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When our team first met Andrée Cazabon it was love at first Zoom call. Andrée is an award winning documentary filmmaker from Jed's home country of Canada. We connected because she runs Reconciliation Education, an organization that creates and curates a series of bilingual online courses which promote a renewed relationship between Indigenous Peoples and Canadians. We cover a lot in this episode, beginning with her groundbreaking and frankly heartbreaking documentary, Third World Canada, a controversial film that made a lot of powerful people pretty uncomfortable. This led to a rewarding journey that culminated in the formation of Reconciliation Education and a partnership with First Nations University. That’s all we're going to say about this episode, except that we're eternally grateful to have Andrée and her brilliant daughter in our lives and that our teams are collaborating to bring her work to a wider audience in Canada and perhaps beyond. Read the episode transcript here: https://www.moreycreative.com/blog/gfg-s2e12 -- Show Notes: Reconciliation Education Reconciliation Education Videos If you enjoyed this podcast, please subscribe, share with your friends and rate and review on Apple Podcasts and Podchaser. If you have any questions or suggestions for future guests, send an email to growforgood@moreycreative.com. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
Most of the time on Grow For Good™ we speak with companies that operate with people and planet in mind. After all, it’s a big world with a lot of people in it. You know what else? There’s a whole lot of animals of all kinds as well. So today is a departure from our people-focus, but not the planet, as we speak with Jeannette Ferran Astorga, the global head of sustainability for Zoetis, an enormous company dedicated to delivering quality medicines and vaccines to the animal kingdom, including our beloved pets.  Jeannette’s deep experience in corporate sustainability and ESG initiatives primed her for the challenge of representing this leading global provider of animal health and the challenges are immense. From assisting communities suffering from the effects of climate change in order to best serve the world’s animal populations to signing on to tackle some of the biggest challenges set forth by the United Nations in terms of sustainability goals, Zoetis has placed animal health and wellbeing and corporate social responsibility at the center of all they do.  We cover a lot of ground with Jeannette, including a bit about her background in CSR and how a company as large and far reaching as Zoetis coordinates activities that honor local communities in disparate regions of the world. We hope you enjoy this conversation with Jeannette as we continue our journey together learning how some companies, both large and small, are coming together to meet the challenges of tomorrow. Read the episode transcript here: https://www.moreycreative.com/blog/gfg-s2e11 -- Show Notes: Zoetis.com Zoetis' Sustainability Zoetis on LinkedIn Zoetis on Twitter If you enjoyed this podcast, please subscribe, share with your friends and rate and review on Apple Podcasts and Podchaser. If you have any questions or suggestions for future guests, send an email to growforgood@moreycreative.com. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
Imagine coming into a business, learning the ropes, fighting through challenges to establish a solid business model only to decide at the moment pretty much everything is clicking, that your number one revenue driver no longer fits your moral compass.  That’s what Basil Camu was faced with when he rose through the ranks of his family business Leaf & Limb. Basil’s father founded the company in the late ‘90s as a tree trimming and maintenance service in North Carolina. Father and son joined forces in 2010 and started a remarkable journey together that would transform the company and just might transform the industry.  There are sustainability journeys and then there is the family and team at Leaf & Limb, who are pushing the boundaries of what’s possible in the landscape industry. Read the episode transcript here. -- Show Notes: Leaf & Limb Leaf & Limb Instagram Project Pando If you enjoyed this podcast, please subscribe, share with your friends and rate and review on Apple Podcasts and Podchaser. If you have any questions or suggestions for future guests, send an email to growforgood@moreycreative.com. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
This is one of those interviews that makes you question if and how you’ll ever do enough in your own life. Not in a depressing way, but in a way that makes you question what is possible. Joe Kenner is the CEO of Greyston Bakery and the non-profit entity that helps support its efforts.  Many of you, whether you realize it or not, have probably come across Greyston’s products. At least if you like ice cream. Their brownies appear in several of the most classic and popular Ben & Jerry’s ice cream flavors. We talk with Joe about Greyston’s fascinating origin story, the amazing brownies the bakery turns out each day to the tune of 40,000 pounds and what makes this operation so very unique. It’s one of those incredible stories that will restore your faith in humanity and make you wonder just what is possible when you hear the lengths Greyston goes to help its community and serve those in need by offering them employment, dignity and mobility. Read the episode transcript here. -- Show Notes: Greyston Bakery Greyston Greyston / Ben & Jerry's Open Hiring® Impact Statement If you enjoyed this podcast, please subscribe, share with your friends and rate and review on Apple Podcasts and Podchaser. If you have any questions or suggestions for future guests, send an email to growforgood@moreycreative.com. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
Caroline is an experienced digital marketer with a deep understanding of web accessibility, something near and dear to our hearts. She is soft spoken and deliberate. An outdoor enthusiast with an artist’s appreciation of the visual world and a desire to bring these visions to life for blind and low vision internet users.  And like most purpose driven entrepreneurs she has the ability to stay focused on growing her business and the greater good that growth affords. In the complex world of digital inclusion, hers seems like a simple solution on the surface but it’s harder to execute than it seems and is often overlooked. And as you’ll hear, Caroline’s approach to alt text is not just powerful, it can sometimes be beautiful.  Read the episode transcript here. -- Show Notes: Scribely Scribely's Vitiligo Series Scribely on Instagram Caroline on LinkedIn Web Developer Chrome Extension If you enjoyed this podcast, please subscribe, share with your friends and rate and review on Apple Podcasts and Podchaser. If you have any questions or suggestions for future guests, send an email to growforgood@moreycreative.com. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
Some of the most inspiring innovations happen when curiosity seekers read the signs that are all around us. The things that most of us see and either don’t think twice about, or assume that they're simply too daunting to tackle.  Anna Bullus saw the signs everywhere. Those little white specks ground into the pavement and on sidewalks everywhere, or worse, maybe stuck to the bottom of your shoe: gum. Gumdrop was born when Anna Bullus wondered just how much gum was discarded and whether there was a way to give it a "second life." Not necessarily a question you might expect from someone who studied three dimensional design in college.  These are the Grow For Good™ stories we’ve come to cherish and we know you will too, when you hear Anna’s story and how she is creating a second life for one of the most universal products in the world.  Read the transcript here. -- Show Notes: Gumdrop Gum-tec® Shop Gumdrop If you enjoyed this podcast, please subscribe, share with your friends and rate and review on Apple Podcasts and Podchaser. If you have any questions or suggestions for future guests, send an email to growforgood@moreycreative.com. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
Kate Jakubas is an engineer at heart and by training—and she has the degrees to prove it. Armed with a bachelor's in material science engineering and a master's in environmental engineering and water management, Kate entered the workforce in areas that lined up nicely with her education. But, something nagged at her conscience. So she did what any good engineer would do. She learned yet another discipline and set about solving it.  The question that nagged at her was, "What exactly is in our cleaning products?" As she progressed in her career, the question never left the back of her mind; until she decided to pursue this with the rigor of an engineer and the spirit of an entrepreneur.  Born, raised and educated in Chicago, there was never a question that her journey into the corporate world as a business owner would take place here as well. Kate founded Meliora and shares her path of starting, running and now growing a people-friendly and planet-friendly line of cleaning solutions. Read the episode transcript here. -- Show Notes: Meliora Cleaning Products B Corp 1% For The Planet Women’s Voices for the Earth If you enjoyed this podcast, please subscribe, share with your friends and rate and review on Apple Podcasts and Podchaser. If you have any questions or suggestions for future guests, send an email to growforgood@moreycreative.com. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
In 2012 an organization called digitalundivided (DID) was founded with the mission of using innovation to create systemic change by catalyzing economic growth for Black and Latinx communities through women entrepreneurs. DID's various initiatives from technology, mentorship and community building have helped women of color recognize their visions and build upon their excellence to launch myriad companies.  This past year, board member Lauren Maillan was tapped as the new CEO of DID to bring her depth of experience as a brand marketer, public personality and entrepreneur to lead the company through the difficult days of COVID and beyond.  Lauren’s story is anything but typical. She’s a powerful force who sets an extreme example of what’s possible, lighting the path of progress for others to follow. Perhaps the most intriguing part of her story is how it all began as the youngest self-made winery owner in the country. Since then she hasn’t stopped building, iterating and creating for a second and now her mission is to bring her spirit and energy to hundreds of powerful and brilliant women of color to help them realize their dreams. -- Show Notes: digitalundivided ProjectDiane If you enjoyed this podcast, please subscribe, share with your friends and rate and review on Apple Podcasts and Podchaser. If you have any questions or suggestions for future guests, send an email to growforgood@moreycreative.com. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
1 in 3 Americans report experiencing severe online hate or harassment. Nearly a third are targeted due to sexual orientation, religion, race or ethnicity, gender identity or disability. Nearly two thirds of LGBTQ+ people have been harassed online.  Enter Leigh Honeywell, a powerhouse cyber security engineer and specialist who has worked for some of the most notable tech companies in the world. As a tech activist determined to bring awareness of online harassment and to close the gender gap in the tech industry, Leigh brought her skill set to bear to tackle these issues and help companies protect their people.   Leigh’s company Tall Poppy helps employees take control of their personal digital safety by protecting them from online harassment with security protocols, technology and training. She is one of the most celebrated professionals in her industry and she’s helping to shape the technology landscape through advocacy, technology and challenging those around her to do better.  -- Show Notes: Tall Poppy Pioneer Fund If you enjoyed this podcast, please subscribe, share with your friends and rate and review on Apple Podcasts and Podchaser. If you have any questions or suggestions for future guests, send an email to growforgood@moreycreative.com. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
We produce enough food every year to feed every single person on the planet. And yet millions around the world go hungry or live in a state of food insecurity. So what happens to the food we produce that doesn’t get consumed? It gets thrown away. Food production is one of the greatest marvels of our time matched only by our propensity to waste what could otherwise be consumed. As you’ve heard in a past episode, companies like American Organic Energy are finding ways to harness the power of food waste and reduce the amount that we throw away in landfills every year. Today we hear from a company that is attacking the problem from the other end of the system. Claire Oliverson is the U.S. Head of Marketing for a new app that connects restaurants, bakeries and grocers with consumers to collect food before it’s thrown away.  The app is called Too Good To Go and it’s a sensation in Europe that has finally landed in the United States. Available today in Boston and New York, Claire’s mission is to introduce the app to as many people in these cities as possible and break into new markets around the country. While the premise is simple, the technology is first class and the power of connecting people with something as basic and beautiful as food is elegant and necessary. -- Show Notes: Too Good To Go Website Too Good To Go for iOS Too Good To Go for Android If you enjoyed this podcast, please subscribe, share with your friends and rate and review on Apple Podcasts and Podchaser. If you have any questions or suggestions for future guests, send an email to growforgood@moreycreative.com. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
Christina Kolbjornsen came to Telemundo via a circuitous path but there’s no question she’s home. Armed with an economics degree and masters in public policy, Christina had a successful career in corporate America before snagging the opportunity to lead the CSR efforts for an organization she loves and admires.  In our wide ranging conversation, Christina and I talk about how the double shot of the Coronavirus and an intense election that put a spotlight on America’s growing hispanic population and how these factors influenced CSR at Telemundo in 2020. We also talk about what’s in store for the New Year, the types of partnerships the company seeks in the community and how to measure the impact of their efforts.   -- Show Notes: Telemundo El Poder en Ti If you enjoyed this podcast, please subscribe, share with your friends and rate and review on Apple Podcasts and Podchaser. If you have any questions or suggestions for future guests, send an email to growforgood@moreycreative.com. Find Morey Creative Studios on LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. Subscribe to our blog here. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
It’s our first episode back from a quick break to kick off Season Two of Grow for Good and what better way to begin than with a burst of inspiring energy from a young politician, executive and serial pursuer of advanced degrees. We returned inward to our home region to kick off the season because we thought it would be interesting to hear what the future sounds like. It sounds a lot like a young man named Josh Lafazan. I hope you enjoy the discussion with Josh as much as we did. And while we want you to take it all in because of the valuable information alone, you’ll be doing yourself a favor by remembering the name Josh Lafazan. No matter where you are in the country, I have a feeling you’re going to be hearing his name a lot in the future.  -- Show Notes: Nassau County  Northwell Health Community Health & Investment Joshlafazan.com Josh's Instagram Josh's Twitter If you enjoyed this podcast, please subscribe, share with your friends and rate and review on Apple Podcasts and Podchaser. If you have any questions or suggestions for future guests, send an email to growforgood@moreycreative.com. Find Morey Creative Studios on LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. Subscribe to our blog here. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
As we started kicking around ideas last year for a podcast that would highlight companies doing great things in the world, we landed on a concept that tackles the adage, “doing well by doing good.”  We decided to focus on for profit companies that fit two categories: Firms that are doing good but happen to have a profit motive attached to their respective causes (such as renewable energy or healthcare, for example) and firms with a profit motive that are known more for their community initiatives—think Bombas giving a pair of socks to the homeless for every pair sold, or Ben and Jerry’s and its social justice initiatives. We decided to name our show Grow For Good™ as it’s our company tagline and has a dual meaning. As a growth-driven digital marketing agency, we help our clients grow their businesses in a sustainable way by implementing best practices around web design, content marketing and lead generation. At the same time, we do our best to align with companies that use their success to do good things in the world. Hence the title, Grow For Good™.  The goal is to create a platform to explore how doing well financially and doing good in the world aren’t mutually exclusive. Like any good experiment, it sounds great in theory but we wanted to test it out in practice. The results do not disappoint.  In just a dozen episodes we have spoken with company founders and executives that are making a positive impact on the world in small and large ways. And some patterns have begun to emerge that we thought would be helpful to share. We'll be back with Season Two before you know it. -- If you enjoyed this podcast, please subscribe, share with your friends and rate and review on Apple Podcasts and Podchaser. If you have any questions or suggestions for future guests, send an email to growforgood@moreycreative.com. Find Morey Creative Studios on LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. Subscribe to our blog here. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
What do you do when you have an entrepreneur’s brain, a charitable heart, singer’s soul and public speaker’s confidence? Change the world of course. Megha Desai is the possessor of all these gifts and the one who leverages them to help empower women and children all over the world.  Megha is president of the Desai Foundation, a public foundation that aims to elevate the health and livelihood of women and children through community programs in the U.S. and India. The programs they fund and facilitate range from menstrual health and hygiene to hard skills and computer science. All in the name of what Megha calls cultivating dignity.  Megha began her career in marketing and advertising, achieving incredible success in her field, which led her ultimately to founding her own marketing agency. Her true passion to help others found a way of creeping into most of her projects as she helped clients develop programs with purpose and focus on more holistic outcomes. Eventually the growth of the foundation and the pull of helping communities here and abroad brought Megha to a crossroads. With a new board of directors in place and an opportunity to develop more impactful programs through the auspices of the foundation, she put her private career on hold and agreed to run the foundation. For a year.   That was a little over four years ago. All of Megha’s energy, intellect, passion and enthusiasm is now poured into her work with the foundation. And the skills she developed in private industry enabled her to see process and outcomes differently than most.  -- Show Notes: Desai Foundation Lotus Festival Megha Desai If you enjoyed this podcast, please subscribe, share with your friends and rate and review on Apple Podcasts and Podchaser. If you have any questions or suggestions for future guests, send an email to growforgood@moreycreative.com. Find Morey Creative Studios on LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. Subscribe to our blog here. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
Not many people know about Fair Harbor the place. But more and more are becoming aware of its clothing namesake. The location is a special hideaway on a strip of Long Island beach called Fire Island. A place where cars aren’t allowed and everyone packs their gear in little red wagons. It’s where the founders in our story spent summers growing up and what inspired their journey.  Jake Danehy and his younger sister Caroline finish each other’s sentences. Literally. Growing up they shared a passion for the beach and the ocean because of the time they spent with their family at Fair Harbor. Every year they grew increasingly concerned about the amount of plastic that washed up ashore. This would stick with them as they grew older and headed off to college.  Caroline followed her big brother to Colgate University in upstate New York. And it was Colgate that provided the fire power behind their idea to create a sustainable beachwear product line using recycled materials. Through Colgate’s entrepreneur accelerator program the duo got their vision off the ground and they haven’t looked back since.  Like most startups, Caroline and Jake did it all in the beginning. From sourcing and manufacturing to marketing and design, they threw themselves into the business. Jake would get a sorely needed reprieve when Caroline graduated Colgate and was able to dedicate herself full-time to the venture. Today, Fair Harbor, the company, is an established brand that boasts partnerships with well-known retailers, a loyal customer following and growing team all focused on the original vision the siblings developed over many summers at Fair Harbor, the place. -- Show Notes: Fair Harbor If you enjoyed this podcast, please subscribe, share with your friends and rate and review on Apple Podcasts and Podchaser. If you have any questions or suggestions for future guests, send an email to growforgood@moreycreative.com. Find Morey Creative Studios on LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. Subscribe to our blog here. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
The world of SaaS, or software as a service, is heating up. As more and more of the economy migrates to the cloud to find operational solutions for real-world problems, SaaS platforms are booming and improving every day. Platform development is in high demand and the market is getting increasingly competitive. From accounting and HR to marketing and finance, the business of business is being reimagined in the cloud.  But what if the business issue you’re trying to solve isn’t marketing or sales related. What if it was something more than just streamlining work processes to enhance outcomes in various business departments? What if your business was helping humans? Humans who have fallen through the cracks and rely on safety nets and services to merely survive? What would that even look like? Since 2003, a company called Bitfocus has been doing just that. Bitfocus helps communities use technology, data and policy to improve their systems of care. It’s a software company that designs data systems such as Clarity Human Services, their SaaS platform, to connect a community’s most vulnerable populations to the most effective services and resources available to them. Their outcomes are more than improved processes and productivity workflows. They’re literally life enhancing.  We talk to Jeff Ugai, Chief Operating Officer of Bitfocus about their approach to technology, the markets they serve and what it has been like to provide such a critical service during a pandemic. -- Show Notes: Bitfocus If you enjoyed this podcast, please subscribe, share with your friends and rate and review on Apple Podcasts and Podchaser. If you have any questions or suggestions for future guests, send an email to growforgood@moreycreative.com. Find Morey Creative Studios on LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. Subscribe to our blog here. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
If you’ve ever hit a point in your life where you wonder what it’s all for and dream of throwing it all away to fulfill your passions, our guest today has probably already done it. Mike LaVecchia, founder of Grain Surfboards, is like a living, breathing X-Games character. Skateboarding, Biking, snowboarding—before everyone did it—sailing and surfing. If you’ve ever sat on your couch watching someone else rip it, shred it, jump it, sail it, Mike’s probably already done it.  But it was Mike’s love for the sea and his experience sailing from Maine to the Caribbean that sparked what would become an incredible career as a craftsman. He began working on boatbuilding as a young man then decided to apply his building skills to one of his greatest loves—surfing.  Moving back to Maine full-time, Mike and a couple of friends set about building classic surfboards that were completely new to an entire generation of surfers, an environmentally conscious generation with an appreciation for sustainability. As the industry grew over the years, Mike and company realized that the boards themselves had moved far from where they started and that the materials used in constructing boards were actually having a negative impact on the environment.  Today Grain Surfboards is an iconic member of the surfing community and their boards are sought after by surfing enthusiasts from around the world. Success hasn’t stopped Mike and his crew from innovating and finding creative partnerships and collaborations that introduce the simple majesty of wood surfboards to the next generation of surfers.  We’ll break it all down in our conversation with Mike LaVecchia as we get a lesson in surf culture, how his boards are hand-crafted with love and delve into yet another inspiring story of beneficial entrepreneurship on Grow For Good. -- Show Notes: Grain Surfboards If you enjoyed this podcast, please subscribe, share with your friends and rate and review on Apple Podcasts and Podchaser. If you have any questions or suggestions for future guests, send an email to growforgood@moreycreative.com. Find Morey Creative Studios on LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. Subscribe to our blog here. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
It’s estimated that the beauty industry has a market cap of more than 500 billion dollars in the United States alone. Household names such as Loreal and Estée Lauder and retailers such as Sephora and Ulta are big business and influence nearly every part of our society. From magazine covers to instagram, brick and mortar stores to online marketplaces, beauty products reflect who are as a society.  For years the industry has employed persons of all backgrounds and gender identities. More recently industry leaders have leaned into the diversity and inclusion movement with initiatives such as Pull Up or Shut Up designed to force transparency among beauty brands on their diversity initiatives. But Laura Kraber noticed something else was missing from the market.  So many of the creative minds in the beauty industry toiled behind the scenes to produce products and images that fit neatly into gender roles and beauty stereotypes. Though not an entrepreneur by nature, Kraber watched and listened to her kids as they navigated effortlessly through the world of gender fluidity when an idea struck her and nagged at her conscience.  The Yale grad who worked in marketing throughout her career and was keenly familiar with the startup culture never saw herself as an entrepreneur. But the more she researched the cosmetic industry she realized that while the industry was rich with talent of all gender identities, there were few, if any products that truly spoke to them as consumers. Kraber had no background in cosmetics and it was risky to enter an industry with so many established brands, but the idea wouldn’t leave her mind. Thus, We Are Fluide was born.  We Are Fluide showcases and celebrates gender-expansive beauty and under-represented faces and voices and supports young people’s self-expression and creativity. We talk to founder Laura Kraber about executing on a vision, remaining focused during a pandemic and driving fearlessly into her mission. -- Show Notes: We Are Fluide If you enjoyed this podcast, please subscribe, share with your friends and rate and review on Apple Podcasts and Podchaser. If you have any questions or suggestions for future guests, send an email to growforgood@moreycreative.com. Find Morey Creative Studios on LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. Subscribe to our blog here. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
It’s estimated that 8 million pieces of plastic pollution end up in our oceans. Every day. 8 million pieces per day. As a result, more than 100,000 marine mammals and turtles, and 1 million seabirds are killed by plastic pollution each year.  By now we’ve all seen the images of the vast tracts of plastic islands in the ocean that amount to ecocide. The problem is so pervasive and persistent that plastic has wound up in our food supply as a result of ocean and animal life consuming our waste, and us consuming them. It’s a problem the world has largely ignored due to the massive influence of plastic in all areas of manufacturing and consumption. Together with her colleagues Alexey and Gilmar, a young entrepreneur from New Zealand named Emma Grose, who now makes her home in the United States, founded a company to tackle two small pieces of the plastic puzzle. Toothbrushes and drinking straws. Sounds small indeed, right? Let’s start with where Emma’s journey began and talk toothbrushes. According to studies, 1 billion toothbrushes are thrown away every year in the United States alone. That’s 50 million pounds of waste every year. Suddenly, Emma’s idea doesn’t sound so small.  In this episode we speak with Emma about her companies Mable Brush and Hay Straws. Mable Brush manufactures bamboo toothbrushes that are delivered in sustainable packaging. Hay Straws manufacturers drinking straws that are made of, well, hay. Wheat to be exact. We talk to Emma about the challenges of launching a sustainable company, how to get scale with new products that challenge conventional wisdom and even touch on how a children’s cartoon influenced the founders’ vision for a more sustainable future.  -- Show Notes: Mable Brush Hay! Straws If you enjoyed this podcast, please subscribe, share with your friends and rate and review on Apple Podcasts and Podchaser. If you have any questions or suggestions for future guests, send an email to growforgood@moreycreative.com. Find Morey Creative Studios on LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. Subscribe to our blog here. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
Marcus Baskerville, son of Sacramento, came by his love of craft beer honestly. You see, California is the craft beer capital of the country with the most independent breweries per capita - and in sheer numbers California has double the amount of breweries than the next most popular state. Baskerville began experimenting with a home brew kit his sister had purchased and after a while became quite renowned in the home brew scene. The scene was rich with information on becoming a better brewer and mentors were abundant and eager to share. Eventually he relocated to San Antonio, Texas, got a regular day job and set about making a name for himself in his new hometown known more for Dos Equis than craft beer.  Soon, Baskerville was flourishing as a home brewer and was offered a chance to do a tap takeover at a local brewpub. Marcus Baskerville was officially in the craft brew game. Like hundreds of bearded hipsters with tattoos and a killer recipe before him, Baskerville went from hobbyist to entrepreneur and wound up opening his own craft beer brewery with friend and colleague Mike Holt called Weathered Souls. A couple of things set Baskerville apart from his predecessors. First, is the Weathered Souls signature stout. Another thing is that he was one of only a handful of brewers in San Antonio. Oh, and Marcus Baskerville is Black.  Now you might not think a Black head brewer and entrepreneur is unlikely in this day and age. But the numbers speak for themselves. Craft brewing is a white male dominated industry like almost no other. Female head brewers make up roughly five percent of all head brewers in the country. Black brewers are around one percent. Being a Black head brewer is only part of this Grow for Good story. Like all great entrepreneur stories, there’s so much more to tell and Marcus Baskerville is far from one dimensional, and neither are his beers. We’ll talk more about his craft, his position in the industry and an idea he had this summer that sparked a revolution in the industry. -- Show Notes: Weathered Souls Brewing Co. Black Is Beautiful If you enjoyed this podcast, please subscribe, share with your friends and rate and review on Apple Podcasts and Podchaser. If you have any questions or suggestions for future guests, send an email to growforgood@moreycreative.com. Find Morey Creative Studios on LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. Subscribe to our blog here. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
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