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Get 10% off your first month of Maastr:https://theselfrecordingband.com/maastrBOOK A FREE IN-DEPTH 1-ON-1 FEEDBACK CALL WITH BENEDIKT:https://theselfrecordingband.com/callJoin the free Facebook Group ("The Self-Recording Band Community"):https://theselfrecordingband.com/community--Jay Maas has made some of the most iconic, influential and important records in punk, hardcore and indie music. He's worked with bands like Have Heart, Bane, Counterparts, State Champs, The Story So Far, Verse, Propagandhi, Somos, No Trigger, Polar Bear Club, Title Fight, Carpathian, Strike Anywhere, Drug Church, Make Do And Mend, the list goes on and on and on... Almost 20 years into his career he started to work on a new project, called Maastr.io. Maastr is an automatic online mastering software, that allows musicians and engineers to master their songs and collaborate efficiently in one place.Knowing that existing automatic, AI-based mastering tools get a bad rep (often for good reason), Jay and Maastr set out to transform the audio mastering process forever. So they built a new kind of intelligent mastering engine, constructed with the expertise of the industry’s very best talents to help you achieve sonically beautiful masters and professionally elevated audio in minutes.And they didn't stop there. Maastr has a built-in collaboration platform that allows engineers and artists to easily communicate and iterate, all in one place. I've been talking to Jay about it for a bit on my other podcast (Outback Recordings Podcast - Episode 54), when he had just started it (among many many other things, so go listen to that episode), then later I became a Maastr subscriber myself, mainly out of curiosity. I've been testing it thoroughly over the past couple of months and had lots of questions about this fascinating tool, Jay's personal approach to mastering, how he uses Maastr and how it can help the self-recording artists out there. So I just had to reconnect with Jay and bring him on this podcast, which was an absolute blast. He's not only brilliant at what he does, but super fun to talk to and an open book when it comes to his knowledge and what he believes in. Enjoy this deep dive into AI-mastering, mastering in general and of course Maastr.io. -Benedikt--For full show notes go to: https://theselfrecordingband.com/137If you have any questions, feedback, topic ideas or want to suggest a guest, email us at: podcast@theselfrecordingband.com
Room Sound Premium Drum Samples: https://theselfrecordingband.com/roomsoundBOOK A FREE IN-DEPTH 1-ON-1 FEEDBACK CALL WITH BENEDIKT:https://theselfrecordingband.com/callJoin the free Facebook Group ("The Self-Recording Band Community"):https://theselfrecordingband.com/communityBenedikt's voice on this episode has been recorded with the Antelope Axino Synergy Core--Dave Piatek and his company Room Sound set out to make the ultimate, realistic, authentic sounding, premium drum sample libraries. I've been using them for years and keep recommending them for this exact reason. They are my favorite drum sample company in the world, absolutely sound like a drum kit and blend really well with your recorded drums. It's mind-blowing.So, we were always wondering what they might be doing differently. What's the secret? How the hell do you make a library like that? Are there best practices for us to follow, when we create our own drum samples? Or when we use those samples?This episode gives you the answers and boy, did we underestimate what goes into all of this. 😅 Dave talks about the mind-numbing, insane amount of tedious detail work that's part of creating these libraries, as well as the incredible process that they came up with to make sure they get it absolutely 100% right every single time.He explains how they made the new Kurt Ballou Vol. 2 library that just came out (this is late summer 2022), how they kept the drums perfectly in tune, how they captured and cut 36000 (!) hits accurately and how they created a super versatile kit that combines multiple world class rooms (Steve Albini's Electrical Audio), mic configurations, processing chains and even recording mediums in one plugin.This one got me really excited and I'm stoked to share it with you now!-BenediktPS: Sorry again, Dave, for completely butchering your name! What an embarrassing way to start an episode 😅--For full show notes go to: https://theselfrecordingband.com/136If you have any questions, feedback, topic ideas or want to suggest a guest, email us at: podcast@theselfrecordingband.com
BOOK A FREE IN-DEPTH 1-ON-1 FEEDBACK CALL WITH BENEDIKT:https://theselfrecordingband.com/callJoin the free Facebook Group ("The Self-Recording Band Community"):https://theselfrecordingband.com/communityDownload the free Ultimate 10 Step Guide To Successful DIY-Recording here: https://theselfrecordingband.com/10stepguideBenedikt's voice on this episode has been recorded with the Antelope Axino Synergy Core-- Wilson Harwood of soundproofyourstudio.com built his dream home recording studio in his backyard. Now he wants to teach you how to build a soundproof recording studio.We brought him on to talk about this on the podcast, because soundproofing is a complicated process that only an expert who's done it can properly explain. It's a topic that is very relevant for many DIY producers, bands and home studio owners, trying to keep sound from going in and out of the studio or jam space. There is tons of information on the internet, but how do you know what to believe?Have you read books and watched endless youtube videos, but still feel confused? Do you wish someone who has already built a soundproof studio could guide you through every step of the process?Well, you can stop searching and start right here with this free, in-depth conversation about all things soundproofing before you continue your journey by diving deeper into the amazing resource that Wilson Harwood has built for you.Enjoy!--For full show notes go to: https://theselfrecordingband.com/135If you have any questions, feedback, topic ideas or want to suggest a guest, email us at: podcast@theselfrecordingband.com
BOOK A FREE IN-DEPTH 1-ON-1 FEEDBACK CALL WITH BENEDIKT:https://theselfrecordingband.com/callJoin the free Facebook Group ("The Self-Recording Band Community"):https://theselfrecordingband.com/communityRoom Sound Drum Samples (The best in the game)*:https://theselfrecordingband.com/roomsoundBenedikt's voice on this episode has been recorded with the Antelope Axino Synergy Core-- When we ask "who's your audience?", most people don’t have a great answer. And many think that it doesn’t matter, because they just make the music they want to make anyways. Let’s discuss this. We believe that having an audience in mind and creating music you personally love are not mutually exclusive. And we also believe that your songs (and ultimately your band / project) will absolutely benefit from writing and producing for an audience. Asking yourself the right questions will help you figure out who this audience is, it will help you find or refine your unique style and sound, and it will help you overcome writer’s block. And it absolutely doesn’t mean that you’re gonna have to “sell out” or enjoy it less!Only if you don't want anybody ever to listen to your music, you can stop thinking about an audience.Listen now, find out who your audience is and learn how this will help you make better records that people actually care about, while staying 100% authentic.--For full show notes go to: https://theselfrecordingband.com/134If you have any questions, feedback, topic ideas or want to suggest a guest, email us at: podcast@theselfrecordingband.com*affiliate link
BOOK A FREE IN-DEPTH 1-ON-1 FEEDBACK CALL WITH BENEDIKT:https://theselfrecordingband.com/callJoin the free Facebook Group ("The Self-Recording Band Community"):https://theselfrecordingband.com/communityRoom Sound Drum Samples:https://theselfrecordingband.com/roomsoundBenedikt's voice on this episode has been recorded with the Antelope Axino Synergy Core-- Last week we talked about the importance of a good headphone mix for a singer. And that included using reverb and delay to make the vocals sound good and sit in the mix better immediately. Now let’s talk about what kinds of reverb, delay and other FX plugins we use on the vocals we record and mix. Let’s also discuss why we chose those and what we typically use them for.There are many different reasons to use effects like reverb and delay. And, as always, being intentional and knowing what to reach for in any situation is critical. At least as a starting point. We’re explaining the thought process and “why” behind our plugin choices and the settings we start with or use most often. So you’re gonna have great starting points to achieve some of the common and popular vocal sounds or to just make things sit better in the mix, as well as some creative approaches that might inspire you to come up with something unique and exciting for yourself. --For full show notes go to: https://theselfrecordingband.com/133If you have any questions, feedback, topic ideas or want to suggest a guest, email us at: podcast@theselfrecordingband.com
BOOK A FREE IN-DEPTH 1-ON-1 FEEDBACK CALL WITH BENEDIKT:https://theselfrecordingband.com/callJoin the free Facebook Group ("The Self-Recording Band Community"):https://theselfrecordingband.com/communityBenedikt's voice on this episode has been recorded with the Antelope Axino Synergy Core--This episode is about going the extra mile to make sure your vocalist feels as good as possible when its time to perform.The performance matters more than anything. The best mic and vocal chain in the world doesn’t matter if the delivery doesn’t cut it. What you record has to resonate with the listener, there’s gotta be a vibe, it just has to feel right. So we need to make sure that a singer we’re recording can do his/her best job when it counts.This is true for every instrument, by the way. But the vocals are such a personal, intimate thing and they are also the thing that listeners care about the most, so that we think it’s especially important to get a good performance here.Besides making sure that the room has a vibe and the whole communication/psychology/coaching thing, there’s one major element that you as the engineer have control over: The headphone mix.You want to make the artists you're recording and their songs sound as good as possible on their headphones, so that they feel like a star and perform like one.So let’s go through what you can (and should) do to make that happen!--For full show notes go to: https://theselfrecordingband.com/132If you have any questions, feedback, topic ideas or want to suggest a guest, email us at: podcast@theselfrecordingband.com
BOOK A FREE IN-DEPTH 1-ON-1 FEEDBACK CALL WITH BENEDIKT:https://theselfrecordingband.com/callJoin the free Facebook Group ("The Self-Recording Band Community"):https://theselfrecordingband.com/communityBenedikt's voice on this episode has been recorded with the Antelope Axino Synergy Core--Recording a band can be done by capturing a live performance where everybody (or parts of the band) is playing together in real time, or by recording overdubs, which means one player at a time. But which is better and how do you pick the right approach?There’s an ongoing and probably never ending discussion out there on this topic. Purists say you need to record live in order to capture the right feel and vibe. Others appreciate the flexibility and control you get from doing it piece by piece. Maybe you find this confusing and are unsure about what to do. So let’s analyze were these opinions are coming from and what the pros and cons are!Once you understand the pros and cons, potential pitfalls and technical requirements for both methods, you can make an educated decision and pick the right approach for your next project. And this episode will help you do exactly that.--For full show notes go to: https://theselfrecordingband.com/131If you have any questions, feedback, topic ideas or want to suggest a guest, email us at: podcast@theselfrecordingband.com
BOOK A FREE IN-DEPTH 1-ON-1 FEEDBACK CALL WITH BENEDIKT:https://theselfrecordingband.com/callJoin the free Facebook Group ("The Self-Recording Band Community"):https://theselfrecordingband.com/communityBenedikt's voice on this episode has been recorded with the Antelope Axino Synergy Core--Parallel compression is one of those advanced techniques, similar to multi-band compression, side-chaining, etc. that sound like a magic bullet or secret ingredient to pro mixes. Let’s explore if this is true and when and how to actually use it.Parallel compression is very powerful, but also dangerous (if not done correctly) and definitely not necessary. It’s another tool at your disposal that some people swear by and others don’t use at all. Understanding it properly will help you make a decision about whether it fits your workflow and style or not.So let’s talk about if, why and how we use it, what to watch out for and which tools we use. Let’s also explore some other techniques you could try that didn’t work for us, but are being used by other mixers successfully.--For full show notes go to: https://theselfrecordingband.com/130If you have any questions, feedback, topic ideas or want to suggest a guest, email us at: podcast@theselfrecordingband.com
BOOK A FREE IN-DEPTH 1-ON-1 FEEDBACK CALL WITH BENEDIKT:https://theselfrecordingband.com/callJoin the free Facebook Group ("The Self-Recording Band Community"):https://theselfrecordingband.com/communityBenedikt's voice on this episode has been recorded with the Antelope Axino Synergy Core--Do you need different files for different streaming services and physical mediums or is it one master to rule them all?Which other deliverables do you need to create (or ask for, in case you're working with other engineers)?Two things are for sure:You want your music to sound as good as possible on any platformYou want to be future proof, which means ready for possible opportunities down the road.So in this episode we explain how we set up our mixing and/or mastering sessions to be able to print all necessary deliverables and what exactly we actually deliver to the artists we’re working with.There are 100 different ways to do it and definitely 100 different opinions out there, so let’s try and explain what really matters and what you as a DIY producer/engineer need (or don't need) to worry about.For full show notes go to: https://theselfrecordingband.com/129If you have any questions, feedback, topic ideas or want to suggest a guest, email us at: podcast@theselfrecordingband.com
BOOK A FREE IN-DEPTH 1-ON-1 FEEDBACK CALL WITH BENEDIKT:https://theselfrecordingband.com/callJoin the free Facebook Group ("The Self-Recording Band Community"):https://theselfrecordingband.com/communityBenedikt's voice on this episode has been recorded with the Antelope Axino Synergy Core--We're super stoked to have Chris Eriksen as our guest on this week's episode!Chris is the artist behind "Skov.", a multi-genre project that blends Rock & Blues roots with RnB & Electronic elements to create a unique Dark Pop vibe. Skov.'s single "Dark Ice" is featured in our online mixing course "Mixes Unpacked - Vol. 2", where Malcom Owen-Flood opens up his original session and walks you through every move he made while mixing the song.In this episode Malcom and Chris explain how they built the perfect team and used a hybrid approach of both pro studio sessions and DIY-recordings to produce "Dark Ice".They are talking about breaking rules, making bold moves, using elements of different genres, things they've learned along the way, engineering tricks and all the little bits and pieces which ultimately lead to the song that's now released. Check out "Dark Ice" on your favorite streaming service and get Mixes Unpacked - Vol. 2 to learn exactly how Malcom mixed the song!For full show notes go to: https://theselfrecordingband.com/128If you have any questions, feedback, topic ideas or want to suggest a guest, email us at: podcast@theselfrecordingband.com
BOOK A FREE IN-DEPTH 1-ON-1 FEEDBACK CALL WITH BENEDIKT:https://theselfrecordingband.com/callJoin the free Facebook Group ("The Self-Recording Band Community"):https://theselfrecordingband.com/communityBenedikt's voice on this episode has been recorded with the Antelope Axino Synergy Core--We're super stoked to have Myk Robinson as our guest on this week's episode! Myk is an audio engineer, producer and content creator from West Tennesse, USA, who started a YouTube channel to begin sharing his love for all things REAPER, and also to begin teaching himself to edit video. His audience on that channel, Let's Talk About REAPER, quickly grew to thousands of subscribers. Viewers tend to appreciate his laid back delivery method, with each video being short and to the point, but also packed with information and entertaining. Myk has the heart of a teacher and absolutely loves connecting with other REAPER users. To be able to do that better, he also started The Unofficial REAPER Users Group on Discord, which took off pretty quickly, too. Myk is primarily a guitarist and bassist and has played in several regional punk, rock, and metal bands for over twenty years. It's been said that you can always find a singer and a guitar player, but reliable drummers and bassists are a hard find for many. This concept lead to Myk learning to play the drums after having a drummer from one of his bands move out of state.Of course, learning to play the drums lead to wanting to learn to record drums. So Myk has spent the past few years refining the art of tracking live drums, as well as editing multi-mic drum performances with multiple takes. He takes a light handed approach to editing and has an old school "get it right at the source" attitude, but also understands that technology is here to help, and ultimately desires to blend the conveniences of modern technolgy with some of the concepts taken from traditional "old school" recording methodology. Myk is happily married, with three adult children and a rather large Brazilian Mastiff named Belle.Some of the things we're talking about on this episode:Myk's career and music journeyWhy Reaper is his DAW of choiceReaper "hacks" every user should know aboutModern music production vs old school music productionThe modern music landscape and how it has changed over the yearsPros and cons of modern production tools and techniquesPizza and burgersMaking exciting music that's authentic and also resonates with peopleEditingImposter SyndromeConstantly second guessing yourselfBeing uncomfortable in public, around other people or in front of a cameraOvercoming the fear of publishing your workCreating contentMyk's collaboration with Warren Huart and Pro Mix AcademyUsing samples, programming drums and recording real drumsFor full show notes go to: https://theselfrecordingband.com/127If you have any questions, feedback, topic ideas or want to suggest a guest, email us at: podcast@theselfrecordingband.com
BOOK A FREE IN-DEPTH 1-ON-1 FEEDBACK CALL WITH BENEDIKT:https://theselfrecordingband.com/callJoin the free Facebook Group ("The Self-Recording Band Community"):https://theselfrecordingband.com/communityBenedikt's voice on this episode has been recorded with the Antelope Axino Synergy Core--If you want to make your life easier when mixing, give yourself more quickly available options in the mix without headaches and tedious setup work, or make sure that your mixing engineer can get the most out of the tracks you deliver, then you need to prepare and export your MIDI tracks correctly.Unfortunately some DAWs make it pretty difficult to export MIDI properly and it’s also different for every DAW. Plus, exporting and importing MIDI is often not as straight forward as doing the same with audio tracks, which can lead to all kinds of errors in the process. As a result of that, mixers like us often get MIDI files delivered that we can’t easily use. Sometimes they’re not usable at all and other times we spend a lot of time to get them to work, only to figure out that there’s still some mix-up somewhere in the files.It’s very hard to tell you how to exactly export and prepare things in your DAW, because they’re all different, but we can tell you what to watch out for and what mixing engineers typically expect you to deliver. It's gonna be pretty easy for you then to figure out the specifics of your DAW, once you have that info.This will also be super helpful if you’re mixing yourself, because there are a few concepts and techniques around using MIDI that will drastically improve your own mixing workflow and give you more creative options quickly, such as triggering phase accurate drum samples off of MIDI, opening gates, creating key spikes, etc.Some of the things we cover in this episode:Understand that MIDI is not audioInclude a MIDI map, or at least understand the concept of mapping MIDI notes and tell collaborators which map and sampler/instrument you used.Make sure the start and end points are correct, as well as the tempo and time signature (these things will often get exported and then re-imported with MIDI)Label everything correctlyDouble check that everything lines up correctlyUnderstand that a mixer might not be running your MIDI in real time. They might print the samples at some point. So be intentional and commit to your production. Understand that different samplers and instruments will react differently to your MIDI. This is important when you decide to switch to a different instrument. You might have to adjust things before you can use the MIDI in the mix.Adjusting MIDI and printing samples/instruments is production work, not mixing. It can serve as a safety net in the mix and adding drum samples, for example, is definitely common when mixing, but adjusting the performances, choosing and committing instruments, etc. has to be done before mixing or added on top of the mixing package you booked, which should be discussed before you start the project.For full show notes go to: https://theselfrecordingband.com/126
BOOK A FREE IN-DEPTH 1-ON-1 FEEDBACK CALL WITH BENEDIKT:https://theselfrecordingband.com/callJoin the free Facebook Group ("The Self-Recording Band Community"):https://theselfrecordingband.com/communityBenedikt's voice on this episode has been recorded with the Antelope Axino Synergy Core--In this episode we’re showing you what to look for in a vocal mic and how to find the right mic for your room and voice.Picking the right mic is crucial because if you choose the wrong one, it’s very hard (if not impossible) to make it sound great in the mix. We’re explaining the reasons for this and give you examples of the most common problems.Things we cover in the episode:Make sure the mic is not too sibilant/bright. When in doubt, darker is better. Know your room and avoid condensers if you’re in an untreated or bad sounding room (most rooms).Learn about pickup patterns and choose a mic with the right pattern for your situation. In most cases: Cardiod. Know your genre and think about the sound you’re going for. Bright? Dark? Polished? Airy? Gritty? Distorted? Modern? Vintage? Do some research on classic mics and popular choices for certain styles.You’ll find that a lot of the classic options are super expensive. Resist the temptation to by a cheap knock-off or cheap condensers in general, with only a few exceptions. If you can afford the high-end mics, perfect! If not, save up or get a good dynamic mic. There are some good affordable condensers, but you really have to do some research and pick one that matches your voice. So be careful.For many people using a dynamic vocal mic is actually a really great idea! Especially in heavier genres and in a DIY recording setup at home.If you can, try a few options before you buy one. Every voice is different. And every room, too.Here are 3 reason why we often recommend good dynamic vocal mics to self-recording bands:Value for money. Good dynamic mics, like a Shure SM7B, a Røde Procaster, an Aston Stealth, an Electro Voice RE20, etc. typically sound better than condensers in the same price range. If you go with a condenser, you’ll probably have to invest a little more.Most rooms are problematic, especially if you record at home or in the jam space, you'll probably have to make the most out of a less-than-ideal acoustic situation. Dynamics are much better for this, as they are far less sensitive and don’t capture as much of the room sound and noise as condensers do.Aggressive vocals are typically a good fit for dynamics because of the "gritty" midrange character and smooth top end of those mics. Condensers can sound a little too detailed for this, sometimes a little harsh, sibilant or brittle and some lack the punch and grit in the mids. Not true for every vocalist and every mic, but for many of them, especially with budget condensers.At the end of the day, you'll have to try and find out what works best with your voice, your style of music and in your room. Just don't think you have to use a condenser, even if that's what you see in most studio pictures. Google "records made with an SM7" and you'll probably feel a lot more comfortable about using a dynamic mic. For full show notes go to: https://theselfrecordingband.com/125
Download the free Ultimate 10 Step Guide To Successful DIY-Recording here: https://theselfrecordingband.com/10stepguideBOOK A FREE IN-DEPTH 1-ON-1 FEEDBACK CALL WITH BENEDIKT:https://theselfrecordingband.com/callJoin the free Facebook Group ("The Self-Recording Band Community"):https://theselfrecordingband.com/communityBenedikt's voice on this episode has been recorded with the Antelope Axino Synergy Core--Multiband compression is very powerful, but also pretty dangerous. Most of the time you don’t need it and you definitely shouldn’t be using it on everything. But once you understand it, you have a great tool at your disposal that does things, other tools just can’t do. Multiband compression is also one of the most popular topics people ask us about. For some reason a lot of beginner engineers and mixers think it’s a magic bullet or the secret to pro mixes. That is not true. In fact, every pro mixer we know uses it only on a few things (if at all) and only in very intentional, specific ways. So let’s talk about when and how we like to use it and what some typical use cases look like for many mixers.For full show notes go to: https://theselfrecordingband.com/124If you have any questions, feedback, topic ideas or want to suggest a guest, email us at: podcast@theselfrecordingband.com
Download the free Frequency Chart Cheat-Sheet here: https://theselfrecordingband.com/frequencychartBOOK A FREE IN-DEPTH 1-ON-1 FEEDBACK CALL WITH BENEDIKT:https://theselfrecordingband.com/callJoin the free Facebook Group ("The Self-Recording Band Community"):https://theselfrecordingband.com/communityBenedikt's voice on this episode has been recorded with the Antelope Axino Synergy Core--It doesn’t matter what your guitar (or any instrument) sounds like on its own, it’s about whether or not it serves the song and fits into the perfect mix for the tune.But when we talk to artists about their sonic vision for the project, so many people mention the guitar tone they like, or how they love or hate bright guitars, scooped midrange, or a dark, “full” sound. While personal preference is obviously a thing and very important, many people completely ignore the fact, that the tone has to work within the context of the mix and the arrangement. And sometimes this means that what they think would be a great guitar tone, ends up being a very bad choice for the project.So Iet’s discuss how to actually figure out a great tone that also fits in! We're approaching this from three different angles:1. Song (intention, message, vibe)2. Arrangement3. Mix1 & 2 have a lot to do with writing and arranging with the final sound in mind, as well as understanding the importance of choosing the right instruments, key, tuning, etc.All 3 have a lot to do with understanding the frequency spectrum. Understanding where each instrument typically lives, where the typical problems are and how each part of the spectrum “feels”.And of course we're doing a deep dive and we're giving you a detailed explanation of what we mean here:1. Does the tone create the intended feeling? Does it cause the right emotional reaction?    2. Does the tone play well with the other elements in your arrangement? What’s the purpose of the instrument or part and does the tone help achieve that?    3. Will the tone work in the mix? How well do the different sounds interact? Are there overlaps or gaps in the frequency spectrum? If so, are they intentional? Where should the bass be taking over the low end? Where should the cymbals be taking over the top end? Where will the vocals fit in? How much treatment will be necessary in order for it to sit well? Where can the guitar itself cut through and really shine?And finally, we're discussing our individual "tone-hunt" processes that help us get the right tones quickly and consistently.For full show notes go to: https://theselfrecordingband.com/123If you have any questions, feedback, topic ideas or want to suggest a guest, email us at: podcast@theselfrecordingband.com
Download the free Ultimate 10 Step Guide To Successful DIY-Recording here: https://theselfrecordingband.com/10stepguideBOOK A FREE IN-DEPTH 1-ON-1 FEEDBACK CALL WITH BENEDIKT:https://theselfrecordingband.com/callJoin the free Facebook Group ("The Self-Recording Band Community"):https://theselfrecordingband.com/communityBenedikt's voice on this episode has been recorded with the Antelope Axino Synergy Core--Out-of-tune vocals, guitars, bass or really any instrument are super common in amateur productions. It's a dead give away. Often it's subtle, sometimes it's so bad that it makes the song really hard to listen to. In many cases it can't be fixed by simply editing and tuning in the DAW. And even if it can be fixed, the results are going to be much better if you can get it right at the source! That's why we decided to make this episode for and show you how to make sure your source tracks are in tune, so you won’t run into problems in the editing and mixing phase.The reality is: People send us out-of-tune tracks all the time and no matter what we do in the mix, they will never sit right and sound great. Even if it’s subtle it can be a distraction, hurt the overall quality of the mix and make everything sound amateur.We don't want your songs to have these kind of problems, so here are 10 hacks for you to avoid it all in the first place!For full show notes go to: https://theselfrecordingband.com/122If you have any questions, feedback, topic ideas or want to suggest a guest, email us at: podcast@theselfrecordingband.com
Download the free Ultimate 10 Step Guide To Successful DIY-Recording here: https://theselfrecordingband.com/10stepguideBOOK A FREE IN-DEPTH 1-ON-1 FEEDBACK CALL WITH BENEDIKT:https://theselfrecordingband.com/callJoin the free Facebook Group ("The Self-Recording Band Community"):https://theselfrecordingband.com/communityBenedikt's voice on this episode has been recorded with the Antelope Axino Synergy Core--Benedikt heard indie-pop producer Mark Eckert talk about this in an Instagram video and thought it’s a really cool and important thing to talk about. Here's why:A lot of people don’t know what they should write about or get stuck in the same topics over and over again. Many try to force ideas or try to force a switch in their style or genre, because they feel like they have to reinvent themselves and their sound. We think authentic art is what resonates with people and that is always art that comes from your personal experiences, from how you see the world, from speaking your truth. These are some of the actionable things we talk about on this episode:If you’re an introvert, leave your comfort zone and connect with people (nice side effect will be connections, collaborations, unexpected opportunities, etc.)Switch it up - As much as we love routines, if you find yourself doing the same things over and over in your life, maybe it’s time to change things, do something spontaneous or replace old habits with new onesFind a hobby that both helps you clear your mind and challenges you physically and/or emotionally/mentally. For us this is running.Find a good balance, don’t work on music all the time (Mark Eckert had some great examples there)Pay attention, be mindful. There’s so much to discover, so many interesting things happening around us every day that we don’t even recognize. It could be nature, people, conversations, politics, society, relationships, or our own emotions. Try practicing paying attention to those things and reflecting back on your days and you’ll find plenty of inspiring things to write about.Pay less attention to other creators and artists and don’t compare yourself constantly. You want to avoid being in a bubble and automatically copying what others do. Your life should be the inspiration, not theirs.Use music that you love not just to compare yourself against it but to form a new version of that combining the different influences + your own personal experiences. Pay attention to how the music makes you feel, figure out what you actually like about it, experience the music.Forced and trained creativity is something we believe in: Setting songwriting challenges with certain constraints like time, or only being able to use 3 chords, or forcing yourself to start with a certain instrument, etc. We think that continued work on this creates a more “fit” creativity that's able to overcome not feeling inspired. Read.For full show notes go to: https://theselfrecordingband.com/121If you have any questions, feedback, topic ideas or want to suggest a guest, email us at: podcast@theselfrecordingband.com
Download the free Ultimate 10 Step Guide To Successful DIY-Recording here: https://theselfrecordingband.com/10stepguideBOOK A FREE IN-DEPTH 1-ON-1 FEEDBACK CALL WITH BENEDIKT:https://theselfrecordingband.com/callJoin the free Facebook Group ("The Self-Recording Band Community"):https://theselfrecordingband.com/communityBenedikt's voice on this episode has been recorded with the Antelope Axino Synergy Core--Last week we explained the concept of mixing into a mix bus chain and how to get the most from applying mix bus processing. This week we’re giving you examples and walking you through our own mix bus chains, as well as the thought processes behind them.We’re mixing into these chains for good reasons and have made some mistakes / not so great decisions before we arrived at the chains that we use now. We want to help you avoid those same mistakes, give you some inspiration for starting points and share exactly why we use what we use today.We're sharing the exact plugins/tools we use, the order we use them in and how we use them, depending in the mix we’re working on.For full show notes go to: https://theselfrecordingband.com/120If you have any questions, feedback, topic ideas or want to suggest a guest, email us at: podcast@theselfrecordingband.com
Download the free Ultimate 10 Step Guide To Successful DIY-Recording here: https://theselfrecordingband.com/10stepguideBOOK A FREE IN-DEPTH 1-ON-1 FEEDBACK CALL WITH BENEDIKT:https://theselfrecordingband.com/callJoin the free Facebook Group ("The Self-Recording Band Community"):https://theselfrecordingband.com/communityBenedikt's voice on this episode has been recorded with the Antelope Axino Synergy Core--On this episode we explain the concept of a mix bus chain, tell you why we use one and compare mixing into a mix bus chain vs applying mix bus processing at the end of the mixing process.Here's why you should care:You don’t have to use mix bus processing, but if you choose to (and most people do), there’s a right and a wrong way to do it. If done wrong, you can completely mess up your balance, destroy everything you’ve worked hard for in your mix, or make it very hard for you to make good decision throughout the process.If done right, however, it can save you time, create the perfect energy for the song, glue everything together and assist you in your mixing decisions.This is what we cover on the show:What does a typical mix bus chain look like? What’s the difference to mastering? Is there any? Mixing into the chain vs applying it afterwardsWhat are some starting points you should try on your mix bus?How to use mix bus processing properly and get the most benefit from itWhat to avoidFor full show notes go to: https://theselfrecordingband.com/119If you have any questions, feedback, topic ideas or want to suggest a guest, email us at: podcast@theselfrecordingband.com
Download the free Ultimate 10 Step Guide To Successful DIY-Recording here: https://theselfrecordingband.com/10stepguideBOOK A FREE IN-DEPTH 1-ON-1 FEEDBACK CALL WITH BENEDIKT:https://theselfrecordingband.com/callJoin the free Facebook Group ("The Self-Recording Band Community"):https://theselfrecordingband.com/communityBenedikt's voice on this episode has been recorded with the Antelope Axino Synergy Core--My guest on this episode is Trevor Reilly, the guitar player, (co-)producer/recording engineer and main songwriter in the band A Wilhelm Scream. I got to nerd out with Trevor on my other show, the Outback Recordings Podcast. We were talking about recording, building a studio, songwriting and all those things that I love to talk about. So I just had to share it with you here! :)We're also discussing their new record "Lose Your Delusion" and Trevor is sharing lots of cool stories, behind the scenes insights and and details about the making of this record.He talks about how they've built their own studio to make this record, their songwriting process, his writing and production philosophies, the history of the band, the story and message behind "Lose Your Delusion", their friendship and how they manage to stay focussed and organized during the process of making a great (DIY-)record without real deadlines and time pressure.So without further ado, here's my conversation with Trevor Reilly for you!Enjoy!BenediktFor full show notes go to: https://theselfrecordingband.com/118If you have any questions, feedback, topic ideas or want to suggest a guest, email us at: podcast@theselfrecordingband.com
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