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Coronavirus Daily

Author: NPR

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A daily news podcast about the coronavirus pandemic, covering all dimensions of the story from science to economics and politics as well as society and culture. Hosted by Kelly McEvers from Embedded. Approximately 10 minutes in length. Publishing weekday afternoons. Includes stories and interviews from NPR's Science, International, National, Business and Washington reporting teams, as well as station reporters, and the crews at Morning Edition and All Things Considered.
63 Episodes
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The more we learn about the coronavirus, the clearer it becomes that it's disproportionately affecting communities of color. And as protests continue across the country, some health experts worry that the hardest hit areas could be in for another wave of cases. By almost every economic measure, black Americans have a harder time getting a leg up. As the pandemic has sent the country's economy into the worst downturn in generations, it's only gotten worse. More from NPR's Scott Horsley and the team at NPR's Planet Money. Despite all of this, there is a bit of good news. Some communities across the country are reporting a decrease in COVID-19 cases. NPR's Rob Stein breaks down the national outlook. [LINK TK]Plus, advice on how to combat anxiety, avoid insomnia and get some rest. Sign up for 'The New Normal' newsletter.You can find more sleep tips on NPR's Life Kit on Apple Podcasts, Spotify and NPR One. Find and support your local public radio station
The coronavirus pandemic has collided with protests all over the country over police brutality and the deaths of George Floyd in Minneapolis and many other black Americans. Now public health officials are concerned for the health of protesters. Atlanta mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms even encouraged protesters in her city to get tested.NPR's Pam Fessler reports the legal fight between Democrats and Republicans over mail-in voting has intensified ever since the pandemic hit.Listen to Short Wave's episode about what we will ⁠— and won't ⁠— remember about the pandemic on Apple Podcasts, Spotify and NPR One. Find and support your local public radio stationSign up for 'The New Normal' newsletter
Bestselling author Cheryl Strayed joins NPR's Ari Shaprio as listeners share stories about acts of kindness they've experienced.These excerpts come from NPR's nightly radio show about the coronavirus crisis, The National Conversation. In this episode:-NPR reporter Miles Parks answers questions about how upcoming elections can be run safely.-Cheryl Strayed, bestselling author of 'Wild' and host of the podcast Sugar Calling, joins NPR host Ari Shapiro to hear listeners' stories about acts of kindness during the pandemic.Find and support your local public radio station.
Democrats want another coronavirus relief bill. A sticking point for Republicans is $600 a week in federal unemployment benefits — which means some workers have been able to collect more money on unemployment than they did in their previous jobs.Essential workers who have continued to work may have received temporary wage bumps. But NPR's Alina Selyukh reports many companies are ending that hazard pay. Challenges to statewide stay-at-home orders are mounting in rural communities that have few coronavirus cases. NPR's Kirk Siegler reports on the dispute in Baker County, Oregon. Plus, experts weigh in on the safety of different summer activities.Find and support your local public radio stationSign up for 'The New Normal' newsletter
A new study suggests the coronavirus is both more common and less deadly than it first appeared, NPR's Jon Hamilton reports. From NPR's Joel Rose: a shortage of machines to process tests is the latest bottleneck in the pandemic supply chain.Certain countries like New Zealand, Germany and several nations in Asia have been successful in controlling the coronvavirus. NPR's Jason Beaubien reports on how leadership played a strong role. Mara Gay is 33-years-old, lives in New York City and got sick with COVID-19 in April. She spoke with NPR's Michel Martin about her long recovery process, despite being young and healthy.Plus, two teenagers who were looking forward to competing in the Scripps National Spelling Bee, which was cancelled this week. Find and support your local public radio stationSign up for 'The New Normal' newsletter
According to Johns Hopkins University, more than 100,000 people have died in the United States from COVID-19, and experts at the World Health Organization warn a second peak of COVID-19 infections could occur during this first wave of the virus. Meanwhile, the global race for a vaccine is generating competition between nations, mainly the U.S. and China. New numbers from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reveal more than 60,000 health care workers have been infected with COVID-19, and almost 300 have died. This is a dramatic increase since the CDC first released numbers six weeks ago. Bangladesh has extended its coronavirus lockdown — except for the garment factories. But with big brands canceling orders, workers face pay cuts, hunger and little to no social distancing. Plus, an obituary writer reflects on COVID-19 deaths.Find and support your local public radio stationSign up for 'The New Normal' newsletter
As the United States nears 100,000 coronavirus deaths and states begin to re-open, what's next for the country? Dr. Ashish Jha of Harvard's Global Health Institute cautions it's still early in the crisis. Researchers have found the coronavirus was introduced to the U.S. in part by affluent travelers — but those weren't the people hit the hardest. Cathy Cody owns a janitorial company in a Georgia community with a high rate of COVID-19. Her company offers a new service boxing up the belongings of residents who have died. Read or listen to the full story from NPR's Morning Edition.Plus, rollerblading is having a moment.Find and support your local public radio stationSign up for 'The New Normal' newsletter
From NPR's Embedded: The workers who produce pork, chicken, and beef in plants around the country have been deemed "essential" by the government and their employers. Now, the factories where they work have become some of the largest clusters for the coronavirus in the country. The workers, many of whom are immigrants, say their bosses have not done enough to protect them. Regular episodes return tomorrow.
NPR Science Correspondent Joe Palca answers listener questions about vaccine development, and medical experts tackle questions sent in by kids.These excerpts come from NPR's nightly radio show about the coronavirus crisis, The National Conversation. In this episode:-NPR Science Correspondent Joe Palca explains how vaccines are made and the unique challenges associated with COVID-19.-Kids' questions are answered by pediatric nurse practitioner Suzannah Stivison from the Capitol Medical Group in Washington, D.C., and Dr. Wanjiku Njoroge, medical director for the Young Child Clinic at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia.Find and support your local public radio station.
Earlier this week, an experimental coronavirus vaccine showed promise. But, for the moment, the full data from that research hasn't been released. Friday morning, Dr. Anthony Fauci told NPR he's seen the data and it looks "quite promising." According to Fauci, barring any setbacks, the US is on track to have a vaccine by early next year. Millions of Americans are turning to food banks to help feed their families during the pandemic. A new federal program pays farmers who've lost restaurant and school business to donate the excess to community organizations. But even the people in charge of these organizations say direct cash assistance is a better way to feed Americans in need.A few months ago, before the lock downs, nearly 3,000 paratroopers of the 82nd Airborne Division left on a short-notice deployment to the Middle East. The 82nd is coming back is being welcomed back to a changed nation and a changed military.Plus, about 180 people are hunkered down together in a Jerusalem hotel, recovering from COVID-19. Patients from all walks of life — Israelis, Palestinians, religious, secular groups that don't usually mix — are all getting along. Listen to the full Rough Translation podcast "Hotel Corona."Sign up for 'The New Normal' newsletterFind and support your local public radio station
A new analysis from Columbia University says that roughly 36,000 people could've been saved if the United States had started social distancing just one week earlier. But that all hinges on whether people would have been willing to stay home. Sign up for 'The New Normal' newsletterResearch with mice, guinea pigs and monkeys is making scientists increasingly optimistic about the chances for developing a COVID-19 vaccine. Three studies released Wednesday show promising results after the animals received experimental vaccines. But public health success will require global cooperation. Meanwhile, state unemployment agencies are feeling the pinch as they try to keep up with unparalleled demand for their services. And as bordering towns begin to ease stay-at-home restrictions, the logistics around reopening neighboring areas is leading to quite a bit of confusion. Plus, sometimes you just need a hug. And if you're isolating alone, TikTok star Tabitha Brown has got you covered with comfort content to help you feel loved.
Three-quarters of Americans are concerned that a second wave of coronavirus cases will emerge, a new NPR/PBS NewsHour/Marist poll finds. Despite that, groups around the country, including in Michigan, are protesting state lockdowns. President Trump's stance on hydroxychloroquine has made the drug harder to study, according to some scientists. Researchers have been digging into contact tracing data from countries that had early outbreaks. Data suggest high risk activities include large indoor gatherings. Lower risk is going to the grocery store.Plus, what is happening with classroom pets when school is out of session due to the coronavirus. Reporter Sara Stacke's story with photos.You can hear more about the NPR poll on the NPR Politics Podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify and NPR One.Find and support your local public radio stationSign up for 'The New Normal' newsletter
There are still a lot of questions about how the coronavirus is transmitted through air. Researchers are looking at how the virus is spread indoors and how to safely have people under one roof. As states around the country lift restrictions and businesses reopen, many workers in close-contact jobs are scared for their health and would rather stay on unemployment. NPR's Chris Arnold reports on what options workers have.Listen to Short Wave's episode about why it's so hard to remember what day it is and some tips for giving time more meaning on Apple Podcasts, Spotify and NPR One.Find and support your local public radio stationSign up for 'The New Normal' newsletter
A new coronavirus vaccine candidate shows encouraging results. It's early, but preliminary data shows it appears to be eliciting the kind of immune response capable of preventing disease. Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell has been signaling that more government spending might be necessary to prevent long-term economic damage. As the pandemic becomes more political, researchers are concerned debates over masks, social distancing and reopening the economy are inflaming an already divided nation. Incidents of violence are rare, but concerning to experts.Plus, a 102-year-old woman who survived the influenza of 1918, the Great Depression, World War II and now, COVID-19.Find and support your local public radio stationSign up for 'The New Normal' newsletter
Sleep experts answer listener questions about insomnia, and a nurse practitioner offers advice to parents about summer childcare.These excerpts come from NPR's nightly radio show about the coronavirus crisis, 'The National Conversation with All Things Considered.' In this episode:- Dr. Sonia Ancoli-Israel of the Center for Circadian Biology, and Dr. Christina McCrae of the Mizzou Sleep Research Lab offer advice to listeners who are having trouble falling asleep.- Pediatric nurse practitioner Suzannah Stivison answers parents' questions about childcare this summer.If you have a question, you can share it at npr.org/nationalconversation, or tweet with the hashtag, #NPRConversation.We'll return with a regular episode of Coronavirus Daily on Monday.
To speed up the process of developing a coronavirus vaccine, the Trump Administration says the government will invest in manufacturing the top candidates even before one is proven to work.As parts of the country reopen, different rules apply across state and even city lines, leaving business owners trying to figure things out for themselves, 'All Things Considered' host Ari Shapiro reports.Demand for goods and services plunged in April according to new data. NPR's Stacey Vanek Smith of The Indicator reports on pent-up demand and what that means for the future of the U.S. economy.The Navajo Nation has one of the highest rates of COVID-19 deaths per capita in the United States. NPR's Code Switch podcast examines why Native Americans have been so hard hit by the coronavirus. Listen to their episode on race and COVID-19 on Apple Podcasts, Spotify and NPR One.Listen to Throughline's episode about the origins of the N95 mask on Apple Podcasts, Spotify and NPR One.Find and support your local public radio stationSubmit a question for "The National Conversation"Sign up for 'The New Normal' newsletter
Career government scientist-turned-whistleblower Rick Bright testified before Congress Thursday that without a stronger federal response to the coronavirus, 2020 could be the "darkest winter in modern history."Schools might not open everywhere in the fall, but some experts say keeping kids home is a health risk, too.Apple and Google want to develop technology to track the spread of COVID-19 while protecting individuals' privacy, while some states like North Dakota are developing their own apps.Plus, tips on social distancing from someone who's been doing it for 50 years: Billy Barr's movie recommendations spreadsheet.Listen to the NPR Politics Podcast's recap of today's hearing on Apple Podcasts, Spotify and NPR One.Send your remembrance of a loved one to embedded@npr.org. Find and support your local public radio stationSign up for 'The New Normal' newsletter
The U.S. has more coronavirus deaths than any country in the world. Dr. Anthony Fauci says the number of American fatalities is likely an under count.Nearly 40% of households making less than $40,000 a year lost a job in March. Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell said on Wednesday that additional government spending may be necessary to avoid long-lasting economic fallout.A small but vocal minority of people are pushing back against public health measures that experts say are life-saving. It's not the first time Americans have resisted government measures during a pandemic. Listen to Embedded's episode on the backlash on Apple Podcasts, Spotify and NPR One. President Trump has prioritized getting sports running again after the coronavirus lockdown. But NPR's Scott Detrow reports the idea is facing logistical and safety challenges.Find and support your local public radio stationSign up for 'The New Normal' newsletter
In a Senate committee hearing on Tuesday, Chair Lamar Alexander of Tennessee asked Dr. Anthony Fauci whether coronavirus treatments or a vaccine could be developed in time to allow college students to return to school in the fall. Fauci said that "would be a bridge too far." There's a full recap of today's hearing on The NPR Politics Podcast. listen on Apple Podcasts, Spotify and NPR One.New York is trying to build what could become one of the largest contact tracing programs for COVID-19. Starting this month, public health officials there are looking to hire as many as 17,000 investigators.Nursing homes account for nearly half of COVID-19 deaths in some states. NPR's Ina Jaffe reports on why nursing homes have been so vulnerable to the virus and what could be done to improve them in the future.Plus, a professional musician sidelined by the coronavirus becomes a one-man marching band for his neighborhood.Find and support your local public radio stationSign up for 'The New Normal' newsletter
Democrats want another stimulus plan, but Treasury secretary Steve Mnuchin says the Trump administration wants to wait before providing any further aid. As more states ease stay-at-home orders, NPR's Allison Aubrey reports on ways to stay safe while seeing friends, going to church and returning to work. The CDC still recommends people wear masks. The coronavirus pandemic has had a disproportionately large effect on black Americans. Lawmakers and local officials are looking for ways to make sure the communities hit hardest are getting the right information about the virus.In Life Kit's latest episode, Sesame Street's Grover answers kids' questions about the coronavirus on Apple Podcasts, Spotify and NPR One. Find and support your local public radio stationSign up for 'The New Normal' newsletter
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Comments (31)

alli lent

the people protesting now to open up should learn from the socially distance protestors in this story..

May 25th
Reply (1)

alli lent

next time I hear Trump make this continued shutdown all about him and people sabotaging him, I'm seriously going to throw up. the ego on him is so repulsive - people are dying but this shut down is about his reelection? c'mon.. how can anyone be that delusional?

May 14th
Reply (1)

Dryad

I work at Walmart and had no idea any protests were going on!

May 7th
Reply

Don Purpura

50 Cent Trolls

May 2nd
Reply

Truls Nordin

Unsubbing to this politically biased brainwashing.

May 1st
Reply

Don Purpura

Tell Muslims not smear Oo on walls.

Apr 24th
Reply

Gail B

stupid

Apr 24th
Reply

Corey Max

Clean your hands often. Use soap and water, or an alcohol-based hand rub. https://createawikipageforyourbusiness.com/

Apr 23rd
Reply

alli lent

that website is cool and all but I absolutely do not miss office sounds when I'm working at home lol

Apr 23rd
Reply

Brian Knowles

that's several episodes in a row where the focus has been on African Americans and a disproportionate risk with their communities. Is there a specific political agenda/message that is being expressed here? So far, the largest determining factor seems to be financial and class status (E.G. an entire NBA team getting tested, along with Congress), so why is skin color constantly being focused on in this program, rather than the largest determining factor which is class status? I'm probably going to stop listening to this, it's gone from informational, to political. Message from those of us who don't drink the Kool-Aid and subsequently subscribe to either blue or red ideology: stop the politics, just give us the information. What happened to public radio being objective?

Apr 13th
Reply

Get money

Show love

Apr 13th
Reply

Kari Gilbert-Whitman

Thank you so much for this podcast! We are monthly sustainers and appreciate your efforts.

Apr 12th
Reply

Don Purpura

Did anybody say Wuhan Bat eaters?

Apr 6th
Reply

Don Purpura

Should have banned flights from Asia to US when virus first started .

Apr 5th
Reply

Teresa Hansen

if this virus doesnt like heat why then would the people infected not sit in a sauna?

Apr 5th
Reply (3)

Don Purpura

Corporate America making Ventilators now ? Why not import from China for a lower cost or is GM or Ford doing this already?

Apr 4th
Reply

Don Purpura

Wuhan Virus could have been contained if CCP would have kept then folks locked in when virus first broke out but no they spread four corners of the world like fricken cockroaches

Apr 4th
Reply

George Evans

"saying that we have done more tests than any other country is just wrong" <- paraphrasing something said by the show that is itself just wrong. Trump said nothing about per capita, so don't say he was wrong when he wasn't. That's all. Otherwise a great episode.

Apr 3rd
Reply (2)

Daniel Miladinovich

Testing would save our country. I can't believe that we, as a nation, have not prioritized it. That quote from Trump really worries me.

Apr 1st
Reply

Marty Stanley

pretty crazy how in the last 4 days the number of known active cases in the US have doubled!!

Mar 31st
Reply
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