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Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Stitcher | Overcast Support the Show. Get the AudioBook! AudioBook: Audible| Kobo| Authors Direct | Google Play | Apple Summary Hey everyone. Stay tuned to the end of the interview where I’ll give you some actionable insights that I learned from my guest. These insights are also in the show notes. As always, thanks for listening. Now on to my guest for today, Matt Wool, CEO of Acceleration Partners and coauthor of the book Moving to Outcomes.  Matt started out working in the movie business, first working on story development then moving into the business side. He realized he liked to make sense of things, to pull together disparate strands and implementing structure and order to them. He left the film industry to go to business school, where he met and worked with the entrepreneur Robert Glazer. After business school and some years working at other companies, he returned to working with Glazer, eventually moving up in Acceleration Partners to becoming CEO.  In Acceleration Partners, Matt works on helping businesses grow by building relationships. He helps them set up affiliate, influencer, and other similar types of programs. Once established, businesses can expect to see 10 to 15% of their online sales come from affiliate partnerships. In order for a company to benefit from affiliate marketing, they need a good site and good conversion rates in order to maintain the partnership. Matt also explains why selling products through Amazon can be a major problem when trying to pursue successful partnerships.  Now, let’s get better together. Actionable Insights One major benefit of using partnerships is that, unlike paying for ads, the business gets to set the price. You offer a particular percentage in commission, for example, and this number can change as your needs change. Interested in exploring affiliate marketing for your business? It’s all about relationship-building, which is a long-term growth strategy. It’s not a quick fix. If you’re a startup doing under $5 million, Matt recommends starting with between 10 and 20 partners. Having a good website and good conversion funnels are two must-haves for affiliate marketing to work. Just as important, of course, is having a product or service people want and others will want to recommend.   Links to Explore Further Matt Wool on LinkedIn Acceleration Partners Moving to Outcomes: Why Partnerships Are the Future of Marketing  Keep In Touch Book or Blog or Twitter or LinkedIn or JSYPR Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Stitcher | Overcast Support the Show. Get the AudioBook! AudioBook: Audible| Kobo| Authors Direct | Google Play | Apple Summary Hey everyone. Stay tuned to the end of the interview where I’ll give you some actionable insights that I learned from my guest. These insights are also in the show notes. As always, thanks for listening. Now on to my guest for today, Mekkie Bansil, CEO and founder of Nonfik, which helps companies create, publish, and promote ebooks. Mekkie studied journalism yet came to believe that most books simply retold the same message. When assigned to write an ebook in a marketing job, she was dismayed that it was just thought of as a tool and that it didn’t really matter that it was any good. An expert in branding and marketing, she created Nonfik in order to help businesses create good-quality ebooks for marketing and lead generation. Nonfik is both a service and a marketplace, offering business books for free on its own platform so people can continue to return to and learn from them. Mekkie believes connecting with customers on an emotional level first is key. When working with companies, she encourages them to be open about their story and message, and to stand up for what they believe in order to set themselves apart. She uses both words and design to help tell their story and promote their brand, and Nonfik is the latest iteration in this project to help businesses do just that.   Now, let’s get better together. Actionable Insights “There’s no right answer,” Mekkie advises. Go with what you believe is right at the time. And it’s okay to change your mind once you have more information.  Someone else can’t define your brand; only the people who lead the business can do that. Marketers can help you figure out how to best tell your story, what tools to use, and how to refine how your brand is communicated. But ultimately, only you can say what you stand for. Focus first on connecting emotionally, whether it’s with a prospective client or simply someone you are getting to know. Then move on to logical, intellectual discussion.  Links to Explore Further  Mekkie Bansil on LinkedIn Nonfik Nonfik on TikTok Keep In Touch Book or Blog or Twitter or LinkedIn or JSYPR Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Stitcher | Overcast Support the Show. Get the AudioBook! AudioBook: Audible| Kobo| Authors Direct | Google Play | Apple Summary Hey everyone. Stay tuned to the end of the interview where I’ll give you some actionable insights that I learned from my guest. These insights are also in the show notes. As always, thanks for listening. Now on to my guest for today, Noah Healy, founder of Coordisc, an alternative market algorithm called the Coordinated Discovery Market (CDM). Noah refers to himself as a “recreational mathematician,” part of a tradition of thinkers going back centuries interested in thinking about mathematical questions. He studied a wide variety of subjects at the University of Virginia, focusing on engineering and economics, but always anchored by an interest in math. He became interested in applying his curiosity to the problems inherent in current economic markets and proposes that what we need now is a change in the algorithm that forms the basis for our current market economy.  Currently, Noah explains, the market operates as an information and communication system. However, there is a lot of noise in that system. A healthy market processes signals to reduce noise, but that is not currently happening. In fact, he says, the noise in the market is “off the scales.” The basic problem is that with the rise of computerization, industries have vastly increased their ability to be more efficient. But the cost of that efficiency is that one error in the system can lead to catastrophe. It also fosters the rampant corruption we now see in our economy. While Noah acknowledges he’s still in the early stages of promoting this idea, there’s been a lot of receptivity to it, because even those businesses that are “status quo” are seeing that problems are structural and can’t be simply “papered over.” This episode just scratches the surface of a much bigger idea, but it is packed with some food for thought on what's at stake and offers some solutions on how we might re-invent our economy. Now, let’s get better together. Actionable Insights Noah refers to his strategy of entrepreneurship as “energetic serendipity.” This view acknowledges the role that luck and opportunity play when putting out a new idea, but at the same stresses the importance of putting yourself in the way of opportunities and being prepared to take advantage of them. Noah notes that two ways to improve the system are to become more efficient or to redo the algorithm. While most businesses focus on the first, he’s focusing on the second. Becoming more efficient has its own risks and limits because of the potential for problems when an error is introduced. Don’t discount the value of simple curiosity, solving problems and asking questions for its own sake. One example Noah gives is how a mathematician in the 19th century who worked out large prime numbers never saw any purpose for it - but it’s now become the backbone for computer security.  Links to Explore Further  Noah Healy on LinkedIn Coordisc YouTube Video about Noah Healy’s CDM model Keep In Touch Book or Blog or Twitter or LinkedIn or JSYPR Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Stitcher | Overcast Support the Show. Get the AudioBook! AudioBook: Audible| Kobo| Authors Direct | Google Play | Apple Summary Hey everyone. Stay tuned to the end of the interview where I’ll give you some actionable insights that I learned from my guest. These insights are also in the show notes. As always, thanks for listening. Now on to my guest for today, Alper Cakir, founder of Xtensio, a SaaS platform tool that enables users to easily create and share documents and deliverables. Alper moved to L.A. from Istanbul in 2003 to pursue a career in music. To make money, he began to offer his services as a designer, primarily in web design, eventually making that his full-time career and starting a design agency with his wife. Xtensio came about from a tool that he and his team built in order to solve the problem of document sharing and visibility across various platforms and devices. It grew out of his work with his clients as they collected information, asking them key questions such as: what problem are you trying to solve and who are your primary customers? He began offering the templates his team developed for in-house use as a lead generator and tool for his clients. In 2015, he decided to make it the focus of his business. Xtensio’s popular “User Persona” template page now has ten-thousand plus downloads a month.  Alper still plays guitar, but he enjoys simply playing for himself. From the very beginning Alper has looked for ways to be his own master: from seeking work that enabled him to still play his music; to starting his own agency; and to building a company without outside funding. He channels his creativity into problem-solving and strategizing on how to continue to offer solutions for other companies and to continue to grow and innovate on his own terms.   Now, let’s get better together. Actionable Insights Alper identifies the three essential building blocks for a company: 1-a problem to solve 2 - a solution that people will pay for and 3 - good storytelling to sell your product or service. Alper recommends focusing on one small specific niche to start; even five customers can be a starting point.  Xtensio is “data inspired” rather than data driven. More than simply collecting the data about what people say they want, Alper says it’s important to ask why they want it. This will give a better picture of what the actual problem is you’re trying to solve.   Links to Explore Further Xtensio.com Alper Cakir on LinkedIn Keep In Touch Book or Blog or Twitter or LinkedIn or JSYPR Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Stitcher | Overcast Support the Show. Get the AudioBook! AudioBook: Audible| Kobo| Authors Direct | Google Play | Apple Summary Hey everyone. Stay tuned to the end of the interview where I’ll give you some actionable insights that I learned from my guest. These insights are also in the show notes. As always, thanks for listening. Now on to my guest for today, Kison Patel, an expert in mergers & acquisitions. He is the CEO and founder of DealRoom (which is part of M&A Science), a platform to help manage the M&A life cycle; podcast host of M&A Science; and author of the book Agile M&A: Proven Techniques to Close Deals Faster and Maximize Value, A Practitioner’s Guide. Kison started out working as an advisor in mergers & acquisitions in Chicago, first with private clients and working up to corporations in various industries. He began his entrepreneurial journey with a tech startup, where he found he enjoyed working with engineers and also saw an opportunity to apply project management tools to the M&A industry.  With DealRoom, he learned to face all the challenges of a tech startup, from working with a team, figuring out product market fit, and strategies for going to market. In 2017, a friend encouraged him to start a podcast. His show, M&A Science, seeks to help those working in the field to better understand the process and learn from others. The show gradually grew and Kison realized there was a demand for more information and resources. He wrote his book and created the M&A Science Academy, for corporate team members to more quickly learn insights and skills others usually take years to learn on their own.  Now, let’s get better together. Actionable Insights Kison places a lot of emphasis on the importance of simply being curious and asking questions. If you’re involved in a merger or acquisition, find out as much as you can about the company you’re partnering with. Similarly, as an entrepreneur, figure out where you want to get to and ask, “What would it take to get there?” Being agile means having the flexibility to respond as new information emerges, allowing you to iterate and reiterate until you get to a place that works best for all. The agile approach to mergers and acquisitions also helps align the people who will be most affected by the changes. Software companies, Kison notes, are often successful at M&A because they already have a more agile approach built into their company culture.  Links to Explore Further M&A Science Podcast M&A Science Academy DealRoom Kison Patel on LinkedIn Keep In Touch Book or Blog or Twitter or LinkedIn or JSYPR Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Stitcher | Overcast Support the Show. Get the AudioBook! AudioBook: Audible| Kobo| Authors Direct | Google Play | Apple Summary Hey everyone. Stay tuned to the end of the interview where I’ll give you some actionable insights that I learned from my guest. These insights are also in the show notes. As always, thanks for listening. Now on to my guest for today, Allen Adamson, cofounder of Metaforce, the “special forces” of marketing, and author of several books on branding and marketing. Allen studied filmmaking in college but realized he didn’t have the drive for making films he saw in others. This realization - that you need to have both passion and talent for what you spend your life doing - has been a guiding principle. After earning an MBA at NYU’s Stern School, he went to work in advertising, starting with Unilever, then moving into agency work and eventually leading Landor Associates, a global branding firm. Allen made the leap to entrepreneurship six years ago when he decided to write his next book. At Metaforce, Allen seeks first to listen and understand what his clients’ problems are, and then work with them on finding a solution, rather than simply offering a service that may or may not be effective. As someone who has worked for years in advertising and marketing, Allen has found himself at the intersection of creativity and business, straddling the line between offering innovative solutions but also recognizing the constraints of budgets and deadlines. Key to succeeding in this area, Allen says, is embracing non-linear thinking. In writing his books, Allen has found he connects naturally with a community of colleagues and potential clients while also learning and then sharing what he’s learned.  Now, let’s get better together. Actionable Insights First, seek to understand. Listen to what your client or customer is struggling with before starting to figure out solutions. Another key factor is company culture. A consensus-driven, risk-averse company culture is not usually going to embrace anything cutting-edge.  Allen recommends that businesses focus on those one or two areas they do well to stand out, rather than trying to do it all. This means focusing on the marketing strategies that you do well, rather than trying to spread yourself too thin.  Allen’s recommendations for young entrepreneurs:  Don’t wait too long. Spend some time in your industry learning “on someone else’s dime,” but after five or so years, strike out before it gets too comfortable. This will also give you time to try and fail, which is inevitable for most entrepreneurs.  Be honest with what you’re good at and what you like doing. If you’re not thinking about your business in the shower or on a run, then you probably don’t have the passion to see it through. Links to Explore Further Metaforce Allen Adamson on LinkedIn Allen Adamson’s Column in Forbes  Keep In Touch Book or Blog or Twitter or LinkedIn or JSYPR Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Stitcher | Overcast Support the Show. Get the AudioBook! AudioBook: Audible| Kobo| Authors Direct | Google Play | Apple Summary Hey everyone. Stay tuned to the end of the interview where I’ll give you some actionable insights that I learned from my guest. These insights are also in the show notes. As always, thanks for listening. Now on to my guest for today, Craig Doig, cofounder of Markee, a new communications platform for companies to communicate and collaborate under their own brand. Craig is now on his seventh startup. He started out wanting to be an artist and earning a degree in animation. This was partially motivated, he says, by wanting to rebel against his father’s more “boots on the ground” worldview. Craig was soon tapped for management and soon moved into founding his first company working in the film business in operational consulting. When his future wife got a job in Delaware, Craig moved with her from L.A., where by chance he ran into one of his previous co-founders, who invited him to work with him in his current company. Craig was soon helming a spin-off company specializing in digital signage. When COVID hit, though, he had to pivot. Markee was born as a way to to provide more secure ways for teams to communicate online. After obtaining venture-capital funding, Markee has been figuring out its path to growth, at first by trying to enter a variety of markets. Craig believes right now focusing on a niche - telehealth - is the way to go because of what Markee can offer that industry.    Now, let’s get better together. Actionable Insights While Craig didn’t end up being an artist as he’d first imagined, he believes his initial time around artists and creatives has given him the perspective to better understand the creative process, key for developing products as an entrepreneur.  Craig recommends taking some time to get to know the people creating the product in your company. Understand how you can best support them and give them what they need to flourish.  Passion for what you’re doing can come from unexpected places. Craig finds satisfaction in helping his customers solve problems and the “little wins” in his day-to-day.  Links to Explore Further Markee.io Markee on Twitter Craig Doig on LinkedIn Keep In Touch Book or Blog or Twitter or LinkedIn or JSYPR Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Stitcher | Overcast Support the Show. Get the AudioBook! AudioBook: Audible| Kobo| Authors Direct | Google Play | Apple Summary Hey everyone. Stay tuned to the end of the interview where I’ll give you some actionable insights that I learned from my guest. These insights are also in the show notes. As always, thanks for listening. Now on to my guest for today, Kehan Zhou, founder of Terrascope, an AI-driven platform that helps buyers find rural properties.  Kehan was born in China and came to the U.S. to study economics at Wesleyan University. After college he went to work on Wall Street and became a municipal bond trader, learning skills in portfolio and risk management. After a few years of doing that, he felt the pull to pursue his own business, wanting the freedom it offers. Like so many entrepreneurs, he went to work trying to solve a problem. In his case, the problem he’s trying to solve is helping potential buyers find rural properties.  Having gone through this process myself, I know firsthand how challenging looking for - and buying - a rural property can be. It’s much more complicated than simply buying a house or condo in the city. Kehan has been able to put his finger on what’s not working in the current process and has developed an online platform that uses AI to help people more effectively filter out potential properties based on various factors. Right now Terrascope serves five states and has had over 30,000 users but hopes to expand to all of the U.S. as well as ultimately be the go-to resource for rural property owners. Now, let’s get better together. Actionable Insights In order to solve a problem, study what works and what doesn’t. Terrascope looks at what’s not working with existing tools and applies what does work - how real estate agents interact with potential buyers - to building their AI tool. They continue to hone and develop the tool based on user feedback.  Start with one piece of the puzzle, and expand from there. Kehan and Terrascope are focused right now on helping people buy rural properties, but he hopes one day to build that out and be the “ecosystem” for people who buy properties, offering an array of services and resources.  Links to Explore Further Terrascope Kehan Zhou on LinkedIn Keep In Touch Book or Blog or Twitter or LinkedIn or JSYPR Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Stitcher | Overcast Support the Show. Get the AudioBook! AudioBook: Audible| Kobo| Authors Direct | Google Play | Apple Summary Hey everyone. Stay tuned to the end of the interview where I’ll give you some actionable insights that I learned from my guest. These insights are also in the show notes. As always, thanks for listening. Now on to my guest for today, Louise Carnachan, an expert on workplace communications and author of the forthcoming book, Work Jerks: How To Cope With Difficult Bosses and Colleagues.  Louise came of age in the “Mad Men” era when options for women were limited. Interested in what makes people tick, she majored in psychology and graduated from college intending to work with children with autism in an institution. But, beginning a pattern she would encounter again and again throughout her life, she had to go in another direction.  She moved to Seattle from California, taking a job as a waitress and eventually earning a master’s. Her career trajectory took another turn when she was again shut out from doing what she intended, but she took a job with a team that was training school staff to work with developmentally delayed children. Through this work she found her calling in helping teams work together more effectively.  From there Louise went on to work at a hospital and eventually started her own business. When the recession hit, she turned back to being an employee, getting hired in her late 50s but continuing to grow her skills in helping people work together and communicate more effectively.  Louise’s book helps people work with difficult supervisors and coworkers by encouraging them to focus on their own behavior and communication skills. She also talks about the importance of understanding cultural differences, whether those differences are caused by work environment or identity, and how we can all handle our own inner “jerks.”  Now let’s get better together. Actionable Insights  Louise says that there are two main questions to ask yourself: How do I manage myself? How do I manage my interactions with others? More effective relationships rest on good management in both areas.  It is possible to interrupt those moments when we find ourselves going into “fight” mode by stopping and taking deep breaths and also knowing what your triggers are and coming up with tactics before they happen. If you have to, walking away is nearly always an option.  Understand the culture. Whether you’re the leader of a company or you are working with people from different cultural backgrounds, cultural differences and the environment we work together in can have an effect on how people interact. Leaders who invite honesty and respond well to it will have employees who are unafraid to tell the truth.  Links to Explore Further Louise Carnachan Website Work Jerks book site Louise Carnachan on LinkedIn Louise Carnachan on Facebook Keep In Touch Book or Blog or Twitter or LinkedIn or JSYPR Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Stitcher | Overcast Support the Show. Get the AudioBook! AudioBook: Audible| Kobo| Authors Direct | Google Play | Apple Summary Hey everyone. Stay tuned to the end of the interview where I’ll give you some actionable insights that I learned from my guest. These insights are also in the show notes. As always, thanks for listening. Now on to my guest for today, Perry Zheng, founder and CEO of Cash Flow Portal. Perry started working as a software engineer in 2010, working for fast-growing companies like Twitter and Lyft. Five years into his career, having reached the position of engineering manager, he started investing in real estate. First he bought a house and lived in it, renting out the other bedrooms. He repeated this a few times and gradually accumulated more properties. Ultimately he decided to take a bigger step of investing in a multi-unit property, which required bringing on other investors. He found, however, the process of basic tasks like obtaining signatures and transferring money was inefficient. This led him to hire a team to develop a software program that people like himself could use, ending up with Cash Flow Portal.  Perry didn’t dive head-first into being an entrepreneur. As a manager at Lyft, he could afford to invest in the company and pay employees while continuing to work. He bootstrapped the company for the first year and a half until he saw that he had a viable product. Once he started to work on attracting investors in order to grow his company, he decided it was time to become a full-time entrepreneur, and he now has a clear vision of where he and his company are headed. Now let’s get better together. Actionable Insights  Perry had funds to finance his startup, but he waited until he saw it could be a viable business to quit his job. This might not be an option available to everyone, but he found this strategy enabled him to start the company without the immediate pressure of having to find and satisfy investors.  Perry notes that by working at both a job and his company, he sacrificed emotional stability for financial stability. What kept him going was passion to the point of obsession for making his idea a reality. In order to achieve your goal, you will need to become someone different than what you are. This doesn’t mean necessarily sacrificing your values, but it does mean recognizing that you may have to learn and acquire new skills to be successful. In short, move out of your comfort zone; if you fail, take the lessons you learned and move on.  Links to Explore Further CashFlowPortal.com Perry Zheng on LinkedIn CashFlowPortal on Facebook Keep In Touch Book or Blog or Twitter or LinkedIn or JSYPR Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Stitcher | Overcast Support the Show. Get the AudioBook! AudioBook: Audible| Kobo| Authors Direct | Google Play | Apple Summary Hey everyone. Stay tuned to the end of the interview where I’ll give you some actionable insights that I learned from my guest. These insights are also in the show notes. As always, thanks for listening.  Now on to my guest for today, Mike Lingle, a tech entrepreneur and creator of Rocket Pro Forma, a tool to help entrepreneurs get a handle on their financial picture and help draw investors. Mike has always been interested in linking engineering and design. Early on he started pursuing architecture, but moved into learning to code to build 3-D models. He developed a presentation software for companies to use in sales.  After 15 years, his company was acquired and he took a couple of years off to pursue his interests in music - during which time he met and married his wife and started a family. He figured out that music wasn’t his future, so he returned to tech, mainly advising and teaching entrepreneurs.  Mike reflects on his first experience having a company, when he realized after his partner left that the company wasn’t financially stable. He realized he needed to better understand the numbers and now believes this skill is essential for a business and business owner to be able to make good decisions for your company.  Rocket Pro Forma is the result of his desire to help entrepreneurs with their financial decision-making and, while his customers usually come to him for a tool to help with presentations for potential investors, he hopes that it will help them in running their business, too.  Now, let’s get better together. Actionable Insight “You have to radically change your behavior in order to radically change your circumstance,” Mike says, noting that he had to learn a new skill in order to be able to get a hold on the finances of his business.  Putting together a financial plan is important to set up and draw investment into your business, but it’s also vital so you can run your business effectively. Mike says having this plan gives him “a map in his head” to follow for making decisions for his business. Own your story, and use numbers to tell the story. While you can get help and outsource tools, ultimately you have to have a clear vision of your story, and be able to tell it effectively. Links to Explore Further Rocket Pro Forma Mike Lingle on LinkedIn Mike Lingle on Twitter Keep In Touch Book or Blog or Twitter or LinkedIn or JSYPR Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Stitcher | Overcast Support the Show. Get the AudioBook! AudioBook: Audible| Kobo| Authors Direct | Google Play | Apple Summary Hey everyone. Stay tuned to the end of the interview where I’ll give you some actionable insights that I learned from my guest. These insights are also in the show notes. As always, thanks for listening.  Now on to my guest for today, Kelley Holland, a financial empowerment coach for women and author of the forthcoming book You Are Worthy, a guidebook for women to help women take charge of their own money.  Like many entrepreneurs, Kelley struggled with the problem she helps others solve. She was for a long time a reporter focusing on business and money. More recently she began writing about personal finance and started seeing how many women have struggled with money, leaving otherwise successful women feeling incompetent or ashamed. Kelley recounts her own struggles with money when she was in her 20s and what motivated her to take charge and confront the barriers holding her back. The services and programs she offers are what she wished she’d had at that time of her life.  Because she only recently became a coach, Kelley has learned the art of the pivot as she’s confronted the realities of having to offer her services during COVID. While she’s had training in speaking and coaching, she’s been limited in what she can do, so she’s going back to her roots as a writer to help spread her message. She now offers a six-week program in both a virtual group format and individually. Now, let’s get better together. Actionable Insights While acknowledging the need for societal change, Kelley focuses on where she can help: that is, helping women remove their internal barriers around managing money. Whether it’s for yourself and for those you’re serving, identifying what emotional hurdles need to be overcome is a critical step toward transformation. Watch your words. Language can be powerful shapers of thought. Kelley gives the example of how different thinking about money might be for women if, for example, they thought of “knitting” a portfolio rather than “building” one. Sometimes tweaking a word or phrase can make a big difference.  Don’t fall in love with the product. Keep your eyes on the end goal and pivot until you find products that work.  Links to Explore Further Own Your Destiny Coaching  Kelley Holland on LinkedIn Keep In Touch Book or Blog or Twitter or LinkedIn or JSYPR Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Stitcher | Overcast Support the Show. Get the AudioBook! AudioBook: Audible| Kobo| Authors Direct | Google Play | Apple Summary Hey everyone. Stay tuned to the end of the interview where I’ll give you some actionable insights that I learned from my guest. These insights are also in the show notes. As always, thanks for listening.  Now on to my guest for today, Michelle Douglas, a brand and marketing consultant and author of the forthcoming book, Don’t Wear Shoes You Can’t Walk In: A Field Guide for Your Twenties. Michelle worked for several years as a brand and marketing manager for an athletic sportswear company. One day on her long commute she started asking herself two key questions: “What did you do today, and how did it do good in the world?” While she found some satisfaction in her job, she realized it wasn’t enough and decided to take the leap into founding her own agency, Ladder, where she works with nonprofits and small businesses. She also decided to write a book based on her daily journaling to help others figure out their own way in the world.  Michelle’s focus in her business and in the book is helping others articulate their mission, vision, and values. The litmus test for seeing if something is in alignment, she says, is to check your gut and look for a rallying cry - a sense of excitement. As a marketing and brand consultant, Michelle is excited to be applying all she knows to marketing her own book, due to be published in April of 2022.  Now, let’s get better together. Actionable Insights The springboard for Michelle’s book was a daily journaling practice where she reflects on what happened and what she learned that day. She recommends it as an invaluable tool for processing your life and for ensuring you carry lessons forward into the next day.  In trying to clarify values and check for alignment with mission and vision, Michelle asks her clients to do “a gut check” and look for a “rallying cry.” Does it feel right? Does it feel exciting?  If you want to share a “lesson learned,” be sure to include details about what was going on and what it meant. Michelle’s original vision for the book was simply to share the lessons learned, but she realized she had to add these elements in order to communicate her message more effectively.  Links to Explore Further Michelle Douglas on LinkedIn Ladder  Don’t Wear Shoes You Can’t Walk In from She Writes Press  Keep In Touch Book or Blog or Twitter or LinkedIn or JSYPR Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Stitcher | Overcast Support the Show. Get the AudioBook! AudioBook: Audible| Kobo| Authors Direct | Google Play | Apple Summary Hey everyone. Stay tuned to the end of the interview where I’ll give you some actionable insights that I learned from my guest. These insights are also in the show notes. As always, thanks for listening.  Now on to my guest for today, Matthew Hunt, founder and CEO of AutomationWolf, which helps B2B businesses increase leads through strategic content.   Matthew founded AutomationWolf after selling his previous marketing company and taking some time off to decide what he wanted to do next. Ultimately he focused on trying to solve the problem of how to help businesses and entrepreneurs leverage their time with more impact while also building their network. The result? He developed a strategy for creating a month of LinkedIn content in 1 ½ hours.  Matthew drives home the point that success in business comes about from building relationships and creating community by earning trust. Ultimately, sales and marketing should be a long game, but one that can be done with minimal time and money while making a big impact. Matthew thinks of marketing as happening in three tiers: one, through short-from content, two, through long-form content, where you demonstrate your skills, and third, through a controlled form, where you provide the structure to engage with potential clients and build relationships. Matthew shares his own unique networking strategy for bringing people together and sharing ideas. Now, let’s get better together. Actionable Insights You don’t need a big advertising budget to sell, nor do you need to rely solely on referrals. Instead, focus on ways to build relationships and community by offering help, being of service, and providing spaces where people can problem-solve together. Encourage input from team members who may be low in rank but may be able to provide perspective and ideas that might otherwise be overlooked or unheard.  Matthew encourages entrepreneurs to focus on being of service by posting thoughtful comments and content in social media instead of engaging in cold outreach strategies: get yourself seen by having something valuable to offer.   Links to Explore Further AutomationWolf.com Matthew Hunt on LinkedIn Matthew Hunt on YouTube Mentioned: Gift•ology by John Ruhlin Keep In Touch Book or Blog or Twitter or LinkedIn or JSYPR Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Stitcher | Overcast Support the Show. Get the AudioBook! AudioBook: Audible| Kobo| Authors Direct | Google Play | Apple Summary Hey everyone. Stay tuned to the end of the interview where I’ll give you some actionable insights that I learned from my guest. These insights are also in the show notes. As always, thanks for listening.  Now on to my guest for today, Rachel Michelberg, author of the book Crash: How I Became a Reluctant Caregiver.  Rachel was an actor, singer, mother of two, and in a troubled marriage when her husband suffered a plane crash that left him severely diabled. Crash is a memoir about the choices she made when faced with no choice - she thought - about having to become a full-time caregiver, a story that she found needed to be told. In this intimate talk, Rachel and I share reflections on the difficult experience of becoming caregiver to a spouse, the vital need for caring for oneself first, and practicing compassion for even the harshest critics.  Rachel also relates her journey of learning to run a business, first as a voice teacher when she had to leave performing behind, and then as an author promoting her book, and the vital necessity of learning to value yourself.  Now, let’s get better together. Actionable Insights Rachel observes that taking care of yourself is “the most unselfish” thing you can do. Once you take care of yourself, you can truly give to your family, your business, or anything else that needs your attention.  Learn to value your offerings and your time. Rachel identifies this as key to building a business and becoming better at what she does. Everyone carries a burden, whether it’s obvious or not. Compassion is key to building better relationships while also protecting your own peace. Links to Explore Further Rachel Michelberg Rachel Michelberg on Facebook Rachel Michelberg on Instagram  Crash from SheWrites Press  Keep In Touch Book or Blog or Twitter or LinkedIn or JSYPR Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Stitcher | Overcast Support the Show. Get the AudioBook! AudioBook: Audible| Kobo| Authors Direct | Google Play | Apple Summary Hey everyone. Stay tuned to the end of the interview where I’ll give you some actionable insights that I learned from my guest. These insights are also in the show notes. As always, thanks for listening.  Now on to my guest for today, Paul Fairweather, co-host of The Common Creative podcast, author, architect, artist, and more.  Paul exemplifies living a multi-dimensional creative life. He’s had a successful career as an award-winning architect; has been a painter for much of his life; has done stand-up comedy and hosted TedX talks; been a property developer; and now divides his time among co-hosting a podcast on creativity and business, writing books, speaking, and pursuing his art.  Paul defies the maxim of “jack of all trades, master of none.” Instead, you can create a life of multiple interests,though, he cautions, you still have to impose limits, boundaries, and discipline to your craft, whatever it is you’re doing at the time.  Paul’s experiences and the lessons he provides are wide-ranging as he reflects on leaving his successful career as an architect behind, discovering almost by accident that he could write, and exploring performance, including what happened when he tried to tell a joke to Robin Williams.  Now, let’s get better together. Actionable Insights Paul believes success can be defined as not just being one of the best in one field - you can define success as the freedom to pursue multiple interests. He is able to find focus partly by finding a common theme among his different activities.  Paul learned as a writer to “murder your darlings,” a concept that can be applied to business, too. Be willing to let go of words or ideas that aren’t working, no matter how attached you might be to them.  Get curious. Paul shares how one serial entrepreneur struck up a conversation with someone at a party, which inspired him down a road that led to a successful business solving the problem of coconut depletion.  Links to Explore Further Paul Fairweather Paul Fairweather on LinkedIn The Common Creative Podcast Keep In Touch Book or Blog or Twitter or LinkedIn or JSYPR Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Stitcher | Overcast Support the Show. Get the AudioBook! AudioBook: Audible| Kobo| Authors Direct | Google Play | Apple Summary Hey everyone. Stay tuned to the end of the interview where I’ll give you some actionable insights that I learned from my guest. These insights are also in the show notes. As always, thanks for listening.  Now on to my guest for today, Lucinda Jackson, a scientist and former corporate executive who has found her calling in writing, speaking, and consulting.  Lucinda has written two books based on lessons she’s learned in life. Her first book, Just a Girl: Growing Up Female and Ambitious, chronicles her experiences as a female scientist and corporate executive when she often found herself the only woman in the room. The book includes advice for women on building self-confidence and how to navigate male-dominated fields, but it also includes her thoughts on raising boys (she has three sons).  Lucinda’s second, forthcoming book, Project Escape, came out of her experiences with her husband building a business in wine-making, joining the Peace Corps in Micronesia and becoming science teachers in Mexico. Lucinda decided then she wanted to have her own business, and her first book was the launching-off point.  Lucinda provides a lot of insight into the various roads she’s traveled, including the importance of figuring out your core values. Now, whenever she’s presented with an opportunity, she asks, “does this meet my core values?” Not one for missing any opportunity to learn, she also credits her success to the skills and discipline she developed working for corporations.  Now, let’s get better together. Actionable Insights Lucinda says one of the key moves she made when becoming an entrepreneur was figuring out her core values. Whether it’s for yourself or your company (or even better, both), these values will provide a compass to keep you on track and help get you where you want to go.  Treat everything, bad or good, as a learning experience. Lucinda credits her years in the corporate world as valuable for teaching her a process she now applies to her own business. When bad things happen, she tries to figure out what the lesson is.  Links to Explore Further Lucinda Jackson  Lucinda Jackson on Facebook Lucinda Jackson on LinkedIn Business Basics for Entrepreneurs | 7 PR Secrets All Founders Should Know Keep In Touch Book or Blog or Twitter or LinkedIn or JSYPR Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Stitcher | Overcast Support the Show. Get the NEW AudioBook! AudioBook: Audible| Kobo| Authors Direct | Google Play | Apple Summary Hey everyone. Stay tuned to the end of the interview where I’ll give you some actionable insights that I learned from my guest. These insights are also in the show notes. As always, thanks for listening.  Now on to my guest for today, Jenn Graham of Inclusivv, formerly Civic Dinners. Jenn trained in design but describes herself as a community organizer at heart. She helped start TedX Atlanta and while she saw a lot of value in the messages the speakers brought, she found herself getting frustrated by the limitations of a model that was speaker-centered. Her search for other models of fostering discourses around significant topics led her to exploring models like salons, Jeffersonian dinners, and focus groups. From here she formulated what became Civic Dinners - a structure to bring a small group of diverse people together to discuss topics of importance in their community. The idea took off, generating interest from local governmental groups and nonprofits that were looking for a way to engage millennials. This is when Jenn realized she needed to start thinking of this project as a business.  Civic Dinners - now Inclusivv - has hosted numerous gatherings, providing the greater Atlanta community ways to talk, offer input, and share stories. It’s given organizations at various levels critical feedback they haven’t been able to get anywhere else. It has been a way to elevate consciousness around social issues, and that has been the most gratifying result for Jenn.  The organization successfully pivoted to going virtual in 2020 and has developed a library of 50 different topic series as well as a structure to ensure a sense of safety, trust, and connection. Jenn reflects on how learning to listen - and how to disagree with empathy - has made an impact on her community, but also on her understanding of how to be a good leader.  Now, let’s get better together. Actionable Insights Graham recommends that leaders “walk toward” conflict instead of away from it. As your business grows, start to welcome and value a difference of thought. Recognize that every conversation operates on two levels: the spoken and the unspoken. Graham notes that when a group of people are diverse, the spoken - the content of the conversation - needs to be more explicit.  Graham offers data that points to a heightened sense of belonging after six months of participating in Inclusivv conversations. A sense of belonging can translate to partners and employees who feel more invested and are more productive.  Links to Explore Further Inclusivv  Jenn Graham on LinkedIn Inclusivv on Twitter  Keep In Touch Book or Blog or Twitter or LinkedIn or JSYPR Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Stitcher | Overcast Support the Show. Get the NEW AudioBook! AudioBook: Audible| Kobo| Authors Direct | Google Play | Apple Summary Hey everyone. Stay tuned to the end of the interview where I’ll give you some actionable insights that I learned from my guest. These insights are also in the show notes. As always, thanks for listening.  Now, on to my guest for today, Janet Luongo, an artist, educator, speaker, and author of a book on creativity and most recently a memoir, Rebellion, 1967.  Janet grew up with a love for art as well as writing; her mother was an artist. Her father, a New York City police officer, instilled in her a sense of justice cultivated in response to the prejudice he grew up with and saw around him. These three interests - art, writing, and racial justice - form the backbone of Janet’s creative journey.  Janet first found success as an artist after moving to Europe with her husband; at the same time she started her memoir about a seminal year of her life as a young art student, a memoir she would return to again and again. Most of her career has been devoted to teaching and working in museums, but she eventually decided to try speaking, and wrote a book on creativity. Since then she’s focused on writing, publishing, and promoting her memoir. While her journey is not one of a typical entrepreneur, there is much that entrepreneurs can learn from her story about how to create a life from following your passion.  Now, let’s get better together. Actionable Insights While Janet doesn’t fit the conventional stereotype of entrepreneur, she exhibits many of the qualities necessary for entrepreneurial - and creative - success. She gets a clear idea of what she wants and takes action toward it, trusting that everything else will fall into place while accepting and learning from any failures along the way. Janet suggests aspiring entrepreneurs ask why: why do I want to do this? Why am I the person to do it? And also, how will it help the world?  Learn from the lessons but also enjoy the journey - enjoy the successes, the people you meet and the experiences you have.  Links to Explore Further Janet Luongo (author website)  Janet Luongo on LinkedIn Keep In Touch Book or Blog or Twitter or LinkedIn or JSYPR or The Story Funnel Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Stitcher | Overcast Support the Show. Get the NEW AudioBook! AudioBook: Audible| Kobo| Authors Direct | Google Play | Apple Summary Hey everyone. Stay tuned to the end of the interview where I’ll give you some actionable insights that I learned from my guest. These insights are also in the show notes. As always, thanks for listening.  Now, on to my guest for today, Steve Christensen, cofounder of Neuwly, an app for live-streaming events around the world and a platform for tour guides to connect with travelers.  Steve and his cofounder Greg believe that when people connect with others from around the world, we all become better for it. While Neuwly originally only provided virtual experiences, it’s building out to become a platform for guides and travelers, to help people explore other parts of the world both virtually and in-person. Steve came to really respect what tour guides have to offer when he went on a tour in Lithuania and realized how much can be learned and experienced when you have someone knowledgeable to show you around.  Steve sees Neuwly as becoming a place where guides can start to build a following and deepen relationships in order to grow their businesses in a world where both in-person and virtual experiences are in demand. He also envisions Neuwly being a site where people can connect with their “herd,” where they can find out what their friends have done and seen in order to find out more about places they visit. With Neuwly, like many entrepreneurs we’ve talked to, the founders are finding a way to use tech to bring together the best of both the old and the new. I also wanted to note that Neuwly is raising a round of funding. This is not investment advice or anything like that but I figured I’d let you know just in case what they are doing interests you. Feel free to email Steve at hello@neuwly.com. Now, let’s get better together. Actionable Insights One aspect that stands out when speaking to Steve is the simple clarity of Neuwly’s mission: to help people connect from around the world, because it makes for more compassionate, more empathetic people. The founders are passionate about their belief that learning about other cultures is vital to making the world a better place.  Look ahead. While participating in live-streaming events is one way people can connect and learn while travel is restricted, Steve is also building the platform for what comes next, offering a way for guides to build a following and advertise their events for real-world experiences, too.  Links to Explore Further Neuwly Neuwly on Instagram Steve Christensen on LinkedIn Get in touch at hello@neuwly.com Keep In Touch Book or Blog or Twitter or LinkedIn or JSYPR or The Story Funnel Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
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