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Consider This from NPR

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Every weekday afternoon, the hosts of NPR's All Things Considered help you make sense of a major news story and what it means for you in 15 minutes. In participating regions, you'll also hear from local journalists about what's happening in your community.
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Since 2016, a number of U.S. diplomats and federal employees have reported symptoms of a mysterious illness, the so-called Havana Syndrome.The list of symptoms include hearing loud sounds, nausea fatigue, and dizzying migraines, among others. The cause of this mystery illness is a source of curiosity, but it remains unknown.Last year the State Department commissioned a study by the National Academies of Sciences for researchers to investigate Havana Syndrome.NPR's Sarah McCammon spoke to Dr. David Relman, a Stanford professor who headed the investigation.One possible cause their group came to was a form of microwave radiation that occurs in a pulsed or intermittent form. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
Colin Powell's life was marked by public service, first as a soldier in Vietnam and then eventually as President George W. Bush's secretary of state. By that time he had already held many prominent positions in government, including national security adviser and chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. He was the first African American to hold each of these roles. But Powell's story will always be entwined with the Iraq War. Although he argued against the invasion in private White House meetings, he did see it through. And he famously defended the strategy on a national stage before the United Nations. NPR National Correspondent Don Gonyea reports on Powell's enormous and complicated legacy. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
One of the killings that sparked racial justice protests last year is again in the national spotlight, with a trial that begins this week in Brunswick, Ga. Three white men are accused of murdering Ahmaud Arbery, a 25-year-old Black man shot and killed as he was jogging down a residential street. NPR correspondent Debbie Elliott reports on the defendants' expected arguments and the evidence stacked against them in a trial that serves as yet another test case for racial justice. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
After the protests last year, we heard the phrase "racial reckoning" a lot, as some groups of people struggled to catch up with what's just been reality for many others. On this episode of NPR's new Book of the Day podcast, we've got two books that might help you reckon with that reckoning, in two different ways: Traci Todd and illustrator Christian Robinson's bright and powerful picture book biography Nina: A Story of Nina Simone and poet Claudia Rankine's Just Us: An American Conversation, in which she puts together poetry, essays and images to bring readers into an uncomfortable but necessary conversation about race. Listen to NPR's Book of the Day on Apple Podcasts, Spotify or NPR One.
Large parts of the West have been hot and dry for so long that reservoirs are running low and some communities are mandating conservation. California is talking about a statewide mandate, too. Meanwhile, farmers are preparing to flood their fields to replenish aquifers, while ranchers are selling off parts of their herds and worried about feeding the rest. NPR's Dan Charles reports from California and NPR's Kirk Siegler reports from North Dakota. Also in this episode: water rights lawyer Christine Klein, who originally spoke to NPR's daily economics podcast The Indicator from Planet Money, in one of a series of episodes on the drought and the economy. Listen to more of The Indicator via Apple, Spotify, or Google. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
Patricia Maginnis, who was 93 when she died on August 30, may have been the first person to publicly call for abortion to be completely decriminalized in America. Despite her insistence on direct action on abortion-rights at a time when many were uncomfortable even saying the word "abortion," Maginnis is not a bold letter name of the movement. That may be because she didn't seek the limelight and she cared more for action then self-presentation.Guests include Lili Loofborow, who profiled Maginnis for Slate; Professor Leslie J. Regan, who wrote the book When Abortion Was a Crime; and the artist Andrea Bowers whose video piece, Letters to An Army of Three recreated the messages people would send Maginnis when they were desperate to access abortion services. Special thanks to the Schlesinger Library, where the 1975 oral history of Pat Maginnis is housed. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
Hate and division on Facebook are not just a problem in the U.S. That's one of the messages whistleblower Frances Haugen took to Congress last week, where she accused Facebook's algorithms of quote, "literally fanning ethnic violence in Ethiopia," a country that's endured nearly a year of civil war. Freelance reporter Zecharias Zelalem has been keeping track of how inflammatory posts on Facebook have led to attacks in the real world. And NPR's East Africa Correspondent Eyder Peralta describes what Ethiopia looks like from the ground as he moves closer toward the conflict. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
In many parts of the U.S., China remains a huge business opportunity despite recent friction. That's the country where Apple makes its phones and Nike stitches its shoes. Yet inside the Washington Beltway, China is a security threat. Full stop. It's one of the few things Democrats, Republicans and most everyone else in the capital agree on. NPR correspondents Greg Myre and John Ruwitch report on this gap between how China is viewed in Washington policy circles and how many outside the proverbial beltway think about the country. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
After decades of Indigenous stories told by non-Natives, two shows from this past year signal a change. Reservation Dogs from FX on Hulu was created by and stars Native people. It follows four Indigenous teenagers growing up on a reservation in rural Oklahoma, with dreams of adventuring to California. Vincent Schilling, a Native journalist and critic for Rotten Tomatoes, calls Reservation Dogs 'a show about Native American resilience.' Rutherford Falls is a sitcom on NBC's streaming platform, Peacock, which follows a conflict over a historical statue in a small town. When the show was co-created by Sierra Teller Ornelas, she became the first Native American showrunner of television comedy. Teller Ornelas told Audie Cornish this year: "There are five Native writers on staff. We had a Native director for four of the episodes, and this is really a reflection of our shared experience as Native people from nations all over the country." In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
Thirty-five years ago, Janet Jackson released an album that changed the course of her career, and of pop music. Control took over radio, reinvented the playbook for Black artists crossing over into pop and ushered in a whole new sound for R&B. But after the wardrobe malfunction at the 2004 Super Bowl halftime show, Janet's reputation took a hit, and she's yet to receive the flowers she deserves. In this episode of NPR's It's Been A Minute, host Sam Sanders wants to set the record straight. Listen to It's Been A Minute on Apple Podcasts, Spotify or NPR One.
Last month, R&B singer R. Kelly was found guilty of racketeering and sex trafficking. Days later, a judge suspended Jamie Spears as the conservator of his daughter Britney Spears' estate. While these cases are completely unrelated, they do have one crucial thing in common: a massive online following, and an ecosystem of think pieces and documentaries that fuel conversation online.NPR's TV critic Eric Deggans discusses the role documentary series have played in cases like R. Kelly's and Britney Spears. He says it's part of a larger movement that some are calling "consequence culture." In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
One day after a worldwide outage on multiple of its platforms, Facebook was accused by a whistleblower of hiding concerns about its products from the public and its shareholders. Both crises reveal the same thing: just how powerful Facebook is on a global scale. Ayman El Tarabishy of George Washington University explains what Monday's outage meant to small businesses around the world. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
Meth-related overdoses have tripled in recent years. In the west, 70 percent of police departments identify meth as their biggest problem. Now one state — California — is on the brink of implementing a major new treatment program that would pay drug users to stay clean. KQED's April Dembosky reports. The meth surge has hit some Black and Native American communities the hardest. NPR's addiction correspondent Brian Mann has this look at what kind of help people in those communities say they need. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
Children being born now will experience extreme climate events at a rate that is two to seven times higher than people born in 1960, according to a new study in the journal Science. The researchers compared a person born in 1960 with a child who was six years old in 2020. That six-year-old will experience twice as many cyclones and wildfires, three times as many river floods, four times as many crop failures and five times as many droughts. Read more about the study here. These extreme changes not only endanger the environment, they take a toll on our mental health. KNAU reporter Melissa Sevigny spoke with residents in Flagstaff, Arizona who are reeling from a summer rife with fires and floods. And NPR's Michel Martin spoke with two climate activists of different generations — Jasmine Butler and Denis Hayes — about their outlook on the planet's future amid new climate change reports. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
Cases, hospitalizations, and deaths are all on the decline in the U.S. — with September marking a turning point in the delta surge. Vaccination rates continue to tick up and will be helped along by more workplace vaccine rules, including one from the Department of Labor. That rule, which has yet to be released, will be enforced by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration. NPR's Andrea Hsu reports on the small agency with a big task. Vaccine rules have been implemented successfully at big companies like United Airlines and Novant Health, where the vast majority of employees have gotten their shots. But in smaller workplaces, vaccine rules present a different challenge. Katia Riddle reports from Malheur County, Oregon. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
People are likely to be confused by climate change terms like "mitigation" and "carbon neutral," according to a recent study. Yet, these terms are ubiquitous in climate research and reports that are meant to be accessible to a general audience.
Michelle Zauner is best known as the frontwoman of indie rock band Japanese Breakfast and like most musicians, she's trying to tell a personal story through her music. But she's spent the last couple of years composing music that has nothing to do with her — for a video game soundtrack.
Like lawmakers across the country, the Republican majority in Texas is getting ready to redraw the lines that define state and congressional voting districts. Those lines cement the shape of political power in the state for the next decade — and it's perfectly legal for the party in power to draw them to its own advantage. Texas Tribune reporter James Barragán and Michael Li of the Brennan Center discuss redistricting in Texas, and around the country. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
Thousands of Haitian migrants who had gathered on the southern border were deported back to their home country last week, even though some of them haven't lived there for a decade. They'd been living in Chile. But increasingly, Haitians in that country are fleeing, in response to a pandemic-battered economy, rising anti-immigrant sentiment, and new government policies. All those factors are not disappearing any time soon — and neither is the flow of migrants out of the country, says Chilean journalist Ignacio Gallegos. NPR's John Otis reports on one part of their perilous journey north. Additional reporting in this episode from Stephania Corpi. Special thanks to Texas Public Radio news director Dan Katz. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
Retail experts are already warning of delays, shortages, and price hikes this holiday shopping season as the pandemic continues to disrupt global supply chains. NPR's Scott Horsley reports on the interconnected nature of those chains — and what happens when a single part delays manufacturing by months at a time. University of Michigan economist Betsey Stevenson explains why labor-related delays and shortages are not going away any time soon. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
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Comments (129)

alli lent

how the hell did the supreme court determine that gerrymandering is legal? it's the most undemocratic thing that could possibly exist.

Oct 1st
Reply

alli lent

unvaccinated people with no outstanding circumstances should be last on the priority list when it comes to getting beds. this was so preventable. they swear up and down it only affects themselves so let's not let it affect others.

Sep 3rd
Reply (1)

PlusCH3

At the end of today's episode of @UpFirst the local news story never actually played...just the preview for it, followed by the usual ad, then the same preview again...Everyone else had that happen, right? #NPR

Aug 27th
Reply

alli lent

why are we waiting until the transmission is high to put on masks? we know the numbers lag by 2 weeks.. so by the time we know there's high transmission, it's already too late

Aug 3rd
Reply

mari arana

That it takes them so long to tell them what happened and that that's protocol is absolute bullshit.

Aug 2nd
Reply

mari arana

This episode made me so angry.

Jul 26th
Reply

it

dá-lhe Amarante no consider this! vale até linkar com o #RoughTranslation

Jul 24th
Reply

alli lent

anyone who thinks this small amount of money will make people not work seriously has no concept of money. at all.

Jul 21st
Reply

alli lent

drive-ins still exist...............

Jun 28th
Reply

it

I seem to identify an either or mentality here, trying to arbiter on which is best. REALLY???? is seems so obvious to me that it's a matter of circumstances and there's no one size fits all!?!

Jun 11th
Reply

alli lent

I miss working from home

Jun 11th
Reply

alli lent

the other Joe clearly missed the last 4 years

Jun 8th
Reply

it

civil religion. freedom of religion, religion of freedom...

May 31st
Reply

it

art of poder, Han? Yet another npr podcast for my long list of want to listen... AND about gender stereotypes nothing the less! thanks!

May 30th
Reply (4)

John

Russia and China won unfortunately. They are so effective at sowing disinformation and the American public is so easily swayed by their own personal biases and selective media sources.

May 29th
Reply

Shannon Compton

The problem I have here is that there are always threats to democracy but especially when the people writing books about the threat to democracy see one side of the political spectrum as the "threat" and the other side as the "answer." Until we look for the corruption on all sides of the story, all of this talk remains fluff pieces and capitalism.

May 29th
Reply

dok dicer

wow. so much unexamined American ideology in this interview. The world did never look at the US as anything exceptional (maybe exceptional violent and meddlesome... but certainly nothing to aspire to). Also the world doesn't need the us to do shit internationally. solve the corruption at the heart of your fucking white supremacist settler colonialist society before you dare to pretend like you are a force for good in the world.

May 29th
Reply

alli lent

"he could take a wrecking ball to the republican party" uhhh too late for that, he already did

May 18th
Reply (1)

mari arana

How lucky for Hallel to have been born to such beautiful humans.

May 16th
Reply

Shannon Compton

I think most everyone is tired of having our lives consumed by a company. We don't get paid a livable wage, we don't get time with our children, we don't get to see a doctor or dentist when needed, we don't get much needed vacation in comparison to the rest of the developed world, and we get treated like we are expendable.

May 13th
Reply (1)
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