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The NPR Politics Podcast

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Every weekday, NPR's best political reporters are there to explain the big news coming out of Washington and the campaign trail. They don't just tell you what happened. They tell you why it matters. Every afternoon.
1055 Episodes
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Democratic Congressman Jamaal Bowman is part of a new class of progressive lawmakers hoping to push their party left on issues like police reform, healthcare and racial justice. A proponent of reparations legislation, the former New York principal tells NPR that President Biden's position "falls short" when it comes to reparations for survivors and descendants of victims of the 1921 Tulsa race massacre.
The Supreme Court threw out a Republican-led challenge to the Affordable Care Act, and the justices ruled unanimously in favor of a Catholic foster agency denying service to LGBTQ couples. Plus, the Biden administration expanded transgender and gay student protections, setting up potential legal battles in conservative states. This episode: Congressional correspondent Kelsey Snell, White House correspondent Asma Khalid, national justive correspondent Carrie Johnson, and education correspondent Cory Turner.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Listen to our playlist The NPR Politics Daily Workout.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
In Geneva, President Biden and Russia President Vladimir Putin met for hours. At separate news conferences Putin described the talks as "constructive" and Biden said he did what he came to do. Both leaders agreed to keep talking. This episode: White House correspondent Scott Detrow, White House correspondent Ayesha Rascoe, White House correspondent Franco Ordoñez, and NPR's Moscow correspondent Lucian Kim.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Listen to our playlist The NPR Politics Daily Workout.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
Democrats on the Hill are meeting with Democratic state lawmakers from Texas to discuss federal legislation on voting rights, an issue that was recently added to the Vice President's list of priorities. But a couple of key moderate Democrats still stand in the way of nationwide reform. This episode: White House correspondents Scott Detrow and Ayesha Rascoe, and congressional correspondent Susan Davis.
In the first overseas trip of his presidency, Biden is in Europe delivering a central message to allies: America is back. But while G-7 leaders agree on confronting the COVID-19 pandemic and climate change, they diverge on how hard to push China. Plus, will Biden's meeting with Vladimir Putin pave the way for a more predictable relationship with Russia?This episode: White House correspondents Scott Detrow, Tamara Keith and Franco Ordoñez.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Listen to our playlist The NPR Politics Daily Workout.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
In a speech announcing the change, President Biden's Attorney General Merrick Garland emphasized that allowing every eligible American adult the chance to vote was not something that is up for debate.Also: a bipartisan group of ten senators brokered their own infrastructure agreement. Now all they have to do is.... convince fifty of their colleagues to sign on.This episode: congressional correspondent Susan Davis, White House correspondent Asma Khalid, Justice correspondent Ryan Lucas, and senior political editor and correspondent Ron Elving.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Listen to our playlist The NPR Politics Daily Workout.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
Some Republican lawmakers have branded the efforts to teach about the effects of racism as "critical race theory." They have introduced legislation in statehouses around the country hoping to ban it.This episode: congressional correspondent Susan Davis, racial justice and politics correspondent Juana Summers, and political reporter Barbara Sprunt.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Listen to our playlist The NPR Politics Daily Workout.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
Vice President Harris emphasized the need for development and healthy civil society in her first foreign trip, meant to curb the flow of migrants and asylum-seekers coming to the United States. And Biden is negotiating over infrastructure with a larger bipartisan group after his negotiations with Republicans foundered.This episode: politics, demographics, and culture reporter Danielle Kurtzleben, White House correspondent Tamara Keith, international correspondent Carrie Kahn, and congressional correspondent Kelsey Snell.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Listen to our playlist The NPR Politics Daily Workout.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
A bipartisan Senate investigation found that police had more alarming intelligence ahead of the Jan. 6 attack than previously documented. And the president is off to Europe this week. He will attempt to reassure leaders that the U.S. is a reliable partner and an important ally against China and Russia.This episode: politics, demographics, and culture reporter Danielle Kurtzleben, White House correspondent Franco Ordoñez, and congressional correspondent Claudia Grisales.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Listen to our playlist The NPR Politics Daily Workout.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
Former president Donald Trump spoke at a North Carolina Republican Party meeting over the weekend. The appearance demonstrated his lasting control of the conservative political ecosystem.This episode: congressional correspondent Susan Davis, senior political editor and correspondent Domenico Montanaro, and national political correspondent Mara Liasson.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Listen to our playlist The NPR Politics Daily Workout.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
Weekly Roundup: June 4th

Weekly Roundup: June 4th

2021-06-0424:534

Sen. Bernie Sanders of Vermont had asked the Labor Department to bar governors from prematurely ending supplementary unemployment payments tied to the pandemic. In an interview with NPR, Walsh said there probably wasn't anything the administration could do to stop them.Also: Vice President Harris is taking her first international trip in an effort to stem the flow of migrants to the U.S. southern border.This episode: White House correspondent Asma Khalid, White House correspondent Tamara Keith, and congressional correspondent Kelsey Snell.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Listen to our playlist The NPR Politics Daily Workout.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
Former President Trump will speak at the North Carolina Republican Party's state convention this weekend, kicking off his unofficial return to the campaign trail as he prepares to stump for Republican candidates. Also, while some Trump administration alumni have followed traditional conservative routes since leaving the White House, others are working to keep the MAGA movement alive.This episode: White House correspondents Asma Khalid and Ayesha Rascoe, and senior political editor and correspondent Domenico Montanaro. Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Listen to our playlist The NPR Politics Daily Workout.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
In Texas this week, state Democrats blocked a number of Republican voting changes purportedly aimed at increasing election confidence. Arizona's continued recounts of 2020 ballots have helped to sustain right-wing conspiracies about irregularities in the presidential election.This episode: White House correspondent Asma Khalid, voting and disinformation reporter Miles Parks, KUT reporter Ashley Lopez, and KJZZ reporter Ben Giles.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Listen to our playlist The NPR Politics Daily Workout.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
The White House announced a number of new orders aimed at tackling the racial wealth gap in connection with the visit. Centenarian survivors of the attack testified before Congress last month about the ongoing lack of justice and accountability for Black Americans harmed by racism.This episode: White House correspondent Asma Khalid, national political correspondent Mara Liasson, and politics and racial justice correspondent Juana Summers.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Listen to our playlist The NPR Politics Daily Workout.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
This month NPR is celebrating its 50th anniversary, and to commemorate the moment we're looking back on the women who shaped how NPR has covered the biggest political stories. Linda Wertheimer, Nina Totenberg, and Mara Liasson built NPR's political coverage from the ground up and take us into the rooms where history was made.This episode: White House correspondent Scott Detrow and White House correspondent Ayesha Rascoe.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Listen to our playlist The NPR Politics Daily Workout.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
Weekly Roundup: May 28th

Weekly Roundup: May 28th

2021-05-2828:045

The country's reckoning with policing, racial equity, and representation have reshaped the contest to run the largest city in the U.S. And, Democratic Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand has pushed for eight years to change the way the military prosecutes sexual assaults. Now, it looks like her legislation could pass Congress.This episode: congressional correspondent Susan Davis, WNYC reporter Brigid Bergin, senior political editor and correspondent Domenico Montanaro, and congressional reporter Claudia Grisales.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Listen to our playlist The NPR Politics Daily Workout.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
The U.S. government and scientists remain uncertain about the exact origins of the coronavirus outbreak: transmission from animals or research lab escape? Either option has lessons for how society can contain future pandemics.This episode: congressional correspondent Susan Davis, White House correspondent Tamara Keith, and science correspondent Geoff Brumfiel.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Listen to our playlist The NPR Politics Daily Workout.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
The Docket is a new ongoing series from The NPR Politics Podcast where we examine the backstory of the laws that impact our daily life. Traffic stops are a routine police practice, but with the rise in body cams and cell phone footage, people have begun to witness how they can escalate to violence and even death. We examine how the law itself may contribute to that escalation. Warning: this episode contains graphic audio. This episode: congressional correspondent Susan Davis and national justice correspondent Carrie Johnson.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Listen to our playlist The NPR Politics Daily Workout.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
During his first address to Congress, President Biden pushed for his party's police reform and racial justice package to be passed by May 25th, the first anniversary of George Floyd's murder by police. They have now missed that deadline.This episode: congressional correspondent Susan Davis, White House correspondent Ayesha Rascoe, and politics and racial justice reporter Juana Summers.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Listen to our playlist The NPR Politics Daily Workout.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
The White House dropped half a trillion dollars in spending from Biden's infrastructure and stimulus proposal in an ongoing show of "bipartisanship," but the cuts weren't to the levels or areas that would improve the legislation's standing with conservatives. And: how Donald Trump has maintained his influence over Republicans.This episode: congressional correspondent Susan Davis, White House correspondent Ayesha Rascoe, national political correspondent Mara Liasson, and senior political editor and correspondent Domenico Montanaro.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Listen to our playlist The NPR Politics Daily Workout.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
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Comments (537)

alli lent

shouldn't a separation of church and state mean you have to follow the law regardless of if you're a church..? it's illegal to discriminate because of sexual orientation. if you can't follow the law, you shouldn't be allowed to run government activities like fostering children.

Jun 17th
Reply

dok dicer

turns out that appointing a woman of color as VP doesn't solve anything of that woman of color is as inhumane as any right winger. who would have thought? and more importantly, who could have known that based on her track record of incarcerating black people?

Jun 10th
Reply

Andi-Roo Libecap

LOLOL the cicadas are so loud where ever Ayesha is reporting from. I love it, but I'm sure journalists find the sound annoying when they hit record.

Jun 8th
Reply

herbsta magus

Trump is NOT on "solid ground" with vaccines or anything related to COVID or really anything else for that matter. I am literally unsubscribing from this compromised Trump propaganda podcast NOW and hopefully when I check in in the future you will not still be covering up for Trump's COMPLETE incompetence and betrayal of this country.

Jun 7th
Reply

herbsta magus

Get f****** real... stop blaming economic problems on people getting unemployment it insulting and incorrect. Forcing people to work at crappy jobs for bad pay is NOT a jobs policy it is sadistic greedy nonsense.

Jun 6th
Reply

Andi-Roo Libecap

I was able to download and play the episode.

May 24th
Reply

Vicky Riddle

that just shows you that companies aren't paying people a living wage. If you make more money sitting at home with government help then you do working at a job what is your choice going to be? It's obvious you're going to stay at home. So these companies need to pay people a living wage so they want to go to work. You should make more money at work than you do on unemployment.

May 21st
Reply (1)

Dirk Wijns

Couldn't download and/or listen this episode on this platform.

May 17th
Reply (2)

Adrian Rodriguez

inflation is only bad economically if it is accompanied by wage stagnation, if wages can adjust up to meet it that there is an overall net gain and the standard of living goes up.

May 13th
Reply (1)

alli lent

wasn't there already a company that partnered with one of the approved companies to help make more? why can't they just do those with other countries to skip all this figuring it out stuff? just be actually good people and help countries get vaccines!!

May 6th
Reply

A Turner

(Yes- I delayed my #MaineCoonCat coat stripping b/c of COVID...Mama did it at home-SMH)

May 3rd
Reply

alli lent

but slow population growth is good for the planet.......

Apr 30th
Reply

alli lent

senator Tim Scott was frustrating to listen to. I didn't make it very far. gave up once he said getting rid of the tax cuts (that did *not* lead to higher wages) would cause wages to drop. no logic anywhere.

Apr 29th
Reply

Caleb Shuler Sr

good

Mar 25th
Reply

Caleb Shuler Sr

you mean, historic inaccurate vote count election

Mar 17th
Reply

Carlene dean

Also, My heart goes out to those people suffering in Texas. One hours that their energy companies and people in influential positions will learn from this disaster to help prevent a similar event in the future. Also, I'm sick to death of "cancel culture" and fervently wish that it would get cancelled.

Feb 22nd
Reply

alli lent

I got chills listening to the whispering...... can't even imagine how scary that must have been.... how can almost half the Congress just forget living through that?

Feb 12th
Reply

Jayann Chipman

oh no, they've cut off the end 😢

Feb 6th
Reply

Leslie Nathan

so funny that sen. portman warns of the dangers of the biden administration starting out on a partisan foot, yet it's the only way the repubs operate. the typical repub hypocrisy

Jan 29th
Reply

Kurben Nnm

definitely don't feel like listening to a Trump enabler

Jan 28th
Reply (4)
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