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Dhammagiri Buddhist Podcasts

Dhammagiri Buddhist Podcasts

Author: Dhammagiri Forest Hermitage

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Dhammatalks, Chanting, Precepts and Meditation with Ajahn Dhammasiha and other Experienced Senior Buddhist Monks in the Theravada Forest Tradition of Ajahn Chah. Recorded at Dhammagiri Forest Hermitage, Brisbane, Australia.

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We're simultaneously livestreaming the Sunday noon sessions on video here: https://vimeo.com/dhammatalks

Every Saturday
07.30 am - Triple Refuge & Precepts
12.00 pm - Dhamma-Discussion, Q&A

Every Sunday:
09.00 am - Triple Refuge & Precepts and guided Meditation
12.00 pm - Dhamma Talk & Discussion
03.00 pm - Chanting, Guided Meditation and Dhamma-Reflection

www.dhammagiri.org.au
www.tinyletter.com/dhammagiri
www.vimeo.com/dhammatalks
150 Episodes
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Two visitors in the audience work as radiographers, taking X-ray and CT scans and so on. Ajahn Dhammasiha uses the opportunity to remind us that meditators should all be "Radiographers" as well:We have to go deeper than the superficial and attractive surface of our body.We have to contemplate what's inside our body: Bones, Blood, Organs, tissue, ligaments, flesh.The Buddha taught us to develop the perception of the internal body parts whenever we look at attractive bodies, so that we can overcome desire, lust and attachment to the body.If we can overcome attachement, identification, desire and lust for the physical elements that constitute our body (and others' bodies), we've already accomplished the major part of our journey to enlightenment and freedom.www.dhammagiri.org.auwww.facebook.com/dhammagiri-forest-hermitagewww.youtube.com/channel/UCJINt0JJBfFm_x0FZcU9QJwwww.tinyletter.com/dhammagiri/archive
Death

Death

2021-04-2730:03

We often try to deny the basic fact of our own mortality. Death is something that happens to others, old people and sick people, but not to ourselves. But denial is no solution, because in the end death will always get us. And deep down we know anyhow we're all mortal, and then the suppressed fear of death will manifest in all kinds of anxieties.Rather than denying death, the Buddha urges us to contemplate death deliberately ('Maraṇussati'). Not to resign ourselves to dying, but to follow the Buddha on the Noble Eight Fold Path that will ultimately lead us beyond death. We all can defeat death and realize the same Deathless State of Nibbāna that the Buddha realized meditating under the Bodhi Tree.www.dhammagiri.org.auwww.facebook.com/dhammagiri-forest-hermitagewww.youtube.com/channel/UCJINt0JJBfFm_x0FZcU9QJwwww.tinyletter.com/dhammagiri/archive
For the Theravada Buddhist New Year 13th April, traditional Buddhists visit the monasteries to make merit, and also to receive blessings to increase their 'good luck'. Ajahn Dhammasiha points out that 'good luck', fortune telling, astrology, feng shui, amulets, charms, and so on are not really a suitable foundation to bring us happiness.If our precepts are not pure, and we are stingy and egotistic, even the blessings of the most revered monks, or the most auspicious astrological constellation will not be able to help us. Instead, the Buddha encouraged us to rely on good karma. We have his garantee that whatever good karma ('puñña') we generate will always catch up with us at some stage, and will always result in happiness and good fortune.www.dhammagiri.org.auwww.facebook.com/dhammagiri-forest-hermitagewww.youtube.com/channel/UCJINt0JJBfFm_x0FZcU9QJwwww.tinyletter.com/dhammagiri/archive
Is All Desire Bad?

Is All Desire Bad?

2021-04-1628:35

Ajahn Dhammasiha is asked about desire/craving.We all know that the Buddha has explained in the Four Noble Truths that craving is the cause of suffering. But how do we find the motivation to practise, if we let go of all desire?Ajahn explains that we have to distinguish different form of desire. Only sensual desire, desire for existance, and desire for annihilation is the cause of suffering. But the desire to practise meditation, to learn the Dhamma, to be virtuous and generous - that desire ('chanda' in Pali) is wholesome, it is part of the path, and it should be deliberately cultivated.www.dhammagiri.org.auwww.facebook.com/dhammagiri-forest-hermitagewww.youtube.com/channel/UCJINt0JJBfFm_x0FZcU9QJwwww.tinyletter.com/dhammagiri/archive
Ajahn Dhammasiha is asked what has sustained him to stay as a monk for 25 years. He explains that in his twenties he had a profound sense of the ultimately disappointing and meaningless nature of normal lay life. This insight motivated him to search for a better spiritual alternative, even though he was young and 'enjoying himself' (according to average worldly standards) as a student in the very exiting city Berlin around the time of German re-unification.The Bhikkhu's life, on the other hand, provides a clear goal and purpose, i.e. Nibbāna, which is infinitely superior to anything the world has to offer. And even if a monk does not succeed in attaining Nibbāna in this life, one makes heaps of good karma for an excellent rebirth, and lives a beautiful, reflective life in quiet nature.www.dhammagiri.org.auwww.facebook.com/dhammagiri-forest-hermitagewww.youtube.com/channel/UCJINt0JJBfFm_x0FZcU9QJwwww.tinyletter.com/dhammagiri/archive
When we carefully investigate the various problems we struggle with, we notice that often the problem is not really the problem, but the real problem is the projection of "I", "Me", "Mine" and "Self". Only once we take up 'ownership' of the issues, only once we identify and cling to them do they become a problem for us.Ajahn Dhammasiha encourages us to instead contemplate the body, feelings, emotions and any external or internal phenomena whatsoever as:"This is not me, this is not mine, this is not my Self"www.dhammagiri.org.auwww.facebook.com/dhammagiri-forest-hermitagewww.youtube.com/channel/UCJINt0JJBfFm_x0FZcU9QJwwww.tinyletter.com/dhammagiri/archive
In this guided meditation, Ajahn Dhammasiha suggests to develop the perception of "Not-Self; Not-Me; Not-I; Not-Mine" together with the breath as our meditation object.Rather than fighting them or trying to suppress them, we regard all disturbing thoughts, emotions, phantasies, and so on as:This is not meThis is not mineThis is not my SelfSeen as not really belonging to us, they loose their power over us, and we can let go of them.Additionally, 'Anatta-Saññā' can be applied even to our meditation object, the breath. If we see the breath as 'not-me', we do not hold it too tightly, and the meditation goes swimmingly.www.dhammagiri.org.auwww.facebook.com/dhammagiri-forest-hermitagewww.youtube.com/channel/UCJINt0JJBfFm_x0FZcU9QJwwww.tinyletter.com/dhammagiri/archivewww.vimeo.com/dhammatalks
Attachment

Attachment

2021-04-0239:58

Ajahn Dhammasiha talks about the 4 kinds of attachment/clinging/grasping ('upādāna'): 1. Clinging to Sensuality 2. Clinging to views/opinions 3. Clinging to rites/rituals/conventions 4. Clinging to a delusion of 'Self' Attachment is the cause of our suffering, and only when we let go of all 4 forms of attachment through insight ('vipassana') will we be able to abandon suffering and experience liberation. www.dhammagiri.org.au www.facebook.com/dhammagiri-forest-hermitage www.youtube.com/channel/UCJINt0JJBfFm_x0FZcU9QJw www.tinyletter.com/dhammagiri/archive .
Like in a Tesla on autonomous driving mode, we're in danger of meditating and living our whole life on automatic pilot: Stuck in conventions, routines and habits. Ajahn Dhammasiha encourages us to break out of conventionality, to live and meditate with 'Beginners Mind': Aware, mindful, open and free. www.dhammagiri.org.au https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCJINt0JJBfFm_x0FZcU9QJw www.facebook.com/dhammagiri-forest-hermitage www.tinyletter.com/dhammagiri/archive
We've all heard the old adage: "No pain - no gain!" In the Buddha's time, they took that to the extreme and thought that to reach the highest gain, enlightenment, one would have to forgo all pleasure, and endure the most intense pain. Even the Bodhisatta fell into that trap and mortified his body with the most extreme ascetic practices.But when he had fasted himself close to death, he finally had the crucial insight: We only have to abondon sensual and unwholesome happiness. But wholesome happiness of generosity, virtue and samādhi is nothing to be feared.Spiritual happiness should be developed, and is the path to awakening.We can use happiness as a means to attain even more happiness.www.dhammagiri.org.auwww.facebook.com/dhammagiri-forest-hermitagewww.tinyletter.com/dhammagiri/archivewww.vimeo.com/dhammatalks
Mettā, Loving Kindness, is unconditional - every being deserves our Loving Kindness, without having to fulfill any 'conditions' beforehand whatsoever. And that applies equally to ourselves. We deserve our own loving kindness, no matter what we did or didn't do, no matter what bad qualities we may still have, or what good qualities we may still lack. We fully qualify and unconditionally wish ourselves well, 'warts and all', according to the instructions of the Buddha, simply because we are a living being. www.dhammagiri.org.au www.facebook.com/dhammagiri-forest-hermitage www.tinyletter.com/dhammagiri/archive www.vimeo.com/dhammatalks
A good doctor listens carefully, examines the patient thoroughly, and prescribes medicine only after he arrived at a well considered and investigated diagnosis.Is that how we treat the ailments of our own mind?Or are we a bad doctor in treating our own mind, immediately applying a standard solution?And when our treatment doesn't work, are we willing to re-investigate and apply a more suitable medicine, or are we just following a "more of the same" approach?Have we properly diagnosed whether our mind suffers from anger, or anxiety, or depression, or restlessness, or greed, or confusion...?Do we use the most appropriate meditation for each of these conditions to treat them?www.dhammagiri.org.auwww.facebook.com/dhammagiri-forest-hermitagewww.tinyletter.com/dhammagiri/archivewww.vimeo.com/dhammatalks
Often we mistakingly believe that thoughts are not so important, as only bodily actions and speech create heavy Karma, not mere fleeting thoughts.But as we think, so the mind will gradually incline. If we regularly think angry thoughts, the mind will incline towards anger. If we think thoughts of loving kindness, the mind will incline towards loving kindness. The inclination forms a habit, and the habit finally becomes an ingrained charactertrait in our heart.Thus, over time these seemingly unimportant and fleeting thoughts actually shape our character. We can gradually train ourselves to become patient, kind, generous, calm and wise, even if we're currently still show the opposite traits!www.dhammagiri.org.auwww.facebook.com/dhammagiri-forest-hermitagewww.tinyletter.com/dhammagiri/archivewww.vimeo.com/dhammatalks
We're often too much in our heads. Body Sweeping is a technique to bring our awareness back into the body.We move our mindfulness gently throughout our physical body: We try to feel and experience every limb and part of our own body directly from inside, from the top of our head down to the the tip of our toes.www.dhammagiri.org.auwww.facebook.com/dhammagiri-forest-hermitagewww.tinyletter.com/dhammagiri/archivewww.vimeo.com/dhammatalks
It's amazing how much of our anguish, heartache and suffering is actually caused by our own thinking!Ajahn Dhammasiha encourages us to analyze carefully and honestly how the very thinking process we're so attached to, and that we strongly identify with as 'me', 'mine' and 'self', is actually generating so much of our internal pain.Once we mindfully become aware of that, we can challange our absolute belief in the 'truth' of our thoughts, change our thought patterns to become more wholesome, and ultimately let go of attachment to thinking.www.dhammagiri.org.auwww.facebook.com/dhammagiri-forest-hermitagewww.tinyletter.com/dhammagiri/archivewww.vimeo.com/dhammatalks
In this guided meditation, Ajahn Dhammasiha encourages us to reflect, remember and rejoice in the good actions we have done. Calling our acts of generosity and kindness to mind and feeling happy about them is a crucial support for our mind to develop samādhi.www.dhammagiri.org.auwww.facebook.com/dhammagiri-forest-hermitagewww.tinyletter.com/dhammagiri/archivewww.vimeo.com/dhammatalks
Ajahn Nyanadipo is the abbot of Bodhipala Monastery near Adelaide. Originally from New Zealand, he came to Australia to ordain at Buddha Bodhivana Monastery, Warburton, while still in his late teenage years. He has trained for many years with Luang Por Kalyano, and is his seniormost disciple. In particular, he was instrumental in the physical development of Bodhivana; building, organizing, managing and supervising most of the construction projects. For the last two years, he has used his skills and extensive experience to develop Bodhipala Monastery near Mount Pleasant, about 50 km east of Adelaide, and to provide Dhamma teachings to the local community of monks, novices and laity. https://www.facebook.com/bodhipalamonasteryadelaide/ We are fortunate that he could visit us for our Community Offering of Forest Cloth ('Pha-Pah') on Magha Full Moon day, and kindly shared some Dhamma encouragement with us at the occasion. In this talk, he encourages us to "keep going" even if we encounter difficulties in our practice. When we do what is difficult, but wholesome and beneficial, we follow the advice of the Buddha: "Enduring patience us the supreme incinerator of defilements". Ajahn also responds to several questions from the audience. www.dhammagiri.org.au www.facebook.com/dhammagiri-forest-hermitage www.tinyletter.com/dhammagiri/archive www.vimeo.com/dhammatalks
Ajahn Nyanadipo is the abbot of Bodhipala Monastery near Adelaide. Originally from New Zealand, he came to Australia to ordain at Buddha Bodhivana Monastery, Warburton, while still in his late teenage years. He has trained for many years with Luang Por Kalyano, and is his seniormost disciple. In particular, he was instrumental in the physical development of Bodhivana; building, organizing, managing and supervising most of the construction projects.For the last two years, he has used his skills and extensive experience to develop Bodhipala Monastery near Mount Pleasant, about 50 km east of Adelaide, and to provide Dhamma teachings to the local community of monks, novices and laity.https://www.facebook.com/bodhipalamonasteryadelaide/We are fortunate that he could visit us for our Community Offering of Forest Cloth ('Pha-Pah') on Magha Full Moon day, and kindly shared some Dhamma encouragement with us at the occasion.In this short recording (7min), he reasures us to be patient in building up Pāramī (j'Spiritual Perfections'). Dhamma practice is not always smooth and easy, but if we persistently continue even through difficulties, our Pāramī will develop and ultimately bear rich fruit.www.dhammagiri.org.auwww.facebook.com/dhammagiri-forest-hermitagewww.tinyletter.com/dhammagiri/archivewww.vimeo.com/dhammatalks
On occasion of offering Forest Cloth at Magha Puja Full Moon, the Sangha at Dhammagiri recites 'Paritta'. These auspicious, protective verses of profound Dhamma-meaning are in 'Pali', the language spoken by the Buddha himself, and have been preserved and regularly recited by the Sangha for the last 2,500 years.The formal request to the Sangha to chant Paritta is recited by TumNext, Ajahn Moneyyo invites all devas (angels/spirits) to participate and listen to the Dhamma being recitedAjahn Nyanadipo, the abbot of Bodhipala monastery near Adelaide, who has specially joined us for today's ceremony, is leading the Paritta chantingAjahn Dhammasiha, Ajahn Moneyyo, V Dantacitto, and V Nipako are joining inwww.dhammagiri.org.auwww.facebook.com/dhammagiri-forest-hermitagewww.tinyletter.com/dhammagiri/archivewww.vimeo.com/dhammatalks
Ajahn Dhammasiha discusses the question: What's the best possible motivation for our practice of generosity?According to the Buddha, we generate good karma not just for happiness in future rebirths, but right here and now good karma is an ornamentation for our mind, beatifying our mind and equipping our mind with wholesome happiness and joy that will support our development of samādhi and insight.Fully understanding that process, and then deliberately practising generosity to make our mind happy in a wholesome way connected with Dhamma is the highest and most beneficial motivation for us to make good karma.www.dhammagiri.org.auwww.facebook.com/dhammagiri-forest-hermitagewww.tinyletter.com/dhammagiri/archivewww.vimeo.com/dhammatalks
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Comments (6)

dv Th

do buddhist podcasting have in the thai or myanmar?

Dec 27th
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Janette McDonald

Sadhu Sadhu Sadhu

Oct 3rd
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Tum So

🙏🙏🙏peaceful🙏🙏🙏

Apr 24th
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james oh

Sadhu Sadhu Sadhu

Apr 23rd
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Jo

Thank you for finding a new podcast option for us to be able to keep accessing our community and talks 🙏🏼

Apr 12th
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UniJB

Welcome to the ne w platform and best wishes 🥳

Apr 9th
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