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Dhammagiri Buddhist Podcasts

Dhammagiri Buddhist Podcasts

Author: Dhammagiri Forest Hermitage

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Dhammatalks, Chanting, Precepts and Meditation
with Ajahn Dhammasiha and other
experienced Senior Buddhist Monks
in the Theravada Forest Tradition of Ajahn Chah.
Recorded at Dhammagiri Forest Hermitage,
Brisbane, Australia.

You can learn more about our monastery,
Ajahn Dhammasiha and our Sangha
at our website:
https://www.dhammagiri.net

We've also got a Youtube Channel,
including regular live podcasts on the weekend
"Dhammatalks at Dhammagiri":
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCJINt0JJBfFm_x0FZcU9QJw

Our email Newsletter:
https://tinyletter.com/dhammagiri/archive


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319 Episodes
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During his stay at Sāsanārakkha Buddhist Sanctuary (SBS), Taiping, Malaysia, Ajahn Dhammasiha was kindly giving permission to make this recording of their Friday Morning Chanting. SBS has a comprehensive training program for bhikkhus (Buddhist monks). In order to cover a wide range of chants for the monks to gradually master, both morning and evening chanting move through a roster of various chants. This recording covers the Friday morning chants, in particular including the Mātikā and Vipassana-Bhūmi chants traditionally recited at funerals. Some of the chants are also done in English language. Bhante Ariyadhammika, the Sanghapariṇāyaka of SBS (leading senior monk/teacher/preceptor), personally leads the chanting. The resident sangha here chants with a very powerful deep bass voice, in fact the most bass chanting style I have encountered anywhere in Theravada monasteries so far 🗣. Even with the limitations caused by my mobile recording equipment, you will notice the deep bass if you use good round-the-ear headphones 🎧, or large loudspeakers 🔊 . (The build-in speakers in mobile phones or even tablets woun't be able to convey the bass fully - but it's still a nice morning puja to listen to 🙂 ) If your interested to learn more about the actual meaning of what is chanted, you can download the full version of the SBS Chanting Book, in Pali + English translations, as a PDF File (about 8MB) here: https://github.com/sasanarakkha/pali-english-recitations/releases/download/build_17.01.2023_06-53/SBS-Pali-English-Recitations.pdf More info on SBS and their excellent training program for monks hailing from all over the world is available here: https://sasanarakkha.org/ More about Dhammagiri Forest Hermitage: https://www.dhammagiri.net/news Our Youtube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCJINt0JJBfFm_x0FZcU9QJw Our email Newsletter: https://tinyletter.com/dhammagiri/archive Our Podcasts on Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/0SHWfWEGkO8OAtSWNJlqyD Our Podcasts on Apple/itunes: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/dhammagiri-buddhist-podcasts/id1534539834 . 
Ajahn encourages us to wath our mind all the time. Even when we meditate, we're careful not to focus exclusively on the meditation object, but to simultaneously be aware of the general state of our mind, and how our mind relates to the meditation object.When we train to do that in our formal meditation, we develop the skill to be able to also watch our mind continously while we're engaged in the activities of daily life. More about Dhammagiri Forest Hermitage: https://www.dhammagiri.net/news Our Youtube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCJINt0JJBfFm_x0FZcU9QJw Our email Newsletter: https://tinyletter.com/dhammagiri/archive Our Podcasts on Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/0SHWfWEGkO8OAtSWNJlqyD Our Podcasts on Apple/itunes: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/dhammagiri-buddhist-podcasts/id1534539834
More about Dhammagiri Forest Hermitage: https://www.dhammagiri.net/news Our Youtube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCJINt0JJBfFm_x0FZcU9QJw Our email Newsletter: https://tinyletter.com/dhammagiri/archive Our Podcasts on Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/0SHWfWEGkO8OAtSWNJlqyD Our Podcasts on Apple/itunes: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/dhammagiri-buddhist-podcasts/id1534539834
To counter the misleading idea that Nibbāna is simply nothing, Ajahn Dhammasiha quotes the well known passage in Udāna 8.3: "There is, monks, an unborn, unbecome, uncreated, unconditioned...". He reminds us not to forget about this final goal of all our practice, to overcome our anxiety about sickness and death by remembering the garantee of the Buddha that the deathless exists, and can be realized by us. We do not contemplate impermanence, death and suffering in order to induce a mindstate of resignation. Instead, we contemplate to free ourselves from death, pain and decay, by attaining the deathless, unconditioned element.  More about Dhammagiri Forest Hermitage: https://www.dhammagiri.net/news Our Youtube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCJINt0JJBfFm_x0FZcU9QJw Our email Newsletter: https://tinyletter.com/dhammagiri/archive Our Podcasts on Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/0SHWfWEGkO8OAtSWNJlqyD Our Podcasts on Apple/itunes: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/dhammagiri-buddhist-podcasts/id1534539834 .
More about Dhammagiri Forest Hermitage: https://www.dhammagiri.net/news Our Youtube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCJINt0JJBfFm_x0FZcU9QJw Our email Newsletter: https://tinyletter.com/dhammagiri/archive Our Podcasts on Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/0SHWfWEGkO8OAtSWNJlqyD Our Podcasts on Apple/itunes: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/dhammagiri-buddhist-podcasts/id1534539834
The Mahāsamaya Sutta (Dīgha Nikāya/Long Discourses #20) is a very famous chant. It is considered supremely auspicious, and particularly liked by all 'Devas' (Angels/Deities/Benevolent Spirits). In every Buddha's livetime, there occurs an event where the Devas of our world system, and even from several adjacent worlds, assemble to meet the Buddha and his Sangha of disciples. In the case of our Buddha Gotama, this event happened in the Great Forest near Kapilavatthu, the hometown of Buddha, where he grew up as a prince.As not all of the 500 monks present are able to see spirits, the Buddha explains which devas have arrived, and gives the names of their leaders, which class of devas they belong to, and the numbers of their retinue. It is widely believed that whenever this sutta is recited, devas feel attracted to come to listen with great joy and in large numbers. An english translation of the Mahāsamaya Sutta is available here:https://www.dhammatalks.org/suttas/DN/DN20.html https://www.dhammagiri.net https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCJINt0JJBfFm_x0FZcU9QJw https://tinyletter.com/dhammagiri/archive https://open.spotify.com/show/0SHWfWEGkO8OAtSWNJlqyD https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/dhammagiri-buddhist-podcasts/id1534539834
Auspicious recitation of Paritta ('Protective Verses & Blessings') at the inauguration of the new Uposatha Hall and Sima ('monastic boundary') at Wat Pah Nanachat, the international Forest Monastery established by Ajahn Chah in Ubon, Thailand. The event was attended by Ajahn Dhammasiha and more than 100 monks in the tradition of Ajahn Chah. Many of the most senior Western disciples were present, including abbots of many monasteries worldwide: Ajahn Kevali - Abbot of Wat Pah Nanachat (hosting the event) Luang Por Pasanno (leading the chanting) - Retired abbot of Abhayagiri, California Luang Por Tiradhammo - Retired abbot of Dhammapala, Switzerland; and Bodhinyanarama, New Zealand Ajahn Amaro - Abbot of Amaravati, England Ajahn Nyanadhammo - Abbot of Ratanawan, Thailand Ajahn Jayasaro - Abbot of Marajina Hermitage, Thailand Ajahn Vajiro - Abbot of Sumedharama, Portugal Ajahn Jutindharo - Abbot of Hartridge Monastery, England Ajahn Khemasiri - Retred abbot of Dhammapala, Switzerland Ajahn Jayanto - Abbot of Jetavana, USA, New Hampshire Ajahn Kusalo - Abbot of Bodhinyanarama, New Zealand Ajahn Dhammasiha - Abbot of Dhammagiri, Australia, Brisbane Ajahn Sukhito - Abbot of Pu Jom Gom, Thailand Ajahn Ahimsako - Abbot of Cittaviveka, England Ajahn Mudito - Abbot of Suddhavari, Brazil (... many more, and many Thai abbots...) May the numerous senior Ajahns chanting in this recording send you off into a fortunate, successful New Year 🎊; and may your Dhamma practice blossom in 2023 with their blessings 😊 More about Dhammagiri Forest Hermitage: https://www.dhammagiri.net/news Our Youtube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCJINt0JJBfFm_x0FZcU9QJw Our email Newsletter: https://tinyletter.com/dhammagiri/archive Our Podcasts on Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/0SHWfWEGkO8OAtSWNJlqyD Our Podcasts on Apple/itunes: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/dhammagiri-buddhist-podcasts/id1534539834 .
There is heaps of happiness for us to enjoy in our Dhamma practice. The discourses of the Buddha are full of specific terms for different flavours of happines, some of which can be experienced already in the beginning stages of our meditative cultivation. Ajahn Dhammasiha encourages us to mindfully identify the different forms of happiness as they arise in our heart, and then to deliberately cultivate them. More about Dhammagiri Forest Hermitage: https://www.dhammagiri.net/news Our Youtube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCJINt0JJBfFm_x0FZcU9QJw Our email Newsletter: https://tinyletter.com/dhammagiri/archive Our Podcasts on Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/0SHWfWEGkO8OAtSWNJlqyD Our Podcasts on Apple/itunes: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/dhammagiri-buddhist-podcasts/id1534539834 .
More about Dhammagiri Forest Hermitage:  https://www.dhammagiri.net/news  Our Youtube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCJINt0JJBfFm_x0FZcU9QJw  Our email Newsletter:  https://tinyletter.com/dhammagiri/archive Our Podcasts on Spotify:  https://open.spotify.com/show/0SHWfWEGkO8OAtSWNJlqyD Our Podcasts on Apple/itunes:  https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/dhammagiri-buddhist-podcasts/id1534539834
Ajahn Dhammasiha encourages us to "be a good Santa". A good Santa Claus will give all the gifts to the kids. A bad Santa may cheat and keep the most expensive presents for himself. Similarly, our task as followers of the Sakyan Sage is to not hold back, but to give absolutely everything away. Not literally giving away, but letting go of absolutely everything: Whether it's material objects, or relationships, loved ones, or our own feelings, emotions, thoughts, views, intentions, consciousness... If we're a good Santa, we let go completely without holding back. More about Dhammagiri Forest Hermitage: https://www.dhammagiri.net/news Our Youtube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCJINt0JJBfFm_x0FZcU9QJw Our email Newsletter: https://tinyletter.com/dhammagiri/archive Our Podcasts on Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/0SHWfWEGkO8OAtSWNJlqyD Our Podcasts on Apple/itunes: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/dhammagiri-buddhist-podcasts/id1534539834 .
In this guided meditation, Ajahn Dhammasiha uses Santa Claus as a metaphor for the process of emptying the mind. Santa's  job is to give gifts to all the kids for Christmas. He's working very  hard to fulfill this task, travelling on his sleigh carrying a very big  and heavy sack with all the presents. Similarly, our mind is carrying  around the heavy load of all kinds of different emotions, feelings,  moods, worries, desires, hopes, concerns, phantasies, images,  thoughts... and so on. When  Santa takes the gifts out of his sack, his task is simply to give it  away to the kid that requested that particular gift. Whether the gift is  some beautiful doll, or some ugly monster, or some boring game, Santa  is not getting involved at all: He's not terrified at the monster He's not attached to the handsome doll trying to keep it for himself He's not throwing away some yukky looking Ninja Turtle in disgust Whatever he finds in the sack, he just acknowledges it and then gives it  away to the kid it's meant for, without clinging or aversion to the  gifts. Similarly,  whatever comes up in our mind, we just acknowledge it for what it is,  but don't get involved at all. We don't attach to the pleasant stuff,  we're not averse to the unpleasant mental objects, no liking, no  disliking, no holding on. It's not our's anyhow, so we just give it all  away, letting go, emptying our mind. More about Dhammagiri Forest Hermitage: https://www.dhammagiri.net/news Our Youtube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCJINt0JJBfFm_x0FZcU9QJw Our email Newsletter: https://tinyletter.com/dhammagiri/archive Our Podcasts on Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/0SHWfWEGkO8OAtSWNJlqyD Our Podcasts on Apple/itunes: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/dhammagiri-buddhist-podcasts/id1534539834 .
Today, one of the visitors is a professor who is an expert on Shakespeare. He and Ajahn Dhammasiha engage in an interesting discussion about art, beauty and it's relationship to Dhamma practice as a Buddhist monk. Can a Buddhist monk still enjoy beauty, or would that conflict with the aim of abandoning all attachments? Does art always celebrates beauty, and present the world as something good and enjoyable?    Ajahn shares that his favourite works of art have always been those that induce a sense of 'nibbidā' (disenchantment) and 'semvega' (spiritual shock/urgency). Art that is not just celebrating life, but instead points us to the fundamental truths of impermanence, disappointment and suffering inherent in all conditioned phenomena. Ajahn recites one of his favourite quotes of Shakespeare to illustrate this point: "Tell me where is fancy bred, Or in the heart or in the head How begot, how nourished? Reply, reply!" "It is engender’d in the eyes, With gazing fed; and fancy dies In the cradle where it lies. - Let us all ring fancy’s knell; I’ll begin it: Ding, dong, bell. Ding, dong, bell." The Merchant of Venice, Act 3, Scene 2, Lines #65-74 If we take 'fancy' in the sense of 'craving', 'desire', Shakespeare uses the same approach as the Buddha. He's asking for the origin, the cause of craving. Where does craving come from, and how does it grow? And just like the Buddha in the Mahāsatipaṭṭhāna Sutta, this little ditty points to the 'eye' and the act of 'gazing' as the source of suffering. "Cakkhu loke piyarūpam sātarūpam, etth'esā tanhā uppajjamāma uppajjati..." "The eye is dear and pleasurable in this world, and it is there where this craving arises..." (Mahāsatipaṭṭhāna Sutta) And then Shakespeare even suggets to ring the 'death-knell' for fancy/craving, i.e. to kill/abandon craving. Where did Shakespeare get that from? Was he perhaps a Buddhist in a past life? More about Dhammagiri Forest Hermitage: https://www.dhammagiri.net/news Our Youtube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCJINt0JJBfFm_x0FZcU9QJw Our email Newsletter: https://tinyletter.com/dhammagiri/archive Our Podcasts on Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/0SHWfWEGkO8OAtSWNJlqyD Our Podcasts on Apple/itunes: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/dhammagiri-buddhist-podcasts/id1534539834 .
Ajahn Dhammasiha offers some reflections on the three characteristics of all conditioned phenomena, versus the three characteristics of the Unconditioned . 3 Qualities of all conditioned phenomena (sankhata-lakkhaṇāni): Coming into existence can be discerned Passing away can be discerned Change while persisting can be discerned 3 Qualities of the Unconditioned (asankhata-lakkhaṇāni): No coming into existence can be discerned No passing away can be discerned No change while persisting can be discerned (Anguttara Nikāya/Numerical Discourses, Book of Threes, #47 & #48) Both groups are very unequal: Conditioned phenomena is ablsolutely everything a unenlightened person has ever experienced: Whether one's own body, or other bodies, or material objects; whether feelings or thoughts or emotions; whether forms or sights or fragrances... all arise and pass away and change, which means they are conditioned. The only phenomenon that's Unconditioned is Nibbāna, the experience of total freedom in the heart of those that have fully realized the Dhamma and are liberated from craving and suffering. From this follows, that all we really have to do in vipassanā meditation, is checking out whatever comes up in our experince, if it has any of the 3 qualities of conditioned phenomena. If we can discern arising or passing away or change, it's only a 'sankhāra', a conditioned phenomenon, and the task is to let it go. Once we can let go of everything conditioned, we experience the Unconditioned, realization of the Dhamma, resulting in at least the first stage of enlightenment, stream entry (sotāpatti). More about Dhammagiri Forest Hermitage: https://www.dhammagiri.net/news Our Youtube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCJINt0JJBfFm_x0FZcU9QJw Our email Newsletter: https://tinyletter.com/dhammagiri/archive Our Podcasts on Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/0SHWfWEGkO8OAtSWNJlqyD Our Podcasts on Apple/itunes: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/dhammagiri-buddhist-podcasts/id1534539834 .
Ajahn Dhammasiha shares the story of Angulimāla, the most infamous mass murderer ('terrorist') in the time of the Buddha. He had already killed 999 persons, and was wearing their thumb bones as a kind of macabre necklace, when the Buddha visited the forest that was his main haunt. Once he had noticed the Buddha, Angulimāla rushed after him, trying to catch up. However, the Buddha used his supreme psychic powers in such a way that it appeared as if he was walking slowly and gracefully, but still moving too fast for Angulimala to reach him.  Exasperated, in the end Angulimāla cried out to the Buddha: "Stop, Ascetic!"   The Buddha replied: "I have stopped, please stop yourself, too!"   Puzzled, Angulimāla enquired what the Buddha meant. After all, he was too fast for him to catch up, so how could he have stopped?   The Buddha explains that he has stopped harming any being, that he has completely stopped using any form of violence.   This simple teaching had such a profound impact on Angulimāla that he took refuge in the Buddha, completely abandoned his violent lifestyle, and even asked for ordination as a monk. The Buddha granted him ordination, and practising with supreme commitment and determination, Angulimala later fully realized the Dhamma and became an Arahant.    Ajahn points out that we often may feel hopeless, or not quite good enough, or have doubts and feeling of guilt about past mistakes - but compared to Angulimāla, whatever we have done wrong is probably much, much less serious. Therefore, if even such an extreme murderer could completely change his ways, it's certainly possible for us as well to overcome whatever bad things we may have done in the past!    You can read the whole story in: Majjhima Nikāya / Middle Length Discourses Sutta #86 "Angulimāla Sutta More about Dhammagiri Forest Hermitage: https://www.dhammagiri.net Our Youtube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCJINt0JJBfFm_x0FZcU9QJw Our email Newsletter: https://tinyletter.com/dhammagiri/archive Our Podcasts on Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/0SHWfWEGkO8OAtSWNJlqyD Our Podcasts on Apple/itunes: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/dhammagiri-buddhist-podcasts/id1534539834 .
In this Guided Meditation, Ajahn Dhammasiha leads us to contemplate the forth foundation of mindfulness (4th Satipaṭṭhāna) in breath meditation (ānāpāṇasati): We breathe in and out contemplating & observing impermanence (anicca) not sure, not certain, unreliable We breathe in and out contemplating 'fading away' (virāga): both the fading away of external objects like sounds and thoughts, and also the fading away of desire, aversion, fear, liking and disliking, attachment - i.e. dispassion We breathe in and out contemplating ending, cessation (nirodha): both the cessation of external objects like sounds and thoughts, and also the ending desire, aversion, fear, liking and disliking, attachment We breathe in and out contemplating letting go (paṭinissagga) Very important: We do not contemplate the impermanence, ending and fading away of the breath. The breath is the anchor of our meditation, we can't let go of it. Instead, we contemplate the impermanence, fading away and cessation of all the thoughts, images, memories, phantasies, worries, desires and aversions that constantly arise in our mind and distract us from the breath. Even if we can't let go of them yet, let's just imagine how they are fading away. After the bell, it not quite over yet, as Ajahn adds some comments on using the same contemplations we used with the breath for our walking meditation. More about Dhammagiri Forest Hermitage: https://www.dhammagiri.net Our Youtube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCJINt0JJBfFm_x0FZcU9QJw Our email Newsletter: https://tinyletter.com/dhammagiri/archive Our Podcasts on Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/0SHWfWEGkO8OAtSWNJlqyD Our Podcasts on Apple/itunes: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/dhammagiri-buddhist-podcasts/id1534539834 .
Ajahn Dhammasiha responds to a question: "Is renunciation or non-attachment the better practice?" Ajahn explains that both terms are often used largely synonymous, and that therefore it's not so much a question of 'either-or'. Both practices are concerned with 'letting go'. But it's also possible to understand these two terms with different nuances of meaning. On the one hand, one can 'renounce' something, even if one still has attachment to it. For example, someone may observe 8 precepts and not eat in the evening. He is 'renouncing' the evening meal for that day. However, he may still be attached to eating in the evening. It takes deliberate effort and determination to 'renounce' the evening meal, even though one would enjoy it, even though one is still attached to it. The term 'non-attachment', on the other hand, usually implies that desire, craving and clinging to the evening meal are really gone. It doesn't require any effort anymore to 'renounce' it, as the attachment is no longer there. Usually it's easier to develop real non-attachment by first renouncing. E.g. monks and nuns give up all their money before they ordain. But there may still be attachment, which even after giving it all up physically, takes a much longer time to truly overcome. It's more difficult to cultivate non-attachment to things we can't fully 'renounce'. Like for example food, or our physical bodies. Without food we couldn't live, we have to take food while we practice, we can't 'renounce' all food. Instead, we have to cultivate non-attachment while we're still taking food every day. This is much more difficult, and there's a danger that we may delude ourselves into thinking we're not attached, even though we're actually are. How deeply we're attached, we often only notice once we can't get the object of our attachment any more. Whenever possible, it's best to practice both, renunciation and non-attachment, together at the same time. First giving it away, or not indulging in it any more, and at the same time using wisdom to gradually abandon any remaining attachments. More about Dhammagiri Forest Hermitage: https://www.dhammagiri.net Our Youtube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCJINt0JJBfFm_x0FZcU9QJw Our email Newsletter: https://tinyletter.com/dhammagiri/archive Our Podcasts on Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/0SHWfWEGkO8OAtSWNJlqyD Our Podcasts on Apple/itunes: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/dhammagiri-buddhist-podcasts/id1534539834 .
It's good to remind ourselves regularly of the final purpose of all our Dhamma practice. Whether it's offering dana, or keeping precepts, developing sense restraint, or watching the breath in formal meditation - in the end all of this should lead to letting go. It's outright impossible to fix all problems in the external world, all issues with our own bodies, and all our relationships and interactions with other beings perfectly. Even if we do our best to make this world a better place, there will still be wars and conflict and sickness and death, as it has always been. The only real 'fix' is simply letting go of it all. Once the heart lets go completely of all conditioned phenomena, it will experience final release and permanent freedom from dukkha, independent from any external conditions.  Ajahn Dhammasiha also anwers a related question: Why is the mind jumping away from the meditation object, and how can we overcome this tendency. More about Dhammagiri Forest Hermitage: https://www.dhammagiri.net Our Youtube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCJINt0JJBfFm_x0FZcU9QJw Our email Newsletter: https://tinyletter.com/dhammagiri/archive Our Podcasts on Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/0SHWfWEGkO8OAtSWNJlqyD Our Podcasts on Apple/itunes: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/dhammagiri-buddhist-podcasts/id1534539834 .
Ajahn Dhammasiha encourages us to give more importance to developing forms of wholesome joy. Like muditā, rejoicing in other beings good actions and accomplishments. However dark the world sometimes may appear to us, if we look carefully, we can still find countless acts of goodness, kindness and beauty occurring all around us. Rather than focussing on problems, and indulging in the faultfinding mind, we can discover so many admirable deeds in this world. When we focus on rejoicing in all the good that is done around us, we have a never ending source of happiness available to us. Ajahn also relates the story how Lady Visākhā requested 8 favours from the Buddha. The Buddha granted her request, as he recognized her deep understanding of the mental process to cultivate Bhāvanā: She was using her amazing generosity not just to generate good karma and attain a fortunate rebirth. Instead, she deliberately used the joy she experienced when reflecting on her good acts as a support to develop rapture and samādhi. Next, she would then use samādhi to develop the factors of enlightenment (satta bojjhangā) to attain Nibbāna. More about Dhammagiri Forest Hermitage: https://www.dhammagiri.net Our Youtube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCJINt0JJBfFm_x0FZcU9QJw Our email Newsletter: https://tinyletter.com/dhammagiri/archive Our Podcasts on Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/0SHWfWEGkO8OAtSWNJlqyD Our Podcasts on Apple/itunes: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/dhammagiri-buddhist-podcasts/id1534539834 .
🔸️Intro (Ajahn Dhammasiha, MC) 🔸️Requesting Triple Refuge & 5 Precepts (Dr Mallik & Vijitha) 🔸️Taking Refuge in Buddha, Dhamma & Sangha  (Conducted by Ajahn Dta Candavaṃso) 🔸️Committing to the 5 Precepts (Conducted by Ajahn Dta Candavaṃso) 🔸️Recitation of Paṃsukūla Sangha-dāna (Dr Mallik & Vijitha) 🔸️Offering of Robes & Forest Cloth to Sangha (All Sangha & Laity) 🔸️Sangha silently contemplates Paṃsukūla Robes (Sangha) 🔸️Recitation of "Kāle dadanti sappaññā..." - Offerings at Auspicious Occasion (Sangha) 🔸️Apalokana Sangha Kamma - Formal Decision of the Sangha to share Sangha Offerings for individual use (Ajahn Khantiko) 🔸️Anumodanā (Rejoicing) & Blessing (Sangha led by Luang Por Kalyano) This year Ven Ajahn Kalyano and four other senior monks have kindly  accepted our invitation to join us for the ceremony, giving us a Sangha  of eight Bhikkhus:  🔶 Luang Por Kalyano & Ajahn Dta Candavaṃso from Buddha  Bodhivana Monastery, Warburton near Melbourne.  🔶 Ajahn Saeang and Ajahn Varadhammo from Bodhisaddha Monastery,  Wilton near Sydney  🔶 Ajahn Khantiko from Wat Doi Mongkonsathan Hermitage in Chiang Mai  province 🔶️ Our own resident monks Ajahn Dhammasiha, Ajahn Moneyyo & Tan Niddaro  On the day of the ceremony we had a severe wether event, with torrential  rains, storms, flooding, and the government issuing a warning to do  only 'essential' travel. One of the two main roads to Dhammagiri was  already flooded and impassable.  Amazingly, some 150 people still came out to join, and they all  thoroughly enjoyed it. With their hearts focussed on making good karma  through generostiy, observing precepts, and listening to Dhamma, they  didn't mind some physical discomfort from inclement weather. Even though  the sky was grey 🌧 and raining, our hearts where sunny 🌞, bright, and  joyful throughout the event 😊 We all received a beautiful teaching that out true happiness does not  depend on external conditions, but on the quality of our heart. A heart  filled with goodness and good karma is happy inside, even in adverse  external conditions. Please note ceremony above is not a formal Kathina, but an offering of 'Forest Cloth' (Pali: Pamsukūla) (Thai: Pah Bah), as conducted if less than 5 monks have spent the rains retreat at the monastery. More about Dhammagiri Forest Hermitage: https://www.dhammagiri.net Our Youtube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCJINt0JJBfFm_x0FZcU9QJw Our email Newsletter: https://tinyletter.com/dhammagiri/archive Our Podcasts on Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/0SHWfWEGkO8OAtSWNJlqyD Our Podcasts on Apple/itunes: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/dhammagiri-buddhist-podcasts/id1534539834 .
Our Robe Offering Ceremony took place amidst torrential downpours, severe weather warnings and major flooding. Defying floods and storms, some 150 Dhamma practitioners still came out to Dhammagiri, determined not to miss this special opportunity for making merit, and to listen to teachings from our visiting senior monk Luang Por Kalyano. Listening to the rain pouring down, and the frogs croaking, Luang Por takes up the theme of dealing with difficulties and problems. He encourages us to apply Dhamma to the challenges we continuously face in daily life. He shares some fascinating stories of even worse flooding he had to cope with as a youg monk, when he stayed with Ajahn Piak at Wat Fa Kram, Lamlukka near Bangkok. The monks had to wade through deep water on their daily almsround, and occasionally would be completely submerged in water when stepping into the wrong spot. One day even a cobra was floating by close to where they washed their bowls. However, the monks could manage, as they used the difficult external conditions as a training to apply the principles of Dhamma in dealing with them. When we take up and maintain the precepts, develop faith in the Tirple Gem, and purify our heart through generating puñña (good karma), we will find that Dhamma starts to permeate our life. The more Dhamma becomes part of our daily life, the more resilience our mind develops to face any difficulties. We apply wisdom (paññā) in dealing with every challenging situation, and reflect on the impermanence of all conditioned phenomena. Through seeing with wisdom we can let go of anger, irritation & frustation, and dwell with a calm and peaceful mind even amidst adversity. The formal 'Invitation to Teach Dhamma' ("Brahmā ca Lokādhipatī Sahampatī...) that you hear in the beginning, right before Luang Por's talk, has been recited very beautifully by Aoy.  You can watch the whole event, including Luang Por Kalyano's Dhamma Talk, Paritta chanting by our sangha of eight monks, observance of Triple Refuge and 5 Precepts, and the formal offering of forest cloth, on our Youtube Channel here: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCJINt0JJBfFm_x0FZcU9QJw Photos of Luang Por Kalyano and our Robe Offering Ceremony are available here: https://www.dhammagiri.net/copy-of-images-of-dhammagiri More about Dhammagiri Forest Hermitage: https://www.dhammagiri.net Our Youtube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCJINt0JJBfFm_x0FZcU9QJw Our email Newsletter: https://tinyletter.com/dhammagiri/archive Our Podcasts on Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/0SHWfWEGkO8OAtSWNJlqyD Our Podcasts on Apple/itunes: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/dhammagiri-buddhist-podcasts/id1534539834 .
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Comments (12)

Dileep Katiyar

Dear Harley, I am so glad I came across this podcast, I wish to take this opportunity to thank you and offer my deepest gratitude for the cubby kuti where I meditated for a week in May 2021 for the first time and everyday I shared merits with everyone who made it possible especially the person who designed and built it. later Ajan told me your parents laboured as well. Anumodana to them too. That was the best week in 52 years of my life and the best birthday I had. Anumodana.🙏🙏🙏🙏🙏🙏

Aug 27th
Reply

Dileep Katiyar

🙏

Aug 8th
Reply

Dileep Katiyar

The story of the monk chanting and seeing devas himself has made me believe in devas and the power of chanting.

Jul 9th
Reply

Dileep Katiyar

Birds of a feather flock together, i heard before but now I understand. thank you

Jul 8th
Reply

MALLIKA JAY

Ajahn, it's an interesting sutta on Contemplation of Duality & stress.It is good to listen to it as a chant, while going through the sutta in English.🙏 Mallika

Jul 3rd
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Ingrid

very helpful and interesting guided meditation. Thank you.

Jul 1st
Reply

dv Th

do buddhist podcasting have in the thai or myanmar?

Dec 27th
Reply

Janette McDonald

Sadhu Sadhu Sadhu

Oct 3rd
Reply

Tum So

🙏🙏🙏peaceful🙏🙏🙏

Apr 24th
Reply

james oh

Sadhu Sadhu Sadhu

Apr 23rd
Reply

Jo

Thank you for finding a new podcast option for us to be able to keep accessing our community and talks 🙏🏼

Apr 12th
Reply

UniJB

Welcome to the ne w platform and best wishes 🥳

Apr 9th
Reply
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