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Heard and Not Seen - The Barnardo's Podcast

Heard and Not Seen - The Barnardo's Podcast

Author: Heard and Not Seen

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We believe that every child should have a voice.

In each episode of Heard and Not Seen, a podcast by Barnardo's, we talk to inspiring children and young people who have faced unimaginable challenges and have incredible stories to tell. We also talk to the project workers, front line staff and experts involved in their journeys.
12 Episodes
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So far, the Oral History Project episodes shared this month have all been conversations between two people from different generations, brought together to discuss a shared experience. In this episode of our Oral History Project, we interview our colleague Chris, who works in our very own Fundraising department, and who tells us about his experiences growing up with Caribbean heritage in East London in the 1970’s and 80’s. He reflects on how his own cultural identity has changed over the years, talks about Black history still not being part of the UK curriculum and explains the importance of having conversations about culture, race and heritage.
For the Oral History Project today, we’ve again brought together 2 people from 2 different generations, again to discuss their unique shared experience of being women of colour and spending time in care. Like Marine, who you heard in the last episode, Julienne also grew up in the Barnardo's girls village in East London.  Julienne is in conversation with Irene, a young woman who has also spent time in care. You met Irene in the last episode, she was the young woman talking to Marine.  Among the many things they talk about, they share their thoughts on the term ‘mixed race’, Julienne explains why she always supports the Indians in Cowboy and Indian films, and she reveals how she tracked down her father, who just happened to be living on the very same road as her best friend.  The purpose of this type of conversation is to give 2 people, one older and one younger, the chance to compare and contrast a shared life experience. They get to swap some of the wisdom and knowledge they’ve gained on their respective journey’s, and we get to learn something too.
The 4th episode in a series that follows Tony Simpson as he retraces his steps through the places and institutions he was born and raised in.  For more information about the project, and to learn more about Tony, please visit the Oral History Project website at http://www.barnardos.org.uk/oralhistory.
The 3rd episode in a series that follows Tony Simpson as he retraces his steps through the places and institutions he was born and raised in.  For more information about the project, and to learn more about Tony, please visit the Oral History Project website at http://www.barnardos.org.uk/oralhistory.
In this episode of our Oral History Project, we’re sharing a wonderful conversation between two women, Marine and Irene. Both are women of colour and both have spent time in the care system. But they are from two completely different generations.  Marine spent the first 16 year of her life in care, specifically our very own Barnardos’ girls village in Barkingside in East London. It was at a time when we were still called Dr Barnardo’s, and it actually doesn’t exist anymore. This village was designed using something called the ‘cottage homes’ model, which believed that young girls could be best supported if they were living in small, family-style groups looked after by a house ‘mother’. The 60-acre site had 65 cottages, a school, a hospital and a church, and provided a home - and training - to 1500 girls.  Just like Marine, Irene also spent several years in care. But she’s a lot younger. She’s 21 in this conversation, and has just graduated from university. The purpose of this type of conversation is to give 2 people, one older and one younger, the chance to compare and contrast a shared life experience.  It gives each of them an opportunity to swap some of the wisdom and knowledge they’ve gained on their respective journey’s, and allows us the chance to learn something too. Disclaimer: In an effort to keep the authentic voice of the guests, this episode contains language that may be considered offensive to some listeners.
The 2nd episode in a series that follows Tony Simpson as he retraces his steps through the places and institutions he was born and raised in.  For more information about the project, and to learn more about Tony, please visit the Oral History Project website at http://www.barnardos.org.uk/oralhistory.
Today, we’re starting a special series called ‘Resilience - A Life In Care’. It’s part of our Oral Project, in which we capture and share the incredible experiences of the Windrush Generation - and their descendants.  Tony Simpson was born in 1961 to a Jamaiican mother in a Salvation Army ‘mother and baby home’. He would then go on to spend the next 16 years of his life in Barnardo’s care. Over 6 episodes Tony will retrace his steps by visiting the places and institutions he was born and raised in.  He will also share his many triumphs – including meeting Royalty, Nelson Mandela and some of the world’s leading figures in business and beyond. Don't forget to rate, review and subscribe.  For more information about the project, and to learn more about Tony, please visit the Oral History Project website at www.barnardos.org.uk/oralhistory.
A short teaser about the story of former Barnardo's boy Tony Simpson, which we'll share, in full, in upcoming episodes.
The Barnardo’s Oral History project is about capturing and sharing the incredible experiences of the post-war African and Caribbean communities in Britain, often referred to as the Windrush Generation. Our first podcast episode in the series - released on Windrush Day 2020 (June 22) - focuses on the story of Barnardo’s Vice President Baroness Floella Benjamin. It also features a short teaser of the story of former Barnardo's boy Tony Simpson, which we'll explore, in detail, over the coming months.  Floella was interviewed by Ola, who is supported by our Youthbuild Academy in Lewisham.
Rohma Ullah from the National FGM Centre talks to Demi Adeyemi – a young author with albinism.
Rohma Ullah from the National FGM Centre talks to Mardoche Yembi – a survivor of witchcraft.
Rohma Ullah from the National FGM Centre talks to Mama Sylla – a mother, campaigner and #FGM survivor.
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