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Step inside the contemporary Dior mind with ‘Dior Talks’, a series of podcasts aimed at bringing together both the people who directly shape the creative direction of the House and those whose artistic, cultural or intellectual impact influence its narrative.
The sixth series, ‘Feminism’, focuses on the women who have inspired Maria Grazia Chiuri, both professionally and personally, and who have been involved in the bold collaborations with the House that the Creative Director of Women’s collections has orchestrated and championed since her arrival in 2016. These podcasts provide a stimulating outlet for the voices of these influential and empowered figures, who talk openly and honestly about their lives, their motivations, the challenges they’ve overcome and their hopes for the future.
The series is hosted by Justine Picardie, the London-based journalist and biographer.
58 Episodes
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Welcome to ‘Feminism’, the new series of ‘Dior Talks’ podcasts, hosted by Justine Picardie. ‘Dior Talks’ creates fascinating spaces for expression, exploring the imaginations and discourses of the artists and thinkers who influence Maria Grazia Chiuri. ‘Feminism’ engages in dialogue with the women who have inspired the Creative Director of Women’s collections and taken part in bold, empowering collaborations with the House. An exceptional roster of guests shares the magic of their thinking and the key moments of their careers with biographer and journalist Justine Picardie.     In this very special, two-part episode, Justine Picardie goes back to the origins of it all with Maria Grazia Chiuri herself, who was the guest on the very first ‘Dior Talks podcast’ on the subject of feminist art in March last year. On this occasion she is joined by her dynamic daughter and muse Rachele Regini, to delve deep into the issues and passions which drive them both in the work they do and the intellectual and creative journeys on which they embark.     Maria Grazia Chiuri needs little introduction. She has been at the helm of Dior since 2016, creating the ready-to-wear and haute couture collections for the House and pursuing a radical, multi-generational and multinational manifesto for contemporary womenswear. This year she published ‘Her Dior: Maria Grazia Chiuri's New Voice’, featuring the work of over thirty of the photographers with whom she has collaborated for the House. Rachele Regini is her daughter with husband Paolo Regini and was raised in Rome. She studied Art History and then Gender Studies at the prestigious Goldsmiths College of Art in London and now lives and works in Paris, where she is a cultural advisor in the Dior creative department.   In this episode, the trio discuss the meaning of sisterhood, the female spirit through the generations and the challenges of female creativity past and present. Maria Grazia Chiuri reminisces about her journey to a career in fashion and the changes which have taken place in the roles which women can now play in the industry. Like the Creative Director’s own mother, women were historically expected to be dressmakers, while men became couturiers. Paradoxically, they talk about the huge changes in fashion wrought by Monsieur Dior and how his New Look revolutionized the way women dressed.     Regini elaborates on how her studies and research, into politics, gender, art and activism, have influenced her own style and the dialogue around stylistic and political principles which she shares with her mother. Crucially, the two also discuss manhood, and how the modern notion of masculinity can be reinterpreted, how fashion can play a vital role in removing stereotypes and redefining sexual politics. Both mother and daughter are avid readers and passionate advocates for women’s genius and liberation, and the ways in which fashion can express and promote both.  
Welcome to ‘Feminism’, the latest series of ‘Dior Talks’ podcasts, hosted by Justine Picardie. ‘Dior Talks’ creates fascinating spaces for expression, exploring the imaginations and discourses of the artists and thinkers who influence Maria Grazia Chiuri. ‘Feminism’ engages in dialogue with the women who have inspired the Creative Director of Women’s collections and taken part in bold, empowering collaborations with the House. An exceptional roster of guests shares the magic of their thinking and the key moments of their careers with biographer and journalist Justine Picardie. This episode finds actress Felicity Jones talks about the huge changes which have taken place in the worlds of theater, film and television in the last few years, with the advent of the #MeToo movement and the increasing challenge to patriarchal structures. Through her more than twenty-five-year career, Jones has seen a revolution in gender politics across the board and has been witness to the exposure of the misogyny which she herself has experienced in the industry. She and Picardie also discuss women in the history of literature, both in drama and prose, and how long it has taken film and television to catch up with the central role which female characters have always had in the culture and canon. Felicity Jones was born in Birmingham in 1983, to an advertising executive mother and journalist father. She started acting at age 11, in an after-school workshop run by Central Television. At 14 she was starring in the TV series The Worst Witch and had a long-running role in the BBC Radio 4 soap opera The Archers. She has starred in many major television productions in the UK, as well as in the USA, and has appeared in numerous stage plays, including at the Donmar Warehouse and Royal Court Theatre. In 2011, she won a Special Jury Prize at the Sundance Festival and has also been nominated for Best Actress at the Academy Awards, the BAFTAs and the Golden Globes. In 2018, she starred in On the Basis of Sex, a biography of Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg. Here, Picardie and Jones get to the heart of the female experience of the world of acting. Picardie is a longtime admirer of the actress’s work, and their conversation travels from industry dynamics, the frustrations of working on an all-male set, the snail’s pace of the industry’s promotion of women’s leading roles and the changes and challenges which Jones has seen and overcome. They delve into the problematic notion of male genius and its erasure of historic female collaboration, and they discuss the remarkable life and career of Bader Ginsburg. The actress is a fan of Maria Grazia Chiuri and has worn her creations for Dior many times, and at many key events in her career. As she herself puts it, Chiuri designs clothes which a woman “can wear down the pub”, an apt expression of the feminism and freedom which fashion can nurture.
Welcome to ‘Feminism’, the new series of ‘Dior Talks’ podcasts, hosted by Justine Picardie. ‘Dior Talks’ creates fascinating spaces for expression, exploring the imaginations and discourses of the artists and thinkers who influence Maria Grazia Chiuri. ‘Feminism’ engages in dialogue with the women who have inspired the Creative Director of Women’s collections and taken part in bold, empowering collaborations with the House. An exceptional roster of guests shares the magic of their thinking and the key moments of their careers with biographer and journalist Justine Picardie. In this third episode, Picardie talks to Eleonora Abbagnato, one of the most important female ballet dancers of her generation. The native Sicilian has risen to the top of the fiercely competitive world of classical dance in both Paris and Rome. She has formed a close and fruitful friendship with Maria Grazia Chiuri, whom she asked, in 2019, to design costumes for ‘Nuit Blanche’, a new production paying tribute to composer Philip Glass, created by young French choreographer Sébastien Bertaud, in which she starred. Chiuri’s enduring love of dance and movement chimed with Abbagnato’s passions to form the first in a series of profound collaborations. Eleonora Abbagnato was born in Palermo, Sicily, in 1978. No one in her family had ever danced before, but at the age of four she started to dance on her own in front of the mirror at home. She left her childhood home at age ten to study dance in Monte Carlo, and at 13 was touring Europe with legendary choreographer Roland Petit and his production of ‘The Sleeping Beauty’. She studied at the elite École de Danse de l’Opéra de Paris and joined the legendary Paris Opera Ballet in 1996. She has since had a meteoric ascent and, in 2021, is looking forward to her farewell performances as an étoile, or principal, this summer. She has also been highly prolific in her native Italy, where she co-hosted the Sanremo Festival in 2007 and, since 2015, has been the Director of the Corps de Ballet at the Teatro dell’Opera di Roma. Here, Justine Picardie and Abbagnato hit the discursive ground running, comparing impassioned notes on the history of classical dance, the changing role of female dancers and the challenges, both mental and physical, that ballet presents. Abbagnato opens up about the huge strain female dancers in particular are put under by (mostly male) choreographers but goes on to reflect on the important and vitalizing contribution women directors and choreographers are now making to the field. She considers the importance of motherhood, both the inspirations of her own mother and also her hopes and ambitions for her young daughters today. They unwrap the special connection she has formed with Maria Grazia Chiuri, and the understanding of the essence of form and movement that has enabled her and her fellow dancers to express such beauty and empowerment while performing in the designs of the house of Dior.
Welcome to ‘Feminism’, the new series of ‘Dior Talks’ podcasts, hosted by Justine Picardie. ‘Dior Talks’ creates fascinating spaces for expression, exploring the imaginations and discourses of the artists and thinkers who influence Maria Grazia Chiuri. ‘Feminism’ engages in dialogue with the women who have inspired the Creative Director of Women’s collections and taken part in bold, empowering collaborations with the House. An exceptional roster of guests shares the magic of their thinking and the key moments of their careers with biographer and journalist Justine Picardie. In this second episode, Picardie talks to Robin Morgan, a hugely influential feminist theorist and much-published writer and journalist. Morgan has been a key figure in the women’s movement, both in the USA and internationally, since the early 1960s, and was also an early participant in the civil rights and anti-Vietnam War movements of the time. She is widely considered a crucial figure in the development of modern feminism and has been forming international networks of like-minded campaigners throughout her adult life. Robin Morgan was born in Florida in 1941, to a single woman who had come south to avoid the censure surrounding unmarried motherhood. She spent her early years as a child model and actor, appearing regularly in TV shows. However, her desire to write led her away from her mother’s ambitions for her acting career and towards a degree at Columbia University. She worked as a secretary for a literary agent after college and married poet Kenneth Pitchford in 1962, with whom she had a son, the musician Blake Morgan. At this time, Morgan became active in various leftwing movements, writing for radical publications such as ‘Liberation’ and ‘The National Guardian’. She joined the Civil Rights Movement and in 1967 co-founded the New York Radical Women group. In 1970, she published her first anthology of theoretical texts, ‘Sisterhood is Powerful’. Concurrently publishing volumes of poetry and works of fiction, she received a National Endowment for the Arts Fellowship in 1979 and has, to date, published 21 books of feminist theory, poetry and fiction and, including several years as editor-in-chief of Ms., has written for multiple newspapers and magazines in the USA and internationally. In 1984, she founded the Sisterhood is Global Institute with Simone de Beauvoir, and in 2005 co-founded the Women’s Media Center. In this second episode of ‘Feminism’, Justine Picardie and Robin Morgan get right to the heart of the major concerns and challenges which have faced and continue to face feminist struggles internationally. Morgan reflects on the surprises and insights of having lived eight decades and recalls the injustices which women faced in their daily lives when she was young. They discuss the transition to post-feminism and the different approaches to women’s causes around the world. Morgan considers the ever-evolving relationship between feminism and the cultural left, and also the perennial hostility from the right. They also talk about Morgan and Maria Grazia Chiuri’s mutual admiration and budding friendship, and the unlikely but magical interaction of fashion and radical feminism which occurred when Chiuri chose to honor Morgan’s remarkable career at a special ceremony in February 2019 in Paris. Morgan has been a long-standing inspiration for the Creative Director of Women’s collections.
Welcome to ‘Feminism’, the new series of ‘Dior Talks’ podcasts, hosted by Justine Picardie. ‘Dior Talks’ creates fascinating spaces for expression, exploring the imaginations and discourses of the artists and thinkers who influence Maria Grazia Chiuri. ‘Feminism’ engages in dialogue with the women who have inspired the Creative Director of Women’s collections and taken part in bold, empowering collaborations with the House. An exceptional roster of guests shares the magic of their thinking and the key moments of their careers with biographer and journalist Justine Picardie. Here, Picardie talks to Sharon Eyal, the highly esteemed dancer and choreographer, who directs the L-E-V Company, the unconventional yet rigorous dance troupe she founded with performance curator Gai Behar.  Trained in classical ballet, she swiftly developed her own uncompromised style early in her career. She has become known for an expansive range of reference, strongly defined aesthetics and complex choreography, has won numerous major awards for her work and performed with her company worldwide. Sharon Eyal was born in Jerusalem, a self-described ‘hyperactive child’ until her parents signed her up for ballet lessons at the age of 4. From 1990 to 2008 she danced with the Batsheva Dance Company, founded by Martha Graham in 1964, and served as associate artistic director for the Batsheva Dancers Create program from 2005-12. Since its founding in 2013, L-E-V has been the arena for her profound, beguiling vision of choreography, with electronic music, fashion, contemporary art and club culture regular references. The company has performed at major venues such as the Joyce Theater, New York, and Sadler’s Wells, London, and international festivals including Jacob’s Pillow Dance Festival, Montpellier Danse and Julidans. In this first episode of ‘Feminism’, Justine Picardie, a longtime fan, asks Eyal about her unrelenting passion for dance and movement as they discuss the central themes of freedom, physicality and flight, both corporeal and emotional. Despite its grueling realities, dance has been a release for Eyal and, intriguingly, a centering source of calm. She talks about the connection she formed with Maria Grazia Chiuri collaborating on the Spring-Summer 2019 show at which Eyal’s dancers gave a remarkable performance, an experience repeated in ‘Disturbing Beauty’, the film that presented the Autumn-Winter 2021-2022 collection. Eyal finds huge inspiration in Maria Grazia Chiuri’s designs and recognizes the importance of female movement, female expression and, most crucially, female liberation in the women’s collections.
Welcome to the Dior Talks series themed around the 5th edition of Dior Lady Art and hosted by Paris-based journalist Katya Foreman. For this year’s event, ten artists and collectives from around the world have participated in a game of metamorphosis by rendering the iconic Lady Dior handbag as a unique piece of art. Today’s guest, the Chinese artist Song Dong, is known for works that reflect on memories that are intrinsic to everyday objects, and the emotions we project on them. One example is windows, the main theme of his Lady Dior bags, a reference to a monumental structure made from old, discarded windows collected in the streets of Beijing that also reveals “reclaimed value.” The large version of the Window Bag features a colorful grid of miniature windows that act as both a window into the soul and onto the world, with shiny mirrors creating a kaleidoscopic effect. The artist’s idea is that its owner may see herself and the world reflected in it, a means of self-discovery and of reinforcing the bag’s function as a portable piece of art. In addition to the world it holds within, the bag offers an interaction with the outside world, changing according to the light, shadows, places and faces. Listen to this episode to find out more about the fascinating universe of an artist for whom “art is life, and life is art.”  Discover Song Dong’s creations :https://youtu.be/i-2FEcVwarc
Welcome to the Dior Talks series themed around the 5th edition of Dior Lady Art and hosted by Paris-based journalist Katya Foreman. For this year’s event, ten artists and collectives from around the world have participated in a game of metamorphosis by rendering the iconic Lady Dior handbag as a unique piece of art. Trans-culturalism, identity and spirituality are key sources of inspiration for our latest guest on the series, Olga Titus. For her reinterpretation of the iconic bag, the Swiss-Malaysian artist gathered elements that trigger emotion and explored the concept of cultural “in-betweenness.” This “third space” is one she knows well, and it serves as a conduit for cultural exchange inspired by the Indian theorist Homi K. Bhabha. “In my artistic work I encircle a cosmos, a galaxy in which self and external perception, biographical elements and cultural identity are reflected and represented in all their facets,” says the artist, whose creative process can be likened to building a cabinet of curiosities. One case in point: a floral rug in her atelier became the basis for one of her Lady Dior bags, and also references Monsieur Dior’s love of gardens. An assortment of mini masks creates an emotional “community” around the bag.   Tune in to this episode to learn more about how Titus approached the Lady Dior, using her signature sequin works as a starting point, and how she incorporated harlequin effects and a kaleidoscope of glass beads to create craft-intensive masterpieces that showcase embroidery at its most extreme.  Discover Olga Titus’ creations :https://youtu.be/A5-knt4E1vY
Welcome to the Dior Talks series themed around the 5th edition of Dior Lady Art and hosted by Paris-based journalist Katya Foreman. For this year’s event, ten artists and collectives from around the world have participated in a game of metamorphosis by rendering the iconic Lady Dior handbag as a unique piece of art. Reinventing tradition and questioning modernity is a creative signature for our latest guest, the multidisciplinary Swiss artist Mai-Thu Perret whose sources of inspiration range from modernist art to literature, historical costume, the occult, and notions of community and utopia as seen through a feminist prism. The Geneva-based artist studied English literature at the University of Cambridge and worked for several artists including the late New York-based painter Steven Parrino before attending the Independent Study Program at the Whitney Museum of American Art. She credits her experience working as a curator and art critic with influencing her process and her interest in narrative.  For her reinterpretations of the Lady Dior, Perret textured the body of the bag with shaggy long-pile tapestry and precious glass bead embroidery in geometric motifs inspired by the German thinker Friedrich Fröbel, whose pictograms were used in kindergarten classrooms in the 19th century, reflecting her fascination with graphic alphabets and languages while nodding to the fashion lexicon and the symbolism of the logo. Made using Venetian jewelry-making techniques, her small enamel versions of the Dior charms resemble “little bones.” Tune in to hear all about Perret’s exploration of the “chameleon-like” Lady Dior, and the playful, unexpected side she discovered in the classic “ladylike” icon. Discover Mai Thu Perret’s creations :https://youtu.be/wo-_ZS24dJk
Welcome to the Dior Talks series themed around the 5th edition of Dior Lady Art and hosted by Paris-based journalist Katya Foreman. Ten artists and collectives from around the world have participated in a game of metamorphosis by rendering the iconic Lady Dior handbag as a unique piece of art. In our latest episode, LA-based French painter Claire Tabouret discusses exploring a new territory of creation within the constraints of the bag’s frame through her captivating hallmark fusion of classical, romantic and hypermodern references. On the artist’s creations, a Degas-like dance scene is offset with faux fur and a glow-in-the-dark handle and charms, while her playful self-portrait as a vampire with a blood-stained mouth has dark undertones, with the mysterious, floatingquality of her paintings and expressive brushstrokes transposed onto the bags. “The image of a vampire is your way of thinking about the creation process, being a sponge, absorbing everything around you. It has a slightly dangerous aspect,” says the artist. Recalling Fauvist painters like Henri Matisse and André Derain, Tabouret’s signature clashing of natural and synthetic shades comesthrough in the contrast of Impressionist tones with touches of acid green and citrine yellow. Tune into this fascinating episode to learn more about the parallels between Tabouret’s Dior Lady Art journey and her own approach to painting, as well as her growing appetite for creating wearable art.  Discover Claire Tabouret’s creations :https://youtu.be/j1uHnrhf-wU
Welcome to the Dior Talks series themed around the 5th edition of Dior Lady Art and hosted by Paris-based journalist Katya Foreman. For this year’s event, ten artists and collectives from around the world have participated in a game of metamorphosis by rendering the iconic Lady Dior handbag as a unique piece of art. Today’s guest, Delhi-based feminist artist Bharti Kher, discusses the symbolism of the bindi, an emblem of the third eye and the common thread in her creative universe, and explains how she used this traditional Indian sign and its inherent codes, language and poetry to transform the iconic Lady Dior bag. “When I work with the bindis, I take something that is a representation and a sign, and then I just run with it,” says the artist who, for this collaboration, created two bags with different “energies” — one featuring an explosion of fiery red bindis, which “is about a night out with my girlfriends,” and a quieter, more sophisticated version.  Explosions of snake bindis — incarnations of life force, transformation and healing — create hypnotic wave movements over the handbag. Tune in to hear all about the journey behind Bharti Kher’s fun, colorful and irreverent spin on a House icon.  Discover Bharti Kher’s creations :https://youtu.be/VjP2lG6Jb0M
Welcome to the Dior Talks series themed around the 5th edition of Dior Lady Art and hosted by Paris-based journalist Katya Foreman. For this year’s event, ten artists and collectives from around the world have participated in a game of metamorphosis by rendering the iconic Lady Dior handbag as a unique piece of art. “Hacking reality” is the motto of Recycle Group’s Georgy Kuznetsov and Andrey Blokhin, who in this episode discuss transposing the Lady Dior into the digital era. The Russian artistic duo is known for deconstructing pillars of artistic culture, like a statue from antiquity or in this case the Lady Dior bag, and bringing them back to life in the virtual world, juxtaposing classical and contemporary iconography. Longtime collaborators of Dior, the fusional creatives have been friends since they were kids, hanging out in their parents’ art studios in early post-Soviet artist residencies. In their new interpretation of the House icon, the bag’s classical quilted cannage motif is distorted into a hypnotic trompe-l’œil vortex and waves recalling glitches or a Snapchat filter, and the letter charms are morphed and twisted.  The eyelets are also altered, and the charms appear to be entirely swallowed by the whirlwind forms, seemingly projecting the bag into the digital realm. “We liked the idea of combining two realities,” explains Blokhin of a fascinating creative vision positioned on reality’s final frontiers. Discover Chris Soal’s creations : https://youtu.be/K5shObQUjoA
Welcome to the Dior Talks series themed around the 5th edition of Dior Lady Art and hosted by Paris-based journalist Katya Foreman. For this year’s event, ten artists and collectives from around the world have participated in a game of metamorphosis by rendering the iconic Lady Dior handbag as a unique piece of art. Sharing the mic in our latest episode is the artist Chris Soal, an emerging talent who was born in 1994, the year the Lady Dior was created. Based in Johannesburg, South Africa, he is known for amorphous wall sculptures made from recycled single-use items, with influences ranging from the Arte Povera movement to African totems and the treasures of nature. With a Midas-like touch, the artist transforms mundane objects into rich, sensual works that challenge conventional notions of value, a concept he transposed onto textured Lady Dior bags covered in bottle tops bent like cowrie shells or furry swaths of toothpicks evoking couture embroidery. One might compare the painstaking handicraft of his work to the elaborate construction of the Lady Dior bag itself, which is assembled from 144 pieces. The story behind its signature cannage motif — borrowed from the Napoleon III seats Monsieur Dior used to seat guests at his haute couture presentations at 30 Avenue Montaigne — echoes his processes of observation and application. Tune in to hear Soal discuss the experience of fusing the haute and the humble in his reinvention of the Lady Dior bag as well as its charms, including turning the letter “O” into a bottle opener.  Discover Chris Soal’s creations :https://youtu.be/mWHNIigfA54
Welcome to the Dior Talks series themed around the 5th edition of Dior Lady Art and hosted by Paris-based journalist Katya Foreman. For this year’s event, ten artists and collectives from around the world have participated in a game of metamorphosis by rendering the iconic Lady Dior handbag as a unique piece of art. Joining us on the podcast today is Gisela Colon, whose creative universe and spark comes from tapping into different geographic locations, from Puerto Rico, where she grew up, to the Californian desert and the whirling metropolis of Los Angeles, her adopted hometown. In this fascinating deep dive, the artist discusses the underlying concept of her two ‘Lady Dior’ bags, which are based on the Eastern philosophy of balance. “The concept of yin and yang, night and day, on complementary opposites,” as the artist puts it — as well as duality in the physical world, like Earth and outer space, and the past and the future. Inspired by the El Yunque National Forest tropical rainforest in Puerto Rico, Gisela’s ‘Amazonia’ take on the Lady Dior features a central green spheroid that, the artist says, emits a special energy imbued with the spirit of the “plants, animals, and the generations that lived before us.” Crafted from holographic iridescent leather, her spellbinding ‘Stardust’ Lady Dior channels the Space Age, the future, magic and intergalactic travels to the “wonders that lie beyond the Earth.” One of her biggest fantasies? Taking the Lady Dior to the moon. Discover Gisela Colon’s creations : https://youtu.be/etbtVWFMIgA
“This bag is an emotion, Dior is an emotion for me,” says Joël Andrianomearisoa, the latest guest on the Dior Talks series themed around the 5th edition of Dior Lady Art and hosted by Paris-based journalist Katya Foreman. Delving into the concepts and processes behind his layered, tactile creations for the project, the Malagasy artist discusses the challenges of condensing his universe in the Lady Dior bag. Entitled the Lady Dior Labyrinth, Joël’s reinterpretation of the iconic handbag is a direct continuation of his black paper series, notably an immersive work created for the first Madagascar Pavilion at the 2019 Venice Biennale, entitled “I Have Forgotten the Night.” That sensorial piece, based on memories of Madagascar, invited the audience to walk through a labyrinth made of black tissue paper curtains. He describes his work as “a research exercise to materialize emotions.” Covered in a mille-feuille leaves of leather and black radzimir silk, in two different versions for night and day, this handwork-intensive bag is a testament to the savoir-faire of the petites mains in the Dior Atelier and the elaborate rituals that go into making one of the House’s most recognizable icons. “Mille-feuille for me is like Dior, it’s part of French culture,” says the artist, who also redesigned the Dior logo, using his own font. His fascination with duality, meanwhile, plays out in the immaculate white lining embroidered with the cryptic message: “Take me to the end of all loves.” Discover Joel Andrianomearisoa’s creations : https://youtu.be/quTrTOkywWM
Welcome to the first episode of the new Dior Talks series, themed around the 5th edition of Dior Lady Art and hosted by Paris-based journalist Katya Foreman. Ten artists and collectives from around the world have participated in a game of metamorphosis by rendering the iconic Lady Dior handbag as a unique piece of art. Our first guest is friend of the House, Judy Chicago, a founder of the American feminist art movement who already collaborated with Dior on the installation “The Female Divine” for the House’s Spring-Summer 2020 haute couture show. The multifaceted, Chicago-born artist has continued to develop a singular, female-centered aesthetic that challenges male domination and celebrates the achievements of women, who are all too often overlooked or relegated to the sidelines. In contrast with the clean, angular lines favored by her contemporaries, she prefers generous, sensual, colorful and suggestive curves, with spirals and shells evoking symbols of female power. In this fascinating episode, Judy explains how the Dior Lady Art project has opened an exciting new chapter in the mission she has pursued since the Seventies, introducing feminine symbols and forms into a world where emblems of virility were omnipresent, as a means of bringing women’s history to the fore. Discover Judy Chicago’s creations for Dior Lady Art : https://youtu.be/Uamr4y3spUg
Welcome to the new series Dior Talks, themed around the 5th edition of Dior Lady Art. In this introductory episode, we’re going back in time to share how the Lady Dior saga began, with a brief history of the icon. Before meeting this year’s artists, we invite you to (re)discover the legacy of the Lady Dior, the quintessence of the Dior spirit. All icons have an extraordinary backstory, and the Lady Dior is no exception. A timeless icon and a celebration of multifaceted femininity, the Lady Dior is a constant in the Dior collections, and is endlessly reinvented anew. Now in its fifth edition, the Dior Lady Art project has seen the bag deconstructed, reinvented and immortalized through a series of limited, collector’s editions reinterpreted, as ever, by a diverse roster of international talents. In 2020, ten contemporary artists and collectives were invited to put their creative stamp on the Lady Dior, approaching the iconic bag like a unique work of art.  Joining Judy Chicago - the godmother of feminist art, who already collaborated with Dior on the installation “The Female Divine” for the set for the House’s Spring-Summer 2020 Haute Couture show - are Joël Andrianomearisoa, Gisela Colón, Song Dong, Bharti Kher, Mai-Thu Perret, Recycle Group, Chris Soal, Claire Tabouret, and Olga Titus. Listen as each of these artists shares their personal experience of transforming the Lady Dior in the latest edition of the Dior Talks podcast series, available on all platforms. 
In this teaser for the new Dior Talks series about the 5th edition of Dior Lady Art, host Katya Foreman introduces the ten contemporary artists and collectives who, in the weeks to come, will share their personal experience of transforming the Lady Dior handbag, one of the most visible icons of the House of Dior. Discover The Dior Lady Art 5th Edition : https://youtu.be/yv3B2gR48eU
Retrouvez la directrice artistique des collections de joaillerie et de haute joaillerie de la maison Dior, dans cette nouvelle série des Dior Talks.  Pour ce sixième épisode, retrouve Eric Troncy, critique d’art et commissaire d’exposition, avec qui elle avait collaboré en 2007, pour la présentation des bijoux de la collection Belladone Island, au musée de l’Orangerie. Il l’interroge ici sur son processus créatif et ses grands imaginaires.
Retrouvez la directrice artistique des collections de joaillerie et de haute joaillerie de la maison Dior, dans cette nouvelle série des Dior Talks.  Pour ce cinquième épisode, Victoire de Castellane retrouve Donatien Grau, philosophe, critique d’art et conseiller de la présidence du musée d’Orsay pour les programmes contemporains. Lui-même passionné par le travail de la créatrice des bijoux Dior, il l’interroge longuement sur ses collections. Ils échangent aussi sur le pouvoir évocateur du bijou et ses représentations dans l’histoire de l’art.
Retrouvez la directrice artistique des collections de joaillerie et de haute joaillerie de la maison Dior, dans cette nouvelle série des Dior Talks.  Pour ce quatrième épisode, Victoire de Castellane rencontre Patrizia Ciambelli, ethnologue, ancienne conservatrice au musée des arts et traditions populaires de Rome, chercheur au centre d’anthropologie de Toulouse. Fille de joaillier, elle raconte ses souvenirs et échange avec Victoire de Castellane sur la notion d’héritage et de mémoire de l’objet. 
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