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Reformed Forum supports the church in presenting every person mature in Christ (Colossians 1:28) by providing Reformed theological resources to pastors, scholars, and anyone who desires to grow in their understanding of Scripture and the theology that faithfully summarizes its teachings.
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Harrison Perkins speaks about Samuel Miller’s views on Presbyterianism. Dr. Perkins has edited a new edition of Miller’s Presbyterianism: Its History, Doctrine, Government, and Worship, which has been published by Log College Press. Samuel Miller, the first professor of Ecclesiastical History and Church Government at Princeton Theological Seminary and a prolific author, published this introduction and defense of Presbyterianism in 1835. Originally titled Presbyterianism: The Truly Primitive and Apostolical Constitution of the Church of Christ, Miller covers the basics of Presbyterian belief and practice, grounding his material in the Scriptures primarily and church history secondarily. Dr. Harrison Perkins is Stated Supply at Oakland Hills Community Church in Farmington Hills, Michigan Visiting lecturer in systematic theology at Edinburgh Theological Seminary and online instructor at Westminster Theological Seminary. He is the author of Catholicity and the Covenant of Works: James Ussher and the Reformed Tradition, of which he spoke on Christ the Center episode 677.
After having created Adam in his image and placing him in the Garden of Eden, God entered into a covenant with him (Gen. 2:16–17). In Westminster Confession of Faith 7.1, the divines wrote, The distance between God and the creature is so great, that although reasonable creatures do owe obedience unto him as their Creator, yet they could never have any fruition of him as their blessedness and reward, but by some voluntary condescension on God's part, which he hath been pleased to express by way of covenant. There are several important things to note in this passage. First, upon creation and prior to the establishment of the covenant, Adam already knew God and owed him obedience merely from the fact that he was created in God's image. God did not owe Adam anything, and Adam could in no way place God into his debt. Second, the type of fruition that the covenant affords is that of God as "blessedness and reward." Adam already owed God personal, perfect, exact and entire obedience, though God voluntarily condescended to establish the covenant of works by which Adam could consummately come to know God in glory. In other words, he could ascend God's holy hill (Psalm 24) through the gratuitous means God provided. Westminster Confession of Faith 7.1 is not describing covenant as the means by which God ontologically or metaphysically condescends to creation. God does not assume new properties, attributes, or characteristics to do so. Neither does the confession speak of the covenant as the means by which Adam comes to know God generally—as if Adam would not even know that God existed apart from a covenant. The covenant is the means by which he may come to know God specifically as his blessedness and reward. https://vimeo.com/410742856
Christ the Center is on the road as Camden Bucey speaks with two guest from the Greenville Presbyterian Theological Seminary Conference. This episode explores Reformed theology and its profound impact on missions. Camden is joined by Chad Vegas, founding pastor of Sovereign Grace Church and founding board chairman of Radius International, along with Jonathan Master, president of Greenville Presbyterian Theological Seminary, to explore the vital relationship between theological education and missionary work. The conversation covers a broad spectrum, from the excitement surrounding the seminary’s annual spring conference to the innovative partnership between Greenville Seminary and Radius International, aimed at equipping the next generation for church planting among unreached language groups. Chad Vegas also shares his personal journey from a dispensationalist background to embracing Reformed theology and the inception of Radius International. This episode sheds light on the challenges and strategies of missionary work, emphasizing the necessity of a solid biblical foundation, cultural sensitivity, and the indispensable role of the local church in sending and supporting missionaries. Join us for an engaging discussion that reaffirms the vital role of Reformed theology in advancing the gospel to the ends of the earth. [00:00:07] Introduction [00:06:35] Greenville Presbyterian Theological Seminary and a Focus on Missions [00:08:35] Radius International and Church Planting among Unreached Groups [00:12:43] Missionary Training and Biblical Foundations [00:18:13] Historical and Theological Foundations of Missions [00:23:22] A Personal Journey to Reformed Theology [00:39:13] Development of Radius International [00:48:24] Missionary Work and Cultural Engagement [00:58:46] Evolving Role of Reformed Theology in Modern Missions [01:10:09] Future Directions for Presbyterian Missions This is Christ the Center episode 850 (https://www.reformedforum.org/ctc850)
In this installment of Vos Group, we turn to p. 336 of Vos’s book Biblical Theology: Old and New Testaments, focusing on the temptations of Jesus Christ. This discussion ventures into the heart of Jesus’s wilderness temptations, offering a rich, theological analysis that challenges and enlightens. We consider the strategic use of Old Testament quotations by Jesus during his confrontation with Satan, underscoring the deep, theological significance of these moments. This episode not only unpacks the unique messianic nature of Jesus’s temptations but also firmly opposes a moralizing interpretation, instead highlighting the redemptive work accomplished through Christ’s victory over sin. Through a careful examination of Jesus as the obedient Son and true Israel, this episode reveals the layers of meaning in these biblical narratives, connecting them to broader themes of redemption, covenant theology, and the Christian life. As we understand Jesus’s role as the mediator who binds and spoils the strong man, this episode encourages believers to find their identity in Christ, resting in his victorious work on our behalf. 00:07 Introduction 04:44 Jesus' Temptation as a Prime Example of His Earthly Ministry 08:43 The Wilderness Temptation 17:10 The Temple Temptation 23:05 The Mountain Temptation 28:44 The Emphases of Matthew and Luke 38:38 Overcoming in Jesus and Entering Paradise 45:01 Looking Ahead 48:11 Conclusion
Reformed Forum exhibited at the Greenville Presbyterian Theological Seminary conference in Greer, SC. This episode offers a deep dive into the Confessional Presbyterian Journal's latest issue, with a special focus on the 50th anniversary of the Presbyterian Church in America (PCA) and the historical development of the PCA's Standing Judicial Commission (SJC). Camden Bucey brings together Rev. Zachary Groff, pastor of Antioch Presbyterian Church, and Dr. Scott Cook, visiting professor of apologetics at Greenville Presbyterian Theological Seminary, both of whom are deeply involved in the Confessional Presbyterian Journal. The conversation starts with an exploration of the journal itself, highlighting its dedication to addressing pressing issues in the church through a blend of pastoral scholarship and rigorous theological analysis. The latest issue's theme revolves around the PCA's 50th anniversary, offering a collection of articles that reflect on the denomination's history, mission, and theological commitments. Zachary Groff provides an overview of the journal's contents, emphasizing the significance of the PCA's commitment to the Great Commission and its historical context. He mentions various contributions that examine the PCA's foundation, its growth, and its ongoing theological debates, particularly those concerning the church's mission and the inclusivity of nations in God's plan through Christ. Dr. Scott Cook focuses on the specific topic of the PCA's Standing Judicial Commission, outlining its origin and evolution. He describes the initial challenges faced by the PCA in maintaining discipline and order within its rapidly growing community. Cook traces the SJC's development back to the 1980s, a period marked by significant debate and eventual compromise within the denomination. He articulates the tension between the desire for a grassroots, decentralized approach to church governance and the practical need for an efficient, centralized judicial body to handle disciplinary cases. This part of the conversation sheds light on the broader issues of polity and ecclesiastical authority within the PCA and offers insights into how the denomination has navigated these challenges over the years. Throughout the episode, the guests underscore the Confessional Presbyterian Journal's role in fostering informed theological conversation and community engagement within the Reformed tradition. The discussion not only celebrates the PCA's past achievements but also critically examines its struggles and future directions, particularly in the realms of theological fidelity, church discipline, and mission​​. 00:00:07 - Introduction 00:03:38 - Guest Introductions: Rev. Zachary Groff and Dr. Scott Cook 00:07:35 - In-depth Look at the Confessional Presbyterian Journal 00:23:00 - The Formation and Significance of the PCA's Standing Judicial Commission 00:27:06 - Challenges and Future Directions for the PCA 00:56:35 - The Development of the SJC: From Concept to Reality 01:00:20 - The Challenges and Controversies of Implementing the SJC 01:04:26 - Reflecting on Growth and the Future of the PCA 01:12:23 - Reflecting on PCA's Place in the Reformed World This is Christ the Center episode 848 (https://www.reformedforum.org/ctc848)
In this enlightening episode, we discuss the nuances of conscience and confessional identity during the Reformation. Joined by Dr. Timothy Scheuers, we turn our attention to the transformative period of the 16th century, exploring how conscience acted not only as a catalyst for reform but also as a complex element influencing church unity, confessional standards, and the intricate relationship between church and state. The core of our discussion centers around Dr. Scheuer’s book, Consciences and the Reformation: Scruples over Oaths and Confessions in the Era of Calvin and His Contemporaries (Oxford University Press), providing a fresh perspective on the role of conscience in driving forward the Reformation’s agenda. We explore the pivotal moments and figures of this era, including Calvin’s return to Geneva and the establishment of the Geneva Academy, to understand how these historical milestones continue to influence contemporary Christian thought and practice. Through a blend of historical examination and practical application, this episode not only sheds light on the foundational aspects of Reformed theology but also invites listeners to reflect on the relevance of these principles in today’s ecclesiastical landscape. Whether you're a theologian, a pastor, or simply someone interested in Christian history and doctrine, this episode offers valuable insights into the enduring legacy of the Reformation and its significance for the contemporary church. Rev. Dr. Scheuers is the Associate Pastor of First United Reformed Church of Chino, CA, and an Adjunct Assistant Professor of History at Providence Christian College (Pasadena, CA).
In this episode, we speak with William Boekestein, Jonathan Landry Cruse, and Andrew J. Miller, the authors behind a new book, Glorifying and Enjoying God: 52 Devotions through the Westminster Shorter Catechism. These three pastors and theologians share their insights and experiences from their journey through the Westminster Shorter Catechism, offering listeners a unique opportunity to understand the profound theological truths encapsulated in this historic summary of faith. William Boekestein, serving the Immanuel Fellowship Church in Kalamazoo, Michigan, alongside his wife Amy and their four children, brings a pastoral heart to our discussion. Jonathan Landry Cruse, author of What Happens When We Worship and pastor of Community Presbyterian Church (OPC) in Kalamazoo, where he resides with his wife and three children, offers a perspective enriched by his literary and ministerial endeavors. Andrew J. Miller, the Regional Home Missionary for the Orthodox Presbyterian Church in central Pennsylvania, shares his extensive missionary experiences, living out the catechism’s teachings alongside his wife Rebekah and their five children. Together, they speak about the motivations behind their collaborative work, the importance of the Westminster Shorter Catechism in today’s Christian walk, and how the book aims to deepen the reader’s love and knowledge of God. Join us as we explore how understanding God leads to a richer relationship with Him, and how the intertwined nature of heart and mind can bring us closer to the glory and enjoyment of God.
In this episode, we welcome Aaron Renn, author of Life in the Negative World: Confronting Challenges in an Anti-Christian Culture, to explore the profound shifts in cultural attitudes towards Christianity and the broader implications for faith in the modern era. Renn, with a diverse background ranging from management and technology consulting as a Partner at Accenture, to urban policy as a Senior Fellow at the Manhattan Institute for Policy Research, and now a Senior Fellow at American Reformer, brings a unique perspective to the discussion. His extensive work has been featured in globally recognized publications such as The Guardian, The Wall Street Journal, and The Atlantic. Life in the Negative World considers the dramatic changes in societal views on Christianity, tracing the journey from the mid-twentieth century—when church attendance was at its peak—to the present day, where professing Christian beliefs often results in social demotion within elite circles. Renn examines the transition from a once Christianity-affirming society to one that is, at best, indifferent, and at worst, hostile to Christian morals and teachings. In our conversation, he articulates the lessons learned from over seven decades of Christian cultural engagement, offering insightful strategies for churches, institutions, and individuals to maintain their faithfulness in an increasingly adversarial environment. This episode is not just a reflection on the challenges faced by modern Christians but also a guide on how to navigate these tumultuous waters with grace, resilience, and a deepened faith. Renn emphasizes the necessity for a diverse array of strategies to engage missionally with a world that often seems at odds with Christian values. Whether you’re a person of faith struggling to find your place in this “negative world,” a church leader seeking direction for your community, or simply interested in the evolving relationship between religion and society, this conversation with Aaron Renn offers valuable insights and hope for the path forward. Join us as we discuss the implications of living out one’s faith in an era that increasingly marginalizes Christian perspectives, and discover how to embrace the challenges of the negative world with courage and conviction. Links Balaji Srinivasan, The Network State James C. Scott, Seeing Like a State AaronRenn.com American Reformer
In this installment of Van Til Group, we turn to the section of Defense of the Faith (pp. 69–72), which begins the chapter titled “The Christian Philosophy of Behavior.” This section outlines the Christian perspective on ethics, drawing from the Reformed confessions to emphasize that human actions, or behavior, should aim to glorify God. It presents a confessional scheme focusing on three key aspects: the highest good (summum bonum) that humans should strive for, the criterion for achieving this good (which must be based on God’s revealed will in Scripture), and the motivation for pursuing this good, highlighting the necessity of faith and regeneration by the Holy Spirit for genuine ethical action. The chapter then considers the relationship between ethics and the Christian philosophy of knowledge. It asserts that understanding God’s nature is fundamental to grasping the essence of Christian ethics, with God’s absolute personality serving as the ultimate interpretative category for human existence. This perspective contrasts with non-Christian views by emphasizing that the good is defined by God’s nature and will, rather than existing independently. The section on “Man as Made in God’s Image” discusses the original moral perfection of humanity, created in the image of the Godhead, and underscores the derivative nature of human moral consciousness. Unlike non-Christian ethics, which may view moral consciousness as the ultimate arbiter of good, Christian ethics sees it as reliant on divine revelation. This foundational difference in epistemology between Christian and non-Christian thought underscores the Christian belief in a receptive rather than creative construction of moral knowledge, with humanity’s moral nature and external revelation jointly guiding ethical understanding.
In this episode, we sit down with David Hall, Senior Pastor of Midway Presbyterian Church in Powder Springs, GA, and a prolific author, to discuss his latest book, Irony and the Presbyterian Church in America: The First Fifty Years. Hall’s work, a historical and analytical exploration of the Presbyterian Church in America (PCA), offers a unique perspective on the denomination’s fifty-year journey since its inception in 1973. Through the lens of irony, reminiscent of Greek dramas, Hall examines the PCA’s evolution within the wider context of American Presbyterianism. David Hall is the author of over 40 books, including influential titles like Savior or Servant? Putting Government in Its Place and The Legacy of John Calvin. As the Founder and Senior Fellow of the Kuyper Institute and a leading figure in the Calvin500 celebration, Hall’s expertise offers a profound look into the PCA’s successes, challenges, and the critical question: can it avoid the decline that other religious communions have faced?
In this episode, Camden Bucey engages in a thought-provoking discussion with Terry Johnson, Senior Minister of Independent Presbyterian Church in Savannah, Georgia and the author of Understanding Family Worship: Its History, Theology, and Practice (Christian Focus). This book provides a timely perspective on family worship. Rev. Johnson reflects on his personal journey, starting with the birth of his first child, which sparked a deep commitment to family worship. Johnson emphasizes the need for consistency and the avoidance of lethargy in practicing family worship. He discusses the challenges and strategies for implementing daily family worship, highlighting the importance of a godly home environment for its effectiveness.  The conversation also covers theological arguments supporting family worship, rooted in Reformed doctrine, and practical aspects like singing, prayer, Scripture reading, and the role of catechesis in family life. The episode concludes with encouragement for families to embrace this historic Christian practice, underscoring its foundational role in imparting faith and nurturing spiritual growth within the family unit.
In this episode, we welcome Drs. Benjamin Gladd and G. K. Beale, co-editors of The Dictionary of the New Testament Use of the Old Testament (Baker Academic) along with D. A. Carson and Andrew Naselli. We explore various theological and biblical topics, particularly focusing on the intricate relationship between the New Testament and the Old Testament. This conversation includes examining how New Testament writers drew upon and interpreted Old Testament texts, shedding light on the continuity and development of biblical themes across the testaments. The episode illuminates the complex intertextuality present in the Bible, emphasizing the importance of understanding these connections for a more comprehensive grasp of Christian theology. Additionally, the dialogue touches upon various methods and challenges in biblical scholarship, including the interpretation of biblical allusions and the significance of these allusions in understanding the New Testament’s fulfillment of Old Testament prophecies and typologies. Drs. Gladd and Beale’s expertise provides a rich, nuanced perspective on these subjects, making the episode particularly valuable for those interested in deepening their understanding of biblical theology and the hermeneutical principles underlying the study of Scripture.
Dr. Cornelis Van Dam joins us to speak about his book In the Beginning: Listening to Genesis 1 and 2, in which he argues that reading Genesis 1 and 2 as history is not only justified but necessary. Van Dam clarifies the different roles that ancient Near Eastern literature and scientific theories should play in our understanding of the Bible as he carefully deals with the exegetical details of the first two chapters of the Bible. He writes: The focus of this work is therefore not to give an all-around commentary and explanation of every verse in Genesis 1 and 2, but to listen to Scripture in order to find out what God is revealing to us about the historicity of the beginning chapters of Genesis. Concentrating on listening to what Scripture actually says brings with it the realization that the reader of the Word has a relatively modest place. The one who listens to Scripture acknowledges that the Word, not the reader, determines the meaning of the text (p. 9). Dr. Van Dam is an Old Testament scholar, who has served with distinction as a professor of Old Testament at the Canadian Reformed Theological Seminary from 1981 to 2011. He holds degrees from Wilfrid Laurier University, Canadian Reformed Theological Seminary, Knox College at the University of Toronto, and the Theological University of Kampen. Over his career, he has made significant contributions to Old Testament scholarship, with a special focus on the Pentateuch. He is the author of notable works including In the Beginning: Listening to Genesis 1 and 2, The Elder, and The Deacon. These publications reflect his commitment to exploring not merely themes in biblical studies but also their implications for Christian doctrine and practice. Dr. Van Dam was honored in 2011 with a Festschrift titled Living Waters from Ancient Springs: Essays in Honor of Cornelis Van Dam. This volume, featuring contributions from notable scholars such as Hans Boersma and Al Wolters, is a testament to his significant impact on theological scholarship and his enduring legacy in biblical studies.
In this installment of our Vos Group, we turn to pp. 335–336 of Biblical Theology: Old and New Testaments to explore the uniquely messianic nature of these temptations, examining how Christ’s experiences differ significantly from human temptations. A key theme of this passage is the comparison of Christ’s temptation with Adam’s, emphasizing Christ’s role as the second Adam and the federal head encountering temptation. Vos warns against a moralizing interpretation of the temptations, instead focusing on their theocentric character and their relation to true religion. The episode further explores the role of the Holy Spirit in these temptations, particularly in empowering Christ and highlighting the inauguration of the kingdom of God. The discussion is rich in its exploration of redemptive history, connecting Christ’s temptations to the broader biblical narrative, from Adam’s failure to Israel’s typological sonship, leading to Christ’s successful fulfillment as the obedient Son of God. This comprehensive analysis aims to deepen understanding of Christ’s work and encourages listeners to appreciate the significance of these biblical events in the context of the entire history of salvation​​.
Join us on this week’s episode as we speak with Fred Greco, pastor of Christ Church in Katy, Texas. He is a trusted authority on parliamentary procedure and church polity and moderator of the PCA’s 50th General Assembly. Born and raised in Buffalo, New York, alongside his wife, Deb, Fred’s academic journey in Classics and History from the University of Buffalo paved the way to a career in law after acquiring his J.D. from the University of Michigan Law School. As a corporate attorney specializing in commercial finance and real estate law in Cleveland, Ohio, Fred’s life took an interesting turn when he was ordained as a ruling elder in the PCA, sparking his transition from business to the pulpit. The call to ministry led him and his family to the heart of Texas, where he now serves as the Senior Pastor of Christ Church. In this episode, we’ll explore Rev. Greco’s rich life experiences, from his expertise in law to his heart for ministry. We’ll explore the relationship between his legal training and his ecclesiastical service, and how this unique background informs his understanding of governance within the church.
We welcome David Schrock to discuss his book, The Royal Priesthood and the Glory of God, in which he presents a biblical theology that explores the theme of priesthood throughout the Bible. The book demonstrates that the concept of priesthood, starting with Adam in the Garden of Eden, is central to understanding God’s plan for humanity and the overarching narrative of Scripture. Schrock argues that Adam, as the first priest in the biblical narrative, sets a pattern for priesthood that echoes through the patriarchs and is ultimately fulfilled in Jesus Christ. This priesthood is not limited to a specific lineage or tribe but is a calling for all of God’s people. The book traces the development of this theme through the Old and New Testaments, showing how the priesthood develops from the Levitical priesthood of the Old Testament to the royal priesthood in Christ, fulfilling God’s purpose for humanity to serve as mediators of his presence and ministers of his covenant. Schrock’s work invites readers to see themselves as part of this royal priesthood, called to serve God and reflect his glory. David S. Schrock is pastor for preaching and theology at Occoquan Bible Church in Woodbridge, Virginia. He is a founding faculty member at Indianapolis Theological Seminary, where he teaches theology. Links davidschrock.com Indianapolis Theological Seminary Christ Over All David Stephen Schrock, A Biblical-Theological Investigation of Christ’s Priesthood and Covenant Mediation with Respect to the Extent of the Atonement, 2013.
Join us for a compelling conversation with Dr. Matthew S. Harmon, Professor of New Testament studies at Grace College and Theological Seminary. Camden Bucey engages Dr. Harmon in an exploration of his book, The Servant of the Lord and His Servant People, which explores the theme of servanthood across the biblical canon, offering insightful perspectives on this pervasive and significant motif​​. During the episode, Dr. Harmon surveys several key biblical figures identified as servants of the Lord, including Adam, Moses, Joshua, David, and Jesus. The conversation also touches upon the New Testament, specifically Paul’s self-identification with the servant of the Lord described in Isaiah. Dr. Harmon elucidates how Paul, and by extension, the Christian church, embody this servant role through Christ’s indwelling, thereby continuing the mission of revealing God’s glory to the ends of the earth​​. This episode promises to offer listeners profound insights into the biblical concept of servanthood and its implications for understanding both the Old and New Testaments, as well as its relevance for the Christian life today. Links Rebels and Exiles: A Biblical Theology of Sin and Restoration The Various and Sundry Podcast Biblical Theology Briefing Podcast
Highlights from 2023

Highlights from 2023

2023-12-2901:43:34

Since 2008, we have been taking time around New Year’s Day to bring you some of the top moments from the preceding year. We have several great clips lined up for you today. The Top Episodes of 2023 (by YouTube views) Dan Ragusa — Preterism and 2 Peter 3 (YouTube) Gray Sutanto and Cory Brock — A Theological Introduction to Neo-Calvinism (YouTube) Greg Beale — The New Testament Use of the Old Testament (YouTube) Carlton Wynne — Calvin’s Institutes of the Christian Religion (YouTube) Camden Bucey — The Importance of Cornelius Van Til for Today (YouTube) Jim Cassidy — Introducing and Interpreting Karl Barth (YouTube) Danny Olinger — Christianity and Liberalism: Introduction (YouTube) Lane Tipton — Exitus and Reditus in the Theology of Thomas Aquinas (YouTube) Jonathan Master — Reformed Theology (YouTube) Michael Beck — Covenant Theology and Cultural Engagement in the Thought of Meredith G. Kline(YouTube)
Join us in this episode of Christ the Center, where host Camden Bucey engages in a free-flowing yet thoughtful discussion with Dr. Owen Anderson, philosopher and professor of religious studies at Arizona State University and pastor of Historic Christian Church in Phoenix. The conversation centers around the nuanced relationship between philosophy, religion, and the concept of free speech within academia and broader American culture. The episode explores the current state of freedom of speech in higher education, highlighting its importance and the obstacles it faces today. Dr. Anderson shares his views on the roles of natural and revealed religion in American philosophical and legal traditions, and how these ideas have influenced the country’s development. Listeners will also appreciate the exploration of Common Sense Realism and its impact on the ideological framework of the American Founding Fathers. This episode provides a reflective look into the challenges of articulating and understanding truth in an increasingly complex age. Listen in for a conversation that offers insightful perspectives on the intersections of philosophy, religion, and free speech in the modern era. Links Dr. Owen Anderson on Substack The Cambridge Companion to the First Amendment and Religious Liberty FIRE’s Guide to Free Speech on Campus
In this episode, we're excited to unveil the inaugural lesson of our new series, exploring the profound depths of the Pentateuch—the first five books of the Bible. Under the able guidance of Dr. Mark Winder, we'll embark on an enlightening journey through six comprehensive, yet accessible, biblical-theological lessons, offering fresh insights into this foundational portion of Scripture. As we introduce this captivating course, join Ryan Noha and Camden Bucey for a reflective update on our year-end projects. We also extend a heartfelt invitation to support our mission through the 'Planting for the Future' campaign. Your generous contributions are pivotal in helping Reformed Forum continue to offer an array of free, high-quality Reformed theological resources to a global audience. Discover more and contribute to our cause at Reformed Forum's donation page (https://www.reformedforum.org/donate).
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Comments (2)

mockingbird lane

also don't agree that the younger generation is more inherently selfish. it was not millennials who destroyed to the economy or environment out of greed and self centeredness. it wasn't them who demand special treatment for their age and supposed experience. I think younger people just (rightly) call out blind obedience older people sometimes feel they're entitled to and promote self care (not selfishness, although certainly some do, just as some baby boomers and gen Xers do).

Jul 8th
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mockingbird lane

somewhat disagree. your parents chose to have you;you did not ask them to. they have a duty and obligation to meet the basic needs of their kids. they aren't going above and beyond just for making sure you're not naked and starved. that line of thinking imo is too similar to parent worship in the East. families owe each other love and respect, mutually, is all.

Jul 8th
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