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The NPR Politics Podcast

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Every weekday, NPR's best political reporters are there to explain the big news coming out of Washington and the campaign trail. They don't just tell you what happened. They tell you why it matters. Every afternoon.
1083 Episodes
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A group of 21 senators from both parties but out a statement that they're close to a deal and another vote is expected as soon as Monday.And an Ohio Democratic primary race to replace Biden official Marica Fudge in the House of Representatives is getting a lot of national attention, including from this podcast.This episode: White House correspondent Scott Detrow, congressional correspondent Susan Davis, and demographics and culture correspondent Danielle Kurtzleben.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Listen to our playlist The NPR Politics Daily Workout.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
Coronavirus cases are on the rise in parts of the United States and there have been new cases among fully-vaccinated lawmakers and government staff. The country as a whole saw a nearly 150% increase in the seven-day case average compared with two weeks prior.The vaccines, though, are still preventing serious infections and mostly keeping people out of the hospital. Now, President Biden and the White House are struggling to figure out how to get the remaining one-third of American adults vaccinated and stop a pandemic backslide.This episode: political correspondent Juana Summers, White House correspondent Tamara Keith, and science correspondent Rob Stein.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Listen to our playlist The NPR Politics Daily Workout.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
Ben Shapiro's conservative commentary and news aggregation site The Daily Wire is a dominant force on Facebook, where sharp headlines drive massive engagement.The upstart The Georgia Star News has pushed outright disinformation about the 2020 presidential election and subsequently scored an exclusive interview with Donald Trump.The two sites illustrate a number of distinct ways in which outrage, social media, and political polarization have reshaped the media landscape.This episode: congressional correspondent Susan Davis, politics reporter Miles Parks, and Georgia Public Broadcasting reporter Stephen Fowler.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Listen to our playlist The NPR Politics Daily Workout.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
President Joe Biden's primary policy initiatives, his trillion-dollar infrastructure and economic plans, face their first test in the Senate this week. And does a federal court ruling limiting the Deferred Action For Childhood Arrivals program, known as DACA, increase the urgency around immigration in Congress?This episode: White House correspondent Scott Detrow, congressional reporter Susan Davis, and national political correspondent Mara Liasson.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Listen to our playlist The NPR Politics Daily Workout.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
Elizabeth Hinton's book America On Fire explores how aggressive policing sparked thousands of incidents of mass violence in Black communities across the United States beginning in the 1960s. NPR's Danielle Kurtzleben talks to the author about how the government's typical response to these "rebellions" — more policing — is both escalatory and inadequate. Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Listen to our playlist The NPR Politics Daily Workout.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
Voting rights activists feel that they have done the work of energizing and organizing voters to care about the issue. Now, they want President Biden to step up the pressure on Congress from the bully pulpit. And Hunter Biden's art sales will be anonymous, which the White House is calling an ethics win. Good governance experts aren't buying it. This episode: White House correspondent Scott Detrow, White House correspondent Tamara Keith, political correspondent Juana Summers, and senior political editor and correspondent Ron Elving.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Listen to our playlist The NPR Politics Daily Workout.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
In his April address to Congress, President Joe Biden said he hoped to prove that democracy and the federal government were still capable of delivering for the American people. This week, Senate Democrats unveiled Biden's chief effort to meet that promise: a $3.5 trillion dollar plan that would — among other things — dramatically expand access to child and health care, as well as overhaul the energy sector to curb climate change. The proposal faces a difficult road to passage and could see considerable revisions.This episode: White House correspondent Asma Khalid, White House correspondent Tamara Keith, and congressional correspondent Susan Davis.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Listen to our playlist The NPR Politics Daily Workout.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
Faced with food and fuel shortages, Cubans have begun unprecedented protests against the country's communist government. President Biden's response could help boost Democratic support among Florida's many Cuban American voters. The party has lost a number of key elections in the state, thanks in large part to lackluster support among conservative expatriates who hope to see Democrats take a harder line against Cuba's communist government. This episode: congressional correspondent Susan Davis, White House correspondent Franco Ordoñez, and international correspondent Carrie Kahn.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Listen to our playlist The NPR Politics Daily Workout.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
Take our survey: npr.org/podcastsurveyVice President Harris talked to NPR's Asma Khalid about the administration's path forward on their voting rights agenda given the major roadblock in the Senate: some Democrats in the chamber are unwilling to change the filibuster, a rules quirk that forces a sixty-to-forty majority to pass most legislation.And many Democrats from the Texas statehouse have come to Washington D.C. to meet with federal lawmakers, fleeing their own state in a procedural stunt to stall a suite of voting restrictions proposed by Republicans there.This episode: White House correspondent Scott Detrow, White House correspondent Asma Khalid, and KUT reporter Ashley Lopez.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Listen to our playlist The NPR Politics Daily Workout.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
Take our survey: npr.org/podcastsurveyDomestic travel is surging as the country reopens, but there is still an international-sized hole in the bottom lines of some U.S. tourism businesses. Would-be foreign visitors are mostly barred from coming stateside as coronavirus travel bans persist — and there have been few concrete answers from the Biden administration on when that will change.And vaccine maker Pfizer has begun talking about providing a coronavirus vaccine booster shot. That could be a huge financial windfall for the pharmaceutical giant, but federal government health groups were quick to say that they're not sure if or when a booster shot will be needed. This episode: congressional correspondent Susan Davis, White House correspondent Tamara Keith, and health correspondent Pien Huang.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Listen to our playlist The NPR Politics Daily Workout.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
Weekly Roundup: July 9th

Weekly Roundup: July 9th

2021-07-0927:033

President Biden gave a defensive speech Thursday updating the American public on his plan for withdrawal from Afghanistan. He said that the United States accomplished its mission in Afghanistan, though his administration acknowledged earlier in the day that the two-decade war "has not been won militarily" and that there are ongoing risks to the safety and prosperity of Afghans.Domestically, the White House is stalled on voting rights reforms: Democrats in Congress can't find a route around the filibuster and conservative courts have throttled historic enforcement options made possible by the Voting Rights Act. This episode: White House correspondent Tamara Keith, White House correspondent Scott Detrow, Pentagon correspondent Tom Bowman, White House correspondent Ayesha Rascoe, and national justice correspondent Carrie Johnson.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Listen to our playlist The NPR Politics Daily Workout.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
Former president Donald Trump filed a lawsuit this week claiming that his rights are violated by social media bans, claims legal experts say are spurious. But there has long been a push for big tech regulation in Washington, and it appears that the wheels are starting to turn. This episode: White House correspondent Tamara Keith, congressional editor Deirdre Walsh, and technology correspondent Shannon Bond.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Listen to our playlist The NPR Politics Daily Workout.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
Though crime rates remain well-below historic highs, assaults and murders have spiked since the pandemic began. Democrats in New York picked ex-cop Eric Adams as their mayoral nominee; he's likely to win. Biden traveled to Chicago to talk gun violence with the city's mayor Lori Lightfoot.This episode: White House correspondent Asma Khalid, national justice correspondent Carrie Johnson, and WNYC reporter Brigid Bergin.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Listen to our playlist The NPR Politics Daily Workout.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
More than five hundred people have been charged in what is on track to be one of the largest criminal investigations in the country's history. Now, a House committee is charged with an impossible task: establishing a widely-accepted set of facts about what happened on January 6th.This episode; White House correspondent Tamara Keith, congressional correspondent Kelsey Snell, and justice correspondent Ryan Lucas.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Listen to our playlist The NPR Politics Daily Workout.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
By 2040, 70% of Americans could be represented by just 30 Senators. And twice in the last two decades, a Republican president has lost the popular vote but won the White House. America's government was built to protect the rights of political minorities, but some critics say the system has become too unfair. What does this mean for the future of U.S. politics? This episode: White House correspondent Asma Khalid, national political correspondent Mara Liasson, and senior editor and correspondent Ron Elving.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Listen to our playlist The NPR Politics Daily Workout.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
Chief Justice John Roberts used to be seen as a solid conservative, but as the center of conservative politics moved to the right so did the justices appointed after him. Now with a 6-3 conservative super majority on the court, what role does the chief justice play?This episode: Congressional correspondent Susan Davis, legal affairs correspondent Nina Totenberg, and special guest Tom Goldstein.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Listen to our playlist The NPR Politics Daily Workout.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
Weekly Roundup: July 2nd

Weekly Roundup: July 2nd

2021-07-0226:182

President Biden did not meet his goal of 70% of Americans having one shot of the vaccine by July 4th, and some hot spots are flaring up in red states with a new variant looming. But there are signs across the nation that the country has radically curbed the spread of the virus. Plus economists are now predicting an ever quicker recovery for the economy.This episode: Congressional correspondent Susan Davis, White House correspondent Tamara Keith, White House correspondent Ayesha Rascoe, science reporter Pien Huang, and senior economic correspondent Scott Horsley.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Listen to our playlist The NPR Politics Daily Workout.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
Former President Donald Trump's family business and its longtime chief financial officer, Allen Weisselberg, have been criminally charged by the Manhattan district attorney's office in a case involving alleged tax-related crimes. The former president was not charged, but it's his name on the business. How could this impact him?This episode: Congressional correspondent Susan Davis, justice correspondent Ryan Lucas, White House correspondent Tamara Keith, senior political editor and correspondent Domenico Montanaro, and journalist Andrea Bernstein (author of American Oligarchs: The Kushners, the Trumps, and the Marriage of Money and Power).Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Listen to our playlist The NPR Politics Daily Workout.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
In a 6-3 decision the Supreme Court upheld the state of Arizona's restrictive voting laws that some argued targeted black and brown voters. Plus, the court ruled in favor of rich donors seeking anonymity when donating to nonprofits, which could mean a lot for campaign contributors. This episode: Congressional correspondent Susan Davis, national justice correspondent Carrie Johnson, and senior political editor and correspondent Domenico Montanaro. Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Listen to our playlist The NPR Politics Daily Workout.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
The Pew Research Center just released the most comprehensive analysis of the demographic breakdown of voters in 2020. We dig into the data and look at what it means for the both parties moving forward.This episode: Congressional correspondent Susan Davis, political reporter Danielle Kurtzleben, and White House correspondent Asma Khalid.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Listen to our playlist The NPR Politics Daily Workout.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
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Comments (540)

dok dicer

covering right wing misinformation outlets: you are waaaaaaaay late to the party.

Jul 21st
Reply

alli lent

unpopular opinion: the Senate should not get vacation or pay unless they actually do their job.

Jul 20th
Reply

Mike Schmechel

,,

Jul 2nd
Reply

alli lent

shouldn't a separation of church and state mean you have to follow the law regardless of if you're a church..? it's illegal to discriminate because of sexual orientation. if you can't follow the law, you shouldn't be allowed to run government activities like fostering children.

Jun 17th
Reply

dok dicer

turns out that appointing a woman of color as VP doesn't solve anything of that woman of color is as inhumane as any right winger. who would have thought? and more importantly, who could have known that based on her track record of incarcerating black people?

Jun 10th
Reply

Andi-Roo Libecap

LOLOL the cicadas are so loud where ever Ayesha is reporting from. I love it, but I'm sure journalists find the sound annoying when they hit record.

Jun 8th
Reply

herbsta magus

Trump is NOT on "solid ground" with vaccines or anything related to COVID or really anything else for that matter. I am literally unsubscribing from this compromised Trump propaganda podcast NOW and hopefully when I check in in the future you will not still be covering up for Trump's COMPLETE incompetence and betrayal of this country.

Jun 7th
Reply

herbsta magus

Get f****** real... stop blaming economic problems on people getting unemployment it insulting and incorrect. Forcing people to work at crappy jobs for bad pay is NOT a jobs policy it is sadistic greedy nonsense.

Jun 6th
Reply

Andi-Roo Libecap

I was able to download and play the episode.

May 24th
Reply

an interested party

that just shows you that companies aren't paying people a living wage. If you make more money sitting at home with government help then you do working at a job what is your choice going to be? It's obvious you're going to stay at home. So these companies need to pay people a living wage so they want to go to work. You should make more money at work than you do on unemployment.

May 21st
Reply (1)

Dirk Wijns

Couldn't download and/or listen this episode on this platform.

May 17th
Reply (2)

Adrian Rodriguez

inflation is only bad economically if it is accompanied by wage stagnation, if wages can adjust up to meet it that there is an overall net gain and the standard of living goes up.

May 13th
Reply (1)

alli lent

wasn't there already a company that partnered with one of the approved companies to help make more? why can't they just do those with other countries to skip all this figuring it out stuff? just be actually good people and help countries get vaccines!!

May 6th
Reply

A Turner

(Yes- I delayed my #MaineCoonCat coat stripping b/c of COVID...Mama did it at home-SMH)

May 3rd
Reply

alli lent

but slow population growth is good for the planet.......

Apr 30th
Reply

alli lent

senator Tim Scott was frustrating to listen to. I didn't make it very far. gave up once he said getting rid of the tax cuts (that did *not* lead to higher wages) would cause wages to drop. no logic anywhere.

Apr 29th
Reply

Caleb Shuler Sr

good

Mar 25th
Reply

Caleb Shuler Sr

you mean, historic inaccurate vote count election

Mar 17th
Reply

Carlene dean

Also, My heart goes out to those people suffering in Texas. One hours that their energy companies and people in influential positions will learn from this disaster to help prevent a similar event in the future. Also, I'm sick to death of "cancel culture" and fervently wish that it would get cancelled.

Feb 22nd
Reply

alli lent

I got chills listening to the whispering...... can't even imagine how scary that must have been.... how can almost half the Congress just forget living through that?

Feb 12th
Reply
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