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The Dinosource

Author: The Dinosource Podcast

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The bare-bones dinosaur edu-tainment podcast! Join your hosts David and Michaela in their journey of dinosaur discovery, starting with the very basics and moving on to the latest dino digs.
35 Episodes
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Featured Creatures - Quick LinksThecodontosaurus on WikipediaAnhanguera on WikipediaReferencesSakagami, 2020; a typical paper about dinosaur neurobiology. Figure 5 is the picture of Triceratops’ skull with its brain superimposed. The brain is very small.No, Stegosaurus didn’t have a second brain in its butt.Walsh et al, 2009; predicting hearing ranges based on dinosaur skull proportions.Ballell, 2020; Thecodontosaurus paleoneurology description.Witmer et al, 2003; both a good primer on determining head posture from labyrinth and a description of Anhanguera’s skull.Get In TouchEmail: dinosourcepodcast@gmail.comTwitter: @TheDinosourceThanks to June "McGreatness" Paik for our lovely podcast artwork.
Featured Creatures - Quick LinksSharovipteryx on WikipediaDryptosaurus on Wikipedia (with Leaping Laelaps shown at the bottom of the page)ReferencesPyrite disease, further explainedGet In TouchEmail: dinosourcepodcast@gmail.comTwitter: @TheDinosourceThanks to June "McGreatness" Paik for our lovely podcast artwork.
Featured Creatures - Quick LinksHeterodontosaurus on WikipediaIchthyornis on WikipediaReferencesDollo’s Law of IrreversabilityMergansers (which are ducks)Brocklehurst and Field, 2021; a very good summary of the most up-to-date theories behind dinosaur tooth lossField et al, 2018; more of Field’s work on avian edentulousness and what made it throug the K-Pg extinction eventGet In TouchEmail: dinosourcepodcast@gmail.comTwitter: @TheDinosourceThanks to June "McGreatness" Paik for our lovely podcast artwork.
Featured Creatures - Quick LinksSinosauropteryx’s Wikipedia pageTupandactylus’ Wikipedia pageTupandactylus looking very polite, at least in David’s opinionThe extremely cursed T. rex skull from Stevens, 2006ReferencesStevens, 2006; the paper with the cursed T. rex, and also some thoughts on bird head-bobbingKoschowitz et al, 2014; discusses the idea that dinosaur vision was a contributing factor to feather evolutionHall, 2008; sclerotic ring size alone doesn’t predict nocturnality, you also need orbit depthSchmitz and Motani, 2011; hey guys look we predict nocturnality based on sclerotic ring size aloneHall et al, 2011; you absolute numptiesOther LinksApologies, but it seems like Adam Savage’s “raptor” build has been removed from YouTubeGet In TouchEmail: dinosourcepodcast@gmail.comTwitter: @TheDinosourceThanks to June "McGreatness" Paik for our lovely podcast artwork.
Featured Creatures - Quick LinksCryolophosaurus Wikipedia pageAppalachiosaurus Wikipedia pageReferencesComet shard, not asteroid, caused the dino extinctionA good primer on taphonomic biasDavid Hone discussing North Korean fossils and other sources of biasWhat we know about Ceratopsians in Appalachia (not much)Yes, shrimp existed in the Mesozoic (and at least as far back as the Carboniferous)Get In TouchEmail: dinosourcepodcast@gmail.comTwitter: @TheDinosourceThanks to June "McGreatness" Paik for our lovely podcast artwork.
Featured Creatures - Quick LinksSpinosaurus Wikipedia pageBaryonyx Wikipedia pageGlossarySpinosaurus aegyptiacus: One of the largest theropod chompy-bois to have ever lived, measuring between 12 and 18m when fully grown and weighing in at 21 tons by some (incredibly unreasonable) estimates. A minimum weight estimate of 7 tons means that this is still no joke of a dino. Although Spinosaurus lived during the late Cretaceous, it was still on the scene about 10-20 million years before T. rex showed up. The first remains were found in North Africa by Richard Markgraf in 1912 and were described by Ernst Stromer. “Spino-” comes from “spine”, referring to the tall neural spines on the creature’s vertebrae, and “aegyptiacus” refers to Egypt, where the first fossils were found, giving “spined lizard from Egypt”.Baryonyx walkeri: A spooky chompy-boi theropod from the Early Cretaceous of England. William Walker is noted as a “plumber and amateur fossil collector” in England; he found the first fossils of Baryonyx in 1983. Alan Charig and Angela Milner described the near-complete fossil which would have measured between 7 and 10m in life and weighed up to 2 tons. “Bary-” comes from the Greek “barus” meaning “heavy”, and “onyx” means “claw”, as in Acinonyx (a.k.a. the cheetah), giving “heavy claw”, so named because the first specimen collected was one of the creature’s claws. The specific name honors Walker, who found the first fossils in a clay pit.ReferencesHone and Holtz, 2021; the most recent paper to cause Spino controversyIbrahim et al, 2020; in which the new tail is revealedIbrahim et al, 2020 (but slightly earlier); a general review of the Kem Kem Beds where Spino fossils have been discoveredIbrahim et al, 2014; Spino had lil bitty legsScott Hartman on Spino’s sail shapeGet In TouchEmail: dinosourcepodcast@gmail.comTwitter: @TheDinosourceThanks to June "McGreatness" Paik for our lovely podcast artwork.
ReferencesDr Dave Hone discussing fossil examination under UVHone and Tischingler on Microraptor under UVInterview with Hone about the paperScientists have used UV light to reconstruct pigmentation on fossil snail shellsTurns out birds have more going on in the UV spectrum than we can see with our dumb human eyesNo, that viral video wasn’t showing pigeons’ natural UV fluorescenceA re-examination of Juravenator with pictures under UV courtesy of Helmut TischlingerGet In TouchEmail: dinosourcepodcast@gmail.comTwitter: @TheDinosourceThanks to June "McGreatness" Paik for our lovely podcast artwork.
ReferencesThe Pokemon phylogeny paper mentioned in the episodeGet In TouchEmail: dinosourcepodcast@gmail.comTwitter: @TheDinosourceThanks to June "McGreatness" Paik for our lovely podcast artwork.
ReferencesQuick primer on why illegally smuggling fossils is badThesaurus tea company, for those who are interestedConcavenator’s introductory paperIcthyovenator is the anti-ConcavenatorCeratosaurus’ forelimb researchGet In TouchEmail: dinosourcepodcast@gmail.comTwitter: @TheDinosourceThanks to June "McGreatness" Paik for our lovely podcast artwork.
ReferencesDinosaurs were not on the way out when the asteroid hit, new research findsProtoceratops nest with 15 juveniles preservedProtoceratops preserved with its footprintYDAW on StyracosaurusCotylorhynchus, the anti-ceratopsidDarren Naish discussing the possibility that ceratopsid frills were attached to the rest of their body all the way up (it’s not likely)Protoceratops fossil with multiple standing on top of each otherGet In TouchEmail: dinosourcepodcast@gmail.comTwitter: @TheDinosourceThanks to June "McGreatness" Paik for our lovely podcast artwork.
ReferencesLIFE magazine from the 1950’s treats “racial senescence” like it’s a real thing that makes any senseThere’s a paper which tries to estimate which dinosaurs were alive at the time of the K-Pg extinction event. I don’t think it’s very good.Of course, David is immediately shown to be wrong about dinosaurs possibly being on the way out when the space-rock hit.Get In TouchEmail: dinosourcepodcast@gmail.comTwitter: @TheDinosourceThanks to June "McGreatness" Paik for our lovely podcast artwork.
ReferencesDino butt!Tetrapod Zoology discussing a few things, including discussing Dr Unwin’s controversial pterosaur paper/press releaseUnwin and Martill on pterosaur fibres (or lack thereof)Dr Tsai’s paper on saurischian hip adaptationsSailbacks vs buffalo-backs in dinosaursBertozzo et al on OuranosaurusGet In TouchEmail: dinosourcepodcast@gmail.comTwitter: @TheDinosourceThanks to June "McGreatness" Paik for our lovely podcast artwork.
ReferencesTherizinosaurs in pictures, although Mark Witton has since indicated that this is probably not an accurate look, even if it did have feathersYour Dinosaurs Are Wrong once again bringing the cold, hard facts about TherizinosaurusPsittacosaurus looked funny and also may have been spelled very different from how you imaginedOsborn’s paper describing Psittacosaurus2016 paper by Vinther et al showing off Psittacosaurus’ colourationWe’ve touched on it before, but feathers on a large animal like Therizinosaurus might have hindered more than they helpedGet In TouchEmail: dinosourcepodcast@gmail.comTwitter: @TheDinosourceThanks to June "McGreatness" Paik for our lovely podcast artwork.
ReferencesI decided to look up what dolphin skeletons looked like. I regret that decision.The big book of paleoart that is mentioned in the episode.A discussion of that book, in progress, with a copy of Riou’s famous (and much copied) illustrationPBS Eons’ episode on DimetrodonPBS Eons with more info on synapsidsWhy not more Eons? Here’s their episode on ichthyosaursGet In TouchEmail: dinosourcepodcast@gmail.comTwitter: @TheDinosourceThanks to June "McGreatness" Paik for our lovely podcast artwork.
ReferencesThe Long Boyes subredditMark Witton on the likely life-behaviour of Tanystropheus from 2015Recent paper on Tanystropheus, detailing the two species and its aquatic lifestyleWhy giraffes have long necks, courtesy of the BBCWhy do animals have long necks? My new favourite paperGet In TouchEmail: dinosourcepodcast@gmail.comTwitter: @TheDinosourceThanks to June "McGreatness" Paik for our lovely podcast artwork.
ReferencesThomas Huxley’s paper where he puts Compsognathus as a sister taxon to Dinosauria (a bold move, to be sure) and makes fun of the name “Dinosauria” (possibly a bolder move)Get In TouchEmail: dinosourcepodcast@gmail.comTwitter: @TheDinosourceThanks to June "McGreatness" Paik for our lovely podcast artwork.
A bit of a break from normal this week, as our hosts have watched the famously bad, low-budget comedy horror movie "Velocipastor".Get In TouchEmail: dinosourcepodcast@gmail.comTwitter: @TheDinosourceThanks to June "McGreatness" Paik for our lovely podcast artwork.
ReferencesComparison of ornithiscian dinosaurs with modern reptiles, looking at who may have been “warm blooded”Discussion of whether dinosaurs were warm blooded from 1990Sharks keep their eyes warmDid you know that sloths don’t have a steady body temperature? Weird but true.Mark Witton has written an excellent blog post on the operating temperatures of animals, and talks about how large animals are more concerned with shedding heat than generating itLooking for our series on the Bone Wars? Look no further!Big dinos had difficulty shedding heat, not keeping itEagle et al’s paper looking at fossilized teeth to determine the temperature at which they were formedA follow-up paper by Eagle doing more of the same, but for different fossilsAnd further replication of these resultsGet In TouchEmail: dinosourcepodcast@gmail.comTwitter: @TheDinosourceThanks to June "McGreatness" Paik for our lovely podcast artwork.
ReferencesYDAW episode on Velociraptor, covering just about everything you could want to know about this beastVelociraptor definitely had feathersThe “fighting dinosaurs” fossil is remarkably poorly-described onlineA discussion of the multiple origins of theropod flight, including velociraptor and other dromaeosauridsVelociraptors were likely nocturnalThe incredible 1969 Ostrom monograph on Deinonychus, including Bakker’s famous illustrationEvidence of Velociraptor scavenging an azhdarchidPrairie dogs do indeed have a surprising vocabularyGet In TouchEmail: dinosourcepodcast@gmail.comTwitter: @TheDinosourceThanks to June "McGreatness" Paik for our lovely podcast artwork.
ReferencesDiscussion of evidence of late sauropods (titanosaurs) eating grasses in India, as seen in their poopRhamphorynchus with a big ol’ fish in its stomachTurns out herbivorous dinosaurs ate plants. This paper is far less about what they ate and far more about how we know we’ve found stomach or gut contents (enterolites or cololites).Evidence of dung beetles in dino poop!Carnivorous poop fossilizes better than herbivorous poopT. rex poop! But in fancy science words.Maiasaura ate woodIncredible preservation of muscle in a dino-poop“Herbivore” doesn’t necessarily mean what you think it does: it seems some plant-muncher was also chomping on crustaceans.Telling fossilized poop from fossilized vomit: harder than it sounds.Want more info on how coprolites and similar terms were named? Well have I got a highly amusing paper for you.Original description of Gryposaurus in the Ottawa NaturalistBorealopelta was a fussy eaterThe open access paper describing BorealopeltaGet In TouchEmail: dinosourcepodcast@gmail.comTwitter: @TheDinosourceThanks to June "McGreatness" Paik for our lovely podcast artwork.
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Comments (1)

Christina Koebernik

LOVE this! Was looking for a podcast about dinosours that didn't require extensive knowledge to be able to follow along. It starts with the basics, which is perfect for me. Informative and funny - a great combination.

Dec 1st
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