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Speak Your Piece: a podcast about Utah's history
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Speak Your Piece: a podcast about Utah's history

Author: Brad Westwood, Senior Public Historian, Utah Dept. of Heritage & Arts

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The past is never truly “in the past.” It’s all around us, it informs us. It speaks to our shared and to our separate identities. “Speak Your Piece” is a podcast where contributors share their insights and discoveries about Utah's history. Hosted by Brad Westwood, Senior Public Historian (Utah Department of Heritage & Arts), "Speak Your Piece" is published every other week (sometime more sometimes less). During the first and second seasons the show was produced in two thirty minute segments. Starting in December 2020, the show will be recorded as one continous hour, with a break halfway. SYP explores general topics: a book or article's key arguments, a database’s unique material, or an exhibit’s compelling story. SYP seeks to tell the stories you may not have heard before, told by a cross-section of Utah historians, curators and archaeologists, as well as rare book dealers, archivists, librarians, and more.The podcast is recorded and engineered at the Studio Underground at Stokes & Associates in Salt Lake City. Conner Sorenson is the sound and post-production engineer. The SYP logo is a photograph entitled "Canyonlands," taken by Utah outdoor photographer Al W. Morton, circa 1955, within the Canyonlands National Park (NPS). The lone man in the image is Kent Frost, looking over a series of needle rock formations located in San Juan County, Utah. The image and rights are owned by the Utah State Historcial Society.
51 Episodes
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3.15.2021 (Season 2: Episode 15; 76 minutes) Click here for the Utah Dept. of Heritage & Arts Show Notes for this  Speak Your Piece episode. Introduction: In this episode of Speak Your Piece, historian Ron Watt describes his latest book, which is part memoir, part county history and part geography tour of 1950s Carbon County. First envisioned as a childhood history to be read only by his family, the project took on a life of its own (an occupational hazard for historians). Supplemented by numerous fieldtrips, interviews with family members and longtime residents, and the consultation of dozens of 1950s primary sources, Ron instead made a book for his grandchildren and for us, available via Amazon. We sampled Ron’s personal but public geographical journey in this episode.Combined, the 1950s spatial, geographical and built environments of Carbon County serve as framework which Watt then adds family history; mining, ranch and farm life descriptions; and the stories of dozens of specific community members, most of whom are second and third generation children of agricultural and labor immigrants, from around the world, who settled and worked in Carbon County in the first half of the 20th century. Moving geographically, west to east, Ron describes the places, people, streets, mines, ranches, farms and the open lands generally following U.S. Highway 50 and 6 and State Road 10. Watt describes 1950s coal mining industry, the sheep and cattle industry and the farms that followed the irrigation canals built during the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Much detail is also offered for the flourishing mid-20th century regional hubs of Price and Helper. Finally, Watt describes the ancient and early 20th century pioneer wagon road winding through Nine Mile Canyon to access to Ashley Valley or the Uinta Basin.It never stops being a personal account, amid the physical and geographical descriptions, you will also read about Ron's many part-time summer jobs, the day to day work life of his farmer/miner/manual labor father, the farm life of his grandparents, and ranch life of his aunt and uncle. We even learn about the dating life of this shy, hardworking and bookish Mormon boy.  Nearly all of it beneficial in our understanding of mid-20th century Utah.Ron Watt's Bio: Born in a mining camp in Spring Canyon, in a rock house built by Italian masons, Dr. Ronald G. Watt, was educated first in Carbon County, then at USU (BA and MA) and at University of Minnesota (PhD, in History). He was employed by the LDS Church in Salt Lake City for 35 years, as a historian, manager of the archives and reference archivist, His passion--besides his family--is writings about Carbon County. Ron also served on the Utah Historical Quarterly Board of Editors as a reader over twenty years.  Additional Readings and Sources: Ronald G. Watt, My Life in Carbon County: A Personal Tour Through Time and Space, Scrivner Books, Provo, Utah, 2018.Watt, A History of Carbon County, Utah Centennial County History Series (1896-1996), Utah State Historical Society and Carbon County, Utah, 1997.  Online Digital Copy  / Out of Print Purchase -- check local rare/used book dealers.Watt, City of Diversity: A History of Price, Utah (2001).Question or comment? Write us at “ask a historian” – askahistorian@utah.gov
3.22.2021 (Season 2: Episode 16; 62 minutes) To read the show notes includng a listed of related materials and the guest's bio, click here -- Utah Department of Heritage and Arts' Speak Your Piece Podcast. Podcast Introduction: The Netflix documentary Murder Among the Mormons (released March 3, 2021, IMDb) has created much national interest, or should I say renewed national interest, in the story of murderer and master counterfeiter Mark W. Hofmann (professionally active 1978 to 1986).  In this episode of Speak Your Piece, historian Allen D. Roberts -- who wrote the book Salamander: The Story of the Mormon Forgery Murders (1988) with former Deseret News reporter and historian Linda Buhler Sillitoe -- describes essential aspects of the Hofmann story that were not included (or maybe landed on the cutting room floor) in Murder Among the Mormons.  Sillitoe's and Roberts' book Salamander was the first full length treatment on the subject, and endures today as the most complete, balanced and accurate, among the half dozen books written to explain, or defend, or to serve as exposé regarding this most complex 20th century Utah story. John Sillito -- Linda Sillitoe's husband (the different spelling is intentional) -- recounts in the podcast how Linda, who is now deceased, saw her purpose as writing for "her tribe, her people," who she believed needed to understand the whole complex, messy and uncomfortable story.  She also felt that she and Robert’s could "act as a translators" for those outside of their community, so they too could understand all the subtle aspects that someone outside might not understand or describe correctly.  To purchase a copy of Linda Sillitoe's and Allen Roberts' book click her: Salamander: The Story of the Mormon Forgery Murders  (Signature Books, 1988, 2nd edition)  **** On KindleHofmann's apparently manipulated, deceived and defrauded his wife, parents, employees, investors, manuscript and rare book dealers, collectors, historians, curators, conservators and even America’s most respected forgery specialists. Revered and respected institutions -- including the Library of Congress, National Archives, the Federal Bureau of Investigation and the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints -- fared no better.  I asked Roberts at the end of this episode, now some thirty-five years later, what he thought were Hofmann’s motives, which were not entirely made clear in the documentary Murder Among the Mormons.
March 1, 2021 (Season 2, Episode 14, 63 minutes) To see the Speak Your Piece  shownotes incluidng the bios of this episode's guests, click here.  From 1923 to 1972 the Utah Parks Company (a subsidiary of the Union Pacific Railroad based in Cedar City, Utah) hosted nearly every visitor that came through Zion National Park, Bryce Canyon National Park, Cedar Breaks National Monument and the North Rim of the Grand Canyon. The UPC transported, guided, fed, entertained and housed tens of thousands of paying tourist each year, using primarily a workforce of young men and women, ages 16 to 26 years of age.In this episode of Speak Your Piece, authors Ryan Paul and Janet Seegmiller, tell the story of the estimated 40,000 high school and college age students, who spent their summers working for UPC. Using hundreds of oral histories, written recollections and photographs, and other historical sources, they tell the stories of coming of age; hard work, comradery and conflict; the comical and revealing; and how tens of thousands of America's youth fell in love with Utah's and Arizona's magnificent, sublime national parks.Singaway, Working and Playing for the Utah Parks Company, 1923 to 1972 (2019), is available only through the Zion National Park Forever Project website.This workforce included "locals" and students from throughout Utah, and urban and rural youth from around the country, from New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, California, Nebraska and more. All hired to serve, prepare and care for the tourist, or “the dudes (referring to both men and women)” who traveled by train and buses, to stay in Union Pacific Railroad’s lodges and Inns.The list of seasonal jobs included mechanic assistants, gearjammers (bus drivers), bellhops, maids, wood boys, linen boys, “talents” (including dance band members, singers, piano players and more), utility workers, nurses, switchboard operators, assistant wranglers, maître d', hostesses, waitresses, bus boys, soda fountain workers, janitors, clerks, dishwashers, bakers assistants, butcher assistants and finally cooks, including pantry prep workers, fry cooks, second cooks, sous chefs and in some cases even the chef.An exhibit regarding UPC's seasonal employees may be seen at Utah's Frontier Homestead State Park Museum.Other Recommended Readings: (1) To understand the vital link between the national parks and America's railroads see Alfred Runte, Trains of Discovery: Western Railroads and the National Parks (4th Edition) and (2) Seegmiller and Paul mention both the wranglers and the burros who transported guests up and down the North Rim of Grand Canyon, and mentioned Marguerite Henry's 1953 book "Brighty of the Grand Canyon."
January 11, 2021 (Season 2, Episode 10, 42 minutes); to read the full Speak Your Piece podcast show notes, including guest bios, click here.  It has been forty-five years (1976-2021) since Utah historian Helen Z. Papanikolas published her book The Peoples of Utah (Utah State Historical Society, 1976) with funding from the Utah American Revolution Bicentennial Commission. The book tells the story of Utah’s first nation people, African Americans, Jewish-Americans, and the early immigrants from the British Isles, Scandinavia, Europe, China, Japan, Greece, the Middle East, Mexico and from Latin America (today described at Latinx).     The co-managing editors of the Utah Historical Quarterly (also based out of the Utah State Historical Society) Dr. Holly George and Dr. Jedediah Rogers, want to publish a new reworking of Papanikolas’ vision, which they have aptly christened “The People of Utah” —revisited. They want the new version to be researched, written, edited and published by 2026; just in time for the 250th anniversary of the American Revolution. They are calling for all interested parties to proffer proposals in this cooperative digital publication (see — CALL FOR PAPERS: REVISITING THE PEOPLES OF UTAH).Regarding the 2026 version, George and Rogers (and their UHQ Board of Editors) want to make this second book, which they plan to produce first in digital form, to be as ground breaking, as rigorous and innovative, as Papanikolas’ book was for its time and place.   Setting the tone for the 1976 book, Helen Papanikolas wrote this first sentence: “Utah has long ceased being an agrarian society of a “peculiar people.” Although still predominately Mormon, many cultures have contributed to its unique essence in this lost domain of the Indians [italics added].” This “unique essence,” included deep economic and cultural impacts that had not been included previously in Utah’s general histories. To Papanikolas and Utah’s cadre of new social historians, these narratives had to be placed in tandem with Utah’s Mormon story. The group of circa 1970s new historians also urged that Utah’s history be more rigorous in following historical methodologies, and more evidentiary-based in its narratives and conclusions.   What will the 2026 People of Utah—revisited say, do, include and amend, differently than the first version, especially covering the last fifty years? What new communities (including and beyond nationalities and ethnicties), what new perspectives, what new fields, what new questions and answers, should be included? As Dr. Holly George and Dr. Jedediah Rogers believe, these questions and answers, and the eventual scholarship to be produced, are entirely open ended. If you would like to take part in this new scholarship click here.______________________________________________________The Utah Historical Quarterly focuses on the Western USA and within boarders of Utah, “reflecting Utah’s geographic and cultural position at the crossroads of the West.” If you enjoy the
Recorded on 01.25.2021 (Season 2: Episode 12; 54 minutes long) this episode of Speak Your Piece is about how you can learn, how you can experience the wonder, and how you can offer a few hours a week to preserve and protect Utah's archeological and historical resources. State Public Archaeologist Elizabeth Hora, and Utah Cultural Stewardship Program Coordinator Ian Wright, talk about a physical world, beyond our modern lives, that most Utahn's know very little about. I include myself in this description; largely I have lived my life from day to day, not always appreciating that scores of prior generations—ancient peoples, Native Americans, early travelers and settlers, and more recent generations—who have done as I am now doing, living and enjoying my live, on the very same ground.To read the show notes including the bios of this episode's guest click Speak Your Piece: A Podcast About Utah's History The physical evidences of human activity, what archaeologists call "material culture," is surprisingly plentiful in Utah; these objects include housing materials, work objects, containers, disposed materials, and what we modern Utahns appropriately call "art," all found under foot, where we excavate, and where we wander in Utah’s open (and developed) lands. The archaeological evidence can be quite grand, even beautiful; while some "stuff" might be considered rather insignificant. That is, until archaeologist open your eyes to the useful information such debris can yield. Next, because these materials are about "people," just like ourselves, we think of ideas like "respecting" and “honoring,” as we interact with these materials. Finally, because we want future generations to experience the learning and the wonder we are now experiencing, we gravitate to the question "how can we preserve and protect these sites and objects?" This is what this Speak Your Piece episode is all about, how to join, be trained, and take part in preserving and protecting Utah's archeological and historical resources.Do you have a question or comment? Write us at “ask a historian” – askahistorian@utah.govSITES AND RESOURCES DISCUSSED IN THIS EPISODE:Utah Public Archaeology Network facilitates archaeological stewardship and education for the benefit of Utahns, indigenous communities, tourists, and the archaeological record by connecting people and fostering a network of supportive partners. Utah Cultural Site Stewardship Program is a pioneering effort in archaeological and historical site stewardship.  The Utah SHPO operates the Site Stewardship program on public lands owned by the BLM, Forest Service, State Parks, and many others in order to help landowners keep an eye on threatened resources. The Utah Division of State History's Public Utah Archaeology Tour (GIS map and photographic tour of twenty-four sites, both pre-historic and historical, that are open to the public, including helpful interpretative information)."Recommendations and Guidelines for Those Interested in Visiting Archaeological Sites" from the Archaeological Institute of America.
The guests in this Speak Your Piece episode live and work in three dispersed regions of Utah: LeeAnn Denzer in east central Utah (Ashley Valley), Diana Call in the southwest corner (Little Valley) and Jami Van Huss in northeast Utah (Cache Valley). What they have in common is a deep interest in their audiences (you and me), a professional commitment to museum studies, and a love for their subject areas—two in local history and one in paleontology (study of fossils including dinosaurs fossels). In geography and in subject matter, these museum professionals stand as examples of Utah’s very diverse network of small museums.The episode's guest represent the Uintah County Heritage Museum (LeeAnn), the St. George Dinosaur Discovery Site (Diana) and the Hyrum City Museum (Jami). Jami Van Huss, the director of the Hyrum City Museum, served as co-producer of this episode. This podcast is an insider view of Utah's small museums. The discussion revolves around the professional work, the responsibilites and standards museums are to follow. We also discussed Utah's remarkable statewide organizations that support museums, and how Utah's small museums have adapted during the COVID-19 pandemic. Altogether our guests today, and everyone mentioned in this episode,  are reimagining, reconsidering and challenging themselves, so your next small museum experience will be both interesting and rewarding.To see the complete show notes go to the Speak Your Piece website. Utah has hundreds of small museums, waiting for you to experience, in person and on-line; in nearly every different stripe and type, including local history, house museums, historical villages, regional art and crafts collections, natural history and science, archeology both pre-historical and historical, military history, Native American, paleontology and more. In some of these small museums you can experience all of these subjects, all in one place. It is as if you are walking through a life-size curio cabinet, where diverse and notable objects have been gathered, in some cases over centuries, by past Utahns who thought such stories and objects, worthy of your contemporary study.The world of museum studies, or the discipline of managing, storing, describing, presenting educational materials and interpreting stories and objects (from a tiny fossilized bones to a regional cultural landscapes) is now in a whirlwind of change. Those who work in Utah’s small museums have to “hold on to their hats” so to speak, as they strive to meet the best in professional practices, and address a handful of interpretive, ethical, cultural and legal challenges.Utah's Small Museum Supporting Organizations:  Utah Museum Association, Utah Office of Museum Services (with the Utah Division of Arts & Museums), and Center for Community Heritage.List of Utah’s Small to Medium Size Museums: Utah Educational Network list (some are not so small), Museums and Heritage Areas, Parks & Recreation, Utah Department of Natural Resources,  and  Wikipedia - list of Utah museums</
Podcast Intro: Dr. Martha Sontag Bradley Evans (University of Utah, Dean of Undergraduate Studies) introduced her book Pedestals & Podiums: Utah Women, Religious Authority & Equal Rights (Signature Books, 2005) by telling her readers how in 1977, as young mother of three, she "bumped into the women’s movement.” Which made all the difference in her life, both as woman and as scholar, who gradually found herself drawn to the study of gender and community (among other subjects).The focus of this podcast is 20th century Utah and LDS women’s history. Although Bradley Evan's book was published fifteen years ago, it is required reading for those who wish to understand the tumultuous women's history of Utah in late 20th century. What makes this an interesting period (and podcast) is that Utah (and the nation) are still reckoning today with many of the same issues.The interview includes the social and demographic changes in the 20th century, from rural to urban and agricultural to industrial; the work of Alice Paul, American women's right activist, who introduced the idea of an Equal Rights amendment (ERA) in 1923; America and Utah’s mid-20th century cultural wars, including women’s rights, civil rights, the sexual revolution and the anti-Vietnam War movement; and unstoppable impact of women on the 20th century economy.Finally, this interview includes the story of the LDS Church's successful fight to stop the passing of the ERA during the late 1970s and into the 1980s. The impact of this battle was not only felt in Utah but across the country, as the LDS Church marshalled ground support across the USA, and facilitated fundraising vital to the state-by-state battles against the radification of this US Constitution ammendment.Describing the fight as moral issue, the LDS Church combined forces with an older generation of Americans, anxious and fearful of social and cultural changes; the emerging Christian Right---including Roman Catholics and Evangelical Christians; and the nascent Conservative wing of the Republican Party.To read the complete shownotes go to Speak Your Piece (Utah Dept. of Heritage & Arts)Guest Bio: Dr. Martha Sonntag Bradley-Evans is a professor in the U of U College of Architecture + Planning, and is the Associate Vice President for Academic Affairs and Dean of Undergraduate Studies. If you enjoyed this podcast, you may also want to listen to the Speak Your Piece podcasts: BETTER DAYS 2020 HISTORIAN KATHERINE KITTERMAN ON WOMEN’S SUFFRAGE HISTORY and “PIONEERING THE VOTE: THE UNTOLD STORY OF SUFFRAGISTS IN UTAH AND THE WEST”: A CONVERSATION WITH NEYLAN MCBAINE.RECOMMENDED BOOKS BY MARTHA SONTAG BRADLEY EVANS: Pedestals and Podiums: Utah Women, Religious Authority and Equal Rights (Signature Books, 2005). This book was the subject of this podcast. To buy a copy click on the title. Kidnapped from that Land: The Government Raids on the Short Creek Polygamists (University of Utah Press, 1993).The Four Zinas: Mothers and Daughters on the Frontier (Signature Books, 2000).
Podcast Introduction: This episode includes William  W. Tanner, the publisher of the Sons of Utah Pioneer’s (SUP) magazine; Wayne Hinton, the organization’s 2020 national president; and Thomas Alexander, the 2015 national president, all engaged in a discussion with Speak Your Piece host Brad Westwood, about this all-male Utah history organization: its origins, it’s membership (today you do not need to be a desendent of a pioneer to join, nor do you need to be member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints); and its flagship history publication the Pioneer. Regarding the magazine, this graphically engaging magazine has been in production since 1995, and its January issue delves into Utah’s campaign for statehood. The interview includes a lively discussion on the messy history of statehood. In the end each guest tells something they think most Utahns would not know about Utah’s statehood story.To see the complete shownotes including brief biographies of Tanner, Hinton and Alexander go to: Speak Your Piece (Utah Dept. of Heritage & Arts)Origin Story of the Sons of Utah Pioneers: Proposed first in 1907 as "the Sons and Daughters of Utah Pioneers," this fledging organization expected both men and women to take part, urging all ancestors of Utah’s pioneers, who arrived during Utah's earliest Euro-American settlement period (1847 to 1869) to join-in. Despite some very grand intentions, and inaugural conference that included LDS Church President Joseph F. Smith as its keynote speaker, the organization gradually stop functioning. Why? One reason was six year prior, in 1901, another Mormon pioneer organization, known as the Daughters of Utah Pioneers (DUP) had been founded. This organization quickly became a promoting force in “honoring Utah’s Pioneers (inspired by the 1897 fiftieth anniversary pioneer jubilee celebration).” The Sons idea was eventually revived, this time in Provo in 1923. This gathering of “Provo men” became the BYU-based George Albert Smith Chapter, and serves today as the oldest chapter in the organization. In 1933 after a Provo SUP member, Lawrence T. Epperson settled in Salt Lake City, the organization came to the capitol city, and shortly thereafter expanded into a national and international organization. Here is the website for the SUP.Since the mid-1930s these two gender based, statewide history organizations (the SUP and DUP), have worked in parallel, and at times together, to honor, document and promote Utah’s Mormon pioneers. To read Dr. Thomas Alexander’s ten page history of the National Society of the Sons of Utah Pioneers click here.In celebration of Utah's 125th statehood anniversary the Utah Department of Heritage & Arts produced a half-an-hour program aired on January o4, 2021 Thrive125: A Utah Celebration. This is the last in a four episode series on Utah's statehood story.  To listen to these other shows click here: Leo Lyman, Ken Cannon and Neylan McBaine.
Podcast Introduction: Keep in mind that on January 4, 2021, Utah will enter its 125th year as a state in the union (1896-2021). This was no small accomplishment, as it took the Territory of Utah forty-seven years to be granted equal status among the previous forty-four states. When the deal was finally closed for Utah, perhaps no other individual was more responsible for this accomplishment than George Q. Cannon (1827-1901).  In this podcast historian Ken Cannon discussing GQC, his early life, his building of Utah’s largest 19th century media apparatus (newspapers, magazines and books), his years serving Utah in Washington, D.C., and how the Mormon patriarch closed the deal in making Utah the 46th state to join the union.Perhaps equally as important, and a bit more eye catching, are the related accomplishments of Cannon’s three oldest sons, John Q., Abraham H. and Frank J.; all of whom played vital roles in Utah’s last ten years toward statehood. One as polygamy stalwart in the LDS Church’s Quorum of the Twelve Apostles (Abraham), one as Utah’s first senator, followed by becoming the most damaging anti-Mormon campaigner in the early 20th century (Frank), and finally, the oldest son (John), groomed to replace his father, but instead fell out of grace in a post Manifesto adulterous relationship that ended with the death of one of Mormonism’s most promising young woman’s leaders.As a Cannon family member, Ken Cannon—who is a decedent of three family lines—has taken an honest historical aim at GQC three oldest sons, offering a detailed and candid assessment of both their noteworthy accomplishments (both in Utah and in the nation’s capital), as well as their solicitous and publically embarrassing actions. Actions that only scions of one of Mormonism most powerful leading families could have done, and to a lesser or greater degree, gotten away with.Cannon and Westwood also discuss Cannon’s work at unlocking the 140 year mystery concerning the famous yet little understood photographs—possibly the most emblematic images regarding the federal response to Mormon polygamy—the C. R. Savage’s photographs of prison uniform cladded Mormon polygamists, serving time in the Utah Territorial Prison while the venerable George Q. Cannon (dubbed "the Mormon premier") presided among them.
Podcast Info: On 29 January 1863 Col. Patrick Connor and his California Volunteers (US Army, Camp Douglas, Great Salt Lake City, Territory of Utah) rode down a snow covered bluff and attacked a Northwestern Shoshoni winter village--on the Bear River, in the far northern section of Cache Valley, 1.6 km from the present Utah and Idaho boundary line—killing over 400 Shoshone men, women and children.In the middle of the Civil War (1861-1865) this horrendous event became "lost" or perhaps better said suppressed, or justified by some settlers as God's will. This band of the Shoshone Nation, whose base camp was Cache Valley, save less than a hundred survivors, was annihilated.Enter Mae Timbimboo Parry (1919-2007), grandmother of Darren Parry, who was the Northwest Band of the Shoshone's matriarch, record keeper and historian. A granddaughter of massacre survivor Pisappih or Red Oquirrh (aka Yeager Timbimboo, born circa 1848, died 1937), Mae heard and felt the painful stories from her grandfather. She not only heard Red Oquirrh's stories, she also listen to and recorded the stories of other survivors; she spoke, presented and lobbied in Boise, Salt Lake City and in Washington, D.C.; and she advised other historians, including Brigham Madsen and Scott R. Christensen. And like her grandfather, Mae told her stories to her children and grandchildren.Mae, as Darren Parry describes her, "ran out of time," and was unable to take her notebooks and do her final work, that is publish her accounts, her people's stories, their perspectives, their knowing, regarding the massacre. Darren Parry speaks to senior public historian Brad Westwood, about his book, his loving story of his grandmother, the Timbimboos and the Parrys, and most importantly, about his people who died, and those who survived, the massacre on January 29, 1863 on Boa Ogoi.Bio: Darren Parry is the former chairman of the Northwest Band of the Shoshone Nation. He is the driving force behind the proposed Northwest Band of the Shoshone Nation Boa Ogoi Cultural Interpretive Center. Parry served on the boards of the American West Heritage Center (Logan, UT) and the Utah State Museum Board. He has also served on the Advisory Board of the Huntsman Cancer Center (SLC, UT). An educator by training, in secondary education with an emphasis in history, Darren graduated from Weber State University (Ogden, UT).  During the last year (2019-2020) he ran for election, unsuccessfully, to the U.S. House to represent Utah's 1st Congressional District. In 2017 he was a receipent of the Esto Pepetua Award from the Idaho State Historical Society, for one who has preserved and promoted the history of Idaho.To read the full shownotes for this podcast, including historical photographs, recommended readings, newsreports and other noteworthy podcasts regarding Parrys book, the massacre and on the NW Band of the Shoshone Nations Boa Ogoi Cultural Interpretive Center, go to SPEAK YOUR PIECE.
Concerning Utah’s statehood story, the oft heard quote comes to mind, attributed to German Chancellor Otto von Bismarck, who said: “laws and sausage, if they are to be enjoyed, should never be watched made.” Lyman’s book argues for the opposite: knowing the stories behind political actions are essential to a vibrant and strong democracy.  Lyman’s “sausage making” history reveals many significant historical insights useful to contemporary life in Utah.  It is also a complex, elusive story, that has been largely untold until now. Perhaps no other historian knows as much, or can tell the story as well as Edward Leo Lyman. Like the story he is telling, it took him almost fifty years to fully understand the extent of this story. Enough years have passed (for many Utahns the history of the 1847 pioneers has always trumped Utah’s statehood story), and enough new scholarship has been completed, to finally tell a complete “sausage making” story about Utah’s elusive statehood quest.Podcast #1 of 4 -- Topics Discussed: Mormon pioneers settle on the Wasatch Front, establish a non-democratic, almost fully theocratic government, and they are anticipating the soon return of Jesus Christ. The first failed attempt at statehood. Federal officials along with California representatives in Washington, D.C., consider placing Utah (or the proposed state of Deseret) into a very large state of California. Utah would help California with a population requirement and California would aid Utah, eventually, in becoming a separate state. Brigham Young’s and the Mormon’s world view drives them to seek total political independence from the United States. Church leaders expect to enter the Union on their own terms. They propose a couple of times “the State of Deseret” during Brigham Young’s life.  There are all together seven attempts at statehood (1849 to 1896).What the birth of the Republican Party (1854) meant to the LDS Church, with the party’s platform to eradicate the “Twin Relics of Barbarism: Slavery and Polygamy.” A failed attempt in 1872, Thomas Fitch, a Republican lobbyist working for the Mormon Church, proposed statehood with an anti-polygamist clause. Brigham Young agrees to it, hoping to see “how far they can go” with this disingenuous gambit.  In the 1870s George Q. Cannon goes to Washington, D.C., serves as Utah’s non-voting delegate to congress; spends over ten years there; he successfully fights off nearly two dozen anti-Utah/polygamy pieces of legislation. Cannon is so good at what he does that congress passes a law requiring that all territorial delegates must be law abiding (specifically not practicing polygamists) citizens. A failed attempt in 1887, President Grover Cleveland sent a trusted cabinet member to the  Utah Territory, seeking LDS Church leaders’ approval, with an anti-polygamist plank his administration would support, to allow statehood for Utah.  US Congress establishes the Utah Commission, to oversee fair democratic elections in the Utah Territory; how federal marshals work in Utah; the Utah Commission applies an anti-polygamy oath to Utah voters; Utah polygamist are jailed and are politically disenfranchised.The deeply polarized worlds of Mormon and non-Mormons living in Utah is explained; the effects of ongoing millennial expectations by Mormons, and the call and want for some kind of heavenly intervention is discussed. Do you have a question or comment, or a proposed guest for “Speak Your Piece?” Write us at “ask a historian” – askahistorian@utah.gov To purchase a copy of Dr. Lyman’s book go to Signature Book’s website or order a copy from your local bookstore. 
Neylan McBaine, until just recently, served as both founder and CEO of Better Days 2020, a Utah non-profit organization, created with the intent of popularizing women’s history through education, legislation, events and the arts. Neylan has become a leader in speaking and writing about women’s leadership and the U.S. Suffrage Movement, with a specific focus on Utah and the West, and the early role that the Western states played in the national movement.  In today's podcast we’ll be discussing Neylan’s book titled Pioneering the Vote: The Untold Story of Suffragists in Utah and the West published in 2020 by Shadow Mountain, an imprint of the Deseret Book Company. The intent of the Shadow Mountain is to publish works that speak to a national audience. Neylan's book is compelling, a work of history with the aid of historically based fictional arch that follows through the entire book, which makes real historical figures, events and circumstances more understandable. Neylan’s work is “a shot across the bows,” with the intent of urging historians and thought leaders to consider a glaring omission in the story of the Women’s Suffrage Movement, which is the vital story from the interior West, most particularly from Utah.  I think another audience for this book is everyday Utahns that want to understand women’s history in Utah. 2020 was the 100th anniversary of a majority of US states that ratified the 19th Amendment, which extended to “most” US female citizens, not to people of color, not to Native Americans, but to white women, the right to vote. Women of color, Native Americans, all had to wait, in some cases in the 1960s to vote without legal roadblocks and harassment  As you can see the story of full franchising of all Americans, is a complex story. And this story in Utah has every more layers of confusion and conflict. 2020 also marked the 150th anniversary of the Utah Territory legislature’s bill giving women 21 years or older the right to vote. Utah’s northern territorial neighbor Wyoming, passed the right to vote, as well the right to hold public office, some months before Utah. However two days after Utah’s bill was passed, Seraph Young, a grandniece of Brigham Young, cast her ballot in a Salt Lake City municipal election, becoming the first woman in the country to vote under an equal suffrage law.  This story is just the tip of the iceberg where Utah and women from surrounding states made vital contributions not only to their local efforts but also national efforts. If you would like to buy a copy of Neylan’s book Pioneering the Vote: The Untold Story of the Suffragists in Utah and the West, we will put this information on our show notes. 
Dr. Cassandra Clark is an adjunct professor at the Salt Lake Community College and is a Public History Marketing Content Coordinator for the Utah Department of Heritage and Arts. She completed her doctorate in American History at the University of Utah in August 2020. Her dissertation title is: “Landscapes of the Mind: The Brain, Space and Scientific Race Theories, and the Environment in the Intermountain West, 1840-1950.” Dr. Clark’s research focuses on western history, history of mental health, race, and scientific race theory.   In today podcast we will be discussing Dr. Clark’s dissertation which focuses on the history of mental health in the interior western states; however we will try to focus, as much as possible, on the history of mental health in Utah. 
Dr. Cassandra Clark is an adjunct professor at the Salt Lake Community College and is a Public History Marketing Content Coordinator for the Utah Department of Heritage and Arts. She completed her doctorate in American History at the University of Utah in August 2020. Her dissertation title is: “Landscapes of the Mind: The Brain, Space and Scientific Race Theories, and the Environment in the Intermountain West, 1840-1950.” Dr. Clark’s research focuses on western history, history of mental health, race, and scientific race theory.   In today podcast we will be discussing Dr. Clark’s dissertation which focuses on the history of mental health in the interior western states; however we will try to focus, as much as possible, on the history of mental health in Utah. 
The story of the siege and massacre of approximately 120 California bound immigrants by Mormon settlers and Paiute Indians at Mountain Meadows (Washington County, 38 m. northwest of St. George) on September 11, 1857 is perhaps the second most well-known story in all of Utah’s history behind only the epic story of the 1847 Mormon Pioneers. The massacred were hastily and incompletely buried after this horrendous event. Two years later in 1859 U.S. Army troops led by Major James H. Carleton, gathered the exposed remains and interred them in two mass graves. The finding of these graves in 2014 by Bassett is the focus of this Speak Your Piece interview. Guest Bio: Everett Bassett is a principal archeologist for Transcon Environmental, Inc., an environmental planning firm, with expertise in the pursuit of developing infrastructure for energy, communications, and mining. Previously Bassett worked as contact archeologist for a firm doing extensive work for the Utah Division of Oil, Gas and Mining. He has degrees in biology, history and anthropology. As a young man Bassett worked as a logger and served in the United States Merchant Marines.
The story of the siege and massacre of approximately 120 California bound immigrants by Mormon settlers and Paiute Indians at Mountain Meadows (Washington County, 38 miles northwest of St. George) on September 11, 1857 is perhaps the second most well-known story in all of Utah’s history behind only the epic story of the 1847 Mormon Pioneers. The massacred were hastily and incompletely buried after this horrendous event. Two years later in 1859 U.S. Army troops led by Major James H. Carleton, gathered the exposed remains and interred them in two mass graves. The finding of these graves in 2014 by Bassett, is the focus of this Speak Your Piece interview. Guest Bio: Everett Bassett is a principal archeologist for Transcon Environmental, Inc., an environmental planning firm, with expertise in the pursuit of developing infrastructure for energy, communications, and mining. Previously Bassett worked as contact archeologist for a firm doing extensive work for the Utah Division of Oil, Gas and Mining. He has degrees in biology, history and anthropology. As a young man Bassett worked as a logger and served in the United States Merchant Marines.
With the fifty-first anniversary of the NYC Stonewall Riots (June 28th to July 3rd) ending just before the 4th of July weekend, we thought this Speaking of Utah podcast by Senior Public Historian Brad Westwood with historian J. Seth Anderson, would offer some good Utah history listening. Anderson is the author of LGBTQ Salt Lake which was published by Arcadia Publishing in 2017. Seth was raised in Central Utah and in Arizona. He is a PhD Candidate in American History at Boston University. His research interests include the history of culture, religion, medicine, and sexuality, from the late nineteenth century through the twentieth century. His dissertation focuses on the history of conversion therapy (a pseudoscientific therapy intent on changing sexual orientation) in the United States. He earned his master’s degree at the University of Utah, where he studied the history and the effects of HIV/AIDS in Utah. Seth has published two books, and his writing have appeared in the Washington Post and the New England Journal of Medicine. Seth and his husband, Dr. Michael Ferguson were the first same-sex couple married in Utah. They currently live in Boston.
Guest BioJeremy Harmon, Salt Lake Tribune Director of Photography (since 2007) has many interests, including the preservation and use of the Tribune’s immense photographic holdings (both analogue and digital), which he oversees on a day-to-day basis.Harmon has also developed during the last six years a keen interest—following the well-established (but not so often followed in the digital world) journalistic tradition—of investigating and tracking down hard evidence. Harmon, and other Salt Lake Tribune reporters, have tracked down newspaper accounts, personal correspondence, police records, prison records, federal records and union records, all concerning Joe Hill (Swedish-American labor activist, songwriter, and member of the Industrial Workers of the World), who met his death in the Utah.Harmon was a key contributor to the Salt Lake Tribune’s website “The Legacy of Joe Hill” and is passionate about Salt Lake City’s untold stories.  SummaryHarmon describes the back drop of early 20th century industries, the vast world of immigrant workers (Hill was a Swedish immigrant), how they came to work on the railroads, and in Utah’s mines and smelters. He describes the growth of unions in the West, especially the IWW or Wobblies, who maintained offices in Salt Lake City. Harmon then describes the killing of another immigrant some two weeks prior, by a Salt Lake police officer, which offers new insight into the Joe Hill story. Harmon then describes the crime (the murder of a grocer and his son on 773 South West Temple), Hill’s arrest, his trial and his execution at Utah’s State Penitentiary (now Sugarhouse Park).In segment two Harmon and “Speak Your Piece” host Brad Westwood, discuss the best history books to read on Hill, and the Salt Lake Tribune’s website “The Legacy of Joe Hill” (all listed below). Harmon urges listeners not to read Pulitzer Prize winner Wallace Stegner’s book Joe Hill (1969, described as a “biographical novel”) which Harmon thinks has done much harm for evidentiary-based history; notwithstanding the book’s literary value. Harmon finally describes the most recently discovered primary sources, his and other’s hypotheses regarding why Hill did not defend himself, and who he may have been protecting (a married women, his Swedish and labor union friends).URLs (book purchase links, associated exhibit, products, video links, etc.)The Salt Lake Tribunes “The Legacy of Joe Hill,” website includes a most assessable collection of accounts, primary sources, photographs, renditions of Hill’s labor songs, and much more.Harmon’s Pics: Buy them on-line or order a copy from your local bookstore.Franklin Rosemont, Joe Hill: The IWW and the Making of a Revolutionary Working Class Counterculture; Chicago: Charles H Kerr, 2003. ISBN: 9780882862644.William M. Adler,  The Man Who Never Died: The Life, Times, and Legacy of Joe Hill, American Labor Icon; New York: Bloomsbury, 2011. ISBN: 1596916966. Gibbs M Smith, Labor Martyr: Joe Hill; Layton, Utah: Peregrine Smith Books, 1969. ISBN: 0448011417. 
Guest BioJeremy Harmon, Salt Lake Tribune Director of Photography (since 2007) has many interests, including the preservation and use of the Tribune’s immense photographic holdings (both analogue and digital), which he oversees on a day-to-day basis.Harmon has also developed during the last six years a keen interest—following the well-established (but not so often followed in the digital world) journalistic tradition—of investigating and tracking down hard evidence. Harmon, and other Salt Lake Tribune reporters, have tracked down newspaper accounts, personal correspondence, police records, prison records, federal records and union records, all concerning Joe Hill (Swedish-American labor activist, songwriter, and member of the Industrial Workers of the World), who met his death in the Utah.Harmon was a key contributor to the Salt Lake Tribune’s website “The Legacy of Joe Hill” and is passionate about Salt Lake City’s untold stories.  SummaryHarmon describes the back drop of early 20th century industries, the vast world of immigrant workers (Hill was a Swedish immigrant), how they came to work on the railroads, and in Utah’s mines and smelters. He describes the growth of unions in the West, especially the IWW or Wobblies, who maintained offices in Salt Lake City. Harmon then describes the killing of another immigrant some two weeks prior, by a Salt Lake police officer, which offers new insight into the Joe Hill story. Harmon then describes the crime (the murder of a grocer and his son on 773 South West Temple), Hill’s arrest, his trial and his execution at Utah’s State Penitentiary (now Sugarhouse Park).In segment two Harmon and “Speak Your Piece” host Brad Westwood, discuss the best history books to read on Hill, and the Salt Lake Tribune’s website “The Legacy of Joe Hill” (all listed below). Harmon urges listeners not to read Pulitzer Prize winner Wallace Stegner’s book Joe Hill (1969, described as a “biographical novel”) which Harmon thinks has done much harm for evidentiary-based history; notwithstanding the book’s literary value. Harmon finally describes the most recently discovered primary sources, his and other’s hypotheses regarding why Hill did not defend himself, and who he may have been protecting (a married women, his Swedish and labor union friends).URLs (book purchase links, associated exhibit, products, video links, etc.)The Salt Lake Tribunes “The Legacy of Joe Hill,” website includes a most assessable collection of accounts, primary sources, photographs, renditions of Hill’s labor songs, and much more.Harmon’s Pics: Buy them on-line or order a copy from your local bookstore.Franklin Rosemont, Joe Hill: The IWW and the Making of a Revolutionary Working Class Counterculture; Chicago: Charles H Kerr, 2003. ISBN: 9780882862644.William M. Adler,  The Man Who Never Died: The Life, Times, and Legacy of Joe Hill, American Labor Icon; New York: Bloomsbury, 2011. ISBN: 1596916966. Gibbs M Smith, Labor Martyr: Joe Hill; Layton, Utah: Peregrine Smith Books, 1969. ISBN: 0448011417. 
Guest BioSondra Jones has spent her adult life researching, listening, writing and doing fieldwork regarding Native American in Utah, Colorado and New Mexico. With a secondary emphasis in anthropology, Jones’s fieldwork projects include work within Utah’s Uintah and Ouray Reservation. She has a PhD in U.S. History from the University of Utah (2013) and has taught American, Utah and Native American Studies at the U of U, BYU and Utah Valley University. Author of over a dozen articles on Native American history, as well as two other published works, Jones’ book Being and Becoming Ute represents decades of careful research and writing. As Dr. Brian Cannon, former Director of the Charles Redd Center for Western Studies and now chairperson of the BYU History Department, stated: “…this sweeping narrative charts the history of the Ute people from prehistoric times into the twenty-first century, showcasing their pragmatic adaptive strategies and exploring their challenges. Jones helps readers to understand tensions and differences of opinion within Ute society between full-bloods and mixed-bloods, modernizers and traditionalists, and the difficulty of maintaining a Ute identity and cultural essence in the face of mainstreaming material and cultural forces.”SummaryJones describes how she came to her subject, how she and her husband transitioned from being English and mathematic majors, to pursing archeology and history. She shares a number of stories, early in her work with the Utes, including her Native American husband’s involvement as a Ute Sun Dancer (performing in the most important spiritual ceremony of the Ute tradition). Jones also describes the Ute’s ability at gradual adaption in technologies: hunting and gathering (from on foot to horseback), food ways, clothing; the Indian reservation system and its effects; the perils of seeking Native American “traditions;” the Spanish trails, caravan trading and the active slave trading, across Utah and the Southwest, prior to the mid-19th century; shortcomings in earlier historical approaches; stories of the Timpanogos Utes, their acquisition of the horse, and prior to this, their interest in creating an alliances with Spanish explorers, to aid in protecting against marauding Shoshoni from the north; various Ute leaders are named along with how they succeeded as leaders, and more. Do you have a question or comment, or a proposed guest for “Speak Your Piece?” Write us at “ask a historian” – askahistorian@utah.govURLs (book purchase links, associated exhibit, products, video links, etc.)To read about and purchase a copy of Being and Becoming Ute: The Story of an American Indian People (2019), go to the University of Utah Press (hard copy, soft and eBook) or gather up the ISBN number (9781607816577) and high tail-it to your local independent bookseller and order a copy there. **** URL Link to the above -- https://uofupress.lib.utah.edu/being-and-becoming-ute/
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