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Consider This from NPR

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Every weekday afternoon, the hosts of NPR's All Things Considered help you make sense of a major news story and what it means for you in 15 minutes. In participating regions, you'll also hear from local journalists about what's happening in your community.
443 Episodes
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The infrastructure bill moving through Congress includes billions to replace lead pipes. In Flint, Mich., NPR's Ari Shapiro talks with residents on how governments can tackle a water crisis equitably.
The FDA Advisory Committee decided not to approve boosters for people sixteen and up. Instead, they made a recommendation for those 65 and up, or younger people at high risk to get a booster shot right now from Pfizer-Biontech.
10 years ago, when the Syrian regime sent tanks and warplanes to stop a an uprising, it sparked a bloody civil war that is still ongoing.
BONUS: The Lost Summer

BONUS: The Lost Summer

2021-09-1948:08

Twenty years ago, during the dog days of summer, a fledgling journalist named Shereen Marisol Meraji — maybe you've heard of her? — headed to Durban, South Africa. Her mission: to report on the meeting of thousands of organizers and ambassadors at the United Nations Conference Against Racism.
After a year away, Broadway's lights are back on. Some of the biggest productions have returned for vaccinated and masked audiences. From "Wicked" to "Chicago" to "Hamilton," theaters in New York are open at 100 percent capacity.
Heatwaves don't have names or categories like hurricanes and wildfires, but they kill more people each year than any other weather event, according to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).
It has been exactly one month since Kabul fell and the Taliban took control of Afghanistan. With U.S. troops gone from the region and the collapse of the Afghan Armed forces, thousands have been fleeing the country for safety.
In India, where arranged marriages are the norm, people typically marry within their religion or caste. But occasionally, some find love on their own and end up with a partner of a different faith.
Last week President Biden announced a six-pronged strategy to combat the newly surging pandemic — including a federal rule that all businesses with 100 or more employees must ensure their workers are vaccinated for COVID-19, or submit to weekly testing for the virus.
This weekend the nation marks 20 years since 9/11 — a day we are reminded to never forget. But for so many people, 9/11 also changed every day after. In this episode, a special collaboration between NPR and StoryCorps, we hear stories about the lasting toll of 9/11, recorded by StoryCorps in partnership with the National September 11 Memorial & Museum. You can learn more about that initiative and find out how you can record your reflections on the life of a loved one at storycorps.org/september11. Also in this episode: the story of how an Afghan translator's life was shaped by 20 years of conflict in his home country, culminating in a desperate attempt to help his family escape. Said Noor's story first aired on Morning Edition and was originally produced by Steve Inskeep, Arezou Rezvani, and Danny Hajek. More here. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
This week, women protested in Kabul after the Taliban announced an all-male interim government. One woman who helped organized the protests told NPR "the world should feel" what Afghan women are facing. That woman — and another who was desperately trying to leave the country — spoke to Rachel Martin on Morning Edition. More from their interviews here. While some women fear the rights they've gained in the last 20 years will disappear, other women — particularly in rural areas — are hopeful for a future with less violence and military conflict. Anand Gopal wrote about them for The New Yorker in a piece called "The Other Afghan Women." He spoke to Mary Louise Kelly. Special thanks to NPR's Michele Keleman for production help on this episode. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
Last week's jobs report for the month of August show signs the delta surge is slowing the economic recovery, just as some pandemic safety net programs disappear. The Supreme Court recently struck down a federal eviction moratorium, and supplemental pandemic unemployment benefits expired on Monday. NPR's chief economics correspondent Scott Horsley explains what that could mean for the pace of the recovery. With a federal eviction ban no longer in effect, renters could tap into billions of dollars in federal rental assistance authorized by Congress. But there's a problem: states have been slow to get that money into programs that can distribute it to tenants and landlords. NPR's Laurel Wamsley reports on one effort to speed things up in Tennessee. Additional reporting in this episode from NPR's Chris Arnold, who's been covering evictions during the pandemic. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
The good news is that firefighters in California have regained control of the Caldor Fire near Lake Tahoe and tens of thousands of evacuated residents can now return to their homes. The bad news is the Caldor Fire is the second wildfire this season to burn through the Sierra Nevada Mountains from one side to the other. Something that never happened before this year. The other fire to do it is the Dixie Fire further north, which is on pace to be the largest California wildfire on record. And while thousands have been impacted with evacuations, millions of people in western states have been living with the smoke for weeks. The general guidance when living with hazy and polluted air is to stay indoors. But NPR's Nathan Rott reports on new research that shows the air behind closed doors may not be much better. And NPR's Lauren Sommer reports on a region of the country that is leading the way with fire prevention that may surprise you.
Most kids are now in their third year of school during the pandemic. It's been a time of ups and downs; adjustments and re-adjustments. Some have flourished in online school and want to stay home — others have floundered and are excited to go back. NPR spoke to a group of kids ages 6 and up about what the pandemic has been like, and how they're feeling about the new school year. Two experts in childhood education and development explain how the pandemic has challenged kids and what we can do to help them: Robin Lake, director of the Center on Reinventing Education; and Katie McLaughlin, a psychologist at Harvard University.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
The Supreme Court's conservative majority allowed a Texas law banning most abortions to go into effect. Almost immediately, abortion providers had to begin turning people away. NPR's Nina Totenberg reports on the court's interpretation of the Texas law and its controversial enforcement provision, which allows any private citizen to sue someone who helps a person get an abortion — with the plaintiff due $10,000 in damages and court costs. Kathryn Kolbert, co-founder of the Center for Reproductive Rights, explains how abortion rights activists are responding. Additional reporting in this episode came from stories by NPR's Wade Goodwyn and Ashley Lopez of member station KUT. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
Some states in the south are have more people in the hospital than at any point during the pandemic — fueled by the highly transmissible delta variant and low vaccination rates. Dr. David Kimberlin, co-division director of Pediatric Infectious Diseases at the University of Alabama at Birmingham, tells NPR the hospital system is Alabama is on the verge of collapse. He spoke to reporter Pien Huang. So what happens — for patients and the people who treat them — when hospitals are full? NPR put that question to two people in charge of hospitals: Dr. Aharon Sareli, Chief of Critical Medicine with the Memorial Healthcare System near Miami; and Dr. Adriano Goffi, a medical director at Altus Lumberton Hospital east of Houston.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
The U.S. military's mission in Afghanistan is over. For many still living in the country, a new struggle has begun: how to move forward after they were not able to make it before the U.S. withdrawal. Mark Schmitz is also grappling with how to move forward. His 20-year-old son, Jared, was one of 13 U.S. service members killed in an attack on the Kabul airport. Schmitz spoke to NPR's Rachel Martin — his interview was produced and edited by the staff of NPR's Morning Edition, where it originally aired. More from the interview here. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
Hurricane Ida's winds intensified rapidly as the storm approached coastal Louisiana over the weekend — making landfall at its most powerful. NPR's Rebecca Hersher explains how Ida was supercharged by climate change.Now the hurricane's remnants are moving north and east, where millions are bracing for flooding and tornado threats. Janey Camp with Vanderbilt University tells NPR why climate change means flooding will become more common in areas where people haven't been accustomed to it in the past. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
A federal bankruptcy judge says he'll rule Wednesday in the case of Purdue Pharma, makers of OxyContin. The company is owned by the Sackler family, who are at the center of a national reckoning over the deadly opioid epidemic.NPR addiction correspondent Brian Mann has been covering the story of Purdue Pharma for years, and explains how the Sacklers may emerge from Purdue's bankruptcy proceedings with their personal fortunes in tact. Find more of Brian's reporting here or follow him on Twitter @BrianMannADK.In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
Venezuela is facing an economic and humanitarian crisis as extreme poverty and violence have forced many to flee the country in recent years. How did a country once wealthy with oil resources fall into such turmoil?
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Comments (128)

alli lent

unvaccinated people with no outstanding circumstances should be last on the priority list when it comes to getting beds. this was so preventable. they swear up and down it only affects themselves so let's not let it affect others.

Sep 3rd
Reply (1)

PlusCH3

At the end of today's episode of @UpFirst the local news story never actually played...just the preview for it, followed by the usual ad, then the same preview again...Everyone else had that happen, right? #NPR

Aug 27th
Reply

alli lent

why are we waiting until the transmission is high to put on masks? we know the numbers lag by 2 weeks.. so by the time we know there's high transmission, it's already too late

Aug 3rd
Reply

mari arana

That it takes them so long to tell them what happened and that that's protocol is absolute bullshit.

Aug 2nd
Reply

mari arana

This episode made me so angry.

Jul 26th
Reply

it

dá-lhe Amarante no consider this! vale até linkar com o #RoughTranslation

Jul 24th
Reply

alli lent

anyone who thinks this small amount of money will make people not work seriously has no concept of money. at all.

Jul 21st
Reply

alli lent

drive-ins still exist...............

Jun 28th
Reply

it

I seem to identify an either or mentality here, trying to arbiter on which is best. REALLY???? is seems so obvious to me that it's a matter of circumstances and there's no one size fits all!?!

Jun 11th
Reply

alli lent

I miss working from home

Jun 11th
Reply

alli lent

the other Joe clearly missed the last 4 years

Jun 8th
Reply

it

civil religion. freedom of religion, religion of freedom...

May 31st
Reply

it

art of poder, Han? Yet another npr podcast for my long list of want to listen... AND about gender stereotypes nothing the less! thanks!

May 30th
Reply (4)

John

Russia and China won unfortunately. They are so effective at sowing disinformation and the American public is so easily swayed by their own personal biases and selective media sources.

May 29th
Reply

Shannon Compton

The problem I have here is that there are always threats to democracy but especially when the people writing books about the threat to democracy see one side of the political spectrum as the "threat" and the other side as the "answer." Until we look for the corruption on all sides of the story, all of this talk remains fluff pieces and capitalism.

May 29th
Reply

dok dicer

wow. so much unexamined American ideology in this interview. The world did never look at the US as anything exceptional (maybe exceptional violent and meddlesome... but certainly nothing to aspire to). Also the world doesn't need the us to do shit internationally. solve the corruption at the heart of your fucking white supremacist settler colonialist society before you dare to pretend like you are a force for good in the world.

May 29th
Reply

alli lent

"he could take a wrecking ball to the republican party" uhhh too late for that, he already did

May 18th
Reply (1)

mari arana

How lucky for Hallel to have been born to such beautiful humans.

May 16th
Reply

Shannon Compton

I think most everyone is tired of having our lives consumed by a company. We don't get paid a livable wage, we don't get time with our children, we don't get to see a doctor or dentist when needed, we don't get much needed vacation in comparison to the rest of the developed world, and we get treated like we are expendable.

May 13th
Reply (1)

alli lent

wtf is "inside the beltway"? I know I didn't get into politics until a year or 2 ago but I've never ever heard that phrase ever

May 5th
Reply
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