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Into America

Into America

Author: MSNBC, Trymaine Lee

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Into America is a show about being Black in America. These stories explore what it means to hold truth to power and this country to its promises. Told by people who have the most at stake.
154 Episodes
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In 1969, a group of young Black educators and students in Bedford-Stuyvesant, Brooklyn founded a pan-African organization called The East. They wanted to take control of their community but knew the only way to do that was to create businesses and institutions founded by, run by, and made for them. The East became a mecca of Black pride and celebration. They created schools centered around African teachings, a food cooperative, a publishing house, music and dance programs, and a world-famous jazz club. Even though the organization no longer exists, many can still feel the spirit of The Eastin Central Brooklyn today. So, when Black-Owned Brooklyn founders, Tayo Giwa and Cynthia Gordy Giwa heard about The East through word of mouth at Brooklyn’s Annual African Arts Festival, they knew it was a story that needed to be told to the masses.On this episode of Into America, Trymaine speaks with Tayo and Cynthia about their upcoming documentary, “The Sun Rises in The East”, which tells the story of this self-sufficient community. They talk about the film and the seeds planted by The East throughoutBrooklyn today. Trymaine also speaks with Fela Barclift, a former member of The East and co-founder of Afro-centric childhood center, Little Sun People. She talks about the power of the movement and what The East meant to her as an educator. For a transcript, please visit https://www.msnbc.com/intoamerica. Thoughts? Feedback? Story ideas? Write to us at intoamerica@nbcuni.com.Further Reading and Listening:The Sun Rises in the EastBlack-Owned BrooklynLittle Sun PeopleAt the Sherman Phoenix, Black Businesses Rise
The rioters on January 6th were overwhelmingly white and male. But sprinkled throughout the mob were several Black people and other people of color. In fact, a Black man who organized the January 6th “stop the steal” rally. It was from that rally’s podium that then-president Donald Trump exhorted his followers to take their grievances down the street to the Capitol building. And Enrique Tarrio, leader of the Proud Boys, one of the most prominent far-right groups at the Capitol that day, describes himself as Afro-Cuban. These are just two Black voices in a far-right movement that has become increasingly multiracial, despite that very movement being beholden to ideals of white supremacy.Joe Lowndes is a professor of political science at the University of Oregon. His research focuses on right-wing extremism, populism and racial politics. He says these movements are less rural and white than they once were, and tells Trymaine Lee why leaders from across the political spectrum need to pay attention. Please follow and share the show on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram, all with the handle @intoamericapod. For a transcript, please visit https://www.msnbc.com/intoamerica. Thoughts? Feedback? Story ideas? Write to us at intoamerica@nbcuni.com
The Face of Anti-Fascism

The Face of Anti-Fascism

2022-01-0630:391

It’s been one year since a mob stormed the U.S. Capitol building in Washington, DC. They were attempting to overturn Joe Biden’s presidential election win by preventing theCongressional certification of his victory. As the attack on the Capitol unfolded, people on the internet immediately began to identify rioters and widely share details about them. Many of the rioters were fired from their jobs or even arrested.  This practice is called doxxing. And using it to chase down far-right extremists became popular through a man named Daryle Lamont Jenkins.Jenkins is a self-described anti-fascist and the founder of One People’s Project. For over 20 years, Jenkins and his organization have used the internet to expose and publicly shame white supremacists. His work has brought him into direct contact with white supremacists at events like the 2017 Unite the Right Rally in Charlottesville, VA, as well as with Black members of the far-right.This week on Into America, host Trymaine Lee speaks with Jenkins about his fight to take on and put a stop to right-wing extremists.Please follow and share the show on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram, all with the handle @intoamericapod. For a transcript, please visit https://www.msnbc.com/intoamerica. Thoughts? Feedback? Story ideas? Write to us at intoamerica@nbcuni.com.Further Listening: Into America: An Election and an InsurrectionInto America: American Coup
Where Are They Now?

Where Are They Now?

2021-12-3036:16

Over the last year and a half, Into America has met some extraordinary people who have shared with us some equally extraordinary stories, but where are they now? On this episode of Into America, we speak with some of our past guests who shaped our show and helped us make better sense of the world around us.We catch up with old friends like Eric Deggans, who had to figure out how to coordinate his mother’s funeral after her death at the beginning of the pandemic.We speak with activist Jeneisha Harris, who recently changed her mind on gun ownership after a frightenin gincident, and we check in on our good friend, Christopher Martin to see how he is doing after the one-year anniversary of George Floyd. We also talk with two of our favorite business owners, Adija Smith of the Milwaukee bakery Confectionately Yours, and Eddie Lewis III, who was counting on COVID debt relief to save his family’s sugarcane farm in Louisiana. Like many of our guests and the rest of the world, our show has evolved, and we want to take this time to reflect and thank you, the listeners, for coming on this journey with us.For a transcript, please visit https://www.msnbc.com/intoamerica. Thoughts? Feedback? Story ideas? Write to us at intoamerica@nbcuni.com.Further Reading and Listening: Life and Loss in a PandemicBlack America's Call to ArmsAt the Sherman Phoenix, Black Businesses RiseAfter George FloydJustice for Black FarmersBlack Joy in the Summertime
Jerry Craft’s graphic novel New Kid has won multiple awards, made the New York Times Best Sellers List, and is beloved by children across the country.But this year, New Kid made headlines for a different reason when a Texas school district pulled the book from its shelves after a white parent complained that it promoted Critical Race Theory and Marxism.  Craft was surprised. The story is based on his own experiences as a young Black kid attending a mostly white private school in New York City. “I had to Google Critical Race Theory and try to find out how I was, how I was teaching it,” he tells Into America. New Kid was born in part because Craft felt that stories about Black kids tend to dwell on trauma instead of normal life. "I just wanted to have kids where the biggest dilemma in their life is if they wanted to play PlayStation or Xbox, or what movie they wanted to go see, you know, as opposed to always having the weight of the world,” he says. “Those are important stories, but I think we have to give kids things to aspire to and to dream."The school district reinstated New Kid after a review, but the ordeal raised old questions about what kind of books are challenged in schools, and who gets to decide what is appropriate for children. Host Trymaine Lee’s 9-year-old daughter Nola read New Kid for her summer reading, and she loved it. Trymaine brings her on the show to talk about the book and representation in children’s literature.“I mean, obviously, if you grow up in a world where you see yourself, that might tell you like, I can't do this, I'm not able to do this, or I'm not capable of this,” she tells her dad. “So I think that in general, just seeing people that look like you and representation as a whole is very important.”For a transcript, please visit https://www.msnbc.com/intoamerica. Please follow and share the show on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram, all with the handle @intoamericapod. Thoughts? Feedback? Story ideas? Write to us at intoamerica@nbcuni.com.Further Reading and Listening: Author of 'Gender Queer,' one of most-banned books in U.S., addresses controversyCheck out Nola Lee on last year’s holiday episode of Into America: Black Toys R Us
In the 1920s, Josephine Baker escaped the violent racism of in the United States to seek refuge in Paris, like so many other Black American creatives have done over time. Baker found that France welcomed her, and the freedom she found there helped her become an international sensation in dancing, singing, and acting. Baker eventually became not only a French citizen but a decorated hero in the French Resistance during World War II. She also continued to speak out against racism in her home country, and was the only woman on the official speakers list at the 1963 March on Washington. All of this helped Baker become the first Black woman, first American, and first entertainer inducted into the Panthéon in Paris, one of the greatest honors bestowed in France. On this episode of Into America, host Trymaine Lee talks about the significance of this honor with Ricki Stevenson, a Black American whose own move to Paris in the 1990s was inspired by Baker, and who has been fighting for more recognition for Baker here in the States. During the induction ceremony last month, French President Emmanuel Macron called Baker “ever fair, ever fraternal, ever fraternal, and ever French,” and held her up as a shining example of French universalism: “Being Black didn’t take precedence over being American or French. She was not fighting in the name of a Black cause, no she was fighting to be a free citizen, one who lived in dignity and completely free.”But France’s relationship with race is much more complicated than that. Rokhaya Diallo, a French journalist, author, and activist, tells Into America that Macron’s words dilute Baker’s own contributions to civil rights, and also obscure the racism that Black French people like her experience on a daily basis. For a transcript, please visit https://www.msnbc.com/intoamerica. Thoughts? Feedback? Story ideas? Write to us at intoamerica@nbcuni.com.Further Listening: Into America: Harlem on My MindInto America: Haiti’s Unforgiveable BlacknessEDITOR’S NOTE: After this episode published, we did hear back from a representative of the French Embassy in Washington, DC. Visit our website to read a summary of their statement. 
Looking back on 2021, it felt like maybe Black Americans got closer to knowing justice.In April, Derek Chauvin was found guilty of murdering George Floyd. And the day before Thanksgiving, three white men were found guilty of murdering Ahmaud Arbery.  But 2021 wasn’t all about victories.  Last month, a jury in Wisconsin cleared Kyle Rittenhouse of multiple homicide charges after he shot and killed two people at a Black Lives Matter protest in 2020. Rittenhouse, who says he brought a semi-automatic rifle to the protest to “protect property,” successfully argued that he fired his weapon in self-defense. On this episode of Into America, Trymaine Lee is joined by two of today’s most prominent civil rights leaders to explore whether Black people in this country can ever experience true justice. Reverend Al Sharpton, the founder of the National Action Network and host on MSNBC, says while there were setbacks, there was plenty to celebrate in 2021. “I think that we ought to mark those victories we get, so people will know we're not fighting alone.”Attorney Ben Crump, who represented both families of Ahmaud Arbery and George Floyd this year, agrees. “We're continuously on this journey. We take sometimes some steps forward and then there are going to be steps back.” But the guilty verdicts this year, he says, "give us hope for America.”For a transcript, please visit https://www.msnbc.com/intoamerica. Thoughts? Feedback? Story ideas? Write to us at intoamerica@nbcuni.com.Further Listening: Into America: The Movement for Ahmaud ArberyInto America: A Verdict for Derek ChauvinInto America: After George Floyd, with Christopher Martin
Ebony & Ivy

Ebony & Ivy

2021-12-0235:511

Although Harvard is one of the Blackest Ivy League schools, Black students still make up just 11 percent of the student body. Many Black students at Harvard experience a level of culture shock when they first arrive to such a historically white space. There’s the whiteness of the university today, but also the institution’s connection to slavery and white supremacy. This culture shock can be doubled for Black students who trace their lineage to enslaved people in this country, often called Generational African Americans at Harvard.Even though the university has started an initiative to address and understand its ties to slavery, and has made increasing diversity on campus a priority for decades, it’s estimated that less than a third of Black students at Harvard are Generational African Americans. But in its publicly released demographics, Harvard doesn’t distinguish between the different kinds of Blackness within the diaspora. And Black students say that’s an issue. On this episode of Into America, Trymaine Lee speaks with three studentsfrom the African diaspora on campus: Mariah Norman, a first year who is Generational African American, Ife Adedokun, a first year whose parents immigrated from Nigeria, and Kimani Panthier, a second year whose parents immigrated from Jamaica. The group talks about what it’s like to be Black at Harvard,and the nuances of Black identity within the diaspora on campus. They tell Trymaine how the university could better support them, and how they find community from each other. For a transcript, please visit https://www.msnbc.com/intoamerica. Thoughts? Feedback? Story ideas? Write to us at intoamerica@nbcuni.com.Further Reading and Listening:Woman sues Harvard claiming it is exploiting images of her 19th-century slave ancestorsInto America: Boston is Blacker Than You Think
When Tricia Hersey was in seminary school, she was exhausted. On top of classes and homework, she had a job and a child. She often wouldn’t get to sleep until 2am, and her grades were suffering. Then, one day, as she was researching histories of enslaved people and Black liberation, she had an idea: instead of running herself into the ground, what if she took a nap instead? That decision turned into a practice of rest in her own life, and then Tricia started sharing it with her community. Soon, her seminary background and her work on rest melded together and in 2016, Tricia founded the Nap Ministry, and became the Nap Bishop. This week on Into America, Tricia tells Trymaine Lee about how she is helping Black people renounce white supremacist and capitalist ideas of work and reclaim rest as radical resistance. For a transcript, please visit https://www.msnbc.com/intoamerica. Thoughts? Feedback? Story ideas? Write to us at intoamerica@nbcuni.com.Further Reading and Listening: The Great Resignation: Why millions of workers are quittingThe Nap MinistryListen to a musical medication by Tricia Hersey 
The 1619 Project was a career-defining moment for New York Times reporter Nikole Hannah-Jones. Released as a standalone issue of the Times Magazine in August 2019, the project sought to reframe the American narrative, linking our country’s founding to the arrival of the first enslaved Africans on the shores of Virginia.When the project was initially released it was widely praised as a much-needed corrective to a white-washed version of American history. But there was also pushback from the likes of then-President Trump and Fox News. And some of that pushback was downright nasty.This week, Penguin Random House is releasing the 1619 Project as a book, audiobook and children’s book. Into America’s Trymaine Lee is one of the book’s contributors. He and Nikole Hannah-Jones sat down to talk about the way the project has shaped America, how it’s shaped her, and the power of changing the narrative.For a transcript, please visit https://www.msnbc.com/intoamerica. Thoughts? Feedback? Story ideas? Write to us at intoamerica@nbcuni.com.Further Reading and Listening:UNC withholds tenure for "1619 Project" journalist after conservative backlashHow Trump ignited the fight over critical race theory in schoolsInto America: Into Reparations with Nikole Hannah-Jones
The Forgotten POW

The Forgotten POW

2021-11-1147:20

In the first year of the Iraq War, seven soldiers were captured and held prisoner by the Iraqi forces for 22 days. Two of them were women. One was Private First Class Jessica Lynch, whose story of heroism was praised in national headlines when she returned to America. The other woman was Specialist Shoshana Johnson, America’s first Black female prisoner of war. Except you might not remember her. The two women are friends, and both risked their lives for this country, suffering significant injuries. But the national spotlight on Lynch’s story left Johnson’s heroism overlooked and unrecognized.On Veterans Day, Trymaine Lee speaks with Shoshana Johnson about her traumatic capture and rescue, her life after the war, and how she wants the military to honor the sacrifices of women of color who wear the uniform.For a transcript, please visit https://www.msnbc.com/intoamerica. Thoughts? Feedback? Story ideas? Write to us at intoamerica@nbcuni.com.Further Reading and Listening: Check out more Veterans Day coverage from NBC NewsFirst black female POW sets the record straight
Justice4Garvey

Justice4Garvey

2021-11-0429:16

In the early 20th  century, the Pan-Africanist Marcus Garvey led the largest movement Black people in the world. Through his organization, the Universal Negro Improvement Association, Garvey preached about the great history of Black culture and called on Black people around the world to unite to create an “Africa for Africans.”But like so many Black leaders, Garvey's fame and power during his lifetime attracted enemies in the white establishment, including J. Edgar Hoover, who was a young agent at the precursor to the FBI. Hoover felt threatened by Garvey, and by 1923, under murky circumstances, Garvey was convicted of mail fraud and sentenced to prison. A few years later, President Calvin Coolidge commuted his sentence, on the condition that the government deport him back to his home country of Jamaica. But the conviction against Marcus Garvey stands to this day. For years, his family has been trying to get Garvey a posthumous pardon. This week on Into America, Trymaine Lee talks with Dr. Julius Garvey, Marcus Garvey’s only surviving son, about his father's life, legacy, and Justice4Garvey, the movement to clear the Garvey name.  For a transcript, please visit https://www.msnbc.com/intoamerica. Thoughts? Feedback? Story ideas? Write to us at intoamerica@nbcuni.com.Further Reading and Listening: Will President Obama Pardon Civil Rights Icon Marcus Garvey?Marcus Garvey and the Universal Negro Improvement Association
Boston maintains a reputation as one of the most racist cities in America, despite its long abolitionist history and image as a bastion of East Coast liberalism. And in many ways that reputation is well-earned. From the city’s staggering racial wealth gap, to its violent backlash against school desegregation in the 1970’s, to racial epithets hurled at Black athletes to this day, there’s plenty of evidence to back up the assertion that Beantown is racist. But often left out of the conversation are the voices of Black Bostonians themselves. Writer, historian and Boston native Dart Adams is on a mission to change that. Dart leads walking tours in the city, highlighting overlooked aspects of Black Boston’s past and present. He recently wrote an article arguing that Black Bostonians are caught in the middle of the debate over their city’s racism. At home they face erasure in Boston’s media landscape, as well as the injustices that Black folks everywhere navigate in dealing with systemic racism. But they also face friendly fire from Black folks outside the city when they try to bring a level of nuance to the conversation which outsiders lack. This week on Into America, Dart Adams gives Trymaine Lee an insider’s view of Black Boston, from the city’s rich musical history to its role as home to some of the greatest Black leaders in civil rights history during their formative years. He also gives us a sense of what it’s like to love a city that doesn’t always love you back.For a transcript, please visit https://www.msnbc.com/intoamerica. Thoughts? Feedback? Story ideas? Write to us at intoamerica@nbcuni.com.Further Reading and Listening: Is Boston America’s Most Racist City? Ask a Black Bostonian for Once (By Dart Adams)For 200 years, Boston elected white men as mayor. Now, a woman of color will lead.‘I Saw a Lot of Hatred': Looking Back at Boston's Busing Crisis
BET’s Album of the Year winner Jazmine Sullivan is one of the biggest names in R&B music, but her world stopped back in 2019 when she found out her mother was diagnosed with breast cancer. Sullivan turned from singing, to taking care of her mom. And over time, she started learning about the racial disparities with disease, like the fact that Black women in the US are 40% more likely to die from breast cancer than white women.Since then, Sullivan has been using her platform to start conversations about health with her fans; and she’s partnering with a new initiative called More Than Just Words-- a campaign aimed at helping Black women recognize the signs of breast cancer, get early screenings, and arm them with the tools to have tough conversations with their doctors. On this week’s episode of Into America, Sullivan sits down with Trymaine Lee to talk about her mother’s breast cancer diagnosis, the journey to recovery, and how Sullivan is using her own experience to help Black women prioritize their health.For a transcript, please visit https://www.msnbc.com/intoamerica. Thoughts? Feedback? Story ideas? Write to us at intoamerica@nbcuni.com.Further Reading and Viewing: Watch Jazmine Sullivan’s interview with Zerlina Maxwell on The ChoiceNBC's Kristen Dahlgren: The 'lowest' part of breast cancer journey wasn't what I expected
On August 31st, Marva Sadler stood outside the Whole Women’s Health abortion clinic in Fort Worth, Texas, and vowed to help as many people as she could before the end of the day. Along with a small staff, Sadler and a physician performed 67 abortions before midnight. The next day, the nation’s strictest abortion ban went into effect. The law, known as SB-8, bans nearly all abortions after fetal cardiac activity is detected, typically around the sixth week of pregnancy, before most people know they are carrying. SB-8 is facing multiple legal challenges, but its authors designed it to stand up to a challenge before the Supreme Court, by moving the enforcement from the state to private citizens, who can sue anyone who “aids or abets” an abortion procedure. So far, the bet has paid off. The Supreme Court let the law take effect in September, and while there’s been recent legal back and forth over the law, it’s still in effect today. In the past six weeks, many pregnant people have sought to get around the ban by crossing state lines or seeking abortion pills online.On this episode of Into America, Marva Sadler, the clinical director for the Whole Women’s Health network, tells Trymaine Lee that this law will have greater consequences for Black people, who already face higher face higher rates of maternal mortality in Texas. Michele Goodwin, a law professor at UC Irvine and founding director for the university’s Center for Biotechnology and Global Health Policy, says the law, with its vigilante nature, is reminiscent of the fugitive slave acts of antebellum America.For a transcript, please visit https://www.msnbc.com/intoamerica. Thoughts? Feedback? Story ideas? Write to us at intoamerica@nbcuni.com.Further Reading and Listening: [[POD ONLY]]:The Texas Abortion Ban is History Revisited, by Michele GoodwinInto America: ‘My Body is a Monument’
The Tax Auction Block

The Tax Auction Block

2021-10-0732:48

With its luxury resorts and golf courses, Hilton Head, South Carolina, is a popular vacation hotspot. But the island is also home to the Gullah Geechee; descendants of formerly enslaved West Africans who have owned land on the island since their ancestors were freed. However, every year Gullah Geechee families are in danger of losing their land to investors at Beaufort County's tax auction. If a family falls behind on its property taxes, the land goes up for auction; and that can happen for as little as a few-hundred dollars in back-taxes. On this episode of Into America, Trymaine Lee speaks with Marine Corp veteran Joseph Walters Jr, who has come close to losing his land two years in a row. And Trymaine talks with members of the Gullah Geechee community who are trying to stop this cycle: Marshview Community Organic Farms owner Sará Reynolds Green, and Pan African Family Empowerment & Land Preservation Network founder Theresa White. Green and White are both part of a network of Gullah advocates raising awareness (and funds) to help people hold onto their land, and the culture that comes with it. For a transcript, please visit https://www.msnbc.com/intoamerica. Thoughts? Feedback? Story ideas? Write to us at intoamerica@nbcuni.com.Further Reading and Listening: Into America: Justice for Black FarmersInto America: Blood on Black Wall Street, What Was Stolen
On September 19th, photographers captured a harrowing scene at the US Mexico border: Border Patrol agents, on horseback, chasing and intimidating a large group of Haitian migrants as they tried to cross into Texas.The images sparked outrage, and President Joe Biden eventually condemned the actions of the agents. But since that day, the Department of Homeland Security has expelled nearly 4,000 Haitian migrants on 37 flights to Haiti — without giving them a chance to claim asylum — under a Trump-era public health rule designed to protect the US from incoming disease. Nana Gyamfi, the executive director of the Black Alliance for Just Immigration, says that the administration is hiding behind policy, rather than standing up for migrants. And for people like Garry Pierre-Pierre, a Hatian-American journalist who founded the Haitian Times news site, it’s been hard to feel like he’s stuck between his adoptive country and his homeland. For a transcript, please visit https://www.msnbc.com/intoamerica. Thoughts? Feedback? Story ideas? Write to us at intoamerica@nbcuni.com.Further Reading and Listening: Top U.S. diplomat in Haiti resigns over 'inhumane' treatment of migrantsTreatment of Haitians at the border in Texas exposes double standard toward refugeesInto America: Protecting Florida Farmworkers
Locked in Hell

Locked in Hell

2021-09-2339:421

Two things are true. Texas is one of the hottest states in the country and climate change is real. Yet, Texas is one of thirteen states that do not have universal air conditioning installed in their state prisons. As climate change gradually makes the state hotter, prisons are forcing their staff and inmates to endure extreme temperatures with little to no relief. LaQuita Davis, now released on parole, was one of those inmates at Lane Murray women's prison in Gatesville, Texas.It was there that she noticed it getting hotter in the prison. That led to many unbearable days and nights; to the point where she had to soak her clothes in water every half hour to cool down enough to sleep at night. On this episode of Into America, Trymaine Lee speaks with Davis about her time in Lane Murray and how she made it through the Texas heat behind bars with no air conditioning. He also speaks with Dr. Susi Vassallo, a Clinical Professor of Emergency Medicine at NYU’s Med School, who has been studying the issue of heat in prisons for several years. She talks about the effect of extreme heat on the body and how prison populations are especially vulnerable to heat-related illnesses.Trymaine also sits down with Amite Dominick, president of Texas Prisons Community Advocates, who for years has been fighting for legislation to bring air conditioning to Texas prisons.  For a transcript, please visit https://www.msnbc.com/intoamerica. Thoughts? Feedback? Story ideas? Write to us at intoamerica@nbcuni.com.Further Reading and Listening: Texas Prisons Air-Conditioning AdvocatesMock Prison CellNBC News Climate Coverage 
As a Black girl in Detroit, Tracy Reese loved making her own clothes and attending the famed Ebony Fashion Fair with her mother. Today, she’s one of the most well-known designers in fashion. Michelle Obama, Sarah Jessica Parker, Tracee Ellis Ross, and Oprah Winfrey have all worn her designs. But getting to this level wasn’t easy. Reese is part of a long line of Black designers influencing the fashion industry, while navigating a world where they’re often underrepresented and marginalized. But Black designers, creatives, and brands have still found ways to break through the industry and push the culture forward in fashion.On this episode of Into America, Reeses peaks to Trymaine Lee about her path to becoming a household name. And Lee speaks with J. Alexander Martin, the co-founder of the iconic sportswear line, FUBU — the first clothing line to integrate fashion with hip-hop culture, media, and entertainment. Martin talks about how he and his crew defied the odds by starting a mainstream brand that is "for us, by us." Reese and Martin took very different, but parallel, paths to make it in the industry. Both faced barriers and pressures to conform, while ultimately learning to move confidently and strut their stuff to become the moguls they are today. For a transcript, please visit https://www.msnbc.com/intoamerica. Thoughts? Feedback? Story ideas? Write to us at intoamerica@nbcuni.com.Further Reading and Listening: Tracy Reese talks about dressing Michelle ObamaHope for FlowersFUBU
Every September 11th, people across the country commemorate the emergency service workers and countless civilians who were lost on 9/11. This includes the Vulcan Society, an organization of former and active Black firefighters in New York City, who gather at a memorial every year to remember the 12 Black firefighters who lost their lives. But many Black firefighters and the families of these fallen heroes feel these men have been overlooked and unrecognized.   On the 20th anniversary of 9/11, Trymaine Lee speaks with Kevin Maynard, whosetwin brother Keith was one of the firefighters killed that day. Kevin, who now works for the Houston Fire Department, talks about the brothers’ different paths to becoming firefighters, and his struggles with grief since Keith’s death.Trymaine also speaks with Captain Paul Washington, the head of Engine 234, a majority Black firehouse in Brooklyn, who was the president of the Vulcan Society during 9/11. Captain Washington talks about how the Vulcan Society pushed for recognition of the Black firefighters who died, and their larger fight for Black representation in the department.For a transcript, please visit https://www.msnbc.com/intoamerica. Thoughts? Feedback? Story ideas? Write to us at intoamerica@nbcuni.comFurther Reading and Listening: [[POD ONLY]]:Mothers Of Black Firefighters Killed On 9/11 Fight To Keep Their Sons’ Memories AliveVulcan Society
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Comments (28)

Robin Blacknell

I really enjoyed this episode (I enjoy all of your episodes). I remember when Jessica Lynch was in the news but I'm hard pressed to recall if I heard about Shoshana Johnson. Thank you for doing this interview and bringing attention to Ms. Johnson's experiences from her capture to her fight for the benefits due to her as a US soldier, and her contributions to this country to maintain the freedoms that we often take for granted. "Freedom has a taste that the Protected will never know". Sincerely, Robin Blacknell

Dec 8th
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randy thomas

This is a black podcast, right. So why am I hearing about a white family????

Oct 24th
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Ronda Walker

Such a horrific tragic story. I feel so bad for all the Americans that were tragically killed and stripped of their properties and businesses. thanks for sharing this story I can totally see why Oklahoma wants to bury that story because they should be freaking ashamed. It just hurts my heart. I have learned so much since George Floyd and I'm grateful to learn the history of such a tragic history of America. we learn things in school but nothing like what we should learn about. I was very sheltered myself from those kind of historical stories I'm just so sorry this happened.

May 28th
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Angela Johnson

Strong recommendation: The Sword and The Shield by Peniel Joseph as supplement to this episode

Apr 13th
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Patricia J. Williams

Wow! Brother Lee... Wow! I always look forward to new episodes of your podcast Into America, but this particular episode was fantastic! Dr. B was amazing, brilliant, and a powerful voice for our community. This episode was life changing. Black Lives Matter is an affirmation said Dr. B... Yes!!!! Thank you for always bringing us your very best my brother! Blessing, light, and Black love!

Apr 9th
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⚖ LifeCoachTay

AMAZING Ep. Classic!!!! Courage Is Our Calling!!!! Legendary👑💎👑

Apr 1st
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John Massari

I get your point but, they're a lot of black heroes, John Stewart, Falcon, Black Panther, Blade, Cyborg, Black Lightning, Misty Knight, Luke Cage, Storm and those are only but a few. Black Panther and Falcon have both been around since the 60's. they were definitely Falcon action figures. However, I'm not going pretend that black action figures aren't under presented, but part of the issue is demand.

Dec 28th
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gaby alseen

Why is it ok for a white kid to have dolls from different races? but Nola can't have a Jojo Siwa doll? As a Canadian this is so stupid and ehem. ...racist. I was really enjoying this podcast until this episode.

Dec 25th
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Béné

Nola is so so smart, I'm sure she will do great things! She could have her own podcast :)

Dec 24th
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Jen Jen

This is a GREAT podcast!

Dec 20th
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bob

this week on "Everything is Racist!"...

Sep 24th
Reply (2)

bob

race bating jerkoff

Sep 10th
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⚖ LifeCoachTay

Thanks!! #BidenHarris2020

Aug 12th
Reply

Sofa King

This woman can suck it for hating Bernie.

Jun 7th
Reply

Vicki Camacho

Lol!! ❤❤❤❤

Jun 7th
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Vicki Camacho

You had me until you mentioned AL Sharpton. I must say the buildup was excellent until you mention him.

May 14th
Reply

Emmett Stokes

This is a well laid out and informative piece of reporting that laden with evidence of the demographic with ALL of the experience of this parcel of the fourth amendment ... unreasonable search and seizure. Although Blomberg is Billoinnaire, philanthropist and innovator, his innate decision with all the law enforcement officials reeks of undertone of racism and implicit biases.

Apr 29th
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Fiona Fleming

really enjoying this

Mar 29th
Reply

Vicki Camacho

Louisiana 8 electrol college votes and Georgia has 16. All 16 of Georgia's electrol college went to Republicans.

Mar 21st
Reply

Susan Shinagawa

I, too, have been supporting Jaime and his campaign from California. The late Senator John McCain (R-AZ), a long time friend of Lindsay Graham, would be rolling over in his grave at how Lindsay has rolled his honor and principles over to the immature, hateful, narcissistic, self-serving Donald Trump. It's time Georgians send Graham home. I'm doing what I can to help Jaime Harrison become the new Junior Senator from the great state of Georgia. I encourage others to do so, too.

Mar 19th
Reply (1)
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