DiscoverPolitical Misfits
Political Misfits
Claim Ownership

Political Misfits

Author: Radio Sputnik

Subscribed: 39Played: 2,890
Share

Description

Political Misfits brings you news, politics and culture ‒ without the red and blue treatment. We aim to facilitate constructive conversations that take new looks at the stories and topics that mean a lot to us, including corporate misconduct, anti-war efforts, climate change, political hypocrisy, poverty, pop culture, electoral politics and much, much more.

Political Misfits airs live daily Monday through Friday from 12-2 p.m. EST and is broadcast on 105.5 FM in Washington, DC, 102.9 FM in Kansas City, Missouri, and to 35 countries on signals such as FM, digital DAB/DAB+ (Digital Radio Broadcasting), and HD-Radio. The show is also made available globally live on SputnikNews.com and is distributed as a podcast shortly after broadcasting on iTunes, iHeartRadio, Spreaker and more.

About us: Hosts Bob Schlehuber and Michelle Witte bring different backgrounds to Political Misfits, but arrive with a mutual curiosity and compassion. Bob is an artist, producer and organizer; someone who works to create conversations that bring together broad and diverse individuals, organizations and ideas. Bob produced the radio show By Any Means Necessary on Radio Sputnik for the past three years; now, he's bringing his commitment to understanding and addressing housing, homelessness, public safety, education, health, workforce development, civility, mutual understanding, and international peace and conflict resolution to Political Misfits.

Michelle is a committed explorer, observer and documentor of our big, beautiful planet and the strange creatures that inhabit it. A long-time writer, teacher and journalist, she returned to the US after ten years overseas with a broader perspective on American politics and culture and our impact on the world. Michelle gets fired up about justice and injustice, responsible travel, good books and bad movies, animal rights, baking and long-distance hikes.
670 Episodes
Reverse
Keith Mackey, founder of Mackey International, an aviation consulting firm specializing in aviation safety, risk management, accident investigation, air carrier certification and safety/compliance audits, tells us about chaos in the airline industry during the COVID-19 pandemic after Southwest Airlines cancelled over 2,000 flights over the weekend, with disruptions carrying over into the week. We talk about the airline’s explanation for these disruptions, citing weather and staffing issues, how Southwest’s vaccine mandates may have provoked a slow-down by its pilots, what the union is saying, and whether we will see similar disruptions in other airlines in the future.Dr. Wilmer Leon, political scientist and host of The Critical Hour on Radio Sputnik, joins us to discuss the trial in absentia of Blaise Compaoré, who stands accused of being involved in the assassination of Burkina Faso leader Thomas Sankara in the 80’s. We talk about the figure of Sankara and his legacy, how his left-leaning and pan-African politics may have led to his assassination, and the role that that France, the United States, and international financial institutions may have played in his killing. Monica Cruz, host and reporter with BreakThrough News, joins hosts Michelle Witte and Bob Schlehuber to talk about the shocking numbers from the US economy, with the Labor Department revealing that workers left their jobs at a record pace in August, totalling 4.3 million, and about 2.9 percent of the workforce within the bar and restaurant industry, as well as retail staff, quitting in droves. We talk about how the pandemic has revealed the precarious conditions of workers, how this could be seen as a protest, and how this could energize workers towards organizing. Chuck Modiano, justice journalist and sports writer at Deadspin, joins us to talk about the firing of Las Vegas Raiders head coach John Gruden over racist, misogynistic, and homophobic emails, the Tyson Fury vs. Donte Wilder fight, and San Antonio Spurs coach Greg Popovich using his pulpit as an NBA coach to speak out on social justice issues.
Esther Iverem, multidisciplinary author and independent journalist, host of "On The Ground: Voices of Resistance From the Nation's Capital" on Pacifica Radio, and founding member of DC Poets Against the War, joins us to talk about a couple of stories reflective on the state of policing in the country, with the case of Clifford Owensby, a paraplegic man who was pulled out of his car during a search under suspicion of drug possession in Ohio, and four Maryland police officers not being charged after a fatal shooting where the evidence does not exactly fit the officers’ narratives. David Rosen is writer on media, tech, politics and sex whose books include “Sex, Sin & Subversion: The Transformation of 1950s New York’s Forbidden into America’s New Normal” and “Sex Scandal America: Politics & the Ritual of Public Shaming.” His most recent book is "Prohibition New York City: Speakeasy Queen Texas Guinan, Blind Pigs, Drag Balls and More.” He tells us about the growing digital divide in the U.S., why our internet is both so bad and so expensive, how we have fallen so far behind some other countries, how telecom giants are becoming a new cartel, and how community broadband networks could not just fill in gaps big internet providers won’t cover, but also offer an alternative to those companies.James Early, former Director of Cultural Heritage Policy at the Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage at the Smithsonian Institution and board member of the Institute for Policy Studies, joins hosts Michelle Witte and Bob Schlehuber to talk about the looting of cultural artifacts at a global scale after new revelations from the Pandora Papers, how not only collectors, but also recognized elite institutions engage in theft of priceless cultural items, and efforts underway to try to get stolen artifacts returned to their rightful homes.Sean Wilson, National Organizing Director for Dream Corps JUSTICE, talks to us about how hard it can be to access any books in prisons sometimes, what it’s like trying to send books to people in prison, and how administrators engage in arbitrary censorship.
guest: Kathy Kelly
Kathy Kelly, American peace activist and author, joins us to talk about the news that the U.N. Human Rights Council is ending its investigation into war crimes in the conflict in Yemen, in a controversial vote that hints at a rebuke to Western nations. We talk about the significance of this investigation, what it means to be abruptly ended, whether there was any horse-trading in the vote, and what Saudi Arabia gains from this.K.J. Noh, a global justice activist, writer, teacher, and a member of Veterans for Peace, joins us to discuss how the CIA is pivoting to the Asia Pacific theater with the opening of a new mission center that would focus on China, what this means for escalating tensions with the U.S. on the heels of weapons sales to Australia, whether this means that terrorism is no longer the main designated threat for the U.S., and the impact this will have on trade and climate negotiations. Bill Mew, leading digital ethics campaigner and CEO of cyber incident firm The Crisis Team, talks to us about new efforts by the US government to protect pipelines and rail transit systems from cyber attacks, which includes issuing and promising new industry regulations intended to strengthen cyber defense in those industries. We talk about whether these proposed regulations will be enough to stave off a cyberattack on energy infrastructure, and the pushback from the industries themselves. We also talk about the TSA imposing new regulations on high risk railroad and rail transit systems, and what these regulations might be.Mitchell Plitnick, political analyst, writer and president of ReThinking Foreign Policy, joins hosts Michelle Witte and Bob Schlehuber to talk about the Facebook leaks and whistleblower testimony, which revealed a bit of Facebook’s role in US foreign policy, and why a private business would align itself with the US government, as well as CIA interests and talking points. We also talk about the public political fight that unfolded over the Iron Dome funding and whether this represents a significant step forward for the Palestinian rights movement.
Dr. David Schultz, distinguished university professor of political science and legal studies at Hamline University and the author of “Presidential Swing States: Why Only Ten Matter,” joins us to talk about electoral law and proposals that are being floated around as solutions to a dysfunctional system, including fixing existing ambiguities about what it means for a state to “fail to make a choice” on Election Day, too-lenient rules about how objections to votes can be filed, and the role of the vice president in certifying the vote. We also talk about what’s the resistance to reforms, and what it would take to restore confidence in U.S. democracy.Dr. Kenneth Surin, professor emeritus of literature and professor of religion and critical theory at Duke University, tells us about the energy crisis that has gripped Europe after months of rising gas prices, and sudden surge that is threatening to create political havoc both in the countries affected and the EU as a whole. We also talk about disagreements over how the bloc should respond, what EU leaders have presented so far, the response to those proposals, and how not all members want to see far-reaching measures enacted for a crisis they might not be feeling as acutely as their neighbors.Kei Pritsker, journalist with BreakThrough News, joins us to talk about the homelessness problem in both Washington D.C. and the country and how it embodies the reality of our unequal system, the fallout of the scandal at Facebook after the whistleblower revelations, and the intersection between social media, the national security state, and foreign policy. We also talk about the ever shrinking infrastructure bill and what we could end up with after all the horse trading is done. John Kiriakou, co-host of The Backstory on Radio Sputnik, joins us to talk about the case of Zayn al-Abidin Muhammad Husayn, a Palestinian man who is currently held at the US prison at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba after he was captured in Pakistan in 2002, the torture he suffered, and how the CIA admitted after the fact that it had made a mistake.
John Ross, author, economist, and senior fellow of the Chongyang Institute at Renmin University of China, joins us to talk about the ongoing trade war between the U.S. and China, after U.S. Trade Representative Catherine Tai gave a speech at the Center for Strategic and International Studies, which revealed that the Biden administration, despite hinting at extending an olive branch to China, is continuing the confrontational stance and policies of the Trump administration. We also talk about the criticism leveled at China’s economic model, and the effect that tariffs have had on Chinese and American consumers.Jonathan Kuttab, co-founder of the Palestinian human rights group Al-Haq and co-founder of Nonviolence International, tells us about a report revealing that there has been a surge in Jewish settler violence against Palestinians in the occupied West Bank over the past two years, with more cases of anti-Palestinian violence in the first half of 2021 than in all of 2019, and the fight to reinstate the PayPal service to Palestininans in the West Bank and Gaza.Dr. Bill Honigman, retired emergency physician and California state coordinator and healthcare issue team coordinator for Progressive Democrats of America, joins hosts Michelle Witte and Bob Schlehuber to talk about how plans to cover millions of uninsured people and offer dental and vision benefits to people on Medicare in the infrastructure bill are being held hostage by congressional opposition from both Democrats and Republicans to lowering drug prices, reports that hospitals are suffering financially during the pandemic, and how a focus on efficiencies are often mistaken for proper health provision.Femi Ayanbadejo, certified nutritionist, human performance expert, NASA technology transfer partner, and founder and CEO of HealthReel, a digital self-health assessment and education platform, joins us to talk about NFL coach Urban Meyer landing in hot water after being filmed at a sports bar fondling a patron, and the ongoing controversy in the NBA where some players are refusing the vaccine and incurring serious monetary losses.
Guest: John Ross
Jon Jeter, author and two-time Pulitzer Prize finalist, former Washington Post bureau chief and award-winning foreign correspondent, joins us to talk about the ongoing fallout from the revelations in the Pandora Papers. We discuss the details of how these individuals and corporations constitute a global kleptocratic regime, and the people, organizations, and states that help them by operating and sustaining the offshoring industry. We also talk about the effects that these practices have on populations abroad, by siphoning money from the state through tax evasion and increasing precarity and inequality.David Rosen, widely published author whose most recent book is "Prohibition New York City: Speakeasy Queen Texas Guinan, Blind Pigs, Drag Balls and More", and an author of book reviews and popular pieces on media-tech, telecom, politics, sex and American life, joins us to talk ongoing Epstein saga: the status of a fund set up for his victims, how the fund set up to compensate Epstein’s alleged victims has perhaps been falling short, the looming legal woes of Prince Andrew after he reportedly spent time at the Bahamas mansion of fashion designer Peter Nygard, who has now been accused of a number of sex crimes, and the state of Ghislaine Maxwell’s trial. Jacqui Luqman and Sean Blackmon, hosts of By Any Means Necessary on Radio Sputnik, join hosts Michelle Witte and Bob Schlehuber to talk about the undue power vested in the tech giant Facebook, and how the various allegations against it come as no surprise considering the lax regulation on technology companies, whose only goal is to increase their profits. We also talk about the extremely popular show “Squid Game,” the impact of its social critique and what U.S. film and television programs can learn from it. Red Grant, comedian and 2022 mayoral candidate for Washington, DC, talks to us about the experience of transitioning from the arts, culture and community into politics, and the importance of bringing unique perspectives into political dialogue and practice.
Dan Lazare, journalist and writer, joins us to talk about the revelations from the Pandora Papers, totalling between 12 million records from offshore companies, giving a glimpse into the ways the wealthy and powerful move, manage and hide their money. We talk about how this group includes over 330 politicians, 130 Forbes billionaires, members of royal families, and religious leaders, among others, and the implications for figures and governments who claim to be against corruption, but now find themselves enmeshed in this scandal. We also talk about whether these revelations will have a meaningful impact, considering the precedent of the Panama Papers, and whether the Biden administration’s proposed changes to tax regulation will actually curtail offshore tax havens used by companies. Wyatt Reed, Sputnik Radio correspondent, joins us to discuss the revelations from a new report highlighting the lengths Virginia-based Dominion Energy went to make sure their dirty name appeared clean in the press, including how Dominion spent nearly $19 million in lobbying, advertising, market research, political payouts, and membership fees over the last four years, including direct payments to newspaper columnists and academic professors. We also talk about the similarities of this case to others at the national level, and how this is representative of a larger issue of institutionalized corruption. Ted Rall, award-winning political cartoonist, columnist, and author whose latest book is “The Stringer,” joins hosts Michelle Witte and Bob Schlehuber to discuss the fallout of the “60 Minutes” interview with Frances Haugen, a Facebook whistleblower who has revealed that Facebook has been putting profits over the well being of its users for a long time, how its algorithms promote misinformation, and even violence, and how higher-ups in the company turned a blind eye to these issues. We also talk about the bombing in Afghanistan that left many civilians dead in Kabul on Sunday, and the Western media coverage of the incident.
Adriana Garriga López, associate professor of anthropology at Kalamazoo College in Michigan, associate faculty of the Brooklyn Institute for Social Research, anthropologist and multidisciplinary artist, and Esteban Gómez, historian and co-host of the “Plan de Contingencia” podcast, join us to talk about the ongoing energy crisis which has seen hundreds of thousands of citizens affected by rolling power outages throughout weeks, and what role the new private energy company Luma has played in this crisis. We talk about how this is yet another example of disaster capitalism and how public-private partnerships have wreaked havoc for workers and the provision of essential services in the name of profit.Darren Thompson, reporter for Native News Online and Unicorn Riot, and Heather Keeler, member of the Minnesota House of Representatives, join us to talk about the news that the Enbridge Line 3 pipeline is going operational today, despite months-long protests. We also talk about some of the social impacts of projects like these beyond the environmental harm, the documented effects of bringing this kind of work, done this kind of way, into indigenous communities, how resistance will continue against this project, what future actions could look like, and the often overlooked tragedy of missing native women. Sara Dady, immigration attorney and former Democratic congressional candidate for IL-16, joins hosts Michelle Witte and Bob Schlehuber to talk about the intraparty fight among Democrats over the proposed infrastructure bill, which now seems certain to be considerably slimmed down, how this manufactured crisis goes beyond characters like Sinema and Manchin, and how disunity conveniently happens whenever there actual meaningful policy at stake. We also talk about how funding for infrastructure is usually disbursed, whether it actually goes to fund the public good and not deepening the pockets of private contractors, the Biden administration announcing new rules that require authorities to only pursue migrants who recently crossed into the country without permission or are deemed to pose a threat to public safety, the future of DACA, and the long racist history of U.S. immigration policies.
Mark Sleboda, international affairs and security analyst, joins us to talk about the meeting between Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan and Russian President Vladimir Putin in Sochi, as they discuss improving relations between the two countries as rifts between Turkey, NATO and the U.S. continue to widen. We talk about the role the two countries could play in Afghanistan after the U.S. withdrawal, what this could mean for Russia and Turkey in the conflict in Syria.Angela Arias Zapata, educator, researcher, and PhD candidate in media, culture & communication at New York University, talks to us about the political situation in Colombia, where the now 5-year-old peace agreement between the government and the FARC is in peril after missteps by the government in its implementation, ongoing violence against labor and community leaders, and the chances of opposition parties in the next election. Dr. Robert Hockett, Edward Cornell Professor of Law and professor of public policy at Cornell University in New York, senior counsel at Westwood Capital, and fellow of The Century Foundation, talks to us about the dueling infrastructure bills in Congress, why the Democrats can’t seem to unify the party to support the more ambitious one, who and what is behind this opposition to increased public spending beyond red and blue lines, and how parties sometimes support policies in order to just secure power without regard to actual policies that may help or harm citizens of the country.Chris Garaffa, web developer, technologist, and security & privacy consultant, talks to us about Facebook investigation into the “toxic” nature of Instagram on teenagers, Google redesigning its search engine and how this may end up pushing more traffic to Google properties like YouTube, Bill Gates’s claiming naiveté after the House Judiciary subcommittee on antitrust released a report concluding that Amazon, Apple, Facebook and Google hold monopoly power, and the YouTube scandal involving RT-Germany that could see the app banned in Russia.
Nick Davies, independent journalist, a researcher with CODEPINK, and the author of “Blood On Our Hands: The American Invasion and Destruction of Iraq,” joins us to talk about the congressional hearing where national security figures, including Defense Secretary Lloyd Austin and Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Gen. Mark Milley, gave testimony on the withdrawal from Afghanistan, the disagreements over the number of troops to keep in the country, the fog of war, and how the endless War on Terror will go on. Kim Keenan, adjunct professor at George Washington University and former General Counsel of the NAACP, joins us to talk about the verdict in the R. Kelly case, where he was found guilty of racketeering, including acts of bribery and sexual exploitation of a child, along with separate charges of sex trafficking. We talk about why is this ruling so important, how RICO and racketeering charges were used in a unique way in this case, and whether this would set a precedent in prosecuting other sexual abuse cases. Ivan Klepov, head of online at RT-Germany, joins us to discuss the decision of YouTube to delete the accounts of RT channels in Germany over covid misinformation accusations, whether these charges are valid, how Russia could retaliate against the tech giant, and what this means for free expression and freedom of the press.Jim Kavanagh, editor of The Polemicist, joins hosts Bob Schlehuber and Austin Pelli to talk about the real threat of a government shutdown over the Biden infrastructure bills, where the party is having difficulties even garnering support among its members, how a shutdown will guarantee a loss of both houses of Congress and possibly could lead to an impeachment, and the prospects of dropping sanctions against Iran.Nookie Bishop, host of the Digital Gumbo Podcast, talks to us about news that more than 90 percent of N.B.A. players have been vaccinated against COVID-19 and whether the remaining players who are refusing vaccines will play again, and four-time Olympic gold medalist Simone Biles stating that she should have retired before the Tokyo Olympics.
Michelle Witte, co-host of Political Misfits on Radio Sputnik, joins us to discuss the political fallout in Germany after the SPD secured victory in the federal election and upcoming task of building a coalition, as well as plans by Mike Pompeo and Gina Haspel to allegedly kidnap or kill Julian Assange while he was living at the Ecuadorian Embassy in London.Chris Smalls, organizer and former-Amazon warehouse worker, joins us in a discussion of Amazon’s continuing worker suppression and the efforts to fight back, with the National Labor Relations Board set hold a hearing on September 28 to review charges that Amazon illegally retaliated against two of its most outspoken internal critics, and the chilling effects of Amazon’s practices on labor organizing.Dr. Iyabo Obasanjo, professor of public health at the College of William & Mary in Williamsburg, VA, tells us about the New York governor declaring a ‘disaster emergency’ amid a staffing shortage crisis prompted by vaccine resisters, what could be done to overcome these challenges, Pfizer beginning a late-stage trial of its potential COVID-19 pill as a preventive treatment, and how this could work in conjunction with vaccines.Sean Michael Love, founder and editor-in-chief of Black House News, and Nick Cruse, Cofounder of Fred Hampton Leftists and citizen journalist focusing on state violence, the class war, and foreign policy, join us to talk about a New York Times story citing a spike in murders throughout 2020 to make the argument that what the country needs is more police, and the redesign of Monument Avenue in Richmond after the Robert E. Lee statue was taken down.Dr. Robert Epstein, author, editor, longtime psychology researcher and professor, former editor-in-chief of Psychology Today, and current Senior Research Psychologist at the American Institute for Behavioral Research and Technology, joins us to talk about YouTube announcing new restrictions on what is considered “advancing false claims” related to the German elections and how these tech giants could pose a threat to press freedom, and Facebook pausing development of an Instagram Kids service that would be tailored for children 13 years old or younger.
Michelle Witte, co-host of Political Misfits on Radio Sputnik, joins us to talk about the results of the federal elections in Germany, where the Social Democrats won a narrow victory, paving the way for a center-left coalition. We talk about what this coalition building effort may look like, who will become kingmaker, and how the right-wing Alternative for Germany Party lost seats, but still came ahead of the leftist party Die Linke. We also talk about how the Greens have lost influence, and what lies ahead for the party. John Kiriakou, co host of The Backstory on Radio Sputnik, talks to us about how CIA officials during the Trump administration had contemplated either abducting or even assassinating Julian Assange, with Mike Pompeo publicly describing Wikileaks in 2017 as a “non-state hostile intelligence service.” We talk about some of the proposals that, at times, took an outlandish quality, and whether they would have been able to pull any of these off. Dr. Sharon Anderson, attorney and business consultant, former law school professor and lecturer at Howard Law, and the CEO and Founder of KCG Consulting Services, joins us to talk about the Minnesota Supreme Court throwing out the third-degree murder conviction of a former Minneapolis police officer who fatally shot a woman who had called 911 to report a possible rape behind her home, whether this ruling could give former Minneapolis Police Officer Derek Chauvin grounds to appeal his own third-degree murder conviction, and the legal tools to hold police accountable Ray Baker, political analyst and host of the podcast Public Agenda, joins us to talk about the ongoing fight over President Biden’s $3.5 trillion infrastructure deal, how it has become a do-or-die fight that now includes the threat of a government closure if the debt ceiling is not expanded by September 30th. We also talk about how Biden, despite presenting himself as the great uniter of both the Democrats and Republicans, is now struggling to unite his own party, and how some profitable corporations may still pay no taxes under a Democratic proposal.
Maru Mora Vilalpando, founder of La Resistencia, community organizer and immigrant activist, joins us to talk about the ongoing Haitian refugee crisis in the southern border, where thousands of asylum seekers have been deported to their home country without a hearing, how the Biden administration’s immigration policies have not differed substantially from the Trump administration, what impact could the resignation of the special envoy to Haiti over the the treatment of migrants could have on policy, and reports that some migrants could be transferred to the Guantanamo Bay prison.Michelle Witte, co-host of Political Misfits on Radio Sputnik, talks to us about the upcoming German federal election, with the CDU lagging in the polls, how Germans may not only say goodbye to Merkel, but maybe to the CDU in power all together. We also talk about the other parties making headway in the polls, and the possibility of the Social Democrats forming a leftist coalition with the Greens and the far-left Die Linke. Dr. Avi Loeb, the Frank B. Baird, Jr. Professor of Science at Harvard University, former chair of the Department of Astronomy, founding director of the Black Hole Initiative, director of the Institute for Theory and Computation, and bestselling author, joins us to talk about the ways in which the interstellar object ‘Oumuamua has spurred a more serious search for extraterrestrial life or artifacts, the debate that it has engendered among the scientific community, and the importance of keeping an open mind to new discoveries and sometimes bucking orthodoxy in the search of knowledge. Ron Placone, comedian and host of "Get Your News On With Ron," talks to us about a veteran disrupting a speaking event by former president George W. Bush over his legacy in the Iraq and Afghanistan wars, and the newest Facebook scandal, which saw its Chief Technology Officer Mike Schroepfer resign after documents leaked by a whistleblower revealed grave content moderation failures at the company and suggested it routinely buried internal research if the findings proved negative.
Mohammad Marandi, professor of English literature and Orientalism at the University of Tehran, joins us to talk about the obstacles for the U.S. and Iran entering into negotiations to revive the nuclear deal, President Biden hinting at the possibility of restarting talks, how the U.S. is putting the onus of responsibility on Iran despite the fact that Iran followed the letter of the deal even after the U.S. balked, how Iran’s new president could negotiate with the U.S., and what impact the withdrawal from Afghanistan could have in the relations between the two countries.Garland Nixon, co-host of The Critical Hour on Radio Sputnik and host of News Views with Garland Nixon on WPFW, talks to us about civil asset forfeiture and how this enables law enforcement to basically steal property from citizens in this country to the tune of $68.8 billion since the year 2000. We also talk about how, in many cases, these seizures are not related to any criminal activity, and how they have also become a roundabout way to fund law enforcement departments, which in turn encourages the continuation of these practices. Afeni, member of Freedom Fighters DC and abolitionist in training, and Jamal Muhammad, host of the Luv Lounge radio show and the Old School Lunch Bag Mix on Square 1 radio, talks to us about the nonstop coverage of the tragic death of Gabby Petito, why it has garnered national attention, and how black and brown victims in similar cases do not receive the same coverage. We also talk about the importance of protecting public spaces in cities, and how gentrification can imperil spaces for civic connection between its citizens. Dr. Gene Olinger, professor at Boston University, principal science advisor for MRI Global Inc., and a recipient of the NIH Director Award, talks to us about the deliberations between agencies and the public regarding vaccines and booster shots, how the messaging and policies have not been entirely clear, the decision to authorize shots for people 65 and over, and predictions that the pandemic could be over by next year.
Kim Keenan, adjunct professor at George Washington University and former General Counsel of the NAACP, joins us to discuss developments in the ongoing fraud case against Theranos founder Elizabeth Holmes. We talk about the details of the charges and how the company’s claims to revolutionize blood testing drew investors that included many important political figures and ended up being a empty shell, the defense that Holmes is putting up claiming abuse, whether this will be effective in court, and how this case connects to Silicon Valley techno-utopian culture. Dr. Yolandra Hancock, board-certified pediatrician and obesity medicine specialist, talks to us about the future of healthcare provision, how telehealth has changed the way Americans access medical treatment over the course of the pandemic, and whether these changes should - and will - be made permanent. We also talk about the limitations of virtual health consultations and treatment, how unequal access to technology can affect the quality of healthcare that people receive. David Swanson, activist, journalist, radio host and author of the book "Curing Exceptionalism," talks to us about Joe Biden’s and Xi Jinping’s speeches at the United Nations General Assembly, how they differed from each other in tone and substance, and whether we will see an attempt at cooperation or continuing escalations between the two countries, in light of recent U.S. weapons sales in the Asia region. We also talk about new developments in the allegations about the so-called Havana syndrome, with new claims coming out from intelligence officials traveling abroad, the unanimous passage of the Havana Act in Congress, and how the allegations of directed energy attacks have been accepted as fact despite the mysterious nature of these cases. Justin Williams, co-host of Redspin Sports, talks to us about NFL rule change proposals for 2021, taunting during games being penalized, new contract proposals by U.S. Soccer and the fight for pay equity, and the fight of Philadelphia 76ers All-Star forward Ben Simmons against management regarding his contract.
Dan Kovalik, author and human rights and labor lawyer, talks to us about the intersection of labor and climate change, and how extreme weather is affecting the U.S. where workers are forced to work in dangerous and unhealthy conditions. We also talk about how empowering federal oversight agencies and worker unionization could alleviate working conditions and work in tandem with other policies to mitigate the effects of climate change.China Dickerson, political strategist and National Political Director for Forward Majority, talks to us about news that U.S. Supreme Court will hear oral arguments in a major abortion case that could ultimately cut off abortion access in dozens of states, what this means for reproductive rights, the intersection between culture, religion and white supremacy in these decisions, and how these restrictions will particularly harm black and brown communities.Dr. Sheila Vakharia, deputy director of research and academic engagement for the Drug Policy Alliance, joins us to talk about how the Biden administration is trying to reach a middle ground on how to confront the opioid epidemic and drawing fire in the process from across the ideological spectrum, and how harm reduction approaches to the epidemic will yield better results than another drug war.Kristine Hendrix, member of the board for Second Chances, which deals with incarcerated individuals and those recently released, contributor to the Truth-Telling Project and "We Stay Woke" podcast, and treasurer for Carla Coffee Wright for U.S. Senate, talks to us about cities implementing universal basic income programs and whether they are enough to keep people out of poverty, vaccine mandates, and the impact of COVID-19 on child care workers and the children they look over.Pam McKinnon, theater director, artistic director for the American Conservatory Theater, and executive board member of Stage Directors and Choreographers, talks to us about the play “Toni Stone”, about first woman to play baseball in the Negro Leagues, the first woman to play professionally in a men’s league, and the importance of telling these often neglected stories.
loading
Comments (7)

Rick Bettencourt

outstanding program

Apr 27th
Reply

Bob Bennett

outstanding program

Jan 18th
Reply

R U Poed

Jamal on point. Democrats run as who they're Not and Republicans run as who they unapologetically are. This is why the overton window has been dragged so far to the right.

May 12th
Reply

Rick Bettencourt

Outstanding!

May 1st
Reply

Rick Bettencourt

Excellent Program

May 1st
Reply

Rick Bettencourt

A Truly Outstanding Program

Mar 30th
Reply

R U Poed

Great debate with China

Mar 29th
Reply
Download from Google Play
Download from App Store