet in cancer https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/31399389Systematic review of the use of ketogenic diets in people with cancer https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10238-021-00710-2Fasting as an adjunct to cancer treatment https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/33271979Connect with meInstagram: doctimcroweFacebook: Thinking NutritionTwitter: CroweTim
Coffee is one of the most popular and safest stimulants that we consume. But during pregnancy, and potentially even when planning a pregnancy, it is one ‘legal drug’ where advice for women becomes a little more prescriptive. Alcohol, soft cheeses, raw fish and even raw sprouts are all foods that are best to limit or avoid during pregnancy. So, should coffee be added to the list and if so, how much is a safe amount to drink? That is what I’ll explore in today’s podcast.Links referred to in the podcastImpact of coffee on successful IVF treatment https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/31043232Meta-analysis on effect of caffeine on pregnancy outcomes https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/29276412Effect of caffeine in healthy adults, pregnant women, adolescents, and children https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/28438661 Should caffeine recommendations during pregnancy be lowered? https://www1.racgp.org.au/newsgp/clinical/experts-conflicted-on-controversial-caffeine-pregn Connect with meInstagram: doctimcroweFacebook: Thinking NutritionTwitter: CroweTim
Coughing, sore throat, runny nose, body aches, fatigue. The classic collection of symptoms synonymous with an acute respiratory tract infection. From the common cold right through to the flu, it is something most people are faced with many times over in their life. So what role nutrition, in particular micronutrient supplements, in helping to bolster your immune system to stop you from getting sick in the first place or helping to fight off an illness once an infection takes hold? In this podcast, I’ll look at the current state of play for the role of supplemental vitamin C, vitamin D and zinc in tackling acute respiratory tract infections.Links referred to in the podcastVitamin C for preventing and treating the common cold https://www.cochranelibrary.com/cdsr/doi/10.1002/14651858.CD000980.pub4/fullZinc for preventing and treating the common cold https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/28515951Vitamin D and ARIs https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/306758732021 meta-analysis of micronutrients and ARIs https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/33472840  Connect with meInstagram: doctimcroweFacebook: Thinking NutritionTwitter: CroweTim
Inflammation is now getting top billing as the latest health concern you should be worrying about. From avoiding so-called inflammatory foods to eating anti-inflammatory foods to treat and even cure inflammation, is there no disease that cannot be explained by our understanding of inflammation? Far from something scary, inflammation is a natural process that helps your body heal and defend itself from harm. It is only when inflammation becomes chronic that the story changes. In this podcast, I’ll explain just what exactly inflammation is, what causes it, when it is good and when it is bad, and importantly: what role diet and lifestyle habits play in inflammation.Links referred to in the podcastMediterranean diet and inflammation https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7400632Effect of probiotics on inflammatory markers https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/30854594 Meta-analysis of dairy foods and inflammation https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/10408398.2014.967385Connect with meInstagram: doctimcroweFacebook: Thinking NutritionTwitter: CroweTim
Move aside coconut oil, your time in the superfood spotlight has passed. Today it is apple cider vinegar, the latest all-natural, all wholesome, all singing, all dancing superfood that's here to save you from just about anything that ails you. With claims ranging from sterilising toothbrushes, curing diabetes and melting away waistlines, in this podcast I’ll look behind the apple cider trend to see what the science has to say.Links referred to in the podcastACV and weight loss clinical trial 1  https://www.jstage.jst.go.jp/article/bbb/73/8/73_90231/_articleACV and weight loss clinical trial 2 https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S1756464618300483 Meta-analysis of ACV and blood glucose responses https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/28292654Review of ACV, glucose responses and potential mechanisms https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/27213723Connect with meInstagram: doctimcroweFacebook: Thinking NutritionTwitter: CroweTim
Eating well and positive lifestyle choices are an important part of reducing a person’s risk of cancer. But when it comes to food choices for people who have survived cancer, key themes surface. A healthy diet and other lifestyle changes are just as important to improve the chances of surviving cancer and reducing its chance of coming back. In this podcast, I’ll look at what the scientific evidence says about lifestyle choices in improving cancer survivability and what are the key recommendations someone with cancer should aim for.Links referred to in the podcastAdherence to cancer prevention guidelines and cancer survivability https://ascopubs.org/doi/full/10.1200/JCO.2012.45.4462Meta-analysis of the effect of diet on mortality and cancer recurrence among cancer survivors https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5181206Physical activity and cancer survival in men http://journals.humankinetics.com/doi/abs/10.1123/jpah.2011-0257Physical activity and colon cancer recurrence https://ascopubs.org/doi/full/10.1200/jco.2006.06.0863 Alternative cancer diets https://ar.iiarjournals.org/content/34/1/39Connect with meInstagram: doctimcroweFacebook: Thinking NutritionTwitter: CroweTim
A person’s risk of cancer can be significantly lessened by simple and fairly obvious nutrition and lifestyle changes. In this podcast, I’ll explore where you should put most of your focus and spoiler alert, none of it has to do with avoiding 5G signals, GMO foods, artificial sweeteners, underarm deodorants or acid causing foods.Links referred to in the podcastWCRF cancer prevention recommendations https://www.wcrf.org/dietandcancer/cancer-prevention-recommendations Adherence to WCRF recommendations and cancer risk reduction  https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/32210367Connect with meInstagram: doctimcroweFacebook: Thinking NutritionTwitter: CroweTim
Want to eat the exact opposite of plant-based? Then the carnivore diet has you covered. A diet that consists entirely of animal foods and zero carbs and plants, it offers the promise of weight loss and a cure for all that ails you from autoimmune diseases to depression. Of all the trends that buck conventional nutrition advice, the carnivore diet lies several standard deviations to the right of the diet crazy curve. In this podcast, I look at what created the carnivore diet trend, what it involves, and importantly: what can we say about its health merits. Links referred to in the podcastGoogle Trends data for carnivore diet searches https://trends.google.com/trends/explore?date=all&q=carnivore%20diet Meeting essential nutrient needs on the carnivore diet https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/32833688 Red meat and TMAO production https://academic.oup.com/eurheartj/article/40/7/583/5232723Connect with meInstagram: doctimcroweFacebook: Thinking NutritionTwitter: CroweTim
Calcium is the most abundant mineral in the body and it’s not just there for making healthy bones. Calcium is needed to move muscles, send nerve signals and release hormones. While dairy gets a lot of the attention for being a good source of calcium, there are plenty of other foods that help meet your needs too. In this podcast, I look at the roles of calcium, the consequences of not getting enough and tackle the controversial area of if calcium supplements are to be recommended or not.Links referred to in the podcastDairy and bone health review 2018 https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/29560832Dairy and bone health review 2019 https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/30657847 Calcium supplements: the good, the bad and the ugly https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/30568435Connect with meInstagram: doctimcroweFacebook: Thinking NutritionTwitter: CroweTim
Collagen supplements are big business. And is it any wonder when they are touted as the elixir for youthful and glowing skin. With plenty of A-list celebrities singing its praises, it’s no wonder collagen is having a moment in the spotlight. And a look at Google Trends shows search interest in collagen supplements really took off at the start of 2019 and it is showing no signs of slowing down. Reading the shopping list of health claims made about collagen - from turning back the clock on your skin, treating joint pain and even ‘healing your gut’ - you should rightly raise your sceptical flag. Yet when you look at the scientific evidence, there could just be some validity to some of these claims. That’s what I’ll be exploring in this podcast. Links referred to in the podcastClinical trial of collagen supplementation and skin health in women https://www.karger.com/Article/Abstract/351376Systematic review of the effect of collagen supplementation on skin https://jddonline.com/articles/dermatology/S1545961619P0009XMeta-analysis of the effect of collagen supplementation on osteoarthritis https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs00264-018-4211-5Connect with meInstagram: doctimcroweFacebook: Thinking NutritionTwitter: CroweTim
What if I told you that all it takes to lose weight, boost energy and prevent diseases like arthritis, osteoporosis and cancer was to eat the right foods to keep the pH of your body in the alkaline zone? Well, if I were prepared to throw out every bit of scientific knowledge that I have of how the human body works to buffer against acidity and alkalinity then sure, I could tell you that. But I’m not. Instead, in today’s podcast, I’m going to investigate those wild health claims made by the celebrity-endorsed alkaline diet and explain why it is pseudoscience squared.Connect with meInstagram: doctimcroweFacebook: Thinking NutritionTwitter: CroweTim
Coeliac disease affects less than 1 percent of the population, yet, despite its relative rarity, there has been an explosion in the adoption of a gluten-free lifestyle. It is becoming more and more common for people to report having problematic reactions to foods containing gluten. Termed non-coeliac gluten sensitivity, this is a condition still in search of a defined disease despite having a large degree of overlap in symptoms with coeliac disease. In this podcast, I’ll explore the connection between coeliac disease, gluten sensitivity and gluten. Links referred to in the podcastClinical trial of gluten challenge in people with gluten sensitivity https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/apt.13372Nutritional quality of gluten vs gluten-free foods https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/26119206Connect with meInstagram: doctimcroweFacebook: Thinking NutritionTwitter: CroweTim
There was a time when plant-based meat substitutes were the exclusive domain of vegetarians and vegans. Now the food science technology behind these plant-based foods has come of age with products designed to closely look, feel, taste and even bleed like the real thing. The rise of meatless meats is all about meeting the demands of traditional meat-eaters who want to cut down on meat and are looking for plant-based protein alternatives. But are these foods really a healthier alternative to their animal counterparts? That’s what I’ll explore in this podcast.Links referred to in the podcastBeyond Meat environmental impact http://css.umich.edu/publication/beyond-meats-beyond-burger-life-cycle-assessment-detailed-comparison-between-plant-basedCHOICE survey of plant-based meats www.choice.com.au/food-and-drink/meat-fish-and-eggs/meat-substitutes/buying-guides/plant-based-meatConnect with meInstagram: doctimcroweFacebook: Thinking NutritionTwitter: CroweTim
Gone are the days when cow’s milk was the only choice at the supermarket. There has been an explosion in recent years of plant-based non-dairy alternative milks. From the very familiar soy milk, we now have almond, coconut, oat, and rice milk plus a host of others joining the party. How well these contender alt-milks stack up against the ‘reference standard’ of cow’s milk is what I’ll be digging into in this podcast. Links referred to in the podcastScientific review of plant-based milks compared to cow’s milk https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s13197-017-2915-yCHOICE review of almond milks https://www.choice.com.au/food-and-drink/dairy/milk/articles/almond-milkConnect with meInstagram: doctimcroweFacebook: Thinking NutritionTwitter: CroweTim
If you want to be less confused about just how to make sense of conflicting nutrition messages that you hear about each day then you’ve come to the right place. In today’s podcast, I’ll unpack what makes nutrition appear to be such a confusing area. But importantly, I’ll help set you straight in knowing how to make sense of it all. Links referred to in the podcast Industry conflict of interest in research https://journals.plos.org/plosmedicine/article?id=10.1371/journal.pmed.0040005 Review of dietary patterns and health https://academic.oup.com/nutritionreviews/article-lookup/doi/10.1111/nure.12153 Avocado and oxidised LDL clinical trial https://academic.oup.com/jn/advance-article/doi/10.1093/jn/nxz231/5588100Connect with meInstagram: doctimcroweFacebook: Thinking NutritionTwitter: CroweTim
Coffee. For some, it is deserving of its own essential food group. But is coffee more than just a way to achieve functioning human capacity first thing in the morning? You may have seen media headlines in the past warning about health risks of coffee. But now that the science has matured, coffee turns out to be one of the most surprisingly positive health stories of recent years. Forget about the latest superfood trend, coffee is where it is at. In this podcast, I’ll look closer at those health benefits and give you the validation you’ve been seeking to justify your caffeine habit. Links referred to in the podcast Review of coffee and health https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/1541-4337.12206 Caffeine use in Parkinson’s disease https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3414662/ Sports Dietitians Australia fact sheet on caffeine https://www.sportsdietitians.com.au/wp-content/uploads/2015/04/110721-Caffeine-Fact-Sheet_SD-Version.pdf Caffeine and the risk of miscarriage https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5733907/ Intermittent fasting in sport https://journals.lww.com/acsm-csmr/Fulltext/2019/07000/Intermittent_Fasting_and_Its_Effects_on_Athletic.6.aspx Connect with meInstagram: doctimcroweFacebook: Thinking NutritionTwitter: CroweTim
Intermittent fasting is currently one of the world's most popular health trends. Characterised by alternating periods of food absence followed by periods of normal eating, promoters of intermittent fasting claim that it is the ‘metabolic key’ to unlocking weight loss, reducing inflammation, cutting the risk of diabetes and heart disease and maybe….even extending your life. This show covers what intermittent fasting is, how to do it, and what the evidence says about that long list of health claims. Links referred to in the podcast Intermittent fasting vs traditional dieting for weight loss https://www.mdpi.com/2072-6643/11/10/2442 Review of the effects of intermittent fasting on health, ageing and disease https://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/nejmra1905136 Fasting during cancer treatment https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/324169.php Children's food choices after watching a healthy cooking show https://www.jneb.org/article/S1499-4046(19)31055-3/fulltext Connect with meInstagram: doctimcroweFacebook: Thinking NutritionTwitter: CroweTim
You are what you eat, but when it comes to your mental health, what you eat can have a profound impact on your mood and how you feel. Welcome to the rapidly moving world of nutritional psychiatry which is uncovering the key links between diet and mental health. And it could just be that it is our gut microbes, by acting as psychobiotics, that are the stars of the show here; so long as they are kept fed well. Links referred to in the podcast Fruits and vegetables consumption and life satisfaction https://ajph.aphapublications.org/doi/full/10.2105/AJPH.2016.303260 Nutrition intervention in depression: the SMILES study https://bmcmedicine.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12916-017-0791-y Nutrition intervention in young people with depression https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0222768 Meta-analysis of diet in depression and anxiety https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/30720698/ Meta-analysis of fish oil in depression https://www.nature.com/articles/s41398-019-0515-5 Meta-analysis of fish oil in anxiety https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamanetworkopen/fullarticle/2702216 Meta-analysis of vitamin D in depression https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6515787Connect with meInstagram: doctimcroweFacebook: Thinking NutritionTwitter: CroweTim
As the end of 2020 approaches, I thought I’d bring in a Christmas theme, but of course, one with a nutritionally based message. And what better way to do that than by unpacking Charles Dickens’ classic: ‘A Christmas Carol’, as a medical case study in vitamin D deficiency. Listen on to learn more.Links referred to in the podcastEnvironmental factors and Tiny Tim’s illness https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamapediatrics/fullarticle/1107722Connect with meInstagram: doctimcroweFacebook: Thinking NutritionTwitter: CroweTim
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