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FLAVORS + kNOWLEDGE

FLAVORS + kNOWLEDGE

Author: WALTER POTENZA

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Flavors and knowledge is a bilingual podcast focusing on the gastronomic education in relation to food as a complement to a healthy lifestyle. Our topics vary from health and wellness suggestions, technical procedures, recipes, stories, products and ingredients analyzation, with the overall mission of educating the consumers, and generating awareness in the “truth of eating well”. Podcasts are in English with an accent and Italian. Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/walter-potenza/support
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The episode of F + K talks about the values of fresh and frozen fruit and produce. Through my cooking, I realized that the nutritional composition of frozen products is not lower than fresh. Every single product may respond in a different way, connected with whatever cooking process is applied, but the nutrients are still there. In both frozen produce and fruit, there is a loss of vitamins, but fibers do not suffer any changes at all. I think the nutritional level among the two groups is very minor and certainly will not make a negative impact on our health. If we compare some fresh vegetables such as peas, corn, green  bean, spinach with the frozen buddies, the vitamin content may be similar or not variable enough to detect. There is, however, the mindset that frozen is less relevant than fresh, and I cannot argue with that,  but as far as the overall nutritional aspect the difference is truly minor. Sponsored by Chef Walters Cooking School Rhode Island USA, Italy, Dubai, Beijing Subscribe to News you can eat 24 Video-Cast on YouTube  For recipes, visit the chef blog.   Share CHEF WALTERS NEWS YOU CAN EAT NEWSLETTER Chefwalter.com for all our related businesses Note: The views and opinions expressed in Flavors and Knowledge are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of News you can eat 24. Any content provided by our  bloggers or authors is of their opinion and not intended to malign any religion, ethnic group, club, organization, company, individual, or anyone or anything. Any general advice posted on our blog, website, or app is only for informational purposes and not intended to replace any medical or other advice. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/walter-potenza/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/walter-potenza/support
Welcome back to F + K. This episode is about losing weight by skipping meals. Sponsored by our agency Mediterranean Diet 21  For a while, I have heard about meal skipping. We seem to trust and try anything to confront weigh-loss, but often the reality proves otherwise. Let’s see If I can explain what happens when we follow this  falsified myth. According to one of the most rooted and shared beliefs in weight loss, skipping meals is a beneficial technique for losing weight because of the common belief that by depriving the body of calories and nutrients, you can reduce fat mass. For breakfast, a coffee and go, a seasoned salad for lunch, eating only for  dinner, etc.: all these behaviors reduce the calories ingested, lose weight, but often it is just water and lean mass, not fat. However, the weight loss does not last long because the metabolism adapts to the caloric constraints implemented and reduces its activity. And even if you only eat 1000 calories a day, you will lose very little fat, and you will be starving. Therefore, the belief that skipping meals is an effective method of weight loss is devoid of scientific foundation. Sponsored by Chef Walters Cooking School Rhode Island USA, Italy, Dubai, Beijing Subscribe to News you can eat 24 Video-Cast on YouTube  For recipes, visit the chef blog.  Share CHEF WALTERS NEWS YOU CAN EAT NEWSLETTER Chefwalter.com for all our related businesses Note: The views and opinions expressed in Flavors and Knowledge are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of News you can eat 24. Any content provided by our bloggers or authors is of their opinion and not intended to malign any religion, ethnic group, club, organization, company, individual, or anyone or anything. Any general advice posted on our blog, website, or app is only for informational purposes and not intended to replace any medical or other advice. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/walter-potenza/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/walter-potenza/support
Welcome back to F + K. This episode is about take-out suggestions. Take out and food delivery has been our new lifestyle since February  2020, it seems. We don' trust the pandemic and the people who often see this as a hoax. Those are the people who luckily have not lost anyone in their circle, and I am thankful for them. You can still enjoy the comfort of your surrounding with some great takeout from your favorite place. It may not replace the experience of a restaurant, but we have adjusted well. Take-out food preparation has unique challenges such as appearance, taste, and consistency, not to mention the proper packaging, often of low quality. There is nothing more detrimental than a  $ 17 pasta dish in a 57 cents container. So you open your phone,  the menu pos up, and think about what to order. You also would like some healthy options along with taste. You can do a couple of things: menus online may have symbols or designations regarding healthier options, especially fast-food establishments. The list often describes some steps on the methodology,  but not all the ingredients. Ask for help.  Restaurant staff can guide you through the menu navigation, ingredient listing, and preparation methods. They need to make a sale and want to  keep you satisfied, especially if you are a repeat customer.  Ask about the portion size when ordering for dinner time. Good dining habits climb in quantity  during lunch and decrease during the evening for digestive reasons.  Overeating in late hours, it's uncomfortable and raises blood sugar levels, even if you do not have diabetes. Ask for sauce on the side.  Remember that many of those dipping sauces carry many calories because loaded with high fructose and sodium. Sponsored by Chef Walters Cooking School Rhode Island USA, Italy, Dubai, Beijing Subscribe to News you can eat 24 Video-Cast on YouTube  For recipes, visit the chef blog.  Share CHEF WALTERS NEWS YOU CAN EAT NEWSLETTER Chefwalter.com for all our related businesses Note: The views and opinions expressed in Flavors and Knowledge are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of News you can eat 24. Any content provided by our bloggers or authors is of their opinion and not intended to malign any  religion, ethnic group, club, organization, company, individual, or  anyone or anything. Any general advice posted on our blog, website, or app is only for informational purposes and not intended to replace or substitute for any medical or other advice. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/walter-potenza/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/walter-potenza/support
10 PASTA MISTAKES

10 PASTA MISTAKES

2020-10-1211:171

Welcome back, dear friends. Cooking and fixing a dish of pasta is not complicated. We resort to it when uncertain about what to cook or short on time. Pasta is also the pride of Italy and the world. We are famous for being the best at preparing it and knowing its secrets. But do you know that in reality, every day without understanding it, we make many mistakes and what seems to be perfect pasta, often hides many imperfections? Even the simplest of pasta-based recipes, such as the classic pasta with a sauce of garlic, olive oil, and chili, must be carried out skillfully. So I have put together ten of the most common mistakes when preparing pasta.  There are others, but these will do for now. How many of you recognize yourself at least at one point? Sponsored by Chef Walters Cooking School Rhode Island USA, Italy, Dubai, Beijing Subscribe to News you can eat 24 Video-Cast on YouTube   For recipes, visit the chef blog.  Share CHEF WALTERS NEWS YOU CAN EAT NEWSLETTER Chefwalter.com for all our related businesses Note:  The views and opinions expressed in Flavors and Knowledge are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the official  policy or position of News you can eat 24. Any content provided by our bloggers or authors is of their opinion and not intended to malign any religion, ethnic group, club, organization, company, individual, or anyone or anything. Any general advice posted on our blog, website, or app is only for informational purposes and not intended to replace or substitute for any medical or other advice. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/walter-potenza/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/walter-potenza/support
Welcome back friends: Sicilian food is contradictory, just like the Sicilian culture. It is an odd mixture of Italian, Greek, Arab, French, Spanish, and North  African. Its dinner plates are living odes to the number of peoples that have conquered, colonized, settled, ruled, and emigrated here. Every region in Italy has its unique culinary traditions, but to lump Sicilian food under the over-arching category of "Italian food" does a  disservice to this island's culture and proud history. The first recorded example of Sicilian food comes from the 5th century B.C., from a  cook named Mithaecus. His writing on his native land's cuisine was the first documented cookbook in Greece – and the first cookbook in the world in which the author's name was well-known and identified. Sicily  was first inhabited by an "ancient people of Italy," with small groups from Egypt and Spain. However, the island was not put on the map until  the Greeks colonized it. They left behind grand ruins and theaters in places like Siracusa and Taormina, but also – significantly – brought olives and grapes with them, introducing some of the most important crops to the region and to what we know of Sicily and Italy today. The  Greek diet – which today is so affectionately called "the Mediterranean diet" – leans heavily on fresh fish, vegetables, and grains. Sponsored by Chef Walters Cooking School Rhode Island USA, Italy, Dubai, Beijing Subscribe to News you can eat 24 Video-Cast on YouTube  For recipes, visit the chef blog.  Share CHEF WALTERS NEWS YOU CAN EAT NEWSLETTER Chefwalter.com for all our related businesses Note:  The views and opinions expressed in Flavors and Knowledge, are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of News you can eat 24. Any content provided by our bloggers or authors is of their opinion and not intended to malign any religion, ethnic group, club, organization, company,  individual, or anyone or anything. Any general advice posted on our blog, website, or app is for informational purposes only and is not intended to replace or substitute for any medical or other advice. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/walter-potenza/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/walter-potenza/support
Hey, friends welcome back to F + K. You cannot visit the city of Naples, an unmissable stop for gastronomy enthusiasts, without tasting a sfogliatella, one of the sweet symbols of the Neapolitan pastry. Loved by both Italians and foreign tourists, this delicious and fragrant pastry, of which the curly and short-crust variants are known, originated 400 years ago and then underwent changes and evolutions. Let's go then to discover its fascinating history, from the conception of the recipe to the present day. According to legend, in 1600 a cloistered nun of the Convent of Santa Rosa in Conca dei Marini (Salerno), on the Amalfi Coast, accidentally invented this iconic sweet from Campania. Some say that a nun from the convent was preparing biancomangiare, a Sicilian sweet made with almonds and milk, but then opted for a creative variant that contained puff pastry and ricotta. Sponsored by Chef Walters Cooking School Rhode Island USA, Italy, Dubai, Beijing Subscribe to News you can eat 24 Video-Cast on YouTube  For recipes, visit the chef blog.  Share CHEF WALTERS NEWS YOU CAN EAT NEWSLETTER Chefwalter.com for all our related businesses Note:  The views and opinions expressed in News you can eat 24  newsletters,  are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of News you can eat 24. Any content provided by our bloggers or authors is of their opinion and not intended to malign any religion, ethnic group, club, organization, company,  individual, or anyone or anything. Any general advice posted on our blog, website, or app is for informational purposes only and is not intended to replace or substitute for any medical or other advice. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/walter-potenza/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/walter-potenza/support
10 KITCHEN TIPS # 1

10 KITCHEN TIPS # 1

2020-10-0205:511

Hey, friends, just a refresher if you are into cooking, with a list of 10 suggestions. 1. When you set up your workspace area, keep in mind sanitized cutting board and clean tools, bowls, and utensils. And make sure to keep a trashcan within arm’s reach. For safety purposes, never trust anyone in the kitchen but yourself. 2. To make an egg wash, whisk together a  large egg with one tablespoon of water or milk until smooth. Use as a  glue to seal pastries, then brush on top for a glossy appearance—egg wash also used for the breading process.......8 more! Tune-in to our latest Flavors + Knowledge Podcast Subscribe to News you can eat 24 Video-Cast on YouTube  For recipes, visit the chef blog.  Chefwalter.com Note:  The views and opinions expressed in News you can eat 24 newsletters,  are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of News you can eat 24. Any content provided by our bloggers or authors is of their opinion and not intended to malign any religion, ethnic group, club, organization, company, individual, or anyone or anything. Any general advice posted on our blog, website, or app is for informational purposes only and is not intended to replace or substitute for any medical or other advice. Share CHEF WALTERS NEWS YOU CAN EAT NEWSLETTER --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/walter-potenza/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/walter-potenza/support
This episode is about cacio e pepe, perhaps one of the simplest pasta dishes to make, but technically challenging. We seem to discover new dishes every time someone travels abroad, or a  blogger features a new something on Instagram. It is the case of this  Roman dish, traditional in all senses, symbol of the capital city, and now trendy pasta in most restaurants. It originated among the pastures during the seasonal movement of livestock, a process called  “Transumanza,” meaning the moves from one region to another seeking better and prosperous fields for the animal FEED. During the long migrations of the flock, the shepherds of the Roman countryside brought with them various ingredients, such as guanciale, also known as pork cheeks used to make Amatriciana, and tonnarelli pasta. Tonnarelli pasta looks like spaghetti—long and thicker than angel air, skinnier than linguine—and when I make them with eggs, its strands are chewy and will hold the cooking. These days, many restaurants use spaghetti and deem it authentic, but tonnarelli was the original pasta of choice. Shepherds carried cheese with them, made from sheep’s milk, made during the stops through the journey, and sold to the local markets they visited. The last ingredients they carried was black pepper. There’s a reason they chose these last three ingredients. Black pepper stimulated the heat receptors and helped the shepherds to protect themselves from the cold. Aged pecorino keeps for a long time. And pasta guaranteed the right amount of carbohydrates and calories. This dish, which over the years has spread from the Lazio countryside to the mountains of Abruzzo and Umbria, leaped and transformed itself from a frugal meal to a dish typical of Roman taverns. According to tradition, the tavern-keepers at the time were careful to serve a “dry” cacio e Pepe to stimulate business. The more cacio a pepe they ate, the more wine they drank. And that's a good thing right? Sponsored by Chef Walters Cooking School Visit our Youtube Channel for News you can eat 24 Video Food Cast  Subscribe to our newsletter at walterpotenza.substack.com Recipes form our available at Chef Walters Fine Foods Blog --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/walter-potenza/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/walter-potenza/support
PANE TOSCANO EXPLAINED

PANE TOSCANO EXPLAINED

2020-09-2408:181

News you can eat 24 analyzes salt-free Tuscan bread. There are over 350 bread types in Italy. Many will disappear within a generation to be replaced by products which seem authentic, but will not be made with traditional local ingredients. Some may actually seem to be the real thing, but the give away is the prefix 'Tipo' written on the package, meaning 'like' and is a reference to the shape and preparation. The flavor then is another matter. So which regions in Italy are worth visiting just for their bread? Sardinia and Puglia for sure, Umbria and Lazio a close second, but all the regions have their unique bread heritage. Pane Toscano is another bread of relevance. Many types of bread overlap into neighboring regions and can also be said to be 'native'. Here in the USA we usually purchase the Italian loaf or the Sicilian type, they are both similar in taste and slightly different in size. We also have ciabatta, focaccia, and piadina as popular choices, considered breads but with much-less leaving incorporated in the dough. Sponsored by Chef Walters Cooking School Visit our Youtube Channel for News you can eat 24 Video Food Cast  Subscribe to our newsletter at walterpotenza.substack.com --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/walter-potenza/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/walter-potenza/support
HELLO FRIENDS, THIS IS CHEF WALTER: TUNE -into OUR PODCAST FLAVORS AND KNOWLEDGE. WE FOCUS ON gastronomic education in relation to a healthy lifestyle, through food first. TOPICS ARE ABOUT FOOD, HEALTH, TRAVEL, TECHNIQUES, NEW DISCOVERIES, AND FUN KITCHEN STORIES. Our philosophy carries a moral obligation of sharing sensible knowledge to generate social awareness. Podcasts are in English with an accent, and Italian. FLAVORS & KNOWLEDGE IS AVAILABLE ON ANCHOR.FM OR ANY PREFERRED PLATFORM. SUBSCRIBE TO FLAVORS + KNOWLEDGE THE PODCAST VOICED FROM A KITCHEN BY A CHEF. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/walter-potenza/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/walter-potenza/support
SIX HEALTHY FISH TO EAT

SIX HEALTHY FISH TO EAT

2020-09-2109:121

Hey, friends welcome back to another informative episode of News you can eat 24. We know to eat fish at least twice a week or more. Lean, healthy  protein and oily-type sources such as tuna, sardines, and salmon provide rich omega-3 fats needed for our diets. It is, however,  challenging for the consumer to decide on which fish to select,  considering the environment, provenience, and overall taste. Seafood  Watch in the Monterey Bay Aquarium in California, together with health  groups and environmental agencies, has compiled a list known as "The Super Green Best of the Best." The guide indicates safety and health for us. To be included in the list, fish must contain low-levels of contaminants, running below 216  parts per billion (ppb), mercury at 11 ppb, from a sustainable fishery. Sponsored by Chef Walters Cooking School Visit our Youtube Channel for News you can eat 24 Video Food Cast  Subscribe to our newsletter   --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/walter-potenza/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/walter-potenza/support
REDUCE CARB INTAKE

REDUCE CARB INTAKE

2020-09-1606:411

News you can eat 24. Hello friends, a brief nutrition tip from our H & W agency Mediterranean Diet 21 According to statistics, carbs should provide 42-62 of the daily calorie intake for all age groups and gender. If we choose a diet of about  2,000-calories per day, the carb amount should be about 300 grams.  Many people hoping to achieve weight-loss take the number 300 and reduce it to an average between 50 and 150. We have been told by numerous sources that a low carb diet can help to lose weight. One of the simplest methods of reach the goal is to reduce the number of starches that are present in just about everything and substitute with lots of vegetables, healthy fats, and quality proteins, keeping in mind that a  measured red-meat intake is also very beneficial. Sponsored by Chef Walters Cooking School Visit our Youtube Channel for News you can eat 24 Video Food Cast  Subscribe to our newsletter  --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/walter-potenza/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/walter-potenza/support
IL CULATELLO DI ZIBELLO

IL CULATELLO DI ZIBELLO

2020-09-1410:481

Sapere I Sapori un podcast in lingua Italiana promosso dalla Scuola di Cucina dello Chef Walter Potenza nel Rhode Island USA Bentornati cari ascoltatori su Sapere I Sapori. In questo episodio parleremo del Culatello di Zibello. Tra i salumi pregiati, il Culatello di Zibello è sicuramente il Re. E un salume a denominazione di origine protetta, tipico della provincia di Parma. Viene citato esplicitamente per la prima volta in un documento del Comune di Parma del 1735, in cui venivano elencati i prezzi dei prodotti ottenuti dalla lavorazione del maiale.  Già allora fu evidente il prestigio di questo prodotto, il cui prezzo risultava infatti il più elevato dell'elenco. Il salume comparirà poi in numerosi altri atti, come nel “Calmiero della carne porcina salata”, in cui vengono citati i “culatelli investiti”, ovvero insaccati. I letterati del tempo classificarono il Culatello nella famiglia dei Salami per il fatto di non avere cotenna, ma essere insaccati in budelli di origine animale. Una curiosità importante cita che inizialmente questo salume era chiamato “investitura”, dal momento che la parola Culatello era considerata volgare. Solo nel documento del 1735 il termine fu impiegato ufficialmente.  Altre importanti citazioni riguardo il prestigio di questo salume si possono ritrovare nella letteratura dell' 800-'900, sia nelle opere del poeta parmigiano Giuseppe Callegari che nel carteggio nato tra lo scultore Renato Brozzi e il celebre poeta Gabriele D’Annunzio. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/walter-potenza/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/walter-potenza/support
THE UNTOLD ON CALAMARI

THE UNTOLD ON CALAMARI

2020-09-1311:191

Suppose you live in Rhode Island or visit the Ocean State. In that case,  you are familiar with Calamari (Italian for squid, or loligo in fishery terms). When I started cooking about five decades ago, cleaning squid was a horrible job (and still is), usually forced upon the kitchen's newest hire. The fish was inexpensive to buy because of the amount of work needed to get it on the plate. Often considered the seafood underdog when compared with scrod, halibut, swordfish, and tuna. Mostly offered as an appetizer, although delicious in many other versions.  Today, Calamari appears in restaurants of any style. In the 70s, the dish never entered the fine dining kitchens, mostly reserved to pizzerie, diners, and some franchises. Sponsored by Chef Walters Cooking School Visit our Youtube Channel for News you can eat 24 Video Food Cast  Subscribe to our newsletter  --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/walter-potenza/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/walter-potenza/support
MY TAKE ON GROUND BEEF

MY TAKE ON GROUND BEEF

2020-09-0308:001

Welcome back friends: this episode of F + K is about ground beef. American families consume a lot of ground beef in such amounts surpassing the rest of the industrialized nations.  From burgers to tacos to chilis and everything else we think of making,  ground meat is the actor. Technically ground beef is a product with at most 30% fat content from parts of the cow's body. Most of the ground beef available in stores have trimmings, leftover particles from sectioned meat products. When a supermarket pre-cut sirloins, the pieces around become ground. Trimmings have fat, and lots of it. Not all the trimmings are from the same animal, but a blend of the various specimen. Some packages will have ground chuck, ground steaks, rib-eye,  and so on. F + K  Sponsored by Chef Walters Cooking School Rhode Island the USA News you can Eat 24 Video-Cast on YouTube Subscribe to our Newsletter HERE --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/walter-potenza/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/walter-potenza/support
Welcome back friends, this is Flavors and Knowledge I am Chef Walter. This episode is about stocks and broths. And so what is a stock? If you are French-trained, you’ll know that chefs put a lot of stock in their stocks. In the business of cooking, if you don’t have a grip on making an excellent stock, you won’t further your career. What is broth? Broths are cooking liquid mostly for soups and light sauces. I make broths by simmering meat in water, to extract flavors from the fat of the meat, enhanced by the additions of seasonings. Sponsored by Chef Walters Cooking School Rhode Island the USA News you can Eat 24 Video-Cast on YouTube Subscribe to our Newsletter HERE --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/walter-potenza/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/walter-potenza/support
News you can eat 24 features "Puttanesca". Spaghetti alla puttanesca "or simply" aulive and cchiapparielle  "(olives and capers) is a typical first course of Neapolitan cuisine. The preparation includes a sauce made of tomato, olive oil, garlic, black  Gaeta olives, capers, and oregano. There is also a Roman version of the same dish that provides another fundamental ingredient: anchovies in salt. Another point of discord between the two interpretations is pasta:  spaghetti, vermicelli or linguine in Naples, and penne in Rome (in addition to the classic spaghetti). The first evidence of a pasta seasoned with a sauce very similar to Puttanesca,  dates back to the early nineteenth century, when writer Ippolito Cavalcanti, proposed several popular recipes in Neapolitan cuisine. One  of them was "Vermicelli all' oglio with olives, capers, and anchovies  sauces." The book Theoretical, practical cooking has been one of the essential books documenting ancient Italian cookery. After some sporadic appearances in various Neapolitan cookbooks, the Italian  Guide of Gastronomy published several specialties from the Campania region in 1931. Among the dishes, Macaroni alla marinara, most likely the current puttanesca. READ MORE HERE Sponsored by Chef Walters Cooking School Rhode Island News you can eat 24 on YouTube --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/walter-potenza/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/walter-potenza/support
For a while, I have been hearing about meal skipping. We seem to trust and try anything to confront weigh-loss, but often the reality proves otherwise. Let’s see If I can explain what happens when we follow this falsified myth. According to one of the most rooted and shared beliefs in weight loss, skipping meals is a beneficial technique for losing weight because of the common belief that by depriving the body of calories and nutrients, you can achieve a reduction in fat mass. For breakfast, a coffee and go, a seasoned salad for lunch, eating only for dinner, etc.: all these behaviors reduce the calories ingested, lose weight, but often it is just water and lean mass, not fat. However, the weight loss does not last long because the metabolism adapts to the caloric constraints implemented and reduces its activity. Remember: Skipping meals to lose weight is unhealthy and above all, not a practical choice. Sponsored by Chef Walters Cooking School Cranston Rhode Island USA Video foo-cast News you can eat 24 YouTube Channel Subscribe to our newsletter on Substack --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/walter-potenza/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/walter-potenza/support
The food-word for today is suppli. Let’s discover this unusual hand-held Roman snack. Supplì is undoubtedly one of the favorite foods of the Romans, and perhaps represents the essence of the Roman more than all other foods. The Roman know how to eat well and precipitously, mostly by hands, especially street food variants. And it is precisely from the streets of Rome that food torture arises. It is a simple and tasty recipe like rice with meat sauce, pecorino cheese,  mozzarella, eggs, and breadcrumbs. The name is Roman, extracted from the French slank dictionary of soldiers stationed in Rome. All of this happened in the early nineteenth century, when a lover of the recipe, called the fried and breaded rice dumpling surprise, referring  to the filling. The Italianization of the French surprise became suppli. Sponsored by Chef Walters Cooking School Video foo-cast News you can eat 24  Subscribe to our newsletter  --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/walter-potenza/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/walter-potenza/support
50 GRAMS ONCE A WEEK

50 GRAMS ONCE A WEEK

2020-08-0806:15

This episode of News you can eat 24 is about the recommended intake amount of cured meats. Nobody wants to give up cured meats definitively. They are part of our tradition and daily diet. The consumer identifies the product as a quick fix, snack, or as a starter. We also have a sodium addiction in the country, which is noticeable in the location numbers of the Subway shops and other notable all-the sodium-you-want franchises. Do you know anyone who shakes salt on food before tasting? Sponsored by Chef Walters Cooking School Rhode island Subscribe to our Video Food-Cast on YouTube and take a look at our newsletter for the latest articles, recipes, and suggestions. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/walter-potenza/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/walter-potenza/support
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