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“For this episode of the RHH podcast, we are bringing you a throwback, and it’s the very popular episode from Season 2 featuring Kike Ojo-Thompson.  The reason we are doing this encore presentation is because we know that so many of you are heading back to the workplace or back into the classroom, and what she has is the ultimate advice on knowing how to succeed and understanding the game board you’re playing on, especially as a Black person.  And so we are bringing it back, this gem of an episode with my girl Kike!Kike's mission is to transform institutions and work cultures into more equitable spaces.  Our conversation explores the tensions and intersections of Black identity within Black communities.  Then we delve into the double discrimination faced by Black women called “Misogynoir”, and finally tips for staying healthy and raising resilient Black children.I love this conversation.  I hope you do too.”    - Dr. OAccess our shownotes to uncover additional meaning! (bit.ly/rhhs2e1)Please support us on Patreon at http://www.Patreon.com/RaceHealthHappy[The “Race, Health & Happiness” podcast is produced with the support of Toronto Metropolitan University.]
In this special episode of Race, Health & Happiness, we are profiling one of our star interns, Jael Joseph. And as a super special treat I’ve also got our senior producer Dr. Karl on the mic, since he plays an important role supervising and working with our students.So… as y’all know, our podcast team is comprised of Black and BIPOC volunteer students and paid interns. Our distinguished guest Jael was our first intern, and she did such a wonderful job that a year later she was promoted to Associate Producer!  She is so talented and a bright light on our team so we decided y’all should meet her! Jael is a media producer, emcee and influencer born in Dominica. Even before becoming a student at Toronto Metropolitan University (formerly known as Ryerson) she had over 10 years of experience in radio as an on-air personality and program coordinator. She is the first Black woman to be the recipient of the Faulhaber Communications Award for women aspiring to be a senior leader in communications. AND She is just wrapping up her master’s degree in Media Production. During our conversation we talk about Jael’s experience as an intern on RHH, the challenges she faced as a Black female immigrant student in North America, and the importance of knowing your worth and demanding that it be respected!      -  Dr. O View our ShowNotes for more information -   https://bit.ly/3Bl3iXZ Please support us on Patreon at http://www.patreon.com/RaceHealthHappy[The “Race, Health & Happiness” podcast is produced with the support of United Way Greater Toronto, and the help of Toronto Metropolitan University, the school formerly known as Ryerson] 
 This is the second of a two-part series.  See S03E04 for Part 1, entitled “Protecting Ourselves” In this episode, we will continue what we started in Episode 4, where I interviewed EDI leader Nouman Ashraf, and we focused on protective factors that can shield us from some of the harms of systemic racism. In that episode we reflected on Nouman’s own journey and how factors like self-love, cultural pride, cultural fluency were protective for him, and I talked about the importance of taking a mindful moment when you are triggered. This episode is about the power of the community organizations that create “protective spaces” for us. I think we don’t always realize the power and protection we get in groups - there is a reason for the saying ‘united we stand’ – it’s just harder to knock us down when we are a collective. As two case examples of this, I spoke to the leaders of the NIA Center for the Arts in Toronto and Roots Community Services in the Greater Toronto Area. Both of these centers provide 4 protective factors that I want to highlight: 1) they provide a sense of belonging, 2) foster a sense of joy, 3) empower their members and 4) cultivate collective self-determination. All are antidotes to the poison of systemic racism and other structural forms of discrimination. I’m going to guide you through the journeys of their organizations, the challenges, the programs they offer and the success stories from these protective spaces.      -  Dr. O View our ShowNotes for more information -  https://bit.ly/3y3TNsN Please support us on Patreon at http://www.patreon.com/RaceHealthHappy[The “Race, Health & Happiness” podcast is produced with the support of United Way Greater Toronto, and the help of Toronto Metropolitan University, the school formerly known as Ryerson]
In this episode, Dr. O speaks with Nouman Ashraf, Assistant Professor at the Rotman School of Management at the University of Toronto. As a leader in the Equity, Diversity and Inclusion space he has spent a lot of his time thinking and teaching about how leadership can be a tool to promote social equity.In this wide-ranging conversation, Nouman discusses what growing up in multiple parts of the world taught him about navigating multi-cultural spaces.  He explains how his understanding of diversity has been a protective factor in his life, particularly against systemic racism.  And then Dr. O digs a little deeper into how we can all curate these protective factors in our own lives.Dr. O was so deeply affected by this conversation that she was inspired to include a Mindful Moment in this episode, where she shares some of her own experiences as a Black woman trying to deal with the “misogynoir” that she has to face every day.This is the first of a two-part series. In the upcoming Episode 5, Dr. O brings on community leaders who will talk about how we protect ourselves as a community from the harms of racism. View our ShowNotes for more information - https://bit.ly/3PBCuaNPlease support us on Patreon at http://www.Patreon.com/RaceHealthHappy[The “Race, Health & Happiness” podcast is produced with the support of United Way Greater Toronto, and the help of “University X”, the school formerly known as Ryerson] 
In this episode Dr. O speaks with anti-poverty activist Paul Taylor.  He is the Executive Director of FoodShare Toronto, an organization that focuses on the connections between food, social justice and community engagement.Paul opens up about his experience with poverty and how it was critical in his journey. He talks about his mother’s love and resilience that inspired him to do purposeful work in challenging racial settings.  Paul and Dr. O analyze institutional discrimination and inequalities in the key determinants of health, education, income, and housing.  Paul also talks about how Black and white populations in Canada differ in their vulnerability to household food insecurity.  This episodes includes a lesson on the goals and benefits of racial caucusing, and how it creates spaces and inclusivity for people of color (PoC).View our ShowNotes for more information - https://bit.ly/3OhweEePlease support us on Patreon at http://www.Patreon.com/RaceHealthHappy[The “Race, Health & Happiness” podcast is produced with the support of United Way Greater Toronto, and the help of “University X”, the school formerly known as Ryerson]
In this episode I speak with Camille Dundas, the Editor-in-Chief of Canada's largest Black online magazine ByBlacks.com and a diversity, equity and inclusion consultant specializing in anti-racism education.We had an incisive conversation where Camille talks about centering herself in her identity after years of running away from it.  She opens up about a traumatizing racist incident that happened to her in broad daylight in Ottawa. She also discusses anti-Black racism in media, and how going to school in the Caribbean taught her about excellence and expecting more from herself.Real talk:  Before we spoke I was a little nervous to be interviewing Camille because she is a GIANT in journalism! But I just took a deep calming breath and then we dug deep into racism in media, the plight of “diversity hires” and even touched on our experiences with wearing weaves!!! Yasss! This episode of the “Race, Health & Happiness” podcast is pure fiya 🔥🔥🔥, check it out!            - Dr. OView our ShowNotes for more information. [https://bit.ly/3J0NKti]Please support us on Patreon at http://www.Patreon.com/RaceHealthHappy[The “Race, Health & Happiness” podcast is produced with the support of United Way Greater Toronto, and the help of “University X”, the school formerly known as Ryerson]
In the Season 3 premiere of the “Race, Health & Happiness” podcast, Dr. O is in conversation with Trey Anthony, the award-winning writer, television star, motivational speaker and mentor.In their discussion, Trey opens up about her journey with depression and how she maintains her mental health.  She talks about her success in the entertainment business, and why this left her with deep feelings of guilt.  She shares how she learned to stop trying to do everything herself and how working with her team helps her to prioritize self-care and wellness.  And she speaks about walking in her purpose and how we can all do the same![The “Race, Health & Happiness” podcast is produced with the support of United Way Greater Toronto]View our ShowNotes for more information. [https://bit.ly/3DkKfeu]
In this special episode of “Race, Health & Happiness” we are talking about — FOOD!  To complete the menu I’ve got two guests.  First I speak with registered dietitian Tameika Shaw, who tells us about how she works with members of communities that are experiencing oppression, and helps them find ways to eat healthy authentic food, with a joyful spirit!  After that I speak with graduate student Gurneet Dhami, who tells us about the creative resistance that is happening in the field of dietetics. Both of my guests are thriving in a field that has a history of both excluding BIPOC people, and reinforcing the racist notion that European food is somehow healthier or superior to other foods. Despite this, these two women of color are making magic in the margins, and how sweet it is! We even recorded part of this episode in Tameika’s kitchen! You may need to get a snack as you listen to this one … Bon appetit!                                                      - Dr. OView our ShowNotes for more information. [https://bit.ly/3DkKfeu]
The last time we featured Celina Caesar-Chavannes on the “Race, Health & Happiness” podcast was way back in 2019, when we were preparing to launch the first season of the show.  At the time Celina was an elected Member of Canadian Parliament, and she was fierce and outspoken about who she was, and the issues that she cared about.  From the outside, it would have seemed that she was on top of the world.  But that just wasn’t the case, the truth was much more nuanced, and even ugly, as you will hear in this episode.  Being in the political sphere broke Celina down, and she eventually decided to leave politics and rebuild her spirit.  Celina went on to write a book about her experiences, (https://www.celinacc.ca/book/) after reading it I wondered, how is Celina doing today?  How does she reconcile all that has happened in the past couple of years?  So I decided to give Celina a call, and the first part of this episode is that conversation.The second part of this special episode is a "Race, Health & Happiness" throwback! It's my original interview with Celina from October 2019, after she had left the Canadian liberal party. We decided to bring back this gem after yet another Black woman, Annamie Paul resigned as the leader of the Green Party this year. A troubling but empowering pattern of Black women saying enough is enough. There is healing and wisdom in that so we’re bringing it back!                                                                                               - Dr. OView our ShowNotes for more information. [https://bit.ly/3DkKfeu]
"In this special episode I speak to my friend and medical colleague Dr. Samir Shaheen-Hussain.  He is the author of the book, “Fighting for A Hand to Hold: Confronting Medical Colonialism against Indigenous Children in Canada”. His book is a powerful example of solidarity and truth telling in medicine. Of note, this episode was recorded before the revelation of the horrific Kamloops residential school burial site, and before the release of the public inquiry into the death of Indigenous patient, woman and mother, Joyce Echaquan. Details of these tragedies are in the ShowNotes, as well as how you can purchase a copy of this book. All author royalties from sales of this book go directly to initiatives that support or are led by Indigenous communities.                                                       - Dr. O"View our ShowNotes for more information. [https://bit.ly/3CZVbO9]
Welcome to Season 2 of The “Race, Health & Happiness” Podcast!  This season is about “Game Changers”, people who are dismantling institutional racism in their own fields, teaching us how to do it, or how to support it, while we thrive.In this episode, I speak with Olunike Adeliyi, the Canadian actress, activist and philanthropist that many of you will know from her roles in the TV shows “Workin’ Moms”, “American Gods” and “Coroner”.  We really connected as sisters of African and Caribbean heritage during our wide-ranging discussion about self care, Olunike’s experiences navigating the acting world as a Black woman, and dealing with racism and colorism in everyday life.Olunike has not only survived but she has surTHRIVED in her career and in her life, thanks to a strength, resilience and centeredness that really comes through in this conversation.  I hope you enjoy listening to this episode as much as I enjoyed connecting with my friend, Olunike.                                                                                                    ⁃Dr. O***View our ShowNotes for more information. [https://bit.ly/rhh0205]
Welcome to Season 2 of The “Race, Health & Happiness” Podcast!  This season is about “Game Changers”, people who are dismantling institutional racism in their own fields, teaching us how to do it, or how to support it, while we thrive.In this episode, I speak with author and "ghostwriter" Kern Carter about the strategies he has used to create his own path in the publishing industry, where institutional racism is alive and well but HE is coming out on top! This episode has great lessons and nourishment for the mind.  ⁃ Dr. O***View our ShowNotes for more information. [https://bit.ly/rhh0204f]
In this bonus episode Dr O. and Dr. Marcia Anderson talk about radical self-care.  The conversation with Dr. Anderson about Indigenous health began with RHH S02 E03, which you can listen to here:  [https://bit.ly/rhhs02e03]African American poet Audre Lorde taught us about wellness, saying:   “Caring for myself is not self-indulgence, it is self-preservation, and that is an act of political warfare.”Please note that this episode was recorded before the recent traumatizing discovery of hundreds of unmarked Indigenous children’s graves on the grounds of some historical Canadian ‘residential schools’.  But we hope this review of radical self-care will be helpful to everyone coping with the heartbreaking realities of our world. Healing is resistance.                                              Dr. O* * *S02 E03 Episode 3 Dr. Marcia Anderson discusses indigenous racism in health care [https://bit.ly/rhhs02e03]S02 E03 ShowNotes  [https://bit.ly/3vrT5lV]
Welcome to Season 2 of the “Race, Health & Happiness” podcast: GAME CHANGERS. In this episode, I interview my girl and colleague Dr. Marcia Anderson – Indigenous woman, mother, physician, advocate, scholar, FEMME and just PURE FIYA!!We dive into the impacts of colonization and her own experiences of anti-Indigenous racism in healthcare. Although this was recorded before the tragic unearthing of Indigenous children’s remains in Kamloops BC, the approaches to healing she describes here can be applied to overcoming almost any form of racial trauma. So I hope it is helpful to everyone directly and indirectly affected by this act of structural violence. And stay tuned in the coming days– we will be releasing a bonus episode that we recorded together, where we do a deep dive into “radical self-care”.  So buckle up, here we go!                                         Dr. OAccess our Show Notes to discover additional meaning
Welcome to Season 2 of the “Race, Health & Happiness” podcast: GAME CHANGERS. In this episode, I’m interviewing Victoria Chan, a journalist who is disrupting and dismantling stereotypes about East-Asian people and communities. In July 2020, I read one of Victoria’s articles which started like this:  “In the midst of a pandemic — and perhaps, because of it — Chinese Canadians find themselves on both sides of the racism dynamic: as victims of targeted attacks and perpetrators of anti-Black sentiment. ”  YESSSSSSSS….That’s still true and incredibly sticky for me as a Black woman, so I’m happy that Victoria agreed to be on the podcast so we could unpack this topic together.  Personally, I am always trying to stand in solidarity with my friends, patients and learners experiencing direct or vicarious trauma from anti-East Asian violence. I’ve attended webinars talking about the anti-East Asian sentiment, including where panelists have disregarded their own privilege and the existence of the “Model Minority Myth”. This was hard to swallow when the Chinese Model Minority Myth is often weaponized and used against other racialized groups like Black communities to undermine our own struggles.  But I never spoke up in these spaces because this is soooooo messy, and involves a good grasp of positionality, oppression, privilege and loss of safety for East Asian communities. So that’s why I had to speak to Victoria after I read that article she wrote.  She and I discussed anti-Black racism, and dove into layers of anti-East Asian racism like “Yellow Peril”, model minority, the “Bamboo Ceiling” and the tensions of white adjacency.  This episode is about untangling the complex weave of oppression and the illusion of belonging within a white supremacist hierarchy. Damn!           Dr. OVictoria Chan's article:If You Hate Anti-Chinese Racism, You Should Hate Anti-Black Racism, Too -  (http://bit.ly/vc_article)Access our ShowNotes to discover additional meaning. (http://bit.ly/rhhs2e2)Victoria's headshot by @Trucreates
“Welcome to Season 2 of The “Race, Health & Happiness” Podcast!  This season is about “Game Changers”, people who are dismantling institutional racism in their own fields, teaching us how to do it, or how to support it, while we thrive.In this episode I speak with Diversity and Inclusion Consultant Kike Ojo-Thompson, whose mission is to transform institutions and work cultures into more equitable spaces.  Our conversation explores the tensions and intersections of Black identity within Black communities.  Then we delve into the double discrimination faced by Black women called “Misogynoir”, and finally tips for staying healthy and raising resilient Black children.I love this conversation.  I hope you do too.”- Dr. OAccess our shownotes to uncover additional meaning! (bit.ly/rhhs2e1)
In preparation for Season 2 of RaceHealthHappy.com, we decided to revisit Season 1 of the show one last time.  Looking back with "2020 Hindsight" at a difficult year we were reminded that the conversations Dr. O had with her guests are still relevant as we continue to explore how to thrive and stay well in a racialized world.  You can enjoy all of the episodes of RHH's Season 1 at http://www.RaceHealthHappiness.com or wherever you get your podcasts.And stay tuned for "Race, Health & Happiness Season 2: Game Changers", debuting on March 31st, 2021.
Dr. O speaks with Director X, internationally acclaimed film and music video director, about the night he got shot, how he wants to use brain science to address gun violence, and why he is not getting support from his friends in the hip-hop community.Shownotes - https://bit.ly/3aTTbdx
Dr. O speaks with researcher and community leader Akwatu Khenti, PhD about how he uses the power of optimism, rooted in his African and Trinidadian heritage, to overcome adversity in his life. Dr. Khenti also talks about the real causes of gun violence in Black communities, including systemic racism and systems of oppression.Show Notes - bit.ly/2D6JxHX
"Dr. O speaks with professor and Black community advocate Dr. Roberta K. Timothy, about how her connection with her African ancestry helps her to survive and overcome Anti-Black Racism and stay mentally healthy.  Dr. Timothy also talks about the impacts of racism on growing minds, the importance of community support and therapy, and why she needs to be surrounded by her people to feel invigorated."Shownotes - bit.ly/2Vm73qv
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