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Into America

Into America

Author: MSNBC, Trymaine Lee

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Into America is a show about being Black in America. These stories explore what it means to hold truth to power and this country to its promises. Told by people who have the most at stake.
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In a follow up to the series Uncounted Millions: the Power of Reparations - which chronicled the remarkable story of Gabriel Coakley, one of the only Black Americans to ever receive reparations for slavery – Trymaine Lee hosted a live discussion and debate on the future of reparations for Black Americans at the 92nd Street Y on May 29th, 2024. Trymaine was joined onstage by Pulitzer-prize winning journalist and creator of the 1619 Project, Nikole Hannah-Jones, and author and columnist at thegrio.com, Michael Harriot. The conversation ranged from the case for reparations today...what might be owed and who should qualify...and what might it take for legislation to finally break through. 
Into America has a live show coming up! Pulitzer prize-winning writer Nikole Hannah-Jones and acclaimed author and columnist Michael Harriot will join host Trymaine Lee onstage at the 92nd St Y in New York City on Wednesday May 29th. As a follow up to our “Uncounted Millions” series, Trymaine, Nikole, and Michael will grapple with what reparations could and should look like for Black Americans going forward. You can join us in-person or via live stream.Get your tickets now while still available.For more: Uncounted Millions: The Power of ReparationsThe 1619 ProjectMichael Harriot’s columns at theGrio
In “Uncounted Millions: The Power of Reparations,” host Trymaine Lee used the story of Gabriel Coakley and his family to explore past and future conversations around reparations. That conversation has come to include educational institutions, many of which were built and sustained through enslavement, like the one mere blocks from Coakley’s home in Washington, DC: Georgetown University. On this special bonus episode, sponsored by the W.K. Kellogg Foundation, Into America dives into racial reconciliation and the GU272. Trymaine speaks with descendants of the 272 enslaved people sold to save the university, and the Jesuit leader trying to work towards repair. What can these conversations teach us about what, if anything, can be done to heal the past?If you want more of Into America & you’re close to New York, check out a live event at the 92nd Street Y on May 29. We’ll continue the conversation on reparations with special guests Nikole Hannah-Jones and Michael Harriot. For more information, go to 92NY.org/events.And, some great news: Into America and our colleagues at Prosecuting Donald Trump have been nominated for Webby Awards! And MSNBC needs your help to win. Check out vote.webbyawards.com and search for “MSNBC” to vote for both shows.
As a bonus for listeners, we’re sharing the first episode of a special series from “Why Is This Happening? The Chris Hayes Podcast,” called “WITHpod 2024: The Stakes.” For the first time since 1892, we have an election in which both candidates have presidential records. It’s a unique chance to take a hard look at what both Joe Biden and Donald Trump have actually done as president. Chris Hayes talks to experts about both candidates’ records on specific policy areas. This week, Aaron Reichlin-Melnick, policy director at the American Immigration Council, joins to unpack immigration policies under Trump vs. Biden, the state of the asylum system, and more. Follow and listen to the whole series: https://link.chtbl.com/withpod_tsfd
Can reparations be a reality for all Black Americans? In New York, the state Gabriel Coakley’s descendants now call home, the governor has signed a bill creating a task force to consider reparations for formerly enslaved people. It’s the third state to do so. But beyond local considerations, does this debate have real momentum at a national level? In the final episode of “Uncounted Millions: The Power of Reparations,” we take a look at public opinion polling on reparations, along with the dollars and cents of making this a reality across the country. And we return to Gabriel Coakley’s descendants to understand how the family plans to keep alive the legacy of service and Black liberation he started a century and a half ago.As we round out our series, Trymaine is joined by: the Coakley-Flateau family, Duke University professor Dr. William Darity, New York Senator Zellnor Myrie, Amherst political science professor Tatishe Nteta, and archivist Dr. Lopez Matthews.
As the Coakley and Flateau families change and grow through time, so too does the conversation on reparations for Black Americans. In this episode of “Uncounted Millions: The Power of Reparations,” both families move west to California, ultimately converging. Soon after, the Japanese Redress movement begins to shape the modern push for reparations in Black America.  In part 4, Trymaine is joined by: attorney Don Tamaki, activist Emily Akpan and California Congresswoman Barbara Lee. 
Gabriel Coakley was an exception. But what about the rule? In episode 3 of “Uncounted Millions: The Power of Reparations,” we’ll travel with Coakley’s descendants as they attempt to learn about the other side of their family, the Flateaus. Most Black families were met with nothing but their freedom after the Civil War and, in some cases, barely even that. Like most, the Flateau family didn’t enter this new era with any sort of government payment for past wrongs. So how did they build a life for themselves? Trymaine joins the family for a trip to Louisiana to unearth some of this history. Along the way, they also get to the bottom of a big family secret.This episode, Trymaine is joined by: Adele and Desmond Flateau, historian Dr. Sharlene Sinegal-DeCuir, and a series of Louisiana archivists he meets along the way. 
In episode 2 of “Uncounted Millions: The Power of Reparations,” Gabriel Coakley builds on the freedom and success found in the first part of our series by going after what’s been denied to most Black families in America: financial freedom. Trymaine Lee traces Coakley’s legacy to understand how a surprising influx of money gave his family access to worlds and privileges denied to most African Americans at the turn of the Century through to today.Trymaine is joined by: siblings John, Adele and Richard Flateau; cousins Desmond and Antoine Flateau; and professors Chris Myers Asch and Kellie Carter Jackson.
The movement for reparations is gaining traction across the country, as cities and states debate what is owed to the descendants of the formerly enslaved. This question – what is owed? – has plagued America since the Civil War. But what Into America discovered is that through a strange legal loophole, a small number of Black people may have managed to get paid. In this series, “Uncounted Millions: The Power of Reparations,” Pulitzer- and Emmy-winning host Trymaine Lee follows the story of Gabriel Coakley, perhaps one of the only Black men in America to receive something akin to reparations. We look at the mark it left on his family for generations and ask: if more Black families had been given a lump sum of money 150 years ago, how might the inequities facing Black America look different today? And how might knowing this story change our current conversation on reparations in America?  Episode 1 begins in Brooklyn with Coakley’s descendants. With them, we travel back to before the Civil War to learn about Gabriel Coakley’s fight for freedom and, eventually, restitution.In addition to Coakley descendants John, Adele, and Richard Flateau, Trymaine is joined by: author Dr. Chris Myers Asch, archivistsDr. Lopez Matthews and Ishamel Childs, and professor Dr. Kellie Carter Jackson.
Into America is back! In a new series, “Uncounted Millions,” we take a look at one of today's most pressing debates: reparations. On a journey that begins in the nation’s capital during the heat of the Civil War and ends in modern day Brooklyn, host Trymaine Lee follows the little-known story of one of the only Black people to receive reparations, and the mark it left on that family for generations to come. The series asks: if more Black families had been given reparations decades ago, how might Black America look different today? And with this series, we’re kicking off a brand new format for Into America. Going forward, we’ll be a seasonal show, giving us a chance to dive deep into the topics most salient for Black America.Here’s a sneak peek of “Uncounted Millions.” Make sure you’re following the show to stay up to date. The series debuts Thursday, February 15th.
Chris Hayes is on tour with his podcast "Why Is This Happening?" for a series of live shows. In Chicago, he celebrated 50 years of hip-hop at the House of Blues. He was joined by scholar Imani Perry, rapper Vic Mensa, and "Into America" host Trymaine Lee. Trymaine talked about why this music has meant so much to him throughout his life, why it matters for Black America - and all Americans, and what new tidbits he learned while making our "Street Disciples" series earlier this year. Plus, a quick update on "Into America." For a transcript of the episode and to hear more "Into America" or "Why Is This Happening?" please visit msnbc.com/podcasts.
Nearly 30 years ago, California voters approved Prop 209, which banned affirmative action for the state’s public universities. For some elite schools like UC Berkeley and UCLA, Black student enrollment plummeted, changing the campuses for decades to come. On Into America, we’re going back to Cali to get a glimpse of what life on campus was like during the golden age of Black student enrollment, how the campus responded to threats to end affirmative action, and what the eventual end of the program meant for generations of Black students. Trymaine Lee speaks with former Cal student Quamé Love, along with others who have walked the campus over the years, and he’s joined by UCLA history and education professor Eddie R. Cole for context on what the Supreme Court’s decision means at this moment in the nation’s history.In this episode, you can also get a sneak peak of actress Alfre Woodard reading the entirety of Justice Brown Jackson’s dissent in the recent Supreme Court case over affirmative action for our friends over at The Beat. And an update from Into America: we’re going to be stepping away for a few months to work on a new reporting project. So we’ll be back in your feeds with a special season of the show shortly. But if you miss us before then, why not re-listen to a few of our favorite episodes below?Follow and share the show on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram, using the handle @intoamericapod.Thoughts? Feedback? Story ideas? Write to us at intoamerica@nbcuni.com.For a transcript, please visit our homepage.For more: Street Disciples: The Concrete JungleInto “I Have a Dream”The Power of the Black Vote: Taking Back the Classroom
California’s official task force on reparations has delivered its final report to the state legislature.The report includes a formula for determining direct financial compensation, along with more than 100 other recommendations, including establishing universal health care, implementing rent caps in historically redlined neighborhoods, and making Election Day a paid holiday.And in their report, the authors spent a significant amount of time explaining why reparations are necessary for the descendants of enslaved Black Americans, and why the government is responsible.Three years ago, host Trymaine Lee spoke about this case for reparations with Nikole Hannah-Jones,  creator of the 1619 Project, and now, a journalism professor at Howard University. The conversation came right after Nikole published her article “What is Owed” in her role as a staff writer for the New York Times Magazine. In light of California taking one small step closer toward reparations, we’re bringing back that discussion.  This podcast was originally published on June 24, 2020.  For more:California's reparations report excludes payment plan but is full of program proposalsFor two California reparations task force members, the hard work comes nextReconstructed: Birth of a Black Nation 
When the news of a Freaknik documentary hit Twitter, people joked about seeing their parents, aunts, uncles on film having too much of a good time. Freaknik was a legendary street party that started in Atlanta back in the early 80s and became a destination for young Black people to dance, watch step shows, and see concerts.“It was the perfect storm. You know, it could not happen anywhere else. It had to happen in Atlanta,” rap legend Uncle Luke told Trymaine Lee. At one point, Luke was crowned “King of Freaknik.”This week Into America continues our celebration of Hip-Hop 50 by revisiting the rise and fall of the greatest block party America has ever seen, and the impact that Freaknik still has on Atlanta and Black youth culture today. Featuring the people who lived it, including Uncle Luke, Maurice Hobson, radio host Kenny Burns, and Freaknik co-founder Sharon Toomer.(Original release date: June 30, 2022)Follow and share the show on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram, using the handle @intoamericapod.Thoughts? Feedback? Story ideas? Write to us at intoamerica@nbcuni.com.For a transcript, please visit our homepage.For More: Street Disciples: The Concrete JungleBig Daddy Kane’s Lyrical LegacyBlack Joy in the Summertime
This week, the US Supreme Court struck down the use of Affirmative Action in higher education, in one of the most widely watched cases of the summer. As part of his television reporting, Trymaine Lee had a conversation with professor Cara McClellan of the University of Pennsylvania’s law school in the lead up to the decision. They talked about the history of this policy, as well as the stakes of losing it. And we wanted to share the conversation with you here on the pod as well.  For more analysis of the Supreme Court decision, check out MSNBC. And keep your eyes on your podcast feeds for more from us in the coming weeks. Follow and share the show on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram, using the handle @intoamericapod.Thoughts? Feedback? Story ideas? Write to us at intoamerica@nbcuni.com.For a transcript, please visit our homepage.For More: Follow MSNBC’s Legal CoverageKnow Your HistoryEbony & Ivy
Aging with Pride

Aging with Pride

2023-06-2956:142

Every June, Pride month is a time for self-expression and celebration. But the road here was paved with struggle and sacrifice.From confronting police during the Stonewall Uprising, to fighting to stay afloat during the AIDS crisis, to battling in the courtroom for the basic rights of citizenship, generations of LGBTQ people have faced gains and losses.  Of the frontlines of each of these fights have been queer baby boomers.On this episode of Into America, Trymaine Lee speaks to elders of the Black community: Naomi Ruth Cobb, a Black lesbian activist from Florida, and Phill Wilson, of the Black AIDS Institute, based in California. We hear two stories, from opposite ends of the country, and learn what it means to find community, grow older, and never back down in the fight for equality. Follow and share the show on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram, using the handle @intoamericapod.Thoughts? Feedback? Story ideas? Write to us at intoamerica@nbcuni.com.For a transcript, please visit our homepage.For More: Pride in the Bible BeltThey lived a 'double life' for decades. Now, these gay elders are telling their stories.Black, Gray and Gay: The Perils of Aging LGBTQ People of Color
America as we know it today would be nothing without Black labor. From the first enslaved Africans who built our economy, to the unheralded agricultural and domestic workers during segregation, to the frontline workers who put their health on the line during the pandemic. Historian Blair LM Kelley has been highlighting the stories of the Black working class her whole career. In her new book Black Folk, she traces the story of Black workers from Reconstruction to the Civil Rights Movement. Kelley unearths forgotten stories of the sharecroppers, washerwomen, Pullman Porters, and US Postal Service employees (to name a few) who provided the engine for the American economy for generations. Beginning with her own family’s history, she details not only the hardships Black workers faced, but also the joy in community, and collective power in labor organizing, the effects of which still echo today.Follow and share the show on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram, using the handle @intoamericapod.Thoughts? Feedback? Story ideas? Write to us at intoamerica@nbcuni.com.For a transcript, please visit our homepage.For More:Into Dirty AirReconstructed: Birth of a Black NationThe Quiet Power of Preservation
In Galveston, Texas on June 19, 1865, Union General Gordon Granger announced General Order No. 3: “the people of Texas are informed that, in accordance with a Proclamation from the Executive of the United States, all slaves are free.” The day became known as Juneteenth, commemorating the actual end of slavery in the United States. Yet more than a century and a half later, Black people in Galveston are still fighting for the “absolute equality” promised to them in that order.The biggest threat today is gentrification, which began after Hurricane Ike in 2008 destroyed the city’s overwhelmingly Black public housing. The situation was made worse recently by a short-term rental boom fueled by the pandemic. Since 2000, the Black population has plummeted by 38 percent.On this episode of Into America, Trymaine Lee travels to Galveston to speak with Sam Collins of the Juneteenth Legacy Project, June Pulliam, whose great-great grandparents moved to the island in 1865, and lawyer and activist Anthony P. Griffin, who is trying to preserve land for Black folks in this historic city.Follow and share the show on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram, using the handle @intoamericapod.Thoughts? Feedback? Story ideas? Write to us at intoamerica@nbcuni.com.For a transcript, please visit our homepage.For More: DC Votes YesJuneteenth is an opportunity for America to reckon with its racial wealth gapJuneteenth shouldn't be about Black people spending but about Black people getting paid
I’m Trym(AI)ne Lee

I’m Trym(AI)ne Lee

2023-06-0833:221

The future is now. Artificial Intelligence already exists in smartphones, helps power social media algorithms, and is accessible through countless apps. AI has generated rappers with records deals and political attack ads.But as AI gains mainstream attention, AI-powered software that helps landlords select tenants has been proven to discriminate against Black applicants and algorithms have misinterpreted healthcare data, resulting in fewer services for Black patients.On this episode of Into America, Trymaine Lee speaks with Gelyn Watkins of Black in AI, to understand the implications of AI for Black America. Together, they test a popular app for accuracy and bias. And, Trymaine has a conversation with the AI version of himself. Follow and share the show on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram, using the handle @intoamericapod.Thoughts? Feedback? Story ideas? Write to us at intoamerica@nbcuni.com.For a transcript & to check out an AI-generated image of Trymaine, please visit our homepage.For More: AI risks leading humanity to 'extinction,' experts warnWhy artificial intelligence needs to be on your mind in 2023Behind the Power and Threat of A.I.
Last week, Into America told the story of Freedom House, a Black-run ambulance service that defined American EMS in the late 1960s. Today, The Healing and Justice Center in Miami, FL operates Freedom House Mobile and Crisis Units, expanding the legacy of wellness from physical to emotional and mental health.In this special two-part story, Into America explores Freedom House then and now; and how Black communities have always worked to keep themselves safe. On part two of ‘Don’t Send the Police,’ Trymaine Lee heads to Miami to speak with Rachel Gilmer, the director of the Healing and Justice Center; Dr. Armen Henderson, director of Health Programs at Dream Defenders, the Center’s parent organization; and others who are spending their days healing the community.Follow and share the show on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram, using the handle @intoamericapod.Thoughts? Feedback? Story ideas? Write to us at intoamerica@nbcuni.com.For a transcript, please visit our homepage.For More: Don’t Send the Police: Send Freedom HouseCaring People Behind a Miami Mental-Health Initiative Want to Change a Tragic Narrative | Editorial
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Comments (31)

Story Pexel

"Into America" is a compelling podcast series that delves deep into the heart of American issues, providing insightful commentary and analysis on topics ranging from politics and social justice to culture and identity. https://www.storypexel.com/

Apr 29th
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ahad saeed

Check This: https://networthhaven.com/

Feb 21st
Reply

Janet Morrison

wow, incredible episode! I am ordering my copy of Black Folk today from Third Eye Books in Portland Oregon. Thank you so much for this podcast and all your work Mr. Lee.

Jun 27th
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Sarah Pritchett

I live in Aotearoa New Zealand and just started listening to this fantastic podcast. I am listening to it in random order and today I listened to this one and was shocked to hear that the book New Boy that my 12 year old son and I read last year was nearly banned in some schools in the US. I love Nola's insightful comments and I agree with her that the Indian in the Cupboard is a difficult read (a friend of my older sons gave it to him a few years ago, I don't think we finished reading it..). Nola, I wish you all the best for your bright future and I hope Michella Obama calls you!

Apr 9th
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Janet Morrison

incredibly moving and inspiring

Feb 21st
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Robin Blacknell

I really enjoyed this episode (I enjoy all of your episodes). I remember when Jessica Lynch was in the news but I'm hard pressed to recall if I heard about Shoshana Johnson. Thank you for doing this interview and bringing attention to Ms. Johnson's experiences from her capture to her fight for the benefits due to her as a US soldier, and her contributions to this country to maintain the freedoms that we often take for granted. "Freedom has a taste that the Protected will never know". Sincerely, Robin Blacknell

Dec 8th
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randy thomas

This is a black podcast, right. So why am I hearing about a white family????

Oct 24th
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Ronda Walker

Such a horrific tragic story. I feel so bad for all the Americans that were tragically killed and stripped of their properties and businesses. thanks for sharing this story I can totally see why Oklahoma wants to bury that story because they should be freaking ashamed. It just hurts my heart. I have learned so much since George Floyd and I'm grateful to learn the history of such a tragic history of America. we learn things in school but nothing like what we should learn about. I was very sheltered myself from those kind of historical stories I'm just so sorry this happened.

May 28th
Reply (1)

Angela Johnson

Strong recommendation: The Sword and The Shield by Peniel Joseph as supplement to this episode

Apr 13th
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Patricia J. Williams

Wow! Brother Lee... Wow! I always look forward to new episodes of your podcast Into America, but this particular episode was fantastic! Dr. B was amazing, brilliant, and a powerful voice for our community. This episode was life changing. Black Lives Matter is an affirmation said Dr. B... Yes!!!! Thank you for always bringing us your very best my brother! Blessing, light, and Black love!

Apr 9th
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⚖ LifeCoachTay

AMAZING Ep. Classic!!!! Courage Is Our Calling!!!! Legendary👑💎👑

Apr 1st
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John Massari

I get your point but, they're a lot of black heroes, John Stewart, Falcon, Black Panther, Blade, Cyborg, Black Lightning, Misty Knight, Luke Cage, Storm and those are only but a few. Black Panther and Falcon have both been around since the 60's. they were definitely Falcon action figures. However, I'm not going pretend that black action figures aren't under presented, but part of the issue is demand.

Dec 28th
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gaby alseen

Why is it ok for a white kid to have dolls from different races? but Nola can't have a Jojo Siwa doll? As a Canadian this is so stupid and ehem. ...racist. I was really enjoying this podcast until this episode.

Dec 25th
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Béné

Nola is so so smart, I'm sure she will do great things! She could have her own podcast :)

Dec 24th
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Jen Jen

This is a GREAT podcast!

Dec 20th
Reply

⚖ LifeCoachTay

Thanks!! #BidenHarris2020

Aug 12th
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Sofa King

This woman can suck it for hating Bernie.

Jun 7th
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Vicki Camacho

Lol!! ❤❤❤❤

Jun 7th
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Vicki Camacho

You had me until you mentioned AL Sharpton. I must say the buildup was excellent until you mention him.

May 14th
Reply (1)

Emmett Stokes

This is a well laid out and informative piece of reporting that laden with evidence of the demographic with ALL of the experience of this parcel of the fourth amendment ... unreasonable search and seizure. Although Blomberg is Billoinnaire, philanthropist and innovator, his innate decision with all the law enforcement officials reeks of undertone of racism and implicit biases.

Apr 29th
Reply