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In today's episode, I’m covering the conventions of the crime genre. This includes the character roles, settings, and events that need to be present in a crime story in order for it to work and satisfy fans of the genre. Here’s a preview of what’s included: [01:30] Crime stories are all about the quest to either solve or commit a crime. So, these stories start with a crime, build with an investigation (or a completion of the crime), and end with identifying and bringing the criminal to justice (or not).[05:15] 1. There’s a crime with at least one victim that launches the investigation.[06:15] 2. The protagonist is intelligent and determined to solve the crime. [08:15] 3. There’s an equally smart or crafty antagonist who seems to be a step ahead of the protagonist the whole time.[09:15] 4. There is a closed circle of suspects, each with a credible motive and a reasonable opportunity to commit the crime.[10:30] 5. There’s a MacGuffin (or a very specific thing the antagonist wants).[11:30] 6. A sidekick character who acts as a sounding board for the protagonist.[12:25] 7. There are clues and red herrings that help (or hurt) the investigation.[13:40] 8. There’s a ticking clock by which the protagonist must solve the crime.[14:37] 9. There’s a speech in praise of the antagonist that shows their brilliance.[15:48] 10. There’s at least one shapeshifter character.[16:42] Key points and episode recapRate + Review + Follow on Apple Podcasts"I love the Fiction Writing Made Easy podcast!" ← If that sounds like you, please consider rating and reviewing this show! Your rating and review will help other writers find this podcast, and they're also super fun for me to go in and read. Just click here, scroll all the way to the bottom, tap five stars to rate the show, and then select "Write a Review." Be sure to let me know what your favorite part of the episode was, too! Also, if you haven't done so already, make sure you're following the podcast! I'll be adding a bunch of bonus episodes to the feed, and if you're not following the show, there's a good chance you'll miss them. Click here to follow now!Links mentioned in this episode:Episode Freebie: Crime Genre Cheat SheetThe 6 Key Scenes Every Crime Story Needs (article)What are Obligatory Scenes and Conventions? (article)Understanding Genre: How to Write Better Stories (article)P.S. Did you know that I have a Facebook group just for fiction writers? In this private group, we talk about all things writing, editing, and publishing fiction. It's free to join and you can request access here. Hope to see you there!
In today's episode, I’m covering the difference between writing in scene versus writing in summary. Here’s a preview of what’s included:[01:45] Scenes are concrete moments that unfold in real time. Readers “watch” the characters move across the setting, interact with other characters or the setting, and speak as if everything’s taking place in the real world, in real time.[02:55] Summaries happen over a condensed period of time (days, months, years, etc.). They convey ideas, concepts, and information rather than create specific experiences that a character (and readers) are “living through” in that moment.[04:20] An example from Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone by J.K. Rowling[07:30] An example from Sharp Objects by Gillian Flynn (trigger warning: a dead body)[10:55] Top 3 guidelines for when you should write in scene[12:20] Top three guidelines for when you should write in summary[16:15] Do not get hung up on this when writing your first draft! Your main job when writing a first draft is to get to THE END–worry about scene vs. summary later.[16:45] Key points and episode recapRate + Review + Follow on Apple Podcasts"I love the Fiction Writing Made Easy podcast!" ← If that sounds like you, please consider rating and reviewing this show! Your rating and review will help other writers find this podcast, and they're also super fun for me to go in and read. Just click here, scroll all the way to the bottom, tap five stars to rate the show, and then select "Write a Review." Be sure to let me know what your favorite part of the episode was, too! Also, if you haven't done so already, make sure you're following the podcast! I'll be adding a bunch of bonus episodes to the feed, and if you're not following the show, there's a good chance you'll miss them. Click here to follow now!Links mentioned in this episode:Ep. 40 - How to Write a Well-Structured Scene (article)How to Write Better Scenes (workshop)P.S. Did you know that I have a Facebook group just for fiction writers? In this private group, we talk about all things writing, editing, and publishing fiction. It's free to join and you can request access here. Hope to see you there!
In today's episode, we’re going to talk about how to edit your messy first draft without slipping into overwhelm. Here’s a preview of what’s included: [01:50] The very first thing you should do when you finish a first draft [04:15] A quick overview of the four editing phases, and how breaking your edits down into these phases will help you reduce overwhelm.[05:45] Phase 1: The “Story Level” edit[09:25] Phase 2: The “Scene Level edit”[13:35] How your editing plan might change depending on your publishing goals[14:30] Phase 3: The “Page Level edit”[16:20] Phase 4: The “Sentence Level edit”[19:35] My answer to writers who ask me, “Can I do these phases out of order?” (spoiler alert: my answer is almost always no)[20:00] FAQ: Is there a way to go through all four phases faster?[20:45] Key points and episode recapRate + Review + Follow on Apple Podcasts"I love the Fiction Writing Made Easy podcast!" ← If that sounds like you, please consider rating and reviewing this show! Your rating and review will help other writers find this podcast, and they're also super fun for me to go in and read. Just click here, scroll all the way to the bottom, tap five stars to rate the show, and then select "Write a Review." Be sure to let me know what your favorite part of the episode was, too! Also, if you haven't done so already, make sure you're following the podcast! I'll be adding a bunch of bonus episodes to the feed, and if you're not following the show, there's a good chance you'll miss them. Click here to follow now!Links mentioned in this episode:Episode Freebie: Your Next Steps DIY Editing ChecklistThe Spun Yarn Beta Reading ServiceProWritingAidHemingway EditorGrammarlyGrammar Girl’s Quick and Dirty TipsP.S. Did you know that I have a Facebook group just for fiction writers? In this private group, we talk about all things writing, editing, and publishing fiction. It's free to join and you can request access here. Hope to see you there!
In today's episode, I’m covering the key scenes that every morality story needs. I’ve also included examples of how they show up in the movie Flight. Here’s a preview of what’s included: [01:45] Morality stories center around a protagonist with a moral compass that’s about to change, for better or for worse. They’re either seeking redemption from past mistakes or they want to silence their inner conscience so they can keep doing selfish things.[03:00] Readers choose these types of stories because they want to see what another person will do when given the choice to act selfishly or altruistically. Will they make the “right” choice? Or the “wrong” one?[05:15] Key Scene #1: The protagonist faces an opportunity or challenge to be selfless[06:05] Key Scene #2: The protagonist commits to doing nothing about the greater need (and may even move in the opposite direction)[07:30] Key Scene #3: The protagonist learns what the antagonist wants and why, and the greater external need is starting to become uncomfortable[08:40] Key Scene #4: The protagonist reaches an all-is-lost moment where it seems like their selfish ways will no longer work[09:35] Key Scene #5: The protagonist either sacrifices something in service of an individual, or they decide once and for all to maintain their selfish way of being[11:00] Key Scene #6: The protagonist is either rewarded with forgiveness, or they’re punished for sticking to their selfish ways[12:15] Key points and episode recap.Rate + Review + Follow on Apple Podcasts"I love the Fiction Writing Made Easy podcast!" ← If that sounds like you, please consider rating and reviewing this show! Your rating and review will help other writers find this podcast, and they're also super fun for me to go in and read. Just click here, scroll all the way to the bottom, tap five stars to rate the show, and then select "Write a Review." Be sure to let me know what your favorite part of the episode was, too! Also, if you haven't done so already, make sure you're following the podcast! I'll be adding a bunch of bonus episodes to the feed, and if you're not following the show, there's a good chance you'll miss them. Click here to follow now!Links mentioned in this episode:Episode Freebie: Morality Genre Cheat SheetEp. 2 - How to Choose the Right Genre for Your Story (article)What are Obligatory Scenes and Conventions? (article)P.S. Did you know that I have a Facebook group just for fiction writers? In this private group, we talk about all things writing, editing, and publishing fiction. It's free to join and you can request access here. Hope to see you there!
In today's episode, I’m sitting down with Stefanie Medrek to talk through her incredibly inspiring story of how she went from having an idea for a story to landing an agent. Here’s a preview of what’s included: [05:00] The exact moment Stefanie had the idea for her story—and how she just knew it wouldn’t let her go until she put pen to paper[08:00] A quick description of Stefanie’s story[09:35] Stefanie’s initial reaction to my advice to throw out all 40,000 of the words she had written, and what happened when she did[12:00] A few of the key takeaways Stefanie learned from re-writing her first draft[15:00] What the editing process was like (and how long it took)[17:35] How and when Stefanie knew she was ready to start querying[19:00] Stefanie’s reaction to getting a heart on her #PitMad pitch (IYKYK)[22:30] The moment Stefanie almost gave up on writing… and then got a call from her (now) agent an hour later[25:00] How having a fleshed out outline helped Stefanie avoid spiraling into overwhelm[27:00] What happened when Stefanie got the offer of representation[28:00] What it was like to get feedback (and suggested changes) from her agent[30:00] A quick look into what writing book two looks like[34:00] Stefanie’s thoughts on 1:1 coaching vs. the Notes to Novel course[38:00] Final words of wisdom and advice from StefanieRate + Review + Follow on Apple Podcasts"I love the Fiction Writing Made Easy podcast!" ← If that sounds like you, please consider rating and reviewing this show! Your rating and review will help other writers find this podcast, and they're also super fun for me to go in and read. Just click here, scroll all the way to the bottom, tap five stars to rate the show, and then select "Write a Review." Be sure to let me know what your favorite part of the episode was, too! Also, if you haven't done so already, make sure you're following the podcast! I'll be adding a bunch of bonus episodes to the feed, and if you're not following the show, there's a good chance you'll miss them. Click here to follow now!Links mentioned in this episode:Stefanie Medrek’s websiteFollow Stefanie on InstagramThe doors to my Notes to Novel course are closing for the rest of 2022 very soon! If you want my proven roadmap for writing a first draft that works, click here to enroll so that you can get started today!Click here to sign up for my FREE TRAINING: The 5 Little-Known Mistakes Most Writers Make (& What to Do Instead)P.S. Did you know that I have a Facebook group just for fiction writers? In this private group, we talk about all things writing, editing, and publishing fiction. It's free to join and you can request access here. Hope to see you there!
In today's episode, I'm going to walk you through the conventions of the status genre. I'm also going to show you how these conventions show up in the movie The Devil Wears Prada. Here's a preview of what's included:[01:45] Status stories center around the protagonist’s inner need for respect that manifests as a specific desire to achieve or accomplish something in the external world.[02:55] Readers of status stories want to feel hopeful that the protagonist will succeed. They want to read about someone who works hard to improve their situation–and they want to feel a sense of triumph when that person succeeds.[05:15] 1- The protagonist wants to gain respect, but what they need is self-esteem.[06:05] 2- The antagonist opposes the protagonist and threatens their position.[07:00] 3- There is a clear (and specific) definition of what it means to be successful.[08:15] 4- The setting is public; people will witness the protagonist's success or failure.[09:10] 5- At least one social problem or moral challenge for the protagonist to face.[10:05] 6- At least one foil character who demonstrates a different path to success.[10:40] 7- At least one mentor figure who guides the protagonist, for better or for worse.[11:35] 8- At least one shapeshifter character who hinders the protagonist’s progress.[12:15] 9- The protagonist must overcome an inner obstacle related to success.[13:25] 10- The ending of a status story is usually bittersweet.[14:30] Key points and episode recap.Rate + Review + Follow on Apple Podcasts"I love the Fiction Writing Made Easy podcast!" ← If that sounds like you, please consider rating and reviewing this show! Your rating and review will help other writers find this podcast, and they're also super fun for me to go in and read. Just click here, scroll all the way to the bottom, tap five stars to rate the show, and then select "Write a Review." Be sure to let me know what your favorite part of the episode was, too! Also, if you haven't done so already, make sure you're following the podcast! I'll be adding a bunch of bonus episodes to the feed, and if you're not following the show, there's a good chance you'll miss them. Click here to follow now!Links mentioned in this episode:Episode Freebie: Status Genre Conventions PDF Cheat SheetConventions vs. tropes: What's the difference? (podcast and article)P.S. Did you know that I have a Facebook group just for fiction writers? In this private group, we talk about all things writing, editing, and publishing fiction. It's free to join and you can request access here. Hope to see you there!
In this episode, we're taking a deep dive into the first chapter of Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows by J.K. Rowling. Join me and fellow developmental editor, Abigail Perry, as we nerd out about the seventh book in the Harry Potter series.Here’s a preview of what we talk about:[07:45] A very quick summary of the first chapter[11:40] A macro analysis of the first chapter using 7 key questions from Paula Munier's book The Writer’s Guide to Beginnings[43:30] A micro analysis of the two scenes within the chapter using the "5 Commandments of Storytelling" from The Story Grid[54:00] Final thoughts and episode recapRate + Review + Follow on Apple Podcasts"I love the Fiction Writing Made Easy podcast!" ← If that sounds like you, please consider rating and reviewing this show! Your rating and review will help other writers find this podcast, and they're also super fun for me to go in and read. Just click here, scroll all the way to the bottom, tap five stars to rate the show, and then select "Write a Review." Be sure to let me know what your favorite part of the episode was, too! Also, if you haven't done so already, make sure you're following the podcast! I'll be adding a bunch of bonus episodes to the feed, and if you're not following the show, there's a good chance you'll miss them. Click here to follow now!Links mentioned in this episode:Click here to check out the LitMatch Podcast with Abigail Perry! You can also get in touch with Abigail through her website or on Instagram @abigailkperry.Ep. 59 - First Chapter Analysis: Harry Potter & the Sorcerer's StoneEp. 60 - First Chapter Analysis: Harry Potter & the Chamber of SecretsEp. 61 - First Chapter Analysis: Harry Potter & the Prisoner of AzkabanEp. 64 - First Chapter Analysis: Harry Potter & the Goblet of FireEp. 66 - First Chapter Analysis: Harry Potter & the Order of the PhoenixEp. 69 - First Chapter Analysis: Harry Potter & the Half Blood PrinceClick here to join our book club! Book Notes is a virtual book club for writers who want to read good books and then deconstruct them to figure out how and why they work. First up: UGLY LOVE by Colleen Hoover!P.S. Did you know that I have a Facebook group just for fiction writers? In this private group, we talk about all things writing, editing, and publishing fiction. It's free to join, and you can click here to request access!
In this episode, we're taking a deep dive into the first chapter of Harry Potter and the Half Blood Prince by J.K. Rowling. Join me and fellow developmental editor, Abigail Perry, as we nerd out about the sixth book in the Harry Potter series–here’s a preview of what we talk about:[05:45] A very quick summary of the first chapter[07:15] A macro analysis of the first chapter using 7 key questions from Paula Munier's book The Writer’s Guide to Beginnings[13:45] A micro analysis of the two scenes within the chapter using the "5 Commandments of Storytelling" from The Story Grid[57:25] Final thoughts and episode recapRate + Review + Follow on Apple Podcasts"I love the Fiction Writing Made Easy podcast!" ← If that sounds like you, please consider rating and reviewing this show! Your rating and review will help other writers find this podcast, and they're also super fun for me to go in and read. Just click here, scroll all the way to the bottom, tap five stars to rate the show, and then select "Write a Review." Be sure to let me know what your favorite part of the episode was, too! Also, if you haven't done so already, make sure you're following the podcast! I'll be adding a bunch of bonus episodes to the feed, and if you're not following the show, there's a good chance you'll miss them. Click here to follow now!Links mentioned in this episode:Click here to check out the LitMatch Podcast with Abigail Perry! You can also get in touch with Abigail through her website or on Instagram @abigailkperry.Ep. 59 - First Chapter Analysis: Harry Potter & the Sorcerer's StoneEp. 60 - First Chapter Analysis: Harry Potter & the Chamber of SecretsEp. 61 - First Chapter Analysis: Harry Potter & the Prisoner of AzkabanEp. 64 - First Chapter Analysis: Harry Potter & the Goblet of FireEp. 66 - First Chapter Analysis: Harry Potter & the Order of the PhoenixWorkshop: How to Write Compelling and Well-Structured ScenesP.S. Did you know that I have a Facebook group just for fiction writers? In this private group, we talk about all things writing, editing, and publishing fiction. It's free to join, and you can click here to request access!
In today’s episode, I’m going to walk you through the pros and cons of indie publishing. Here’s a preview of what you’ll hear in the episode:[01:30] Indie publishing is the pure do-it-yourself publishing path. It's where you, the author, take on ALL the roles of and basically become the publisher of your own book.[02:30] The pros of indie publishing[08:20] The cons of indie publishing[13:20] Final thoughts and episode recapRate + Review + Follow on Apple Podcasts"I love the Fiction Writing Made Easy podcast!" ← If that sounds like you, please consider rating and reviewing this show! Your rating and review will help other writers find this podcast, and they're also super fun for me to go in and read. Just click here, scroll all the way to the bottom, tap five stars to rate the show, and then select "Write a Review." Be sure to let me know what your favorite part of the episode was, too! Also, if you haven't done so already, make sure you're following the podcast! I'll be adding a bunch of bonus episodes to the feed, and if you're not following the show, there's a good chance you'll miss them. Click here to follow now!Links mentioned in this episode:Episode Freebie: How to Pick Your Publishing Path WorksheetEp. 66 - The Pros and Cons of Traditional PublishingThe Alliance of Independent Authors (ALLi)ALLi’s resource that’s all about choosing a self-publishing service that’s written by authors and full of unbiased advice.Indie Publishing Resources: IngramSpark and CreatespaceJane Friedman’s downloadable publishing chart that gives a wider look at the different publishing options available. Writer Beware has a lot of information about scams against authors and companies to watch out for. Preditors and Editors, which is a watchdog site for authors with listings of which publishers are recommended and which are scams. P.S. Did you know that I have a Facebook group just for fiction writers? In this private group, we talk about all things writing, editing, and publishing fiction. It's free to join, and you can click here to request access!
In today’s episode, I’m going to walk you through the pros and cons of traditional publishing. Here’s a preview of what you’ll hear in the episode:[01:35] Traditional publishing refers to the established system of submitting a finished manuscript to agents with the goal of getting a book deal with one of the Big Five publishers.[03:00] The pros of traditional publishing[08:45] The cons of traditional publishing[15:20] Final thoughts and episode recapRate + Review + Follow on Apple Podcasts"I love the Fiction Writing Made Easy podcast!" ← If that sounds like you, please consider rating and reviewing this show! Your rating and review will help other writers find this podcast, and they're also super fun for me to go in and read. Just click here, scroll all the way to the bottom, tap five stars to rate the show, and then select "Write a Review." Be sure to let me know what your favorite part of the episode was, too! Also, if you haven't done so already, make sure you're following the podcast! I'll be adding a bunch of bonus episodes to the feed, and if you're not following the show, there's a good chance you'll miss them. Click here to follow now!Links mentioned in this episode:Episode Freebie: How to Pick Your Publishing Path WorksheetIndie Publishing Resources: IngramSpark and CreatespaceJane Friedman’s downloadable publishing chart that gives a wider look at the different publishing options available. Writer Beware has a lot of information about scams against authors and companies to watch out for. Preditors and Editors, which is a watchdog site for authors with listings of which publishers are recommended and which are scams. P.S. Did you know that I have a Facebook group just for fiction writers? In this private group, we talk about all things writing, editing, and publishing fiction. It's free to join, and you can click here to request access!
In this episode, we're taking a deep dive into the first chapter of Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix by J.K. Rowling. Join me and fellow developmental editor, Abigail Perry, as we nerd out about the fifth book in the Harry Potter series![03:40] A very quick summary of the first chapter[06:25] A macro analysis of the first chapter using 7 key questions from Paula Munier's book The Writer’s Guide to Beginnings[25:00] A micro analysis of the two scenes within the chapter using the "5 Commandments of Storytelling" from The Story Grid[57:00] Final thoughts and episode recapRate + Review + Follow on Apple Podcasts"I love the Fiction Writing Made Easy podcast!" ← If that sounds like you, please consider rating and reviewing this show! Your rating and review will help other writers find this podcast, and they're also super fun for me to go in and read. Just click here, scroll all the way to the bottom, tap five stars to rate the show, and then select "Write a Review." Be sure to let me know what your favorite part of the episode was, too! Also, if you haven't done so already, make sure you're following the podcast! I'll be adding a bunch of bonus episodes to the feed, and if you're not following the show, there's a good chance you'll miss them. Click here to follow now!Links mentioned in this episode:Click here to check out the LitMatch Podcast with Abigail Perry! You can also get in touch with Abigail through her website or on Instagram @abigailkperry.Ep. 59 - First Chapter Analysis: Harry Potter & the Sorcerer's StoneEp. 60 - First Chapter Analysis: Harry Potter & the Chamber of SecretsEp. 61 - First Chapter Analysis: Harry Potter & the Prisoner of AzkabanEp. 64 - First Chapter Analysis: Harry Potter & the Goblet of FireWorkshop: How to Write Compelling and Well-Structured ScenesP.S. Did you know that I have a Facebook group just for fiction writers? In this private group, we talk about all things writing, editing, and publishing fiction. It's free to join, and you can click here to request access!
In this episode, we're taking a deep dive into the first chapter of Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire by J.K. Rowling. Join me and fellow developmental editor, Abigail Perry, as we nerd out about the fourth book in the Harry Potter series:[03:05] A very quick summary of the first chapter[05:50] A macro analysis of the first chapter using 7 key questions from Paula Munier's book The Writer’s Guide to Beginnings[20:30] A micro analysis of the two scenes within the chapter using the "5 Commandments of Storytelling" from The Story Grid[38:50] Final thoughts and episode recapSubscribe & Review in Apple PodcastsAre you subscribed to my podcast? If you’re not, I want to encourage you to do that today. I don’t want you to miss an episode! Especially because I’m adding a bunch of bonus episodes to the mix, and if you’re not subscribed, there’s a good chance you’ll miss out on those. So, click here to subscribe to the show on Apple Podcasts!If you're already a subscriber, and if you enjoy the show, I would be really grateful if you left a review over on Apple Podcasts, too. Those reviews help other writers find my podcast, and they’re also super fun for me to go in and read. Just click here to review, select “Ratings and Reviews” and “Write a Review,” and let me know what your favorite part of the show is. Thanks in advance!Links mentioned in this episode:Click here to check out the LitMatch Podcast with Abigail Perry! You can also get in touch with Abigail through her website (www.abigailkperry.com) or you can find her on Instagram @abigailkperry.Ep. 59 - First Chapter Analysis: Harry Potter & the Sorcerer's StoneEp. 60 - First Chapter Analysis: Harry Potter & the Chamber of SecretsEp. 61 - First Chapter Analysis: Harry Potter & the Prisoner of AzkabanWorkshop: How to Write Compelling and Well-Structured ScenesP.S. Did you know that I have a Facebook group just for fiction writers? In this private group, we talk about all things writing, editing, and publishing fiction. It's free to join, and you can click here to request access!
In this episode, I'm sharing the three contextual elements you'll want to include at the beginning of each one of your scenes. We'll also look at how these three elements show up in the opening of a scene from the novel An Ember in the Ashes by Sabaa Tahir. Here's a preview of the key points:[03:10] Key element #1: Where and when is this scene taking place?[04:35] Key element #2: What is your POV character's mental and emotional state?[08:55] Key element #3: What is your POV character's goal and motivation?[17:35] Final thoughts and episode recapSubscribe & Review in Apple PodcastsAre you subscribed to my podcast? If you’re not, I want to encourage you to do that today. I don’t want you to miss an episode! Especially because I’m adding a bunch of bonus episodes to the mix, and if you’re not subscribed, there’s a good chance you’ll miss out on those. So, click here to subscribe to the show on Apple Podcasts!If you're already a subscriber, and if you enjoy the show, I would be really grateful if you left a review over on Apple Podcasts, too. Those reviews help other writers find my podcast, and they’re also super fun for me to go in and read. Just click here to review, select “Ratings and Reviews” and “Write a Review,” and let me know what your favorite part of the show is. Thanks in advance!Links mentioned in this episode:Ep. 40 - How to Write a Well-Structured SceneBook: An Ember in the Ashes by Sabaa TahirP.S. Did you know that I have a Facebook group just for fiction writers? In this private group, we talk about all things writing, editing, and publishing fiction. It's free to join, and you can click here to request access!
In today's episode, we're going to talk about the key scenes that every crime story needs to have in order to work and to satisfy fans of the genre. Here's a preview of what's included:[01:15] Crime stories are all about the quest to either solve or commit a crime. So, these stories start with a crime, build with an investigation (or a completion of the crime), and end with identifying and bringing the criminal to justice (or not).[02:15] Readers choose crime fiction because they want to follow the trail of clues, make meaning of those clues, and figure out the puzzle right alongside the protagonist. They want to see the wrongs righted, and they want to see justice prevail.[03:05] Obligatory scenes are the key events, decisions, and discoveries that move a protagonist along their journey from point A to point B. They help us writers craft a story that works AND a story that will deliver a specific emotional experience.[04:35] Key scene #1: The protagonist discovers a crime that’s indicative of a master antagonist.[05:55] Key scene #2: The stakes become personal to the protagonist, and they commit to figuring out what’s going on so they can bring the antagonist to justice. [07:10] Key scene #3: The protagonist learns more about what the antagonist wants and why. This raises the stakes, and the clock starts ticking.[08:40] Key scene #4: The protagonist reaches an all-is-lost moment where they realize they’ve come to the wrong conclusion or they’ve been pursuing the wrong person. [10:05] Key scene #5: The protagonist exposes the true criminal in the big climactic moment and unravels all the antagonist’s motives and plans.[11:40] Key scene #6: The protagonist brings the antagonist to justice (or not).[12:55] Key points and episode recap.Subscribe & Review in Apple PodcastsAre you subscribed to my podcast? If you’re not, I want to encourage you to do that today. I don’t want you to miss an episode! Especially because I’m adding a bunch of bonus episodes to the mix, and if you’re not subscribed, there’s a good chance you’ll miss out on those. So, click here to subscribe to the show on Apple Podcasts!If you're already a subscriber, and if you enjoy the show, I would be really grateful if you left a review over on Apple Podcasts, too. Those reviews help other writers find my podcast, and they’re also super fun for me to go in and read. Just click here to review, select “Ratings and Reviews” and “Write a Review,” and let me know what your favorite part of the show is. Thanks in advance!Links mentioned in this episode:Episode Freebie: Crime Genre Key Scenes PDF Cheat SheetP.S. Did you know that I have a Facebook group just for fiction writers? In this private group, we talk about all things writing, editing, and publishing fiction. It's free to join, and you can click here to request access!
In this episode, we're taking a deep dive into the first chapter of Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban by J.K. Rowling. Join me and fellow developmental editor, Abigail Perry, as we nerd out about the third book in the Harry Potter series:[03:00] A very quick summary of the first chapter[04:50] A macro analysis of the first chapter using 7 key questions from Paula Munier's book The Writer’s Guide to Beginnings [21:00] A micro analysis of the two scenes within the chapter using the "5 Commandments of Storytelling" from The Story Grid[40:00] Final thoughts and episode recapFollow & Review in Apple PodcastsAre you following my podcast? If not, I want to encourage you to do that today so that you don't miss an episode! Especially because I’m adding a bunch of bonus episodes to the mix and if you’re not following the show, there’s a good chance you’ll miss out on those. So, click here to follow this show in Apple Podcasts!If you're already a follower, and if you enjoy the show, I would be really grateful if you left a review over on Apple Podcasts, too. These reviews help other writers find my podcast and they’re also super fun for me to go in and read. Just click here to review, select “Ratings and Reviews” and “Write a Review” and let me know what your favorite part of the show is. Thanks in advance!Links mentioned in this episode:Click here to check out the LitMatch Podcast with Abigail Perry! You can also get in touch with Abigail through her website (www.abigailkperry.com) or you can find her on Instagram @abigailkperry.Ep. 59 - First Chapter Analysis: Harry Potter & the Sorcerer's StoneEp. 60 - First Chapter Analysis: Harry Potter & the Chamber of SecretsEp. 40 - How to Write a Well-Structured SceneWorkshop: How to Write Compelling and Well-Structured Scenes
In this episode, we're taking a deep dive into the first chapter of Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets by J.K. Rowling. Join me and fellow developmental editor, Abigail Perry, as we nerd out about the second book in the Harry Potter series:[03:30] A very quick summary of the first chapter[05:30] A macro analysis of the first chapter using 7 key questions from Paula Munier's book The Writer’s Guide to Beginnings [25:00] A micro analysis of the two scenes within the chapter using the "5 Commandments of Storytelling" from The Story Grid[46:00] Final thoughts and episode recapFollow & Review in Apple PodcastsAre you following my podcast? If not, I want to encourage you to do that today so that you don't miss an episode! Especially because I’m adding a bunch of bonus episodes to the mix and if you’re not following the show, there’s a good chance you’ll miss out on those. So, click here to follow this show in Apple Podcasts!If you're already a follower, and if you enjoy the show, I would be really grateful if you left a review over on Apple Podcasts, too. These reviews help other writers find my podcast and they’re also super fun for me to go in and read. Just click here to review, select “Ratings and Reviews” and “Write a Review” and let me know what your favorite part of the show is. Thanks in advance!Links mentioned in this episode:Click here to check out the LitMatch Podcast with Abigail Perry! You can also get in touch with Abigail through her website (www.abigailkperry.com), or you can find her on Instagram @abigailkperry.Ep. 59 - First Chapter Analysis: Harry Potter & the Sorcerer's StoneEp. 40 - How to Write a Well-Structured SceneWorkshop: How to Write Compelling and Well-Structured Scenes
In this episode, we're taking a deep dive into the first chapter of Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone by J.K. Rowling. Join me and fellow developmental editor, Abigail Perry, as we nerd out about the first book in the Harry Potter series:[04:30] A very quick summary of the first chapter[07:00] A macro analysis of the first chapter using 7 key questions from Paula Munier's book The Writer’s Guide to Beginnings [38:00] A micro analysis of the two scenes within the chapter using the "5 Commandments of Storytelling" from The Story Grid[60:00] Final thoughts and episode recapFollow & Review in Apple PodcastsAre you following my podcast? If not, I want to encourage you to do that today so that you don't miss an episode! Especially because I’m adding a bunch of bonus episodes to the mix and if you’re not following the show, there’s a good chance you’ll miss out on those. So, click here to follow this show in Apple Podcasts!If you're already a follower, and if you enjoy the show, I would be really grateful if you left a review over on Apple Podcasts, too. These reviews help other writers find my podcast and they’re also super fun for me to go in and read. Just click here to review, select “Ratings and Reviews” and “Write a Review” and let me know what your favorite part of the show is. Thanks in advance!Links mentioned in this episode:Click here to check out the LitMatch Podcast with Abigail Perry! You can also get in touch with Abigail through her website (www.abigailkperry.com) or you can find her on Instagram @abigailkperry.Ep. 60 - First Chapter Analysis: Harry Potter & the Chamber of SecretsEp. 40 - How to Write a Well-Structured SceneWorkshop: How to Hook Readers in Your First 5 Pages
In this episode, I'm sharing the 10 most common querying mistakes I see writers make and how to avoid them. Here's a preview of what you'll hear in the episode:[02:45] Mistake #1: Your story isn't 100% ready to send out just yet.[04:25] Mistake #2: Sending your query to the wrong person.[06:15] Mistake #3: Not following the submission guidelines. [08:45] Mistake #4: You forgot to include your metadata.[09:50] Mistake #5: Your word count is too high or too low.[11:10] Mistake #6: The genre of your story isn't clear.[12:30] Mistake #7: The comp titles listed don't make sense.[14:25] Mistake #8: Your story summary is too vague.[16:35] Mistake #9: You've tried to fit too much stuff in your query.[18:55] Mistake #10: Your query letter is unprofessional or weird.[21:00] Final thoughts and episode recapFollow & Review in Apple PodcastsAre you following my podcast? If not, I want to encourage you to do that today so that you don't miss an episode! Especially because I’m adding a bunch of bonus episodes to the mix and if you’re not following the show, there’s a good chance you’ll miss out on those. So, click here to follow this show in Apple Podcasts!If you're already a follower, and if you enjoy the show, I would be really grateful if you left a review over on Apple Podcasts, too. These reviews help other writers find my podcast and they’re also super fun for me to go in and read. Just click here to review, select “Ratings and Reviews” and “Write a Review” and let me know what your favorite part of the show is. Thanks in advance!Links mentioned in this episode:Workshop: How to Hook Readers in Your First 5 PagesEp. 2 - How to Choose the Best Genre for Your Story
In today’s extra special bonus episode, I'm sharing an interview I did earlier this year with Emma Dhesi for her Be A Bestseller Summit. We talked about genre and how your story’s genre can help you write a story that works. And specifically, we dove into the thriller genre and talked about how the key scenes and conventions of the thriller genre show up in The Silence of the Lambs. This was such a fun event to be a part of because it’s always fun to talk about writing, but also there were 25-30 other speakers who all shared their insights, tips, and strategies on the writing, editing, and publishing process., too.The event is officially over, but you want to watch a replay of all the interviews, you can click here to purchase an All-Access Pass. Enjoy!Follow & Review in Apple PodcastsAre you following my podcast? If you’re not, I want to encourage you to do that today. I don’t want you to miss an episode! Especially because I’m adding a bunch of bonus episodes to the mix and if you’re not subscribed there’s a good chance you’ll miss out on those. So, click here to subscribe to the show in Apple Podcasts!If you're already a follower, and if you enjoy the show, I would be really grateful if you left a review over on Apple Podcasts, too. Those reviews help other writers find my podcast and they’re also super fun for me to go in and read. Just click here to review, select “Ratings and Reviews” and “Write a Review” and let me know what your favorite part of the show is. Thanks in advance!Links Mentioned in this Episode:Click here to access the interviews from the Be a Bestseller 3.0 Summit hosted by Emma Dhesi. Note: There is a fee for the All-Access Pass.P.S. Did you know that I have a Facebook group just for fiction writers? In this private group, we talk about all things writing, editing, and publishing fiction. It's free to join and you can request access here. Hope to see you there!
Action Genre Conventions

Action Genre Conventions

2022-02-1521:011

In today's episode, I'm going to walk you through the conventions of the action genre. I'm also going to show you how these conventions show up in the movie The Hunger Games. Here's a preview of what's included:[01:25] Action stories are about life and death, and good versus evil. They’re about a character who has to rise up, overcome great obstacles, defeat forces of evil, and maybe even save the world. But that being said, these stories aren’t always about superheroes.[02:35] Readers choose action stories to experience the excitement of the life and death stakes and situations that the protagonist is presented with. But it’s not just about that—we choose these stories because they inspire us to become the best versions of ourselves, too.[03:35] Genre conventions are the character roles, settings, and micro-events that are specific to a genre. They’re what help us writers write a story that works AND evoke emotional reactions in our readers.[04:50] #1 - The protagonist has a special talent or gift and the potential for heroism. [06:55] #2 - The protagonist’s goal is to stop the antagonist and save victims.[08:10] #3 - There are multiple lives at stake (including the protagonist’s).[09:10] #4 - The antagonist is stronger and/or more powerful than the protagonist. [10:25] #5 - The protagonist has a moral compass that the antagonist does not.[11:50] #6 - There’s a speech in praise of the antagonist.[13:00] #7 - There’s a MacGuffin (or a very specific thing the antagonist wants).[13:50] #8 - There are sidekicks who help the protagonist save the victim/s.[14:45] #9 - There’s at least one mentor figure who gives the protagonist guidance.[15:25] #10 - There’s a ticking clock that puts pressure on the protagonist. [17:05] Key points and episode recap.Follow & Review in Apple PodcastsAre you following my podcast? If not, I want to encourage you to do that today. I don’t want you to miss an episode! Especially because I’m adding a bunch of bonus episodes to the mix and if you’re not following the show there’s a good chance you’ll miss out on those. So, click here to follow the show in Apple Podcasts!If you're already a follower, and if you enjoy the show, I would be really grateful if you left a review over on Apple Podcasts, too. Those reviews help other writers find my podcast and they’re also super fun for me to go in and read. Just click here to review, select “Ratings and Reviews” and “Write a Review” and let me know what your favorite part of the show is. Thanks in advance!Links mentioned in this episode:Episode Freebie: Action Genre Conventions PDF Cheat SheetAction Conventions: The 10 Things Every Action Story Needs (article)Action Obligatory Scenes: The 6 Scenes Every Action Story Needs (article)Conventions vs. tropes: What's the difference? (podcast and article)P.S. Did you know that I have a Facebook group just for fiction writers? In this private group, we talk about all things writing, editing, and publishing fiction. It's free to join and you can request access here. Hope to see you there!
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