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Featured Creatures - Quick LinksDreadnoughtus on WikipediaScipionyx on WikipediaReferencesRiley Black on dinosaur lungsMuch of the research for this episode came from The Sauropod Dinosaurs by Hallett and WedelSome additional research came from The Dinosauria, 2nd editionBrocklehurst’s most recent paper on dinosaur breathing from 2020Get In TouchEmail: dinosourcepodcast@gmail.comTwitter: @TheDinosourceThanks to June "McGreatness" Paik for our lovely podcast artwork.
Featured Creatures - Quick LinksLufengosaurus on WikipediaElasmotherium of WikipediaReferencesTyler Green on the “Four Dinosaurs of the Apocalypse”Fluffy T. rex memeThe penguin/sauropod memeStarkey Comics on the stealing of his Lufengosaurus memeGet In TouchEmail: dinosourcepodcast@gmail.comTwitter: @TheDinosourceThanks to June "McGreatness" Paik for our lovely podcast artwork.
Featured Creatures - Quick LinksKentrosaurus on WikipediaAcrocanthosaurus on WikipediaReferencesKurzgesagt’s video on exploding miceAbout 50 people per year in the US are killed by farm animalsPachycephalosaurus packed a punchRiley Black’s explanation of the Acrocanthosaurus trackwayGet In TouchEmail: dinosourcepodcast@gmail.comTwitter: @TheDinosourceThanks to June "McGreatness" Paik for our lovely podcast artwork.
Featured Creatures - Quick LinksOrnithomimus on WikipediaLambeosaurus on WikipediaReferencesThe Tumblr post that has been screen-shotted and shared around. If you know of an earlier source than this post please get in touch!Slate on what dinosaurs tasted likeWhat dinosaur would be tastiest? Yeah, it’s a surprisingly common news article.One of the only sources I could find mentioning both Cadmium and the Late Cretaceous.A source I found after recording indicates that there may be some truth to the idea that cadmium was more present in the soil for some time in the Cretaceous.Get In TouchEmail: dinosourcepodcast@gmail.comTwitter: @TheDinosourceThanks to June "McGreatness" Paik for our lovely podcast artwork.
Featured Creatures - Quick LinksTarbosaurus on WikipediaUbirajara on WikipediaReferencesNicolas Cage Returns Stolen Mongolian Dinosaur SkullMartill is quoted on the ethics of fossil poachingUbirajara’s press coverage from before the paper was “temporarily removed”Get In TouchEmail: dinosourcepodcast@gmail.comTwitter: @TheDinosourceThanks to June "McGreatness" Paik for our lovely podcast artwork.
Featured Creatures - Quick LinksDiabloceratops on WikipediaEuoplocephalus on WikipediaReferencesDon Henderson’s first paper on modeling dinosHenderson’s “Tipsy Punters” paperHone and Holtz’s Spinosaurus paperAnimal Planet’s video about hippos swimmingLythronax was the dinosaur Michaela was trying to mentionBloat and Float examinedGet In TouchEmail: dinosourcepodcast@gmail.comTwitter: @TheDinosourceThanks to June "McGreatness" Paik for our lovely podcast artwork.
Featured Creatures - Quick LinksPatagotitan on WikipediaGiganotosaurus on WikipediaReferencesYes, dinosaurs were big (shocker)A fun paper on how sauropods got as big as they didGet In TouchEmail: dinosourcepodcast@gmail.comTwitter: @TheDinosourceThanks to June "McGreatness" Paik for our lovely podcast artwork.
Featured Creatures - Quick LinksAnchiornis on WikipediaKulindadromeus on WikipediaReferencesLet’s Make a Music’s album including “Utah: Industry”Mark Witton on the phenomenon of “feather resistance”Mark Witton (again) on whether or not T. rex had feathers; also included is some good examples of paleoart featuring feathered rexesYour Dinosaurs Are Wrong did a whole episode on feathers which is quite informative!Fable the raven (who can talk!)Kiwi and Pixel’s channel featuring birdphoneGet In TouchEmail: dinosourcepodcast@gmail.comTwitter: @TheDinosourceThanks to June "McGreatness" Paik for our lovely podcast artwork.
Featured Creatures - Quick LinksCedarosaurus on WikipediaBonitasaura on WikipediaReferencesA pop-sci article about the Malone 2021 paperMalone et al’s paper hypothesizing sauropod gastroliths and long-distance migrationThe first Wings paper quoted by Malone which argues strongly that most supposed gastroliths are just weird rocksThe second Wings paper that argues that most sauropod gastroliths were also just weird rocksFricke et al with evidence of sauropod migration over ~300kmGet In TouchEmail: dinosourcepodcast@gmail.comTwitter: @TheDinosourceThanks to June "McGreatness" Paik for our lovely podcast artwork.
Join our Alliance in Jurassic World: Alive, the mobile game! Search for "Dinosource Podcast", and if that doesn't work send us an email or a tweet!Featured Creatures - Quick LinksWikipedia article on MagyarosaurusWikipedia article on StruthiosaurusReferencesTwitter account of Riley Black; consider following her tweets instead of reading too much more about Nopcsa! She’s written a ton of paleontology news articles for the wider public as well as a couple books!Twitter account of Natalia Jagielska, a paleontologist studying pterosaurs (lots of great art in the account)A documentary about Nopcsa and his boyfriend/secretary DodaThe Sedgwick Museum of Earth Sciences’ video about NopcsaGet In TouchEmail: dinosourcepodcast@gmail.comTwitter: @TheDinosourceThanks to June "McGreatness" Paik for our lovely podcast artwork.
Featured Creatures - Quick LinksWikipedia article on MaiasauraWikipedia article on CitipatiReferencesDinosaurs laid soft-shelled eggs for the most partRiley Black says “no, dinosaurs didn’t die out because they were all boys”The “Mafia hypothesis” on WikipediaGet In TouchEmail: dinosourcepodcast@gmail.comTwitter: @TheDinosourceThanks to June "McGreatness" Paik for our lovely podcast artwork.
Featured Creatures - Quick LinksBrontomerus on WikipediaStaurikosaurus on WikipediaReferencesDescription of Psittacosaurus’ butt by Bell et al, 2020Femoral retraction in dinosaurs and the importance of the caudofemoralis longus by Gatesy, 1990Description of Staurikosaurus by Colbert, 1970Get In TouchEmail: dinosourcepodcast@gmail.comTwitter: @TheDinosourceThanks to June "McGreatness" Paik for our lovely podcast artwork.
Featured Creatures - Quick LinksThecodontosaurus on WikipediaAnhanguera on WikipediaReferencesSakagami, 2020; a typical paper about dinosaur neurobiology. Figure 5 is the picture of Triceratops’ skull with its brain superimposed. The brain is very small.No, Stegosaurus didn’t have a second brain in its butt.Walsh et al, 2009; predicting hearing ranges based on dinosaur skull proportions.Ballell, 2020; Thecodontosaurus paleoneurology description.Witmer et al, 2003; both a good primer on determining head posture from labyrinth and a description of Anhanguera’s skull.Get In TouchEmail: dinosourcepodcast@gmail.comTwitter: @TheDinosourceThanks to June "McGreatness" Paik for our lovely podcast artwork.
Featured Creatures - Quick LinksSharovipteryx on WikipediaDryptosaurus on Wikipedia (with Leaping Laelaps shown at the bottom of the page)ReferencesPyrite disease, further explainedGet In TouchEmail: dinosourcepodcast@gmail.comTwitter: @TheDinosourceThanks to June "McGreatness" Paik for our lovely podcast artwork.
Featured Creatures - Quick LinksHeterodontosaurus on WikipediaIchthyornis on WikipediaReferencesDollo’s Law of IrreversabilityMergansers (which are ducks)Brocklehurst and Field, 2021; a very good summary of the most up-to-date theories behind dinosaur tooth lossField et al, 2018; more of Field’s work on avian edentulousness and what made it throug the K-Pg extinction eventGet In TouchEmail: dinosourcepodcast@gmail.comTwitter: @TheDinosourceThanks to June "McGreatness" Paik for our lovely podcast artwork.
Featured Creatures - Quick LinksSinosauropteryx’s Wikipedia pageTupandactylus’ Wikipedia pageTupandactylus looking very polite, at least in David’s opinionThe extremely cursed T. rex skull from Stevens, 2006ReferencesStevens, 2006; the paper with the cursed T. rex, and also some thoughts on bird head-bobbingKoschowitz et al, 2014; discusses the idea that dinosaur vision was a contributing factor to feather evolutionHall, 2008; sclerotic ring size alone doesn’t predict nocturnality, you also need orbit depthSchmitz and Motani, 2011; hey guys look we predict nocturnality based on sclerotic ring size aloneHall et al, 2011; you absolute numptiesOther LinksApologies, but it seems like Adam Savage’s “raptor” build has been removed from YouTubeGet In TouchEmail: dinosourcepodcast@gmail.comTwitter: @TheDinosourceThanks to June "McGreatness" Paik for our lovely podcast artwork.
Featured Creatures - Quick LinksCryolophosaurus Wikipedia pageAppalachiosaurus Wikipedia pageReferencesComet shard, not asteroid, caused the dino extinctionA good primer on taphonomic biasDavid Hone discussing North Korean fossils and other sources of biasWhat we know about Ceratopsians in Appalachia (not much)Yes, shrimp existed in the Mesozoic (and at least as far back as the Carboniferous)Get In TouchEmail: dinosourcepodcast@gmail.comTwitter: @TheDinosourceThanks to June "McGreatness" Paik for our lovely podcast artwork.
Featured Creatures - Quick LinksSpinosaurus Wikipedia pageBaryonyx Wikipedia pageGlossarySpinosaurus aegyptiacus: One of the largest theropod chompy-bois to have ever lived, measuring between 12 and 18m when fully grown and weighing in at 21 tons by some (incredibly unreasonable) estimates. A minimum weight estimate of 7 tons means that this is still no joke of a dino. Although Spinosaurus lived during the late Cretaceous, it was still on the scene about 10-20 million years before T. rex showed up. The first remains were found in North Africa by Richard Markgraf in 1912 and were described by Ernst Stromer. “Spino-” comes from “spine”, referring to the tall neural spines on the creature’s vertebrae, and “aegyptiacus” refers to Egypt, where the first fossils were found, giving “spined lizard from Egypt”.Baryonyx walkeri: A spooky chompy-boi theropod from the Early Cretaceous of England. William Walker is noted as a “plumber and amateur fossil collector” in England; he found the first fossils of Baryonyx in 1983. Alan Charig and Angela Milner described the near-complete fossil which would have measured between 7 and 10m in life and weighed up to 2 tons. “Bary-” comes from the Greek “barus” meaning “heavy”, and “onyx” means “claw”, as in Acinonyx (a.k.a. the cheetah), giving “heavy claw”, so named because the first specimen collected was one of the creature’s claws. The specific name honors Walker, who found the first fossils in a clay pit.ReferencesHone and Holtz, 2021; the most recent paper to cause Spino controversyIbrahim et al, 2020; in which the new tail is revealedIbrahim et al, 2020 (but slightly earlier); a general review of the Kem Kem Beds where Spino fossils have been discoveredIbrahim et al, 2014; Spino had lil bitty legsScott Hartman on Spino’s sail shapeGet In TouchEmail: dinosourcepodcast@gmail.comTwitter: @TheDinosourceThanks to June "McGreatness" Paik for our lovely podcast artwork.
ReferencesDr Dave Hone discussing fossil examination under UVHone and Tischingler on Microraptor under UVInterview with Hone about the paperScientists have used UV light to reconstruct pigmentation on fossil snail shellsTurns out birds have more going on in the UV spectrum than we can see with our dumb human eyesNo, that viral video wasn’t showing pigeons’ natural UV fluorescenceA re-examination of Juravenator with pictures under UV courtesy of Helmut TischlingerGet In TouchEmail: dinosourcepodcast@gmail.comTwitter: @TheDinosourceThanks to June "McGreatness" Paik for our lovely podcast artwork.
ReferencesThe Pokemon phylogeny paper mentioned in the episodeGet In TouchEmail: dinosourcepodcast@gmail.comTwitter: @TheDinosourceThanks to June "McGreatness" Paik for our lovely podcast artwork.
Comments (1)

Christina Koebernik

LOVE this! Was looking for a podcast about dinosours that didn't require extensive knowledge to be able to follow along. It starts with the basics, which is perfect for me. Informative and funny - a great combination.

Dec 1st
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