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The Brookings Cafeteria

Author: The Brookings Institution

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From 2013–2022, the Brookings Cafeteria podcast presented experts, ideas, and solutions across a range of policy topics. You can listen to past episodes at brookings.edu/BCP. The Brookings Podcast Network produces other policy-oriented shows that may interest you. Learn more at brookings.edu/podcasts. Follow on Twitter @policypodcasts.
432 Episodes
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In this final episode of the Brookings Cafeteria podcast, John R. Allen, president of the Brookings Institution, offers his views on Russia's war on Ukraine—including the February 4 joint statement between Russia and China; on China's continued ambitions for global leadership; and on the role of the Brookings Institution at a time when, as Allen says, "truth is under direct assault." Show notes and transcript:   Follow Brookings podcasts on Apple or Google podcasts, or on Spotify. Send feedback email to , and follow us and tweet us at  on Twitter. The Brookings Cafeteria is part of the .
Amy Liu, vice president and director of Brookings Metro, says that more than ever, cities and metro areas matter for America's future. They are at the forefront of demographic change, innovation, competitiveness, adaptation to climate change, and more. Show notes and transcript:   Follow Brookings podcasts on Apple or Google podcasts, or on Spotify. Send feedback email to , and follow us and tweet us at  on Twitter. The Brookings Cafeteria is part of the .
Darrell West, vice president and director of Governance Studies, says the forces that have fueled political polarization and extremism in the U.S. even since the January 6th attack on the U.S. Capitol are worsening. He offers insights about why, and what citizens and government can do about it. Show notes and transcript:   Follow Brookings podcasts on Apple or Google podcasts, or on Spotify. Send feedback email to , and follow us and tweet us at  on Twitter. The Brookings Cafeteria is part of the .
Brahima Sangafowa Coulibaly, vice president and director of the Global Economy and Development program at Brookings, addresses the divergent paths between wealthy countries and the developing world in the post-COVID-19 economic recovery. Show notes and transcript:   Follow Brookings podcasts on Apple or Google podcasts, or on Spotify. Send feedback email to , and follow us and tweet us at  on Twitter. The Brookings Cafeteria is part of the .
Stephanie Aaronson, vice president and director of Economic Studies at Brookings, discusses the state of jobs and the U.S. labor market.  Show notes and transcript:   Follow Brookings podcasts on Apple or Google podcasts, or on Spotify. Send feedback email to , and follow us and tweet us at  on Twitter. The Brookings Cafeteria is part of the .
Suzanne Maloney, vice president and director of Foreign Policy at Brookings, discusses the state of negotiations aimed at reviving the Iran nuclear deal, U.S.-Iran relations, and prospects for Iranian moderation in the future. Show notes and transcript:   Follow Brookings podcasts on Apple or Google podcasts, or on Spotify. Send feedback email to , and follow us and tweet us at  on Twitter. The Brookings Cafeteria is part of the .
On this episode of the Brookings Cafeteria, an expert on housing policy discusses her new book that addresses America's housing challenges and proposes practical changes to make more housing available and affordable for all Americans. Jenny Schuetz is a senior fellow in Brookings Metro and author of the new book, “Fixer-Upper: How to Repair America’s Broken Housing Systems,” publishing this month by Brookings Institution Press. You can find it on our website, Brookings.edu. She’s interviewed by Brookings Press Director Bill Finan. Show notes and transcript:   Follow Brookings podcasts on Apple or Google podcasts, or on Spotify. Send feedback email to , and follow us and tweet us at  on Twitter. The Brookings Cafeteria is part of the .
Andre Perry, a senior fellow in Brookings Metro and author of “Know Your Price: Valuing Black Lives and Property in America’s Black Cities,” published in 2020 by Brookings Institution Press, talks about a new partnership with the NAACP that focuses on the strengths and assets of Black majority cities that are worthy of increased investment. Show notes and transcript:   Follow Brookings podcasts on Apple or Google podcasts, or on Spotify. Send feedback email to , and follow us and tweet us at  on Twitter. The Brookings Cafeteria is part of the .
Carol Graham, the Leo Pasvolsky Senior Fellow and director of research in Global Economy and Development, who is an expert on a range of issues related to happiness, the economics of well-being, and America's crisis of despair, talks about her new research on brain health and its connection to the economy and health, and a new proposal for a White House Brain Capital Council. Show notes and transcript:   Follow Brookings podcasts on Apple or Google podcasts, or on Spotify. Send feedback email to , and follow us and tweet us at  on Twitter. The Brookings Cafeteria is part of the .
Senior Fellow Michael O'Hanlon discusses some of the most challenging foreign policy issues facing the United States today, from Russia to China, from Afghanistan to the Middle East. Show notes and transcript:   Follow Brookings podcasts on Apple or Google podcasts, or on Spotify. Send feedback email to , and follow us and tweet us at  on Twitter. The Brookings Cafeteria is part of the .
Is America's democracy failing and putting the U.S. economic system at risk? That’s the question in the title of a new report from Governance Studies at Brookings and the States United Democracy Center, co-authored by Brookings senior fellows Bill Galston and Elaine Kamarck. To discuss the report’s findings, Kamarck, who is also founding director of the Center for Effective Public Management at Brookings, joins the Cafeteria on this episode. Show notes and transcript:   Follow Brookings podcasts on Apple or Google podcasts, or on Spotify. Send feedback email to , and follow us and tweet us at  on Twitter. The Brookings Cafeteria is part of the .
This is the Brookings Cafeteria podcast's seventh annual look at the top economic issues of the coming year. And discussing the state of the U.S. economy, inflation expectations, and more is David Wessel, senior fellow and director of the Hutchins Center on Fiscal and Monetary Policy at Brookings. Show notes and transcript:   Follow Brookings podcasts on Apple or Google podcasts, or on Spotify. Send feedback email to , and follow us and tweet us at  on Twitter. The Brookings Cafeteria is part of the .
To celebrate the closing of another tumultuous year, this episode features our favorite clips from past 12 months. We hope you enjoy it, take the opportunity to download full episodes that interest you, and share the show with friends. Show notes and transcript:   Follow Brookings podcasts on Apple, Google podcasts, or Spotify. Send feedback email to , and follow us and tweet us at  on Twitter. The Brookings Cafeteria is part of the .
Last month, Brookings Metro, formerly the Brookings Metropolitan Policy Program, turned 25. Since Brookings Metro’s conception in 1996, America’s cities and urban communities have changed dramatically. On this episode of the Brookings Cafeteria podcast, you’ll hear from metropolitan experts on how America’s local communities have changed, where things stand at this crucial moment in time amid generational federal investment, and what it will take in the future for every community in America to be prosperous, just, and resilient. Show notes and transcript:   Follow Brookings podcasts on Apple or Google podcasts, or on Spotify. Send feedback email to , and follow us and tweet us at  on Twitter. The Brookings Cafeteria is part of the .
The two-day, virtual Summit for Democracy convened by President Biden and that wrapped up on December 10 aimed to rally nations around the world against growing authoritarianism. The podcast’s two guests in this episode have long been involved in the work of supporting democracy and thwarting democratic backsliding, both in the U.S. and abroad, and they are co-authors of a new report on how to advance democracy. Norm Eisen is a senior fellow in Governance Studies at Brookings, former U.S. ambassador to the Czech Republic, and former White House ethics czar; and Susan Corke is director of the Intelligence Project at the Southern Poverty Law Center, and formerly worked at Freedom House, U.S. Embassy Moscow, U.S. Embassy Prague, and the German Marshall Fund. They are co-authors of “Democracy Playbook 2021: 10 commitments for advancing democracy.” Also on this episode, Senior Fellow Sarah Binder offers her view on the challenges that are piling up in Congress as the first session comes to a close in a matter of week. Show notes and transcript:   Follow Brookings podcasts on Apple or Google podcasts, or on Spotify. Send feedback email to , and follow us and tweet us at  on Twitter. The Brookings Cafeteria is part of the .
This is a rebroadcast of the first episode of a new show from the Brookings Podcast Network—”17 Rooms,” a podcast about actions, insights, and community for the Sustainable Development Goals (or SDGs) and the people driving them. In “17 Rooms,” co-hosts John McArthur—who directs the Center for Sustainable Development at Brookings, and Zia Khan—senior vice president for innovation at The Rockefeller Foundation, talk with thought leaders and practitioners who are pushing to make change across all 17 of the SDGs as part of the 17 Rooms initiative, where people from diverse backgrounds meet in their own “Rooms,” one for each of the SDGs, to identify concrete actions they can take over the next 12-18 months toward the Goals. In this episode, Khan and McArthur preview the show, discuss the 17 Rooms process, and introduce themselves, explaining why they are excited about this work. You can find ways to listen and subscribe to 17 Rooms on our website, brookings.edu/17RoomsPodcast. Show notes and transcript:   Follow Brookings podcasts on Apple or Google podcasts, or on Spotify. Send feedback email to , and follow us and tweet us at  on Twitter. The Brookings Cafeteria is part of the .
Jim Crow laws that prevented Black citizens from voting are clearly racist, as are redlining practices that excluded Black homebuyers from white neighborhoods. But what about laws and regulations that don’t rely on disparate treatment based on race? Can such policies still be racist? Bill Gale explores these questions in his new research, including in a paper titled “Public Finance and Racism.” He is the Arjay and Frances Fearing Miller Chair in Federal Economic Policy, a senior fellow in Economic Studies, and co-director of the Urban-Brookings Tax Policy Center. Also on this episode, Senior Fellow David Wessel, director of the Hutchins Center on Fiscal and Monetary Policy, addresses President Biden’s renomination of Jay Powell to be chair of the Federal Reserve, his nomination of Lael Brainard to be vice chair, and the big question confronting the Fed: inflation. Show notes and transcript:   Follow Brookings podcasts on Apple or Google podcasts, or on Spotify. Send feedback email to , and follow us and tweet us at  on Twitter. The Brookings Cafeteria is part of the .
Computer science education in K-12 schools matters, not because it’s about training the next generation of computer programmers, but because computer science education builds skills for life, say the guests on this episode. Emiliana Vegas, senior fellow and co-director of the Center for Universal Education at Brookings, and Michael Hansen, senior fellow in the Brown Center for Education Policy at Brookings, are co-authors, along with Brian Fowler, of a new report, “Building Skills for Life: How to expand and improve computer science education around the world,” and they join me on the Brookings Cafeteria today. Also on this episode, Adie Tomer, senior fellow in Brookings Metro, reflects on the enactment of the new federal infrastructure program, which he calls the largest single investment in the country’s built environment in at least half a century. Show notes and transcript:   Follow Brookings podcasts on Apple or Google podcasts, or on Spotify. Send feedback email to , and follow us and tweet us at  on Twitter. The Brookings Cafeteria is part of the .
On this episode, a discussion with experts Fiona Hill and Angela Stent on Russia’s re-emergence as a great power after the Cold War ended, under the leadership of Vladimir Putin, and also more broadly on how economic change, deindustrialization, and other forces open doors for populist leaders to rise in places like Russia, and the United States and the United Kingdom as well, as we’ve seen in recent years. Stent is a nonresident senior fellow with the Center on the United States and Europe at Brookings and senior adviser to the Center for Eurasian, Russian and East European Studies and professor emerita of government and foreign service at Georgetown University. She is the author, most recently, of “Putin’s World: Russia Against the West and with the Rest.” Fiona Hill, the Robert Bosch Senior Fellow in the Center on the United States and Europe, served from 2017 to 2019 as deputy assistant to the president and senior director for European and Russian Affairs on the National Security Council. Her most recent book is “There Is Nothing for You Here; Finding Opportunity in the Twenty-First Century.” Hill and Stent also talk about how their careers in Soviet and Russian studies got started, the rise of Putin’s Russia, how social and economic decay can lead to the rise of populist leaders, and how to revive opportunity in America. Show notes and transcript:   Follow Brookings podcasts on Apple or Google podcasts, or on Spotify. Send feedback email to , and follow us and tweet us at  on Twitter. The Brookings Cafeteria is part of the .
Seventy percent of people report that they have done something abusive to someone else online, and a majority report being cyberbullied themselves. Nearly 90 percent of teenagers report witnessing online bullying. In a new report published by Brookings, “Bystander intervention on social media: Examining cyberbullying and reactions to systemic racism,” researchers examine the cyberbullying phenomenon, especially its racial aspect, and the strategies onlookers use to intervene. On this episode, two report authors discuss their findings: Rashawn Ray, senior fellow in Governance Studies at Brookings and a professor of sociology and executive director of the Lab for Applied Social Science Research at the University of Maryland; and Melissa Brown, assistant professor in the Department of Communication at Santa Clara University.  Also on this episode, Governance Studies Senior Fellow Molly Reynolds explains why Democratic leaders in Congress are using reconciliation to try to pass President Biden’s legislative priorities, and why that process can be so difficult to use to achieve policy goals. Show notes and transcript:   Follow Brookings podcasts on Apple or Google podcasts, or on Spotify. Send feedback email to , and follow us and tweet us at  on Twitter. The Brookings Cafeteria is part of the .
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Comments (7)

Bryson Carrier

There isn't a podcast I've tried to listen more than the Brookings podcasts, but every time I go to listen, the sound quality is just so bad, it drives me away. I really am trying to listen to this and the other Brookings podcasts, but you guys really need to do something about your audio quality, or I'm never going to be able to actually listen to what you guys have to say.

Mar 28th
Reply (1)

Nels Abrams

Wow, great podcast! Is it possible to get a list of the books mentioned?

Jul 10th
Reply (1)

iTunes User

As a previous reviewer said, this podcast humanizes some pretty wonky subjects. The interviewer deserves a lot of credit for that, but the experts being interviewed also show an ability to break down difficult topics. All the podcasts are 30 minutes and are published once a week so its a great regular program for your queue.

Aug 31st
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iTunes User

This is the type of podcast you put on while sitting in front of a fire, pouring yourself a glass of wine, and thinking deeply about the world's problems. It's interesting and calming at the same time, like you've joined a group of really intelligent friends for a 30-minute chat.

Aug 31st
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iTunes User

NPR listeners would enjoy this. Saw this podcast listed on the Brookings website and gave it a try. These are great conversations that humanize some fairly wonky topics. They're about 30 minutes so you get insights and details that go deeper than most news coverage.

Aug 31st
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