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Public Health Insight

Author: PHI Productions

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Public health is a population-based field of science focused on preventing disease and promoting health. Podcast listeners will be empowered with knowledge about a variety of different public health issues affecting global communities from our team of public health professionals and other expert guests, through engaging and interactive conversations every week. | Please leave us feedback or suggested topics for our future episodes at ThePublicHealthInsight@gmail.com. | Music Credits: "Loopster"Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com)Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/
43 Episodes
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In previous Public Health Insight Podcast episodes, you may have learned about opioids, harm reduction, safe consumption sites, and the broader social determinants of health that have population-level impacts. In part 1 of this mini-series, Tim Davis, author of TRIPOLAR: The Story of A Bipolar Triathlete, joins the podcast to share his lived experience with childhood trauma, substance use and addictions, and thoughts of suicide. Trigger WarningPlease note that this episode will discuss issues around mental illness and trauma, and may contain sensitive or triggering content. The purpose of this episode is to minimize the stigma associated with men’s mental illness and to create a culture in society that promotes a safe space for men to be vulnerable and seek help when needed. If you or someone you love has been impacted by suicide, you are not alone. Please use your discretion when listening to this content and connect to the appropriate supports as needed. For our listeners in Canada, Crisis Services Canada offers a national suicide prevention hotline which can be reached at 1 833 456 4566 or by text at 45645. Another resource for people who prefer to correspond via text message is Crisis Text Line - you can get in touch with trained Crisis Counsellors 24/7 by texting ‘CONNECT’ to 686868.Share Your Thoughts With Us!Follow us on Instagram, Twitter, LinkedIn, and Facebook. We would love it if you shared your thoughts by commenting on our posts, sending us a direct message through social media, or by emailing us at ThePublicHealthInsight@gmail.com. Until then, we’ll see you in the next one.Support Our ShowIf you like our show, feel free to lend us some support by making a contribution on our Patreon page (link below) so we can continue creating the content that you enjoy as we expand the Public Health Insight Community.Music CreditsOver Time by AudionautixHome by DeKobeMonroe by Lakey InspiredSupport the show (https://www.patreon.com/publichealthinsight)
According to LivingWorks, a global suicide prevention organization, we are more likely to come in contact with someone in need of suicide intervention than we are to come in contact with someone needing CPR. Why do you think there is less emphasis on suicide prevention and intervention skills compared to other negative health outcomes, from a societal perspective? The Public Health Insight Podcast discusses the levels of suicide prevention (i.e., universal, selective, and indicated) and provides an overview of the various suicide prevention models or frameworks, such as the Socio-Ecological Model, Zero Suicide, Mental Health Commission of Canada’s Roots of Hope, and other community-led models. The conversation concludes with an analysis their strengths and limitations, and other community strategies moving forward to invest in holistic suicide prevention.If you or someone you know has been thinking about or impacted by suicide, you are not alone. For our listeners in Canada, Crisis Services Canada offers a national suicide prevention hotline which can be reached at 1-833-456-4566 or by text at 45645. Another resource for people who prefer to correspond via text message is the Crisis Text Line - you can get in touch with trained Crisis Counsellors 24/7 by texting ‘CONNECT’ to 686868.References for Our Discussion Public Health Agency of Canada: Language Matters: Safe Language and Messages for Suicide PreventionWorld Health Organization (WHO): National suicide prevention strategies: progress, examples and indicatorsShare Your Thoughts With Us!Follow us on Instagram, Twitter, LinkedIn, and Facebook. We would love it if you shared your thoughts by commenting on our posts, sending us a direct message through social media, or by emailing us at ThePublicHealthInsight@gmail.com. Until then, we’ll see you in the next one.Support Our ShowIf you like our show, feel free to lend us some support by making a contribution on our Patreon page (link below) so we can continue creating the content that you enjoy as we expand the Public Health Insight Community.Icon made by Freepik from www.flaticon.com Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/publichealthinsight)
Suicide is one of the leading causes of death worldwide, claiming the lives of more than 800,000 people each year. September is designated as Suicide Prevention Awareness Month in many jurisdictions across the world, however, it often does not receive the attention and urgency it deserves. The Public Health Insight Podcast discusses the importance of raising awareness of suicide and intentional self-harm, protective factors, the role of stigma, the need to use appropriate language, how to recognize the warning signs, and COVID-19’s impact on the incidence of suicide and prevalence of self-harm.Please use your discretion when listening to this content and connect to the appropriate supports as needed. If you or someone you know has been thinking about or impacted by suicide, you are not alone. For our listeners in Canada, Crisis Services Canada offers a national suicide prevention hotline which can be reached at 1-833-456-4566 or by text at 45645. Another resource for people who prefer to correspond via text message is the Crisis Text Line - you can get in touch with trained Crisis Counsellors 24/7 by texting ‘CONNECT’ to 686868.References for Our Discussion Public Health Agency of Canada: Language Matters: Safe Language and Messages for Suicide PreventionWorld Health Organization (WHO): National suicide prevention strategies: progress, examples and indicatorsPartnership with ‘Moving Beyond Repair’ - A Student-Led Conference hosted by the University of Toronto’s Dalla Lana School of Public HealthOver the course of 3 days you can explore upstream approaches to Public Health Emergencies, engage with experts in Public Health, and listen to emerging student research. Not only will you have access to webinar sessions, you will also be able to attend interactive workshops and small-scale social networking events. The conference takes place from Thursday, November 12th to Saturday, November 14th - it is FREE to register.Learn more about  Moving Beyond Repair and secure your tickets by visiting: https://www.eventbrite.ca/e/moving-beyond-repair-upstream-approaches-to-public-health-emergencies-registration-127036534695. Wherever you are in the world, everyone is invited to attend.Share Your Thoughts With Us!Follow us on Instagram, Twitter, LinkedIn, and Facebook. We would love it if you shared your thoughts by commenting on our posts, sending us a direct message through social media, or by emailing us at ThePublicHealthInsight@gmail.com. Until then, we’ll see you in the next one.Icon made by Freepik from www.flaticon.com Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/publichealthinsight)
November is Fall Prevention Month in Canada. In Canada, almost 150,000 people, aged 65 and older, were hospitalized for injuries between 2017 and 2018. The majority of injuries were caused by falls, and every year, it is estimated 1 in 3 seniors aged 65 years and older are likely to fall at least once. Falls are a result of a combination of multiple risk factors and therefore requires a multi-pronged public health approach. The Public Health Insight Podcast examines promising practices and evidence-based interventions across the areas of falls risk assessments, the 3Es of injury prevention (i.e., engineering, education, and enforcement), exercise programs, the role of healthcare providers, community, and supportive policies. Is there more we should be doing to address falls or should we be more focused on creating an environment for seniors to maintain their independence?References for Our Discussion American Public Health Association (APHA) | Nation’s Health: Preventing senior falls requires community approach: CDC resources help health workers create programs that workPartnership with ‘Moving Beyond Repair’ - A Student-Led Conference hosted by the University of Toronto’s Dalla Lana School of Public HealthOver the course of 3 days you can explore upstream approaches to Public Health Emergencies, engage with experts in Public Health, and listen to emerging student research. Not only will you have access to webinar sessions, you will also be able to attend interactive workshops and small-scale social networking events. The conference takes place from Thursday, November 12th to Saturday, November 14th - it is FREE to register.Learn more about  Moving Beyond Repair and secure your tickets by visiting: https://www.eventbrite.ca/e/moving-beyond-repair-upstream-approaches-to-public-health-emergencies-registration-127036534695. Wherever you are in the world, everyone is invited to attend.Share Your Thoughts With Us!Follow us on Instagram, Twitter, LinkedIn, and Facebook. We would love it if you shared your thoughts by commenting on our posts, sending us a direct message through social media, or by emailing us at ThePublicHealthInsight@gmail.com. Until then, we’ll see you in the next one.Support Our ShowIf you like our show, feel free to lend us some support by making a contribution on our Patreon page (link below) so we can continue creating the content that you enjoy as we expand the Public Health Insight Community.Icon made by Freepik from www.flaticon.com Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/publichealthinsight)
The World Health Organization defines a fall as “an event which results in a person coming to rest inadvertently on the ground,  floor or other lower level.” Fall-related injuries may be fatal or non-fatal, however, most are non-fatal, but may still result in significant injury or disability. Falls are the second leading cause of unintentional injury deaths worldwide, second only to road traffic incidents. November is Fall Prevention Month in Canada and the Public Health Insight Podcast seized the opportunity to discuss this historical month-long commitment to raising awareness about the incidence of falls, the underlying causes and associated risk factors, and negative health outcomes that occur as a result of falling. References for Our Discussion American Public Health Association (APHA) | Nation’s Health: Preventing senior falls requires community approach: CDC resources help health workers create programs that workShare Your Thoughts With Us!Follow us on Instagram, Twitter, LinkedIn, and Facebook. We would love it if you shared your thoughts by commenting on our posts, sending us a direct message through social media, or by emailing us at ThePublicHealthInsight@gmail.com. Until then, we’ll see you in the next one.Support Our ShowIf you like our show, feel free to lend us some support by making a contribution on our Patreon page (link below) so we can continue creating the content that you enjoy as we expand the Public Health Insight Community.Icon made by Freepik from www.flaticon.com Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/publichealthinsight)
In the United States, older adults over the age of 65 currently represent 16% of the population, and this is expected to increase to 25% by the year 2060. Globally, there were 703 million people over the age of 65 years in 2019 and the total number of older persons is projected to more than double to 1.5 billion in 2050. This reality highlights the need for an ‘Age-Friendly’ society that meets their complex health needs associated with the expected increase in the number and severity of comorbidities and chronic diseases. Krithika Srivats, leader of HGS’s Healthcare Clinical Practice, joins the Public Health Insight Podcast to share her knowledge and expertise about some of the promising practices of the Frailty Framework, the need to integrate an age-friendly approach into care management for the aging population, and the desire of older adults to age in place in their communities.References for Our Discussion Social Work Today: Age-Friendly Health Systems: What Matters MostRush Center for Excellence in Aging (CEA): Age-Friendly Health System: Introducing The 4Ms Framework for an Age-Friendly Health SystemShare Your Thoughts With Us!Follow us on Instagram, Twitter, LinkedIn, and Facebook. We would love it if you shared your thoughts by commenting on our posts, sending us a direct message through social media, or by emailing us at ThePublicHealthInsight@gmail.com. Until then, we’ll see you in the next one.Support Our ShowIf you like our show, feel free to lend us some support by making a contribution on our Patreon page (link below) so we can continue creating the content that you enjoy as we expand the Public Health Insight Community.Icon made by ultimatearm from www.flaticon.com Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/publichealthinsight)
3.5 million Canadians are considered primary caregivers for someone living with dementia. These caregivers are often unpaid and rarely receive formal support, leading to high rates of burnout and other negative health outcomes. Rishawn Dindial and Praja Vaikuntharajan share their knowledge with the Public Health Insight Podcast about the burden experienced by dementia caregivers and how healthcare technology, such as the Memoryz App, can be used to alleviate caregiver dual-role strain.Partnership with the Global Health Students and Young Professionals SummitThe Canadian Global Health Students & Young Professionals Summit (GHSYPS) aims to give space to students and young professionals (SYPs) involved or interested in the global health field. This is the forum for global health SYPs to connect, network, engage, and be inspired. Learn more about GHSYPS by visiting: https://ghsyps.ca/. The Summit takes place on Saturday, October 17, 2020 - it is free to register!References for Our Discussion Memoryz: Redefining the Standard of Care The Economist: As humanity ages the numbers of people with dementia will surge Support Our ShowIf you like our show, feel free to lend us some support by making a contribution on our Patreon page (link below) so we can continue creating the content that you enjoy as we expand the Public Health Insight Community.Icon made by monkik from www.flaticon.com Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/publichealthinsight)
More than 50 million people around the world are living with dementia and this number is expected to double every 20 years, as the global life expectancy continues to increase. Dementia is a general term used to describe a collection of symptoms, which includes impaired memory, language, problem-solving and other thinking abilities that are severe enough to interfere with daily life. Alzheimer's disease is the most common form of dementia. As part of Dementia Awareness Month, Rishawn Dindial and Praja Vaikuntharajan from Memoryz, a healthcare startup company focusing on dementia care, join the Public Health Insight Podcast to discuss some of the unintended consequences of an aging population, the global incidence and prevalence of dementia, gaps in dementia funding and research, and the importance of public health in advocacy and eliminating stigma.Partnership with the Global Health Students and Young Professionals SummitThe Canadian Global Health Students & Young Professionals Summit (GHSYPS) aims to give space to students and young professionals (SYPs) involved or interested in the global health field. This is the forum for global health SYPs to connect, network, engage, and be inspired. Learn more about GHSYPS by visiting: https://ghsyps.ca/. The Summit takes place on Saturday, October 17, 2020 - it is free to register!References for Our Discussion Memoryz: Redefining the Standard of Care The Economist: As humanity ages the numbers of people with dementia will surge Support Our ShowIf you like our show, feel free to lend us some support by making a contribution on our Patreon page (link below) so we can continue creating the content that you enjoy as we expand the Public Health Insight Community.Icon made by photo3idea_studio from www.flaticon.com Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/publichealthinsight)
Health workers in healthcare facilities, homecare, hospital staff, and many others have long been recognized as crucial components in a functioning and thriving society. They provide crucial services to the public to ensure that population health needs are met. Despite their important societal contributions, the World Health Organization estimates that health workers are at high risk of violence all over the world; this violence can be perpetrated by patients, their caregivers, or members of the general public. The Public Health Insight Podcast discusses the prevalence and incidence of type 2 violence - violence perpetrated by patients and/or visitors, the underlying root causes, and the overall barriers and facilitators of health worker safety.Partnership with the Global Health Students and Young Professionals SummitThe Canadian Global Health Students & Young Professionals Summit (GHSYPS) aims to give space to students and young professionals (SYPs) involved or interested in the global health field. This is the forum for global health SYPs to connect, network, engage, and be inspired. Learn more about GHSYPS by visiting: https://ghsyps.ca/. The Summit takes place on Saturday, October 17, 2020 - it is free to register!References for Our Discussion Violence Against Healthcare Workers: A Rising Epidemic by Wallace StephensViolence against health workers by WHOSupport Our ShowIf you like our show, feel free to lend us some support by making a contribution on our Patreon page (link below) so we can continue creating the content that you enjoy as we expand the Public Health Insight Community.Icon made by Vitaly Gorbachev from www.flaticon.com Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/publichealthinsight)
Education as a social determinant of health has the power to improve health outcomes for communities across the world, but what happens when access continues to be an issue for some neighbourhoods and populations? Nicole Vick, Adjunct Professor, TEDx Speaker and Amazon Best Selling Author of Pushing Through: Finding The Light in Every Lesson, remains with the Public Health Insight Podcast to shift our discussion to focus on the disparities in access to education, the barrier of social exclusion and institutional racism in our academic institutions, and how these factors interact to impact the health of already marginalized communities. Share Your Thoughts With Us!Follow us on Instagram, Twitter, LinkedIn, and Facebook. We would love it if you shared your thoughts by commenting on our posts, sending us a direct message through social media, or by emailing us at ThePublicHealthInsight@gmail.com. Until then, we’ll see you in the next one.Partnership with the Global Health Students and Young Professionals SummitThe Canadian Global Health Students & Young Professionals Summit (GHSYPS) aims to give space to students and young professionals (SYPs) involved or interested in the global health field. This is the forum for global health SYPs to connect, network, engage, and be inspired. Learn more about GHSYPS by visiting: https://ghsyps.ca/. References for Our Discussion Krishni Metivier’s ‘Envisioning Higher Education as Antiracist’ Virginia Commonwealth University’s ‘Why Education Matters to Health: Exploring the Causes’ Support Our ShowIf you like our show, feel free to lend us some support by making a contribution on our Patreon page (link below) so we can continue creating the content that you enjoy as we expand the Public Health Insight Community.Icon made by freepik from www.flaticon.comSupport the show (https://www.patreon.com/publichealthinsight)
Education is one of the most important modifiable social determinants of health. Despite the power of higher education, many health disparities persist for marginalized and racialized populations. Nicole Vick, TEDx Speaker and Amazon Best Selling Author of Pushing Through: Finding The Light in Every Lesson, joins the Public Health Insight Podcast to discuss the role of education as a social determinant of health, examine racism in higher education as a barrier to the success of racialized students and graduates, and the importance of informal education or public health literacy. Follow us on Instagram, Twitter, LinkedIn, and Facebook. We would love it if you shared your thoughts by commenting on our posts, sending us a direct message through social media, or by emailing us at ThePublicHealthInsight@gmail.com. Until then, we’ll see you in the next one.Global Health Students and Young Professionals Summit (GHSYPS)Link to event: https://ghsyps.ca/Link to abstract Submission (Due September 20th): https://forms.gle/ATixemoFZNE5FcRr8 If you like our show, feel free to lend us some support by making a contribution on our Patreon page (link below) so we can continue creating the content that you enjoy as we expand the Public Health Insight Community.Icon made by freepik from www.flaticon.comSupport the show (https://www.patreon.com/publichealthinsight)
Road traffic collisions are largely preventable, however, it consistently remains one of the top 10 leading causes of premature death every year. The Public Health Insight Podcast discusses the role of leadership and institutional management in preventing road traffic collisions and Vision Zero as a framework to address road safety. The conversation concludes with an overview of some effective best practices and evidence-based interventions, such as seatbelts, drink-driving laws, and helmets. Follow us on Instagram, Twitter, LinkedIn, and Facebook. We would love it if you shared your thoughts by commenting on our posts, sending us a direct message through social media, or by emailing us at ThePublicHealthInsight@gmail.com. Until then, we’ll see you in the next one.If you like our show, feel free to lend us some support by making a contribution on our Patreon page (link below) so we can continue creating the content that you enjoy as we expand the Public Health Insight Community.Icon made by prettycons from www.flaticon.comSupport the show (https://www.patreon.com/publichealthinsight)
Road traffic collisions are the 8th leading cause of death and one of the most burdensome causes of injury world-wide. In particular, it is the leading cause of death for children and young adults aged 5-29. The Public Health Insight Podcast examines road traffic deaths and injuries from a global perspective, some differences between developed and developing countries, and introduces the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) geared towards road safety.Follow us on Instagram, Twitter, LinkedIn, and Facebook. We would love it if you shared your thoughts by commenting on our posts, sending us a direct message through social media, or by emailing us at ThePublicHealthInsight@gmail.com. Until then, we’ll see you in the next one.If you like our show, feel free to lend us some support by making a contribution on our Patreon page so we can continue creating the content that you enjoy as we expand the Public Health Insight Community. Icon made by Freepik from www.flaticon.comSupport the show (https://www.patreon.com/publichealthinsight)
Social isolation and loneliness are an indication of the number of social supports and the perceived collective quality of those connections. Dr. Mehrete Girmay is a Public Health Analyst based in the U.S. and she remains with the Public Health Insight Podcast to continue our discussion about some of the impacts of social isolation and loneliness on health outcomes, their disproportionate impact on the senior population, and the need for a creative systems-thinking approach that prioritizes equity. If you like our show, feel free to lend us some support by visiting our Patreon page and making a contribution so we can continue creating the content that you enjoy as we build the Public Health Insight Community. Follow us on Instagram, Twitter, LinkedIn, and Facebook. We would love it if you shared your thoughts by commenting on our posts, sending us a direct message through social media, or by emailing us at ThePublicHealthInsight@gmail.com. Until then, we’ll see you in the next one.Icon made by Freepik from www.flaticon.comSupport the show (https://www.patreon.com/publichealthinsight)
Social isolation and loneliness are often used to refer to the same concept, however, in public health research, some important differences exist. Social isolation is more of an objective measure based on the size of one’s social network and the frequency of social interactions. On the other hand, loneliness refers to the subjective discrepancy between one’s desired level of social connection and actual social connection. Dr. Mehrete Girmay joins the Public Health Insight Podcast to discuss the impact of social isolation on population health and their association with premature mortality and chronic diseases.  Follow us on Instagram, Twitter, LinkedIn, and Facebook. We would love it if you shared your thoughts with us through direct message on your social media platform of choice or by emailing us at ThePublicHealthInsight@gmail.comIcon made by Freepik from www.flaticon.comSupport the show (https://www.patreon.com/publichealthinsight)
There are many different harm reduction strategies in public health, including wearing seatbelts while in a vehicle or wearing a helmet when riding a bike. Public Health Insight’s Hosts assemble for a captivating discussion on one of the more controversial harm reduction strategies, referred to as Safe Consumption Sites (SCS). In this conversation, we explore the history of SCS, political and ideological opposition to the sites, and its overall societal benefits. The United States is behind many developed countries in terms of implementing legal safe consumption sites, do you think it's time for the U.S to have Safe Consumption Sites?Follow us on Instagram, Twitter, LinkedIn, and Facebook. We would love it if you shared your thoughts with us through direct message on your social media platform of choice or by emailing us at ThePublicHealthInsight@gmail.comIcon made by Smashicons from www.flaticon.comSupport the show (https://www.patreon.com/publichealthinsight)
Racialized and marginalized populations often disproportionately experience negative health outcomes compared to the broader population; COVID-19 is no exception. Linda Holdbrook joins the Public Health Insight Podcast to continue our conversation on the social determinants of health, with a deeper dive into the role racism plays in population health and how the underlying health disparities have been magnified by the ongoing pandemic.Follow us on Instagram, Twitter, LinkedIn, and Facebook. We would love it if you shared your thoughts with us through direct message on your social media platform of choice or by emailing us at ThePublicHealthInsight@gmail.comIcon made by Freepik from www.flaticon.comSupport the show (https://www.patreon.com/publichealthinsight)
The Social Determinants of Health (SDOH) is a central dogma to the field of public health. There are many different definitions of SDOH from reputable organizations, however, in its simplest form, it refers to the social and economic conditions in which people are born, grow, work, live, and age - working as a system to influence the health of populations. Linda Holdbrook joins the Public Health Insight Podcast to discuss some of these SDOH as identified by the World Health Organization and the importance of incorporating these determinants to achieve effective public health practice. As a prelude to our next episode, we ask the question whether racism or racial discrimination, should replace ‘race’ as a social determinant of health. What do you think?We would love it if you followed us and shared your thoughts with us through direct messages on Instagram, Twitter, Facebook, or by emailing us at ThePublicHealthInsight@gmail.comIcon made by Freepik from www.flaticon.comSupport the show (https://www.patreon.com/publichealthinsight)
Abstinence-based messaging and interventions have long been used as the gold standard to deter populations from adopting various types of behaviours that can have detrimental effects on health. However, its limited success in addressing drug addiction and other public health issues has called for a more holistic multi-pronged approach to meet the needs of our modern-day society. Harm reduction is an evidence-based public health strategy that has been implemented to minimize the risk of injury, disease, or death associated with a potentially high-risk or addictive behaviour. Public Health Insight’s Podcast Hosts discuss the underlying principles of harm reduction strategies and the overall weaknesses of stand-alone abstinence-based programs and health promotion campaigns. Follow us on Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook. We would love it if you shared your thoughts with us through direct message on your social media platform of choice or by emailing us at ThePublicHealthInsight@gmail.comIcon made by Freepik from www.flaticon.comSupport the show (https://www.patreon.com/publichealthinsight)
Systemic racism in institutions such as the healthcare system can amplify already existing racial and ethnic health disparities. For the past decade, cultural competence has been explored as a potential solution to remedy the mistreatment and substandard care often delivered to people of colour, immigrants, and other marginalized populations. Rose Marcelin joins the Public Health Insight Podcast to discuss some of the promising outcomes that may be achieved if cultural competence is integrated into healthcare practice as well as some limitations in scaling up such initiatives. Follow us on Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook. We would love it if you shared your thoughts with us through direct message on your social media platform of choice or by emailing us at ThePublicHealthInsight@gmail.com.Icon made by Smalllikeart from www.flaticon.comSupport the show (https://www.patreon.com/publichealthinsight)
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