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All of America's top ten talk shows are hosted by millionaires and billionaires! This is not one of them. You Talk It. We Live It. is a talk show about, by and for working people. Hosted by three women who know the every day realities of struggling to keep food on the table, pay the bills, educate their families while supporting friends and community. This show will bring you unfiltered perspectives of the issues confronting the working class.
21 Episodes
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In the first episode of Season 4 of YTWL hosts River Scholl and Ellen Quale are joined by guest host Maria Picar to discuss the campaign to raise the federal minimum wage and the positives and negatives of expanding America's biggest rental assistance program — Section 8. Below are some of the pros and cons for raising the federal minimum wage:Pros: Raising the minimum wage would increase economic activity and spur job growth.The Economic Policy Institute stated that a minimum wage increase from the current rate of $7.25 an hour to $10.10 would inject $22.1 billion net into the economy and create about 85,000 new jobs over a three-year phase-in period.Increasing the minimum wage would reduce poverty.According to a 2014 Congressional Budget Office report, increasing the minimum wage to $9 would lift 300,000 people out of poverty, and an increase to $10.10 would lift 900,000 people out of poverty.A higher minimum wage would reduce government welfare spending.If low-income workers earned more money, their dependence on, and eligibility for, government benefits would decrease. The Center for American Progress reported in 2014 that raising the federal minimum wage by 6% to $10.10 would reduce spending on the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP, formerly known as food stamps) by 6% or $4.6 billion.Cons:Increasing the minimum wage would force businesses to lay off employees and raise unemployment levels.The Congressional Budget Office projected that a minimum wage increase from $7.25 to $10.10 would result in a loss of 500,000 jobs. [5] In a survey of 1,213 businesses and human resources professionals, 38% of employers who currently pay minimum wage said they would lay off some employees if the minimum wage was raised to $10.10. 54% said they would decrease hiring levels. Raising the minimum wage would increase poverty.A study from the Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland found that although low-income workers see wage increases when the minimum wage is raised, “their hours and employment decline, and the combined effect of these changes is a decline in earned income… minimum wages increase the proportion of families that are poor or near-poor.” [47] As explained by George Reisman, PhD, Professor Emeritus of Economics at Pepperdine University, “The higher wages are, the higher costs of production are. The higher costs of production are, the higher prices are. The higher prices are, the smaller the quantities of goods and services demanded and the number of workers employed in producing them."A minimum wage increase would hurt businesses and force companies to close.60% of small-business owners say that raising the minimum wage will “hurt most small-business owners,” according to a 2013 Gallup poll.Source ProCon.org
In this two part episode of YTWL host River Scholl, speaks with Gandhi Scholar Michael Sonnleitner about his 2020 trip to India and the Indian's government's response to COVID -19.This time last year, theories about India’s astonishingly low rates of COVID-19 infection included hot weather, natural immunity and the country’s high proportion of young people; some also attributed it to the country’s harsh lockdown. India was doing so well that in megacities like Mumbai and Delhi, officials had begun dismantling temporary COVID-19 facilities. Fast-forward to now, April 2021, and cases and deaths are soaring, leaving hospitals running out of oxygen. The shortage of beds and space is so acute that people are dying in car parks waiting to be admitted. Daily rates are currently over 300,000, the world’s highest-ever daily infection rate. - gavi.org 
In this first episode of Season Three of  You Talk It. We Live It hosts Ellen Quale,  Emily Metcalfe and River Scholl talk with camera operator and producer Donna Quante about her experiences in the film and television industry.  Quante, an Emmy award winning camera operator and producer took home an Emmy three times for Benson, Golden Girls and the 1984 Summer Olympics in Los Angeles. Here are some interesting facts to digest.2019-2020 SEASONOverall, women accounted for 31% of individuals working in key behind-the-scenes positions.Women comprised 30% of all creators, directors, writers, producers, executive producers, editors, and directors of photography on broadcast programs, 31% on cable programs, and 35% on streaming programs.63% of programs employed 5 or fewer women in the behind-the-scenes roles considered. 16% of programs employed 5 or fewer men.Overall, women fared best as producers (39%), followed by writers (36%), executive producers (32%), directors (30%), creators (28%), editors (17%), and directors of photography (8%).94% of the programs considered had no women directors of photography, 81% had no women editors, 76% had no women directors, and 73% had no women creators.Women accounted for 28% of creators. This represents a historic high.Programs with at least 1 woman creator employed substantially greater percentages of women in other key behind-the-scenes roles and featured more female characters than programs with exclusively male creators. For example, on programs with at least 1 woman creator, women accounted for 69% of writers versus 20% on programs with no women creators.Programs with at least 1 woman executive producer featured more female protagonists, and more women in other key behind-the-scenes positions, than programs with exclusively male executive producers. For example, on programs with at least 1 woman executive producer, women accounted for 39% of writers. On programs with exclusively male executive producers, women comprised 12% of writers.Center for the Study of Women in Television and Film And some disclaimer stuff: No guarantee is given regarding the accuracy of any statements or opinions made on the podcast or website.  The content here is for informational and entertainment purposes. Views and opinions expressed in the podcast and website are our own and do not represent that of our work places. However, we do welcome any comments, suggestions, or correction of errors. This website or podcast should not be used in any legal capacity whatsoever.
In this special episode of You Talk It. We Live It hosts, progressive River Scholl and conservative Ellen Quale,  discuss the recent events in Washington, D.C,. And don't forget to join us on January 15th for our first official episode of Season 3! Some disclaimer stuff: No guarantee is given regarding the accuracy of any statements or opinions made on the podcast or website.  The content here is for informational and entertainment purposes. Views and opinions expressed in the podcast and website are our own and do not represent that of our work places. However, we do welcome any comments, suggestions, or correction of errors. This website or podcast should not be used in any legal capacity whatsoever.
In this episode of You Talk It. We Live It  Host River Scholl, speaks with Oregon lobbyist Mike Selvaggio about the role of lobbyists in our state and federal governments and their ability to affect positive change. Below are some interesting facts about lobbyists. But first, what exactly is lobbying?Lobbying as defined by the Encyclopedia Britannica is;  any attempt by individuals or private interest groups to influence the decisions of government; in its original meaning it referred to efforts to influence the votes of legislators, generally in the lobby outside the legislative chamber. Lobbying in some form is inevitable in any political system.And the  term 'lobbyist'  was derived from the act of standing in the lobbies right outside of voting chambers to influence lawmakers at the last minute. 1. They Are Master CommunicatorsFirst and foremost, every successful lobbyist is a master communicator. They state their objectives clearly and confidently without losing focus of their desired goal, which is crucial to a movement’s success. Solid communication skills are the foundation of any good argument, and that’s what a lobbyist needs to get results.2. They Are ConnectedOften, lobbyists have a clear inside scoop on an issue, granting them a unique perspective that allows them to credibly predict the outcome of a movement. They have a thorough understanding of the inner workings of a company or campaign, and they’re skilled at leveraging their experience to reach goals.3. They Are Invested in a CauseMany lobbyists hold causes close to their hearts. This is especially true at the local level, throughout grassroots movements that affect communities or certain groups. While data and statistics are important to lawmakers when it comes to backing a cause, they must first be captivated by a story. Legislators value getting to see exactly how an issue affects their constituents as its more compelling and human than graphs and charts.4. They Are BoldFinally, lobbyists take risks. They’re bold in how they go about spreading their messages. -sourced from USC Annenberg School of JournalismPhoto by Andrea Piacquadio from PexelsDisclaimer:No guarantee is given regarding the accuracy of any statements or opinions made on the podcast or website.  The content here is for informational and entertainment purposes. Views and opinions expressed in the podcast and website are our own and do not represent that of our work places. However, we do welcome any comments, suggestions, or correction of errors.This website or podcast should not be used in any legal capacity whatsoever.
In this tenth episode of You Talk It. We Live It  hosts Emily Metcalfe and River Scholl speak with Professor Betsy Leondar Wright, an economic justice activist about class and classism in the United States. Here are some interesting facts about class and classism in the United States:Classism is differential treatment based on social class or perceived social class. Classism is the systematic oppression of subordinated class groups to advantage and strengthen the dominant class groups. It’s the systematic assignment of characteristics of worth and ability based on social class.There are six social classes in America.  The upper class (3% of the population ) is divided into upper-upper class (1% of the U.S. population, earning hundreds of millions to billions per year) and the lower-upper class (2%, earning millions per year). The middle class (40%) is divided into upper-middle class (14%, earning $76,000 or more per year) and the lower-middle class (26%, earning $46,000 to $75,000 per year). The working class (30%) earns $19,000 to $45,000 per year.  The lower class (27%) is divided into working poor (13%, earning $9000 to 18,000 per year) and underclass (14%, earning under $9000 per year). People of color will become a majority of the American working class in 2032. This estimate, based on long-term labor force projections from the Bureau of Labor Statistics and trends in college completion by race and ethnicity, is 11 years sooner than the Census Bureau projection for the overall U.S. population, which becomes “majority-minority” in 2043.Americans generally like unions and broadly support the right of workers to unionize. A majority (55%) holds a favorable view of unions, versus 33% who hold an unfavorable view, according to the 2018 Center survey mentioned above. In a 2015 survey, large majorities said manufacturing and factory workers (82%), public transportation workers (74%), police and firefighters (72%) and public school teachers (71%) should have the right to unionize. About six-in-ten (62%) said fast-food workers should be able to unionize.Overall, 67% of Americans favor increasing the federal minimum wage from $7.25 an hour to $15, according to a Pew Research Center survey from earlier this year. Sourced from: Class Action, the Economic Policy Institute and the Pew Research CenterPhoto by Andrea Piacquadio from PexelsAnd some disclaimer stuff: No guarantee is given regarding the accuracy of any statements or opinions made on the podcast or website.  The content here is for informational and entertainment purposes. Views and opinions expressed in the podcast and website are our own and do not represent that of our work places. However, we do welcome any comments, suggestions, or correction of errors. This website or podcast should not be used in any legal capacity whatsoever.
In this first episode of Season Two of You Talk It. We Live It, host Emily Metcalfe is joined by Marvin Peña, Grassroots Engagement Coordinator at VOZ Workers' Rights Education Project to talk about Voz's work to empower, engage and promote grassroots organizing amongst day laborers and immigrants in Oregon.Here are some interesting facts about Voz:Voz is a worker-led organization that offers leadership development workshops and  support to day laborer leaders in getting engaged in their community. Voz is led by a joint Board of community members and Day Laborers. The Day Laborer Committee makes up half of the Board of Directors, and is elected from active Voz members every year.Day laborers bring a wealth of skills, knowledge, and life experiences to Voz and their leadership.Some of Voz's Recent Day Laborer Committee victories include:Raising the minimum wage to $17Making Workforce Development the top organizational strategic priorityBuilding a more secure fence to increase safety at the Worker CenterUpdating the Code of Conduct at the Worker Center to prioritize inclusivity and accountability to ensure that the Worker Center is a safe space for all.-sourced from Voz. Find more information about Voz here: https://portlandvoz.org And some disclaimer stuff: No guarantee is given regarding the accuracy of any statements or opinions made on the podcast or website.  The content here is for informational and entertainment purposes. Views and opinions expressed in the podcast and website are our own and do not represent that of our work places. However, we do welcome any comments, suggestions, or correction of errors. This website or podcast should not be used in any legal capacity whatsoever.
In this special episode of You Talk It. We Live It host Sky, speaks with Lissalyn Loring from The Blackfeet Indian Reservation in Montana about her experiences growing up on the reservation and her family's search for her cousin Ashley Loring HeavyRunner one of thousands of missing Indigenous women across the United States and Canada. Here are some interesting facts:In 2017, they were 5, 712 Missing Native American Woman and Girls reported to the National Crimes Information Center4 out of 5 of Native women are affected by violence today.The U.S Department of Justice found that American Indian women face murder rates that are more than 10 times the national average.Homicide is the 3rd leading cause of death among 10-24 years of age and the fifth leading cause of death for American Indian and Alaska Native women between 25 and 34 years of age. – Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Homicide Sourced from:  Justice Washington  Disclaimer:No guarantee is given regarding the accuracy of any statements or opinions made on the podcast or website.  The content here is for informational and entertainment purposes. Views and opinions expressed in the podcast and website are our own and do not represent that of our work places. However, we do welcome any comments, suggestions, or correction of errors. This website or podcast should not be used in any legal capacity whatsoever.The artwork for this episode was created by 12 year old Ronelle CalfBossRibs 
You Talk It. We Live It host River  talks with American Sign Language (ASL) interpreter and founder of Portland's Fingers Crossed Interpreting Andrew Tolman, and their efforts to help make protests in Portland, Oregon more  accessible to the D/deaf community. Here are some interesting facts about the D/deaf community:  Deaf with an uppercase D Deaf with an uppercase D is often used to describe people who were born deaf, or who became deaf and actively engage in the deaf community.  People who identify as uppercase Deaf tend to prefer using sign language, as it may be their first language. The deaf community has its own culture and sense of identity, based on a shared language. Deaf people (with a capital D) are usually proud of their Deaf identity.  Deaf with a lowercase d Deaf with a lowercase d is used to describe anyone who has the medical condition of hearing loss.   People who identify as lowercase d deaf tend not to have a strong connection to the deaf community. They are also most likely to use speech over sign language. Sometimes deaf is used to refer to people who are hard of hearing too.   Hard of Hearing Hard of hearing is used to describe someone with mild to moderate hearing loss.  Those who identify as hard of hearing often don’t use sign language as their preferred language. - sourced from deafunity.org Disclaimer:No guarantee is given regarding the accuracy of any statements or opinions made on the podcast or website.  The content here is for informational and entertainment purposes. Views and opinions expressed in the podcast and website are our own and do not represent that of our work places. However, we do welcome any comments, suggestions, or correction of errors.This website or podcast should not be used in any legal capacity whatsoever.
COVID-19 has brought the entertainment industry to its knees and artists of all stripes are struggling  just like the rest of us . Join us for our series An Artist's Tale as we talk to creatives of every stripe about their lives and work during the pandemic. Hauk has a tradition for defying convention and limitation. His songs are too country for metal, too heavy for country, too punk for folk, too folk for punk, and always in your face. Hauk has released 10 solo albums, two albums with Black Hat Society, an album with The Pirates Charles. He has also produced bands like No Convention, Margot Lane and the Greybirds, Post Relic, and more. He has also scored two feature films and many short filmsincluding the award winning “Pirate Captain Toledano.” Join our hosts River Scholl and Emily Metcalfe as they talk with Hauk in a wide ranging interview about his experiences as an artist during the COVID-19 pandemic.  And some disclaimer stuff: No guarantee is given regarding the accuracy of any statements or opinions made on the podcast or website.  The content here is for informational and entertainment purposes. Views and opinions expressed in the podcast and website are our own and do not represent that of our work places. However, we do welcome any comments, suggestions, or correction of errors. This website or podcast should not be used in any legal capacity whatsoever.
Sommer Martin is a filmmaker and voice actor based in Portland, Oregon.  Her favorite genre to write is horror and with a background in fundraising, communications and theatre Martin will be launching her own production company specializing in hiring BIPoc crew and talent later this year.  Join our hosts River Scholl and Ellen Quale as they talk with Martin in a wide ranging interview about her experiences as a woman of color in the movie industry. And some disclaimer stuff: No guarantee is given regarding the accuracy of any statements or opinions made on the podcast or website.  The content here is for informational and entertainment purposes. Views and opinions expressed in the podcast and website are our own and do not represent that of our work places. However, we do welcome any comments, suggestions, or correction of errors. This website or podcast should not be used in any legal capacity whatsoever.
You Talk It. We Live It host Ellen Quale talks with Amalgamated Transit Union 757 (ATU 757)  President Shirley Block about the ATU's work during the pandemic and their fight for fair pay and benefits, a safe, secure working environment and democracy in the workplace.ATU 757 organizes public transit workers in Oregon and Southern Washington. Here are 5 interesting facts about unions:Union members earn better wages and benefits than workers who aren’t union members. On average, union workers’ wages are 19% higher than their nonunion counterparts.More than 75% of union workers have jobs that provide health insurance benefits, but less than half of nonunion workers do.Unions help bring more working people into the middle class. In fact, in states where people don’t have union rights, workers’ incomes are lower.Working people in a union are five times more likely to participate in an employer-provided pension plan than working people without a union.Unions help employers create a more stable, productive workforce—where workers have a say in improving their jobs.Source AFL-CIOAnd some disclaimer stuff: No guarantee is given regarding the accuracy of any statements or opinions made on the podcast or website.  The content here is for informational and entertainment purposes. Views and opinions expressed in the podcast and website are our own and do not represent that of our work places. However, we do welcome any comments, suggestions, or correction of errors. This website or podcast should not be used in any legal capacity whatsoever.
COVID-19 has brought the entertainment industry to its knees and artists of all stripes are struggling  just like the rest of us but really how are they doing? What is life like now for the working musician?   Join our hosts Ellen Quale,  Emily Metcalfe and River Scholl as they talk with artist and musician Dulcie Taylor about the trials of creating during a pandemic. Dulcie learned a hard music lesson at an early age – don’t leave your ukulele unattended in a porch chair at the beach. Some clueless teenager can sit on it and smash it to bits. The demise of her ukulele was a tough moment for ten-year-old Dulcie but that Christmas her Mother bought her a guitar and Taylor’s lifelong love of singing and songwriting began. In hindsight, a grown-up Taylor sees the smashed ukulele as something of a blessing in disguise…after all, she has shared the stage with a long and impressive list of artists, including Jerry Lee Lewis, Asleep at the Wheel, Guy Clark, John Gorka, and Kathy Mattea. - source dulcietaylor.com And some disclaimer stuff: No guarantee is given regarding the accuracy of any statements or opinions made on the podcast or website.  The content here is for informational and entertainment purposes. Views and opinions expressed in the podcast and website are our own and do not represent that of our work places. However, we do welcome any comments, suggestions, or correction of errors. This website or podcast should not be used in any legal capacity whatsoever.
Hello my friends!Welcome, to this very special bonus Christmas episode of YTWL! On this episode, two of our non-Christian hosts River Scholl and Ellen Quale, share the traditions and celebrations of their faiths as well as deeply personal thoughts and memories of Christmas' past; and one of our most passionate listeners Stormy Berks joins us to talk about Yule traditions! It's been a hard year for us here at YTWL as it has been for most of you. Many of us have lost family members, friends and coworkers to COVID-19 and the pandemic is still taking its toll but WE DID get through it and we will, again, next year —together. From our families to yours—we wish all of you a happy holiday season and we look forward to you joining us in 2021 for Season Three of YTWL!Our next episode drops on January 15th, 2021! Photo by cottonbro from PexelsDisclaimer:No guarantee is given regarding the accuracy of any statements or opinions made on the podcast or website.  The content here is for informational and entertainment purposes. Views and opinions expressed in the podcast and website are our own and do not represent that of our work places. However, we do welcome any comments, suggestions, or correction of errors.This website or podcast should not be used in any legal capacity whatsoever.
You Talk It. We Live It host River Scholl talks with Journalist and Broadcaster Ryan Broome about COVID-19's impact on the Caribbean island of Barbados and the nation's efforts to combat the pandemic. Here are five interesting facts about Barbados:The name Barbados was chosen by a Portuguese explorer called Pedro a Campos. When he landed in Barbados, the island was covered in fig trees which have a beard like appearance and hence named the island "Los Barbados" which means The Bearded One!32% of the country is agricultural land and the island was once covered in dense rainforest. Some of which can still be found in parishes located in the centre of the island.  Barbados was a British Colony for over 300 years and gained its independence in 1966. In 2021, the country plans to sever all remaining ties with Britain to become a full fledged republic!Barbados has over 3000 hours of sunshine each year. The hottest month recorded was in April and the coolest in January.In 2016, the World Economic Forum ranked Barbados' educational system 9th best in the world. Disclaimer:No guarantee is given regarding the accuracy of any statements or opinions made on the podcast or website.  The content here is for informational and entertainment purposes. Views and opinions expressed in the podcast and website are our own and do not represent that of our work places. However, we do welcome any comments, suggestions, or correction of errors.
In this wide ranging special episode of You Talk It. We Live It host River Scholl and her special guest Nikki Jackson talk about the Black Lives Matter (BLM) movement, the protests in Oregon and the resurgence of Black grassroots efforts towards equity and equality; and its implications for white people in America.Here are some interesting facts:During the 2015–2016 school year, Black students represented only 15% of total US student enrollment, but they made up 35% of students suspended once, 44% of students suspended more than once, and 36% of students expelled. The US Department of Education concluded that this disparity is “not explained by more frequent or more serious misbehavior by students of color.”In New York City, 88% of police stops in 2018 involved Black and Latinx people, while 10% involved white people. (Of those stops, 70% were completely innocent.)In one US survey, 15.8% of students reported experiencing race-based bullying or harassment. Research has found significant associations between racial bullying and negative mental and physical health in students.From 2013 to 2017, white patients in the US received better quality health care than about 34% of Hispanic patients, 40% of Black patients, and 40% of Native American patients.Black women are 3 to 4 times more likely to experience a pregnancy-related death than white women, even at similar levels of income and education.Black Americans are more likely than white Americans to be arrested. Once arrested, they are more likely to be convicted, and once convicted, they are more likely to experience lengthy prison sentences.Black Americans and white Americans use drugs at similar rates, but Black Americans are 6 times more likely to be arrested for it.On average, Black men in the US receive sentences that are 19.1% longer than those of white men convicted for the same crimes.In the US, Black individuals are twice as likely to be unemployed than white individuals. Once employed, Black individuals earn nearly 25% less than their white counterparts.One US study found that job resumes with traditionally white-sounding names received 50% more callbacks than those with traditionally Black names.In the US, Black workers are less likely than white workers to be employed in a job that is consistent with their level of education.Sourced from: https://www.dosomething.orgAnd some disclaimer stuff: No guarantee is given regarding the accuracy of any statements or opinions made on the podcast or website.  The content here is for informational and entertainment purposes. Views and opinions expressed in the podcast and website are our own and do not represent that of our work places. However, we do welcome any comments, suggestions, or correction of errors.Photo credit: Photo by Brett Sayles from Pexels
In this episode of You Talk It. We Live It  River Scholl speaks with President of AFT - Oregon Jaime Rodriguez about teaching during COVID-19 and the ever shifting needs and responsibilities of teachers during the pandemic. Here are some interesting facts about education in the United States:How many teachers are there in the U.S.?In America's public schools there are 3.2 million full-time-equivalent teachers, according to federal projections for the fall of 2020.How many schools are there in the U.S.?There are 130,930 K-12 schools in the U.S., according to 2017-18 data from the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES). What are the racial demographics of teachers?When it comes to race, America’s teachers look very different from its student population.79.3% White9.3% Hispanic6.7% Black2.1% Asian1.8% Two or more races0.5% American Indian/Alaska Native0.2% Native Hawaiian/ Pacific IslanderWhat percent of teachers are women?Teaching continues to be a profession dominated by women. According to 2017-18 numbers from NCES 76.5 percent of teachers are female, while 23.5 percent are male.What's the average U.S. teacher salary?The average base salary for teachers is $57,900, according to 2017-18 data from NCES.Information sourced from www.edweek.orgPhoto credit:icon0.comAnd some disclaimer stuff: No guarantee is given regarding the accuracy of any statements or opinions made on the podcast or website.  The content here is for informational and entertainment purposes. Views and opinions expressed in the podcast and website are our own and do not represent that of our work places. However, we do welcome any comments, suggestions, or correction of errors. This website or podcast should not be used in any legal capacity whatsoever.
In this episode of You Talk It. We Live It hosts Emily, River and Sky joined by the Artist Helen Amirian talk about sexual crimes, sexual violence and the criminal justice system's response to sexual assault allegations when the alleged perpetrator of the sex crime is affluent, white and male. And some disclaimer stuff: No guarantee is given regarding the accuracy of any statements or opinions made on the podcast or website.  The content here is for informational and entertainment purposes. Views and opinions expressed in the podcast and website are our own and do not represent that of our work places. However, we do welcome any comments, suggestions, or correction of errors. This website or podcast should not be used in any legal capacity whatsoever.
In this episode of You Talk It. We Live It. hosts Emily, River and Sky talk with musician and artist Helen Amirian about her work, journey of self discovery and healing.And some disclaimer stuff: No guarantee is given regarding the accuracy of any statements or opinions made on the podcast or website.  The content here is for informational and entertainment purposes. Views and opinions expressed in the podcast and website are our own and do not represent that of our work places. However, we do welcome any comments, suggestions, or correction of errors. This website or podcast should not be used in any legal capacity whatsoever.
In this first episode of You Talk It. We Live It. hosts Emily and River speak with British community organizer Rodney Grant and retired Portland Community College professor Michael Sonnleitner about their experience with COVID-19. And some disclaimer stuff: No guarantee is given regarding the accuracy of any statements or opinions made on the podcast or website.  The content here is for informational and entertainment purposes. Views and opinions expressed in the podcast and website are our own and do not represent that of our work places. However, we do welcome any comments, suggestions, or correction of errors. This website or podcast should not be used in any legal capacity whatsoever.
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