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The NPR Politics Podcast

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Every weekday, NPR's best political reporters are there to explain the big news coming out of Washington and the campaign trail. They don't just tell you what happened. They tell you why it matters. Every afternoon.
761 Episodes
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As the country erupts in protests over police brutality and racism, two-thirds of Americans think President Trump has increased racial tensions. That poll comes as news that 2.5 million American jobs were added in May as Trump encourages the country to reopen. Plus, a look at the type of leadership Americans want in this moment.This episode: campaign correspondent Scott Detrow, campaign correspondent Asma Khalid, White House reporter Ayesha Rascoe, and editor & correspondent Ron Elving.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
Since the White House has increased its military in the nation's capital, more protesters are gathering by the day. The protests continue to remain largely peaceful despite the Trump administration's focus on violence. Plus, misinformation is spreading quickly as more people are turning to social media to understand what's happening on the ground.This episode: campaign correspondent Scott Detrow, political reporter Alan Wise, political reporter Miles Parks, and investigations reporter Tim Mak.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station
Despite curfews imposed across the country, protesters continue to gather to demand action after the death of George Floyd. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi has called on the the Congressional Black Caucus to draft legislation while President Trump continues to focus on quelling the protests.This episode: campaign correspondent Scott Detrow, White House reporter Ayesha Rascoe, and congressional correspondent Kelsey Snell.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station
Former Vice President Joe Biden condemned both police violence and President Trump's increasingly confrontational response to widespread unrest in a Tuesday morning speech delivered at Philadelphia City Hall. This episode: campaign correspondent Scott Detrow, campaign reporter Juana Summers, and senior political ediotr and correspondent Domenico Montanaro.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station
Escalating his rhetoric during a period of roiling national crises, President Trump on Monday threatened to deploy the U.S. military to cities or states that don't take "necessary" actions to halt violent protests, saying the armed forces will "quickly solve the problem for them." This episode: White House correspondent Tamara Keith, White House reporter Ayesha Rascoe, and national political correspondent Mara Liasson.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station
President Trump on Monday called governors weak and urged them to "dominate" to prevent further violent demonstrations following the death of George Floyd, a black man in Minneapolis who died after a white police officer kneeled on his neck. Plus former Vice President Joe Biden meets with black leaders and is encouraged to listen to younger African-Americans.This episode: campaign correspondent Scott Detrow, White House reporter Ayesha Rascoe, and national political correspondent Mara Liasson.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station
President Trump responded to violent protests days after the killing of a black man. He said he will send in the National Guard, adding: "When the looting starts, the shooting starts." Joe Biden called on the nation to better empathize with the pain of black Americans in the wake of the death of the black man by a white police officer.Plus, the death toll from the coronavirus pandemic reaches a 100,000 milestone. This episode: Congressional correspondent Susan Davis, White House reporter Ayesha Rascoe, campaign correspondent Scott Detrow, and science correspondent Richard Harris.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station
The Justice Department says it has made the investigation into George Floyd's death "a top priority," after furor over a video depicting a white police officer kneeling on his neck spilled over into widespread protests for a second night. Both Democrats and Republicans called Floyd's death a tragedy. But what action could come from it?This episode: Congressional correspondent Susan Davis, White House reporter Ayesha Rascoe, and justice correspondent Ryan Lucas.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station
Twitter has placed a fact-checking warning on a pair of tweets issued by President Trump in which he claims without evidence that mail-in ballots are fraudulent. The label comes in the middle of a series of tweets from the president touting a conspiracy theory.This episode: Congressional correspondent Susan Davis, White House correspondent Tamara Keith, and political reporter Miles Parks.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station
President Trump has threatened to relocate the Republican National Convention, which has been scheduled to take place in Charlotte, N.C., in August. He is objecting to the governor's safety measures.Meanwhile Democrats weigh options for how they may host their own convention.This episode: Congressional correspondent Susan Davis, White House correspondent Tamara Keith, and political reporter Juana Summers.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station
The coronavirus has reshaped how voting may happen for the 2020 elections, and Democrats and Republicans are battling in courts across the country trying to get the upper hand in November. But because the landscape has changed so quickly, neither party is sure what exactly gives them an advantage.This episode: White House correspondent Tamara Keith, political reporter Miles Parks, and correspondent Pam Fessler.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station
In an at-times tense exchange on the radio show Breakfast Club, former Vice President Joe Biden said, "If you have a problem figuring out whether you're for me or Trump, then you ain't black." The comments drew widespread criticism.Plus, China moves to exert more control over Hong Kong causing more tension with the United States.This episode: White House correspondent Tamara Keith, reporter Juana Summers, editor & correspondent Ron Elving, Congressional correspondent Kelsey Snell, and chief economic correspondent Scott Horsley.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station
The president with a major social media presence is facing a Democratic challenger with fewer digital resources. Biden's strategy counts on real-world conditions overcoming Trump's virtual dominance. This episode: congressional correspondent Susan Davis, White House correspondent Tamara Keith, and campaign correspondent Asma Khalid. Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station
Hoping to build on the party's success in 2018, the Democratic Party will take aim at federal challengers who want to repeal Obamacare and state candidates who resist Medicare expansion. Plus, a new NPR/PBS NewsHour/Marist poll finds that two-thirds of Americans do not expect their daily lives to return to normal for at least six months.This episode: White House correspondent Tamara Keith, congressional correspondent Susan Davis, and senior political editor and correspondent Domenico Montanaro. Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station
Members of the Senate Banking Committee squabbled Tuesday over how quickly the U.S. economy can rebound from the coronavirus shutdown and whether the federal government is doing enough to support struggling families and businesses in the meantime. This episode: White House correspondent Tamara Keith, congressional reporter Claudia Grisales, and chief economic correspondent Scott Horsley.
Congressional Democrats announced Saturday they're requesting all records and documents regarding President Trump's decision to fire State Department Inspector General Steve Linick, the fourth government watchdog Trump has fired or sought to remove in the last six weeks. Plus, former President Obama addresses 2020 graduates and says the United States lacks the leadership to fight the pandemic. This episode: White House correspondent Tamara Keith, White House reporter Ayesha Rascoe, and national political correspondent Mara Liasson.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station
In this week's roundup: Senator Richard Burr, Republican of North Carolina, had his cell phone seized by the FBI as they investigate his stock trades in the weeks before the coronavirus pandemic gathered steam in the U.S. And, what will the Supreme Court say about the limits on a president's ability to forestall investigations into his conduct?This episode: White House correspondent Tamara Keith, Justice Department correspondent Ryan Lucas, congressional correspondent Kelsey Snell, and chief legal affairs correspondent Nina Totenberg.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station
Career government scientist Rick Bright testified that he was pushed out as the head of a government medical research agency after pushing back against higher-ups over an under-researched coronavirus treatment touted by the president. Bright says raised alarms about critical supply shortages early on in the pandemic. This episode: campaign correspondent Asma Khalid, congressional correspondent Susan Davis, science correspondent Allison Aubrey. Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station
House Democrats plan to move forward with a $3 trillion bill for additional coronavirus relief, following up on the historic $2 trillion aid package passed in March. It prioritizes granting hazard pay to front-line workers and providing aid to state and local governments, which had not been allotted in previous bills. It is seen as an opening salvo in a long series of negotiations on the next relief package.This episode: campaign correspondent Asma Khalid, congressional editor Deirdre Walsh, and national political correspondent Mara Liasson.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station
Public health needs continue to stymie lawmakers' hopes for an immediate economic reopening. The nation's top health experts appeared — virtually — before a Senate committee today and provided updates on coronavirus testing and the state of the outbreak.This episode: campaign correspondent Asma Khalid, White House correspondent Ayesha Rascoe, and science correspondent Richard Harris.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station
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Comments (413)

Jimmy Jurassic

"That black guy who got killed by the cops." "Which one?" "The one who they suffocated." "Which one?"

Jun 2nd
Reply

Dk

"you know", "just stuff", "just things like that", and "what not." Vague and personal impressions. I am still though a huge fan of Planet Money!

May 31st
Reply

Alex Biasin

Aisha Roscoe, mic drop 👏👏

May 29th
Reply

David Smith

the NFL draft this year was still pretty good this year and completely virtual

May 28th
Reply

Claude Poliakoff

unsupported fear mongering needs to be constructively addressed. All public speaking, including POTUS, should all be broadcast asynchronously, allowing time for performing fact-checking, to be included on broadcast via concurrent running strip along with proclamation

May 25th
Reply

sirenasd

I dont think it's so much about knowing the right thing to say. I think the question is one of sincerity and authenticity. Showing he can listen and take leadership from black youth is what is in question. It really has nothing to do with Trump. And does not mean I am withholding my vote. Because I believe Biden is genuinely empathetic and it takes character to apologize.. But an youth antiracist forum to develop or revise the party platform on this WOULD BE GREAT. Maybe @SheThePeople could organize it. Putting it out into the universe.

May 25th
Reply

alli lent

Trump's anti Biden China ads are so ridiculous and nonsensical. just a bunch of random sounds bites with no context and a scary commentary over the whole thing. if I didn't already dislike Trump, that would have done it for me.

May 24th
Reply

Courtney Ferrell

that can't let it go was adorable!!

May 23rd
Reply

Angela Howard-Gibbs

Biden is trying too hard to take the high road. It's time to go to the woodshed!

May 22nd
Reply

alli lent

hearing a description of Trump's site sounds like someone describing a Twilight Zone episode

May 22nd
Reply

marc atkinson

of course . triangulation was the goal of this false hysteria from day 1

May 20th
Reply

sirenasd

Seriously? Give up democracy and make our president a dictator with no checks and balances? No thank you! I don't care what trump and his minions call congress. It's all spin. And we are all dizzy and dying because the antiquated electoral college installed a President without winning the majority of the country's votes. And once installed has NEVER had the support of even 50% of voters. If he is complaining about "harassment" Trump should stop acting like a dictator, stop breaking the law, and respect our constitution.

May 18th
Reply

alli lent

you know the best way to avoid Congress acting like McCarthy? don't elect people like McCarthy!

May 16th
Reply

marc atkinson

California trying to stick up the federal government for cash to pay for gigantic unfunded pension liabilities

May 13th
Reply

Jonathan M

guy below me has no clue what he's talking about. Flynn pleaded guilty, twice.

May 10th
Reply

Courtney Ferrell

the floor.is lava IS totally universal! there's a whole episode of the show Community about it!

May 9th
Reply

marc atkinson

NPR loves the pandemic

May 9th
Reply

marc atkinson

Your bias is so obvious. so sad , so partisan. You didn't even mention disgraced former FBI deep-state operator Peter Strozk's written declarative on how to frame Michael Flynn. NPR is now a hollow shell of what it once was. Worthless.

May 9th
Reply

marc atkinson

oh PLEASE pick the Lizbian. would love to watch Trump crush them by 30 points

May 9th
Reply

Janet Hernandez

I love Buster!

May 6th
Reply
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