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As the current generation of materials scientists approaches retirement, it’s essential to inspire a new generation to take up the reins. Marcus Fish, development director at the Ceramic and Glass Industry Foundation, talks about the history of the Foundation, its mission, and its projects and initiatives to excite students about careers as ceramic and glass professionals.View the transcript for this episode here.About the guestMarcus Fish is development director at the Ceramic and Glass Industry Foundation (CGIF). The American Ceramic Society launched CGIF in 2014 to attract, inspire, and support the next generation of ceramic and glass professionals. Since its inception,  CGIF has launched programs in student outreach, international student exchanges, travel grants, student leadership development, a university-industry network, and its online Ceramic and Glass Career Center. Learn more about CGIF here and donate to the Foundation here.About ACerSFounded in 1898, The American Ceramic Society is the leading professional membership organization for scientists, engineers, researchers, manufacturers, plant personnel, educators, and students working with ceramics and related materials.
Every artifact in the universe has a surface, and modifying that surface can endow an object with new and improved properties. Christopher Berndt, Distinguished Professor of Surface Science and Engineering at Swinburne University of Technology, describes the use of thermal spray technologies to coat surfaces, the challenges companies face implementing these technologies on an industrial scale, and what is in store for the future of this field.View the transcript for this episode here.About the guestChristopher Berndt is Distinguished Professor of Surface Science and Engineering at Swinburne University of Technology and director of the Australian Research Council Industrial Transformation Training Centre in Surface Engineering for Advanced Materials. He has conducted research in the field of surface engineering for close to 45 years, and specifically the application of coatings using thermal spray technologies (examples of recent papers on this topic here and here). He recently was awarded the 2021 Victoria Prize for Science and Innovation in the Physical Sciences.About ACerSFounded in 1898, The American Ceramic Society is the leading professional membership organization for scientists, engineers, researchers, manufacturers, plant personnel, educators, and students working with ceramics and related materials.
For centuries glass has been the material of choice for storing, shipping, and sipping wine. How did that come to pass, and why? Jim and Penelope Shackelford, authors of the ACerS-Wiley book “The Glass of Wine,” share how they developed a lifelong appreciation of wine, discuss the many intersections between winemaking and wine enjoyment that involve glass, and touch on how ceramics play a role in winemaking as well.View the transcript for this episode here.About the guestsJim Shackelford is an ACerS Fellow and Distinguished Professor Emeritus in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering at the University of California, Davis. Penelope Shackelford is a former teacher who served as an arts writer for Davis Enterprise, Artweek, and other national arts publications and as associate editor for arts for the journal Multicultural Education. Their book, “The Glass of Wine: The Science, Technology, and Art of Glassware for Transporting and Enjoying Wine,” published by ACerS-Wiley, is available at this link.About ACerSFounded in 1898, The American Ceramic Society is the leading professional membership organization for scientists, engineers, researchers, manufacturers, plant personnel, educators, and students working with ceramics and related materials.
In May 2021, the United Nations declared 2022 the International Year of Glass. University of Central Florida professor Kathleen Richardson and The Ohio State University professor Manoj Choudhary discuss the importance of glass in our lives, give the history of IYOG, and preview some of the events taking place to celebrate this International Year.View the transcript for this episode here.About the guestsKathleen Richardson is Pegasus Professor of Optics and Materials Science and Engineering at the University of Central Florida and past president of The American Ceramic Society. Manoj Choudhary is retired from a research career at Owens Corning and currently an adjunct professor at The Ohio State University. Richardson and Choudhary serve on the North American Steering Committee for IYOG, which is coordinating IYOG events in the United States and Canada. Learn more about the International Year of Glass at https://ceramics.org/iyog. Tune in for a livestream of the opening ceremonies in Geneva, Switzerland, on February 10 and 11 at https://iyog2022oc.org.About ACerSFounded in 1898, The American Ceramic Society is the leading professional membership organization for scientists, engineers, researchers, manufacturers, plant personnel, educators, and students working with ceramics and related materials.
Being a professor requires you to wear many hats, including being a teacher, researcher, mentor, and possibly more. Beth Dickey, Teddy & Wilton Hawkins Distinguished Professor and department head of materials science & engineering at Carnegie Mellon University, describes her work to attract and retain the next generation of materials scientists, including by incorporating data science into university materials science curricula, developing new faculty mentorship programs, and in a variety of leadership roles in The American Ceramic Society.View the transcript for this episode here.About the guestBeth Dickey is the Teddy & Wilton Hawkins Distinguished Professor and department head of materials science & engineering at Carnegie Mellon University. Her research group uses electron microscopy and spectroscopy techniques to develop processing–structure–property relationships for materials in which the macroscopic physical properties are governed by point defects, grain boundaries, or internal interfaces. As 2021–2022 ACerS president, one of Dickey's main goals is to begin implementing the new ACerS strategic plan.About ACerSFounded in 1898, The American Ceramic Society is the leading professional membership organization for scientists, engineers, researchers, manufacturers, plant personnel, educators, and students working with ceramics and related materials.
Strategic plans are a crucial tool for businesses to track their progress toward certain goals, but how do you develop a strategic plan? ACerS executive director Mark Mecklenborg and past president Dana Goski share how the new strategic plan for ACerS was developed, its top-level goals, and how the Society will start working with the plan.View the transcript for this episode here.About the guestsMark Mecklenborg is executive director at The American Ceramic Society. Dana Goski is ACerS past president and vice president of research and development at Allied Mineral Products, a global monolithic refractory producer headquartered in Columbus, Ohio. Mecklenborg and Goski helped lead the process to develop ACerS’ new strategic plan, which the Board of Directors approved in September 2021. View a high-level overview of the plan at this link, and find ways to get involved with supporting the plan here. Questions? Contact Mecklenborg at mmecklenborg@ceramics.org.About ACerSFounded in 1898, The American Ceramic Society is the leading professional membership organization for scientists, engineers, researchers, manufacturers, plant personnel, educators, and students working with ceramics and related materials.
Inspiring research in materials science works best when the information is relatable and easily accessible. Ricardo Castro, professor of materials science and engineering at the University of California, Davis, describes how a jet engine demonstration piqued his interest in ceramics, why he uses superheroes to teach students about materials, and discusses the importance of open-access publishing to facilitating science research.View the transcript for this episode here.About the guestRicardo Castro is professor of materials science and engineering at the University of California, Davis. His research group focuses on the processing and properties of nanoceramics. He has launched several programs to grow student interest in materials science using superheroes, such as the Engineering Superheroes series. He is also editor-in-chief of ACerS' open-access journal, International Journal of Ceramic Engineering & Science.About ACerSFounded in 1898, The American Ceramic Society is the leading professional membership organization for scientists, engineers, researchers, manufacturers, plant personnel, educators, and students working with ceramics and related materials.
While increased innovation is a desirable outcome of a diverse workforce, the compassion and understanding that arise is what will truly help us break down walls and build a better world. Olivia Graeve, professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering at the University of California, San Diego, discusses her life growing up in Tijuana, Mexico, why she believes compassion is the key to a diverse community, and describes her work building bridges between Mexico and the U.S. as director of the CaliBaja Center for Resilient Materials & Systems.View the transcript for this episode here.About the guestOlivia Graeve is professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering at the University of California, San Diego, and director of the CaliBaja Center for Resilient Materials & Systems. Her research group focuses on the design, development, and manufacturing of materials in extreme environments. The CaliBaja Center is a binational research institute that hosts both research and educational activities to connect students in Mexico and the United States.About ACerSFounded in 1898, The American Ceramic Society is the leading professional membership organization for scientists, engineers, researchers, manufacturers, plant personnel, educators, and students working with ceramics and related materials.
Diversifying both energy sources and workforce are necessary as we move toward a sustainable future. Sossina Haile, Walter P. Murphy Professor of Materials Science and Engineering at Northwestern University, discusses her work on fuel cell technology, her experience as an immigrant pursuing science in the United States, and some tips for supporting diversification in both of these areas.View the transcript for this episode here.About the guestSossina Haile is Walter P. Murphy Professor of Materials Science and Engineering at Northwestern University in Illinois. Her research group focuses on solid-state electric chemistry for sustainable energy purposes. Haile is a member of the ACerS Diversity & Inclusion Subcommittee. Also, learn more about the Department of Energy’s Hydrogen Energy Earthshot to reduce the cost of clean hydrogen.About ACerSFounded in 1898, The American Ceramic Society is the leading professional membership organization for scientists, engineers, researchers, manufacturers, plant personnel, educators, and students working with ceramics and related materials.
Sometimes the best way to learn is through doing something yourself. Adelle Schade, director of the Science Research Institute at Albright College, describes the importance of experiential learning in science education, her journey to founding SRI, and some of the student successes from the program so far.View the transcript for this episode here.About the guestAdelle Schade is dean of precollege and summer programs at Albright College in Pennsylvania and director of the Science Research Institute at Albright. She started SRI a little over six years ago at Conrad Weiser High School, and the program has now expanded to Albright College to accommodate more students and teachers. Schade credits the late Ted Day for his "huge" influence on the program.About ACerSFounded in 1898, The American Ceramic Society is the leading professional membership organization for scientists, engineers, researchers, manufacturers, plant personnel, educators, and students working with ceramics and related materials.
While focusing on a topic is important when pursuing a Ph.D., you should give yourself the freedom to explore other interests as well. Steve Feller, B.D. Silliman Professor of Physics at Coe College, describes the benefits of pursuing teaching opportunities during his physics graduate studies, his use of NMR in glass research, and how his interest in numismatics led to numerous research projects and publications in that field as well.View the transcript for this episode here.About the guestSteve Feller is B.D. Silliman Professor of Physics at Coe College in Cedar Rapids, Iowa. He was instrumental in developing an extensive NSF-funded glass research program at Coe over the last 40 years. In addition to his glass research, Feller studies numismatics and has published a book on civilian camp money of World War II with his daughter Rachel, which is now the standard book in that area.About ACerSFounded in 1898, The American Ceramic Society is the leading professional membership organization for scientists, engineers, researchers, manufacturers, plant personnel, educators, and students working with ceramics and related materials.
Started in 2011, the Materials Genome Initiative (MGI) aims to accelerate the pace of new materials development. James Warren, director of the Materials Genome Program at the National Institute of Standards and Technology,  talks about how he became involved with the MGI, describes the initiative's goals and successes, and considers what the next decade holds for the MGI.View the transcript for this episode here.About the guestJames Warren is director of the Materials Genome Program at the National Institute of Standards and Technology. He has been involved with the Materials Genome Initiative since its inception, and he continues to play a central role in guiding the initiative into its second decade. Additional parts from Warren's interview can be found in the June/July 2021 issue of the ACerS Bulletin.About ACerSFounded in 1898, The American Ceramic Society is the leading professional membership organization for scientists, engineers, researchers, manufacturers, plant personnel, educators, and students working with ceramics and related materials.
Finding the way that you learn best can help you to achieve goals that may once have seemed out of reach. Scott McCormack, assistant professor of materials science and engineering at the University of California, Davis, discusses how he overcame learning challenges during his elementary school years, how he helps his own students learn the sometimes scary topic of thermodynamics, and his experience setting up a university research program as a young professor.View the transcript for this episode here.About the guestScott McCormack is assistant professor of materials science and engineering at the University of California, Davis. His research group at UC Davis studies ceramics in extreme environments, specializing in characterization of thermochemical and thermophysical properties. McCormack previously chaired ACerS President’s Council of Student Advisors and is now chair of ACerS Northern California Section, which he helped to reinvigorate with ACerS past president Sylvia Johnson.About ACerSFounded in 1898, The American Ceramic Society is the leading professional membership organization for scientists, engineers, researchers, manufacturers, plant personnel, educators, and students working with ceramics and related materials.
Thailand is known for its traditional ceramics industry—but there are signs that research in more advanced ceramic technologies is taking off as well. Rattikorn Yimnirun, dean of the School of Energy Science and Engineering at Vidyasirimedhi Institute of Science and Technology, and his colleagues Naratip Vittayakorn and Jakrapong Kaewkhao discuss the current state of the ceramics industry in Thailand, how they cofounded the Thailand Chapter of ACerS, and what role they see the Chapter playing in the country’s local ceramic community.View the transcript for this episode here.About the guestsRattikorn Yimnirun is dean of the School of Energy Science and Engineering at Vidyasirimedhi Institute of Science and Technology in Rayong, Thailand. He is chair of the ACerS Thailand Chapter, which he cofounded with Profs. Kaewkhao and Vittayakorn in 2019. In December 2020, the Thailand Chapter made its introduction to the larger ACerS community during the 5th International Conference on Smart Materials and Nanotechnology (SmartMat@2020) in Thailand. Learn more about the Thailand Chapter on their Facebook page.Jakrapong Kaewkhao is professor of physics and head of the Center of Excellence in Glass Technology and Materials Science in Nakhon Pathom Rajabhat University in Nakhon Pathom, Thailand. He is vice chair of the ACerS Thailand Chapter.Naratip Vittayakorn is professor of materials science at King Mongkut’s Institute of Technology Ladkrabang in Bangkok, Thailand. He is academic chair of the ACerS Thailand Chapter.About ACerSFounded in 1898, The American Ceramic Society is the leading professional membership organization for scientists, engineers, researchers, manufacturers, plant personnel, educators, and students working with ceramics and related materials.
Advances in transmission electron microscopy allow researchers to explore the structure of materials at atomic resolutions—and improvements in TEM continue to be made. Yuichi Ikuhara, professor of engineering innovation at the University of Tokyo, discusses his work using scanning TEM to characterize grain boundaries in ceramics, the recent advances that have greatly improved this technique's resolution capabilities, and where he sees TEM headed in the future.View the transcript for this episode here.About the guestYuichi Ikuhara is professor of engineering innovation at the University of Tokyo, Japan. His group researches the mechanical and functional properties of materials using scanning transmission electron microscopy. An ACerS Fellow, Ikuhara is a member of the Basic Science Division and a firm believer in studying both materials science and microscopy techniques in order to fully understand the properties of materials.About ACerSFounded in 1898, The American Ceramic Society is the leading professional membership organization for scientists, engineers, researchers, manufacturers, plant personnel, educators, and students working with ceramics and related materials.
What does it take to communicate science effectively? Taylor Sparks and Andrew Falkowski, associate professor and BS/MS student, respectively, at the University of Utah, discuss how they got into the field of materials science, what led them to start their podcast Materialism, and offer ways for scientists to improve their science communication skills.View the transcript for this episode here.About the guestsTaylor Sparks is associate professor and associate chair of the materials science and engineering department and associate director of the Materials Characterization Lab at the University of Utah. His research focuses primarily on the discovery, synthesis, and characterization of new materials for energy applications. In addition to co-hosting the podcast Materialism with Falkowski, Sparks has a YouTube channel where he posts materials science lectures.Andrew Falkowski is a BS/MS student in the materials science and engineering department at the University of Utah. His research focuses on using computational methods to explore new, more advanced materials. Falkowski co-hosts Materialism with Sparks.About ACerSFounded in 1898, The American Ceramic Society is the leading professional membership organization for scientists, engineers, researchers, manufacturers, plant personnel, educators, and students working with ceramics and related materials.
What is it like to pursue the same degree as your parent—or to have your child working in a field similar to yours? Dad and daughter duo Greg and Ashley Hilmas, university professor and government research materials engineer, respectively, describe their similar journeys to becoming ceramic engineers, how their career paths diverged after earning their Ph.D.'s , and what it is like working in the same niche field.View the transcript for this episode here.About the guestsGreg Hilmas is Curator's Professor of Ceramic Engineering at the Missouri University of Science and Technology in Rolla, Missouri. His research focuses on ultrahigh-temperature ceramics and their composites. Two of Hilmas' three daughters, including Ashley, are following in his footsteps to become ceramic engineers.Ashley Hilmas is a research materials engineer at the Air Force Research Laboratory in Dayton, Ohio. Her research focuses on SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composites. Hilmas has been an ACerS member since her undergraduate years, and in graduate school she served as committee chair and chair of ACerS President's Council of Student Advisors.About ACerSFounded in 1898, The American Ceramic Society is the leading professional membership organization for scientists, engineers, researchers, manufacturers, plant personnel, educators, and students working with ceramics and related materials.
Being the CEO of a corporation takes more than a degree and managerial experience. Carol Jackson, chair and CEO of HarbisonWalker International, describes her pathway to becoming the CEO of a global refractories company, the challenges of operating during a global pandemic, and why she believes in cultivating a strong corporate culture.View the transcript for this episode here.About the guestCarol Jackson is chair and CEO of HarbisonWalker International, headquartered in Pittsburgh, Pa. She currently is serving a two-year term as chair of the World Refractories Association. In both roles, Jackson is actively involved in education efforts to increase societal awareness of refractories and their importance, including with HarbisonWalker's own podcast, High Temperature Times.About ACerSFounded in 1898, The American Ceramic Society is the leading professional membership organization for scientists, engineers, researchers, manufacturers, plant personnel, educators, and students working with ceramics and related materials.
If nuclear energy is to become a major contributor to the energy portfolio, we must find ways to safely and effectively dispose of the radioactive waste it generates. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory materials scientist Charmayne Lonergan discusses what she's learning through her research on vitrifying Cold War era nuclear waste at PNNL, how the laboratory helps educate the public about this technology, and her goals as a STEM Ambassador to increase diversity in the sciences.View the transcript for this episode here.About the guestCharmayne Lonergan is a materials scientist at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in Richland, Washington. Outside of her work on the vitrification of nuclear waste, Lonergan serves as a PNNL STEM Ambassador, co-chair of the ACerS Young Professionals Network Steering Committee, and on the ACerS Publications Committee. Check out displays that PNNL's STEM Ambassadors use when talking to the community about their work here.About ACerSFounded in 1898, The American Ceramic Society is the leading professional membership organization for scientists, engineers, researchers, manufacturers, plant personnel, educators, and students working with ceramics and related materials.
Additive manufacturing is a hot topic in the ceramics industry right now, but that was not always the case. Johannes Homa, cofounder and CEO of Lithoz GmbH in Vienna, Austria, describes his journey to launching the ceramic additive manufacturing company in 2011, some of the challenges that he and his business partner had to overcome, and why he sees a very bright future for the additive manufacturing of ceramics.View the transcript for this episode here.About the guestJohannes Homa is cofounder and CEO of Lithoz in Vienna, Austria. Homa became interested in the additive manufacturing of ceramics during grad school and launched Lithoz with his cofounding partner, Johannes Benedikt, in 2011. The company is actively involved in education efforts to increase public and market awareness of the opportunities ceramic additive manufacturing offers.About ACerSFounded in 1898, The American Ceramic Society is the leading professional membership organization for scientists, engineers, researchers, manufacturers, plant personnel, educators, and students working with ceramics and related materials.
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