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EMS on AIR

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EMS on AIR is an education and entertainment podcast designed to keep healthcare providers safe, informed, and prepared. The EMS on AIR Podcast was originally launched in response to the COVID-19 pandemic as a way to communicate efficiently and directly with EMS personnel. Now, we’ve started branching out to all things healthcare but still tailored with the national EMS audience in mind. This podcast has begun to transform into a bridge between subject matter experts, the most recent data, and the EMS providers that make a difference every day in the field.
53 Episodes
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In this episode, we sit down with Randall Hawkins, the National Sales Director of GD.  Randall is here to discuss the importance of reliable, clear communication between EMS and the hospital.  Specifically, we’ll compare and contrast traditional EMS communication technology and tools versus the new mobile tele-health tech that has been becoming more popular and affordable over the last 5-10 years.  Then, we’ll discuss how the OCMCA is leveling up their game by introducing a new mobile tele-health platform by way of their brand-new Electronic Communications Special Study, or eComs for short.  Communication technology has come a long way and it’s only getting better, cheaper and more reliable.  Instead of trying to stick to traditional communication tech, the OCMCA is testing out the use a telemedicine application called e-Bridge.  This application offers several features including live video streaming and voice and text communication. It is also capable of EMS tracking with live ETA, and specialized burn, STEMI, stroke, sepsis, and trauma functions. They can even customize pretty much any type of alert notification you can think of.  GD’s e-Bridge also offers seamless integration into CAREpoint, which is used by many hospitals throughout the nation.  Visit EMSonAIR.com for the latest information, podcast episodes and other details.  Follow us on Instagram @EMSOnAIR.Please keep emailing your questions, comments, feedback and episode ideas to the EMS on AIR Podcast team by email at QI@OCMCA.org.  Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/emsonair?fan_landing=true)
Over the past decade, numerous advances have been made in the treatment of stroke patients.  During that time, stroke center designations have evolved.  Designating bodies across the US generally recognize four stroke center levels. These four levels have been created in collaboration with the American Heart Association and American Stroke Association. Starting with the highest level of care, they include:Comprehensive stroke centers Thrombectomy capable stroke centersPrimary stroke centersAcute stroke ready hospitalsIn this episode, we sit down with two stroke experts from Ascension Providence Rochester Hospital.  Dr. John Whapham, MD, MS, FAAN, FSNIS, the Medical Director of Neuro Interventional Surgery, and Amanda Kalinsky, MS, AGACNP-BC, RN, CCRN, Nurse Practitioner and the Stroke and Neuroscience Program Manager.  They are here to discuss what it takes for a hospital to advance its stroke center capabilities and designation.  Specifically, their hospital is going through the process advancing from a Primary designation to a Thrombectomy Capable Stroke Center designation.  Both guests have experience with advancing a hospitals stroke center designation.  They are currently completing the process of advancing from a Primary designation to a Thrombectomy Capable Stroke Center designation.  They’ll help us appreciate what it takes for a hospital to advance their stroke center certification.  In addition, they’ll give us their opinion on the use of stroke severity scales by EMS to identify and measure potential strokes.  Finally, we list and describe key things that every EMS crew should consider each time they encounter a potential stroke patient.  Visit EMSonAIR.com for the latest information, podcast episodes and other details.  Follow us on Instagram @EMSOnAIR.Please keep emailing your questions, comments, feedback and episode ideas to the EMS on AIR Podcast team by email at QI@OCMCA.org.  Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/emsonair?fan_landing=true)
In this episode, we welcome Emily Bergquist, MSA, Paramedic I/C (BergquistE@michigan.gov) to compare and contrast Michigan to other US state EMS systems.  Emily is the Medical Control Authority Coordinator for the State of Michigan Bureau of EMS, Trauma and Preparedness.  She is the one at the State EMS office that works on all of the protocols and supports the MCAs to assure that the multitude of Michigan’s EMS systems function the way that they’re supposed to.  The spectrum of EMS system styles, organizational structures, and response methods in this country is vast.  In addition, each system faces a unique set of conditions, such as the specific geographic area, the citizen demographics, the number and level of EMS personnel, the number of hospitals, and the distance between citizens and the hospitals.  This is why there’s so much truth behind the old saying, “If you’ve seen one EMS system, you’ve seen one EMS system.”  This sentiment couldn’t be truer in the State of Michigan.  In Michigan, our State EMS office communicates with the various constituent EMS systems, agencies and providers by way of a Medical Control Authority, or an MCA.  An MCA is a quasi-governmental body that maintains EMS standards, regulations and protocols within a defined geographic area.  Per the state law, an MCA is funded by all of the hospitals within that geographic area that receive EMS patients.  In a bit of an oversimplification, an MCAs job is to coordinate the EMS system and establish written protocols for its EMS agencies as well as ensure physicians, hospital staff, and providers are educated on the protocols.  This is a very unique structure with its own set of strengths and weaknesses.  Visit EMSonAIR.com for the latest information, podcast episodes and other details. Follow us on Instagram @EMSOnAIR.Please keep emailing your questions, comments, feedback and episode ideas to the EMS on AIR Podcast team by email at QI@OCMCA.org.  Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/emsonair?fan_landing=true)
In this episode, Dr. Ethan Brandler discusses the S-LAMS stroke severity scale that is currently being used by the New York City Fire Department.  Dr. Brandler is an associate professor of emergency medicine at Stony Brook University Hospital and he is also the Associate Medical Director of the university-based EMS system which provides 911 and critical care services. He also provides online medical control for the NYFD EMS service and is the medical director for various EMS agencies around his home in Long Island, New York. He even responds to calls as a paramedic in his hometown of Plainvew, New York.   When he’s not working in the hospital, teaching or going on calls as a paramedic, Dr. Brandler spends time conducting research on behalf of EMS and stroke.  His efforts have produced multiple published papers on the topic of EMS and the use of stroke severity scales, specifically on the S-LAMS scale.  In this episode, Dr. Brandler discusses a lot of very important and interesting things, but primarily he describes why NYFD EMS stroke protocols were updated to include stroke severity scales.  In addition, he walks us through their stroke protocol, the use of S-LAMS, how NYFD prepared to implement the updated stroke protocols into operation and, most importantly, he talks about the real life benefits their stroke patients are experiencing.  If you want to get a hold of Dr. Brandler you can email him at Ethan.brandler@stonybrookmedicine.eduVisit EMSonAIR.com for the latest information, podcast episodes and other details. Follow us on Instagram @EMSOnAIR.Please keep emailing your questions, comments, feedback and episode ideas to the EMS on AIR Podcast team by email at QI@OCMCA.org.  Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/emsonair?fan_landing=true)
In this episode, Dr. Steve McGraw and Dr. Russell Faust are back to answer more questions from the EMS and hospital communities.  In episode 11 (launched Dec 15, 2020) of this season, Dr. McGraw and Dr. Faust laid out all the questions they’ve been receiving about the COVID-19 vaccinations and delivered clear and concise answers.  Most importantly, all of their answers were based in the latest scientific data and literature that clearly demonstrates the safety of the COVID vaccines that are currently available.  We’ll keep the ball rolling and field more questions from the EMS and hospital communities.  During this episode, the doctors answer the following questions:Is the vaccine safe?  What about people that are immunosuppressed? What happens to the mRNA after it completes its mission? What are the known short and long-term side-effects of the current COVID vaccines?If I already had COVID, do I have natural immunity?  If so, why get the vaccine?How do the COVID vaccines impact flu vaccines or other similar vaccines I have had recently? When do I get my second dose?  When I went to get my vaccine, they scheduled my second dose for 18 days later.  I thought it was supposed to be 21 days later.  Which is correct?Should women that breast feed, pregnant women, women trying to get pregnant or men trying to impregnate get the vaccine?Do I need to wear a mask after being vaccinated for COVID?Dr. Steve McGraw is an ED physician at Ascension Providence Hospitals in both Southfield and Novi, Michigan.  Doc is also the current Oakland County Medical Control Authority EMS Medical Director which provides oversight to over 50 EMS agencies.  Dr. Russel Faust is the Medical Director of Oakland County Health.  Before medical school, Dr. Faust earned his pHD in cellular molecular biology.  After medical school he trained as a trauma surgeon and THEN, if that wasn’t enough, he did a fellowship in pediatric head and neck surgery.  My man Russ has 30 years in academic medicine, and he ran NIH funded labs to do applied translational cellular molecular biology.  Oh yeah, Russ’ first job in the medical field was as an EMT in the State of New York.  Visit EMSonAIR.com for the latest information, podcast episodes and other details.  Follow us on Instagram @EMSOnAIR.Please keep emailing your questions, comments, feedback and episode ideas to the EMS on AIR Podcast team by email at QI@OCMCA.org.  Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/emsonair?fan_landing=true)
In this episode, we introduce you to Jennifer Combs, MSN, ARNP,  from Healthy Mothers, Healthy Babies Coalition of Broward, Inc. and Captain James Carrol from Fort Lauderdale’s Fire Rescue.  These two fantastic people have teamed up for about the last ten years to create and grow the Direct On Scene Education Program, more commonly called DOSE.  DOSE is an innovative attempt at eliminating sleep-related infant death due to suffocation, strangulation or positional asphyxia by using First Responders to identify and remove hazards while delivering education on scene. First Responders are trained to identify and remove hazards from an infant's sleep space while on scene during emergency and non-emergency 911 calls.  To learn more about how you can implement DOSE or to obtain more info, go to their website, DOSEprogram.com.Our guests give us the real-world facts as well as the intent and purpose of the DOSE Program.  Then, they’ll provide real life examples of how DOSE has made a continuous positive impact on the number of sleep-related infant deaths each year.  Finally, we will walk you through how first responders and their agencies can implement DOSE and make a huge impact in their community.Visit EMSonAIR.com for the latest information, podcast episodes and other details.  Follow us on Instagram @EMSOnAIR.Please keep emailing your questions, comments, feedback and episode ideas to the EMS on AIR Podcast team by email at QI@OCMCA.org.  Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/emsonair?fan_landing=true)
The COVID-19 vaccines are here!  Today, we welcome back Dr. Steve McGraw and Dr. Russell Faust.  Together, these guys have been major part of EMS’ understanding and response throughout the entire COVID-19 pandemic.  Even though we are located in Southeast Michigan and we mention our home state a lot, today’s content applies to EMS on the national and even the global scale.  Dr. Steve McGraw is an ED physician at Ascension Providence Hospitals in both Southfield and Novi, Michigan.  Steve is also the current Oakland County Medical Control Authority EMS Medical Director which provides oversight to over 50 EMS agencies.  Dr. Russel Faust is the Medical Director of Oakland County Health.  Before medical school, Dr. Faust earned his PhD in cellular molecular biology.  After medical school he trained as a trauma surgeon and THEN, if that wasn’t enough, he did a fellowship in pediatric head and neck surgery.  Our man Russ has 30 years in academic medicine, and he ran NIH funded labs to do applied translational cellular molecular biology.  My boys are wicked smart!  What we're saying is that Russ and Steve know what they’re talking about.  They’re both considered experts in their respective fields and they’re here to explain what the vaccines are, how they work and the safety profile.  Since the announcement of the release of the COVID vaccines, the docs have been fielding a LOT of questions from their colleagues as well as their family and friends about the vaccines.  Are they safe?  What if I already had COVID, should I get it? What if I’m pregnant?  Do the vaccines alter your DNA?  What if I don’t want to get it right now, can I get it later?  As you can imagine, the list of questions goes on and on.  In an effort to help, we’ve invited Steve and Russ to come on and lay out all the questions they’ve been receiving and deliver clear and concise answers.  Most importantly, all of their answers are based in the latest scientific data and literature that clearly demonstrates the safety of the current COVID vaccines that are currently available.  Visit EMSonAIR.com for the latest information, podcast episodes and other details.  Follow us on Instagram @EMSOnAIR.Please keep emailing your questions, comments, feedback and episode ideas to the EMS on AIR Podcast team by email at QI@OCMCA.org.  Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/emsonair?fan_landing=true)
Hatzalah of Michigan is a volunteer EMS agency that augments existing EMS response in the cities of Oak Park, Southfield, and Huntington Woods, Michigan with community-based state-certified volunteer EMS providers. Their volunteers are local, dedicated community members, who drop everything and hurry to assist those in need. Nobody can argue that when something goes wrong, seconds can make the difference between life and death.  These guys take that statement VERY seriously.  It isn’t uncommon for them to have a dispatch to on scene time of 90 seconds.  Most 911 calls are longer than 90 seconds.  That’s crazy fast.    In this episode we discuss who Hatzalah of Michigan is, what they do, and why they do it.  Then, we’ll discuss the impact their agency and community experienced, and/or still may be experiencing, during the COVID-19 pandemic.  Finally, we finish with a talk about Hatzalah of Michigan joining the OCMCA Stroke systems of Care Special Study.Hatzalah is a Hebrew word that means rescue.  Hatzalah is the common title of volunteer EMS organizations serving mostly Jewish communities around the world.  There’s way more of these organizations then you might think, and they do some pretty amazing things.  Most local branches operate independently of each other, but they all typically use the common name Hatzalah.  Visit EMSonAIR.com for the latest information, podcast episodes and other details. Follow us on Instagram @EMSOnAIR.Please keep emailing your questions, comments, feedback and episode ideas to the EMS on AIR Podcast team by email at QI@OCMCA.org.  Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/emsonair?fan_landing=true)
During this episode, we welcome back Dr. Robert Swor, an emergency center physician at Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, in Oakland County, Michigan. For over the last 30 years, Dr. Swor has been a staple in the EMS community in Michigan.  Especially when it comes to the latest research involving EMS and cardiac arrest.  Dr. Swor has an intensive background when it comes to EMS cardiac arrest outcome data and that’s why he’s here.  In part 1 (S2E6), Dr. Swor discussed the data and related controversies regarding airway, breathing and ventilation and EMS management of cardiac arrest patients.  In today’s episode, we get into the details and data of compressions, blood flow and circulation.  Like many complicated things, the more I learn about cardiac arrest care, the more I realize how much I don’t know.  Data provides us with an objective look at what is supposed to happen vs. what actually happened.  Sometimes, looking at the data from an objective perspective can reveal controversy regarding the “best” treatment options for cardiac arrest patients.  Bottom line, what we expect regarding how things work or how well they work isn’t always truth.  In this two-part discussion, we discuss many of the controversies that find their way into the discussions of EMS provides and give you with hard facts, as their currently known.  Visit EMSonAIR.com for the latest information, podcast episodes and other details.  Follow us on Instagram @EMSOnAIR.Please keep emailing your questions, comments, feedback and episode ideas to the EMS on AIR Podcast team by email at QI@OCMCA.org.  Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/emsonair?fan_landing=true)
In this episode, we welcome back Dr. Steve McGraw and Dr. Russell Faust.  Dr. McGraw is an ED physician at Ascension Providence Hospitals in both Southfield and Novi, Michigan.  Doc is also the current Oakland County Medical Control Authority EMS Medical Director which provides oversight to over 50 EMS agencies.  Dr. Faust is the Medical Director of Oakland County Health right here in Southeast Michigan.  Together, these guys have been major part of EMS’ understanding and response throughout the entire COVID-19 pandemic.  Even though we are located in Southeast Michigan and we mention our home state a lot, most of the EMS on AIR content applies to EMS on the national and even the global scale.  This episode speaks to how our local system has been preparing for the availability of COVID-19 vaccinations.  We do address the topic from a national perspective, but we’ll be using Oakland County and many other areas of Michigan, as an example of how large systems are preparing for the next stage of this unfamiliar process.   Dr. Faust will lead us off with an update of the current COVID trends, as of November 24, 2020.  Russ provides a nice overview of the national, state and local COVID updates and information.  Then, the docs compare and contrast the first wave of COVID in April 2020 to the current wave of COVID we’re seeing in late November early December 2020.  We wrap up the discussion with a focus on the current status of COVID-19 vaccinations and how EMS may be used in mass administration process to the public.  This is a very informative episode that I really enjoyed, and I hope you do, too.  Visit EMSonAIR.com for the latest information, podcast episodes and other details. Follow us on Instagram @EMSOnAIR.Please keep emailing your questions, comments, feedback and episode ideas to the EMS on AIR Podcast team by email at QI@OCMCA.org.  Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/emsonair?fan_landing=true)
In this episode, Geoff sits down with one of his long-time colleagues and friends, Chris Haney, Director of Operations at Star EMS.  Chris is a fixture of the first responder community in Oakland County, Michigan with over 37 years of experience in EMS.  He enjoyed a full career at the Pontiac Fire Department prior to his time at Star EMS.  Throughout his time on the job, Chris has been a part of pretty much every committee, work group and task force you can think of in our county, region and state EMS system.  He's here for a down and dirty discussion about what the everyday EMS provider in Michigan should know about the current COVID rules, emergency orders and related protocols.  Let’s face it, we’re all going through a LOT of COVID fatigue in the prehospital community.  It’s hard to stay current on the “need to know stuff,” that “they” want us to know and do AND keep up with the constant barrage of COVID related calls.  Not only is there almost too much information out there, but much of it seems like it contradicts one rule or another which just makes things more confusing.  Trust me, we get it.  To make it easy, clear and concise, Chris and Geoff thought it would be a good idea to just sit down and talk about the various “things” the boots on the ground should know.  We also thought this would be a good chance to give everyone listening some background and context as to how the various medical control authorities, regional networks and the State of Michigan EMS system work in concert to share information back and forth to best serve the specific conditions of our diverse communities. The pandemic has given us an example to show how this giant state-wide system works and this talk may shed a tiny amount of light on a topic that isn’t always so clear. Now, there’s NO WAY you can teach someone how a state EMS system works in a 25-minute podcast and today we’ll just skim the surface.  However, by the end of this episode I think you’ll find clarity regarding the general process of how EMS rules, protocols and directives cascade downward and upward in Michigan.  Visit EMSonAIR.com for the latest information, podcast episodes and other details.  Follow us on Instagram @EMSOnAIR.Please keep emailing your questions, comments, feedback and episode ideas to the EMS on AIR Podcast team by email at QI@OCMCA.org.  Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/emsonair?fan_landing=true)
In this episode, we welcome Dr. Robert Swor, an emergency center physician at Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, in Oakland County, Michigan. For over the last 20 years, or so, Dr. Swor has been a staple in the EMS community in Michigan.  Dr. Swor ALWAYS been deeply involved in EMS and cardiac arrest research.  He has a pretty impressive background when it comes to EMS cardiac arrest outcome data.  Data provides us with an objective look at what is supposed to happen vs. what actually happened.  Sometimes, looking at the data from an objective perspective can reveal controversy regarding the, “best,” treatment options for cardiac arrest patients.  Bottom line, what we expect regarding how things work or how well they work isn’t always truth.  In this two-part discussion, we’ll discuss many of the controversies that find their way into the discussions of EMS providers and give you with hard facts, as their currently known.  Dr. Swor discusses on the data and related controversies regarding airway, breathing and ventilation in regard to EMS management of cardiac arrest.  In part 2, we’ll get into the details and data of compressions, blood flow and circulation. Visit EMSonAIR.com for the latest information, podcast episodes and other details. Follow us on Instagram @EMSOnAIR.Please keep emailing your questions, comments, feedback and episode ideas to the EMS on AIR Podcast team by email at QI@OCMCA.org.  Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/emsonair?fan_landing=true)
In this episode, we introduce our listeners to three key role players at Beaumont Hospital - Royal Oak, located in Oakland County Michigan.  Beaumont Hospital Royal Oak is a Comprehensive Stroke Center that served 1,319 patients in 2019.  Needless to say, that’s a lot.  In addition, Beaumont Royal Oak is a participating hospital in the OCMCA Stroke Study.  In this discussion, we’re joined by Dr. Rebbeca Grysiewicz, Comprehensive Stroke Program Medical Director, as well as Beaumont Royal Oak’s stroke coordinators Caitlin Woodruff and Wendy Carriveau.  They’re here to talk about the value of EMS when it comes to the recognition and treatment of stroke patients.  It turns out, EMS has WAYYY more of an impact on the decision-making process a stroke team uses to select a treatment plan for stroke patients.   In this episode, our guests will provide us with their perspective regarding the value of EMS and how we can make even more of a positive impact. The OCMCA Stroke Systems of Care Special Study is rapidly expanding.  If you’d like to know more information about the OCMCA’s stroke study, or if your agency or hospital would like to participate, visit OCMCA.org/stroke.  There you’ll find all the information you need about the study and how your EMS agency or hospital can participate.  You’ll even find study data, as well as a few presentations that you can download.  You don’t have to be located in Michigan to participate.  The OCMCA would LOVE participants from all over the US help us to identify the strengths and weaknesses of implementing a stroke severity scale, so that we can share the knowledge amongst the entire prehospital community.  Visit EMSonAIR.com for the latest information, podcast episodes and other details.  Follow us on Instagram @EMSOnAIR.Please keep emailing your questions, comments, feedback and episode ideas to the EMS on AIR Podcast team by email at QI@OCMCA.org.  Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/emsonair?fan_landing=true)
The primary objective of this episode is to provide you with an overview of the initial findings from the first two years of the Oakland County Medical Control Authority Stroke Systems of Care Special Study that is being conducted in southeast Michigan.  The pilot phase of this study went into effect January 1, 2018 and after two years the OCMCA has compiled some interesting and promising findings.  The big guy, Dr. Steve McGraw is here to provide us with an overview of these findings and tell us what they might mean for the future of EMS stroke care.  Dr. Steve McGraw is an ED physician at Ascension Providence Hospitals in both Southfield and Novi, Michigan.  Doc is also the current Oakland County Medical Control Authority EMS Medical Director.  The OCMCA provides EMS oversight to 54 EMS agencies within Oakland County, Michigan.  Even though we are located in Southeast Michigan and we mention our home state a lot, most of the EMS on AIR content applies to EMS on the national and even the global scale.  Before Dr. McGraw leads the way in the study data discussion, we welcome back Dr. Russel Faust, the medical director for Oakland County Health here in southeast Michigan.  Russ kicks us off with an update of the COVID-19 pandemic for EMS and related healthcare providers.  In addition, we take a little tangent and discuss some recent events that may have caused a little confusion over the last month or so here in Michigan.  Dr. Faust will cover the details, but the bottom line is that in early October State of Michigan Emergency Orders by the Governor were struck down by the State Supreme Court.  It seems that many people did not realize the orders were struck down on a procedural technicality, and a few days later, the technicalities were corrected, and the orders were re-issued by way of the Director of the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services.  So, yes Michigan still has Emergency Orders in place and yes there are components that healthcare providers, like EMS, should be aware of.  Visit EMSonAIR.com for the latest information, podcast episodes and other details. Follow us on Instagram @EMSOnAIR.Please keep emailing your questions, comments, feedback and episode ideas to the EMS on AIR Podcast team by email at QI@OCMCA.org.  Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/emsonair?fan_landing=true)
When an EMS provider or agency becomes convinced that a stroke severity scale is the right thing to adopt for their system, they often assume the best thing to do is take all stroke patients, or at least those with indicators of LVO, to stroke centers that can provide neuro intervention.  It’s easy to consider bypassing one hospital for another in these situations, but the data clearly shows that the best thing we can do is gather ALL the necessary information related to the patient and their stroke. Then, transport them to the CLOSEST appropriate stroke center, which might not offer neuro interventional services like mechanical thrombectomy.  Either way, it is a data driven decision steeped in evidence. In this episode, Geoff sits down with Chris and Jason Seitz.  Chris is a traveling ED physician who works around the country in EDs that need the help. His brother Jason is a firefighter/paramedic at the Madison Heights FD.  Together, they own and operate Seitz and Sirens, which provides American Heart Association courses, NREMT prep courses and a litany of other EMS and healthcare education.  I just started collaborating with these gentlemen, and I think we’re onto something.  You can get a hold of them at SeitzandSirens.com. Visit EMSonAIR.com for the latest information, podcast episodes and other details.  Follow us on Instagram @EMSOnAIR.Please keep emailing your questions, comments, feedback and episode ideas to the EMS on AIR Podcast team by email at QI@OCMCA.org.  Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/emsonair?fan_landing=true)
In this episode, we present an example of an EMS system using FAST-ED to evolve their stroke system of care.  The OCMCA Stroke Systems of Care Special Study is designed to evaluate EMS’s ability to measure stroke severity using FAST-ED.  I’ll provide you with a nice clean overview of the study, who’s currently in it, how to get involved, and more.  This study is rapidly expanding.  If you’d like to know more information about the OCMCA’s stroke study, or if your agency or hospital would like to participate, visit OCMCA.org/stroke.  There you’ll find all the information you need about the study and how your EMS agency or hospital can participate.  You’ll even find study data, as well as a few presentations that you can download.  You don’t have to be located in Michigan to participate.  The OCMCA would LOVE participants from all over the U.S. help us to identify the strengths and weaknesses of implementing a stroke severity scale, so that we can share the knowledge amongst the entire prehospital community.  Please keep emailing your questions, comments, feedback and episode ideas to the EMS on AIR Podcast team by email at QI@OCMCA.org.  Visit EMSonAIR.com for the latest information, podcast episodes and other details. Follow us on Instagram @EMSonAIR.And PLEASE, whatever podcast platform you use, subscribe to our podcast, and leave us a rating and a review.  It REALLY helps us to grow this podcast.  Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/emsonair?fan_landing=true)
The EMS on AIR is back with Season 2!  In this season opener, Dr. McGraw kicks us off with a very brief COVID-19 update for EMS.  Then, the doc gives us a clear picture of what is at stake for stroke patients.  Stroke is a big deal.  It’s the third leading cause of death, and according to the CDC, in 2018, 1 in every 6 deaths from cardiovascular disease was due to stroke.  Someone in the United States has a stroke every 40 seconds AND every 4 minutes, someone dies of stroke.  It’s a big deal, but EMS can do something to help.  Dr. McGraw provides an overview of the evolution of treatments available to stroke patients over the last 40-ish years.  Over this time, the odds for these patients have improved with the advancement of technologies available at stroke centers.  However, to truly realize the benefit, the entire healthcare system needs to evolve its awareness and ability to not only detect stroke, but to identify how severe a stroke is when it’s happening.  Dr. McGraw and I discuss the evolution of stroke identification by EMS in the field over the last 40-ish years and how it has advanced to the point where many EMS systems across the nation are using stroke severity scales to efficiently and effectively measure stroke severity, obtain targeted pieces of information about the patient and the event ALL in an effort to get the patient to the best possible treatment in the quickest and safest manner.   We’ll also touch on the OCMCA Stroke Systems of Care Special Study, which is assessing EMS’s ability to identify and measure stroke in the field using the FAST-ED stroke severity scale.  If you’d like to know more information about the OCMCA’s stroke study, or if your agency or hospital would like to participate, visit OCMCA.org/stroke.  You’ll find all the information you need about the study and how your EMS agency or hospital can participate.  You’ll even find some of study data, as well as a few presentations that you can download.   Visit EMSonAIR.com for the latest information, podcast episodes and other details.  Please keep emailing your questions, comments, feedback and episode ideas to the EMS on AIR Podcast team by email at QI@OCMCA.org.  Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/emsonair?fan_landing=true)
In this BONUS episode, Dr. Faust kicks us off with an update of the status of the virus and its impact on our communities. Then, our other resident expert and all-around amazing human being Dr. Steve McGraw joins in to discuss the differences in the COVID infection and severity rates between what we experienced in March and April 2020 and the spike that occurred in August 2020.  In August 2020, it appears there was an increased rate of COVID transmission, but a decreased rate in severity and fatality.  Dr. McGraw and Dr. Faust provide their perspectives on this topic, and much more.  Then, we finish off the episode about what EMS might expect as we transition to cold and flu season.  Visit www.OCMCA.org/coronavirus for more details. Send your questions to QI@OCMCA.org.  Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/emsonair?fan_landing=true)
In today’s BONUS episode, we have put together a group of local experts to provide a nice clean overview of the most current OCMCA EMS Emergency Protocols that went into effect September 9, 2020.  Since then, all EMS providers in Oakland County, Michigan are expected to understand and provide care in accordance with these protocols.  The good news is that this will be easy, because the few updates were logical, reasonable and necessary.  We’ll dive into each of the four current EMS Emergency Protocols and spend a bit of time clearing up any misconceptions, but first let me remind you that you can access these protocols 24/7 through OCMCA.org/protocols, or on the OCMCA EMS Protocols App, which is totally free and available on Google and Apple devices.Visit www.OCMCA.org/coronavirus for more details. Contact us, or send your questions, comments or ideas to QI@OCMCA.org.  Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/emsonair?fan_landing=true)
In this episode, we wrap up season one by providing you with a reminder that the fight is not over, not even close.  The world must remain diligent and EMS must maintain a high degree of operational and PPE discipline on duty and recognize the impact of social distancing off duty.  The real trick will be to avoid COVID fatigue in the healthcare world as a topic of discussion, training and operations even though it has pretty much overshadowed everything in our life for almost 6 months and counting.  Getting numb to a topic, especially under the circumstances, even for a short time, provides an opportunity for something bad to happen, and we need to do everything we can to avoid that.  So, even though the pandemic isn’t over, and even though the first season of the EMS on AIR podcast is ending, we will be shifting our focus from COVID-19 as our primary topic to an in-depth look at the world of stroke and how EMS has been rapidly expanding their knowledge and skills to benefit stroke patients.  The goal is to keep our listeners motivated with leading edge topics and experts and we think stroke is primed to remain a huge focus on the national stage.  Visit www.OCMCA.org/coronavirus for more details.Contact us, or send your questions, comments or ideas to QI@OCMCA.org.  Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/emsonair?fan_landing=true)
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