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Part 2 pf my 2-part series into essential project management vocabulary.
Do you have to work on projects? Maybe you are looking to start working as a project administrator and you need to sharpen your knowledge of essential project management vocabulary. If you do, then today’s lesson of the podcast will be super helpful. Projects are an essential part of any business. I mean, if we didn’t run projects, then how would we implement new ways of working, new software solutions or enact change within the organisation? It is safe to say that whether you like it or not, you will be working on some form of a project in your working like. To be more effective you will need to know the project management lingo and what it all means. So, let’s take a look at part one of my series into project management vocabulary. 
In this week’s episode of the Art of Business English we are going to review some idioms with the verb “hit” that you might find useful for your next business meeting.
In this week’s episode of the Art of Business English we are going to review some common idioms with the verb “strike” that you might come across in business contexts.
Hi, welcome to a new episode of The Art of Business English. This week I have another “Grammar Day” episode for you. In fact, we are going to take a look at the use of the words “as” and “like”. They are important components for making comparisons. As you can imagine, making comparisons is an incredibly important language function in business. Unfortunately, these two words are often confused when people are trying to use them when comparing two or more things. Nonetheless, there are some important differences between them, as well as some other functions. So, let’s learn some of their uses to improve our communication skills.
Welcome back to The Art of Business English. In this week's episode we are going to review comparative and superlative adjectives to help you improve your communication skills in a business context. Comparatives and superlatives are very important in business English since they provide a way to discuss the standards of a service or product against those of the competition or to evaluate the performance of a company through time. They are also useful when we need to describe the skills of employees or applicants wishing to work on a project. First, I am going to teach you the basic rules to form and use these adjectives, as well as some common mistakes, and then I am going to show you an example on how to use them in business contexts. Don't forget to enrol in my new course "Business English Expressions". You can get it at 50% off!! https://theartofbusinessenglish.com/product/business-english-expressions-online-course/
Hi, welcome to yet another episode of the Art of Business English podcast. Today I have another useful lesson for you on how you can talk about degrees of change within your organisation. As you know, the world is constantly changing, nothing stays the same for long. In order to be able to discuss this change you are going to need some of the expressions that I am sharing with you today.
Hi, welcome to a new episode of The Art of Business English. This week we are going to take a look at past modal verbs. This is an extension of last week’s episode on modals. If you didn’t get a chance to see that one, then you can review it by clicking here. So, let’s turn to past modal verbs. What are they? Well, they are important to make deductions and to show different levels of certainty about past events. Also, they are used to express criticism or unfulfilled wishes. Using these verbs correctly will help you to get moving in the right direction to speak English naturally. The general form for using past modals is: modal + have + past participle Now let’s start learning how to use them in business contexts!
In this week's episode we are going to review modal verbs and how to use them in order to improve your communication skills in a business context.
In this week’s episode of the Art of Business English we are going to review some more phrasal verbs with two particles to help you expand your vocabulary. Although most phrasal verbs are made up of a verb and a particle, sometimes, they have two particles. Today you will learn ten 3-word phrasal verbs that contain the preposition “for”.
Welcome back to The Art of Business English. In this week's episode we have the second part of my mini-series on three-word phrasal verbs.   If you haven’t taken a look at episode 1, then you can review it here.   Also, if you haven’t subscribed to the podcast, now is a good moment. When you subscribe you will be first to know when I release a new episode, plus you will get access to all of my special offers and discounts.     Today I am going to be focusing on 3-word phrasal verbs that end with the preposition “to”. Remember, any verb that follows a preposition needs to be in the gerund or ING form.   Let’s start learning!
Hi, welcome to a new episode of The Art of Business English. This week we have the first part of a mini-series on phrasal-prepositional verbs, also known as phrasal verbs with two particles, which will help you enrich your vocabulary and your understanding of native speakers.   In the first episode we will be covering three-word phrasal verbs with the preposition “with”. This means that the last word in the three-word structure is “with”. Keep reading on and you will understand.   Phrasal verbs are very common in English, especially in more informal contexts. They are made up of a verb and a particle or, sometimes, two particles. The particle often changes the meaning of the verb.   In terms of word order, there are two main types of phrasal verbs: separable and inseparable. With separable phrasal verbs, the verb and particle can be apart or together. Phrasal verbs with two particles are inseparable. Even if you use a pronoun, you put it after the particles.   So, let’s see what we’ve got!   Read the full blog post here: https://theartofbusinessenglish.com/three-word-phrasal-verbs-with-the-preposition-with
Welcome back to The Art of Business English. In this week's episode we are going to learn some expressions to describe difficult situations. Sadly, from time to time, we all have to deal with things that annoy us or cause stress. These phrases will widen your knowledge of vocabulary for talking about them in English.   First, I will present the phrase and describe the meaning, and then I’m going to give you an example of its use.   Let’s dive in!  
Hi, welcome to this week’s episode of The Art of Business English. Have you ever been in an awkward situation and wondered how to express your discomfort in a polite way? Or have you ever needed to ask another person for something you need them to do without sounding bossy? In this episode we are going to review some expressions which will help you to achieve these purposes and pave the way to fix unpleasant situations smoothly.   Some of these phrases are useful to politely introduce a topic you need to discuss or to request a change of conduct; others convey that you are aware that your opinion might not be shared by the other person, but that you are asking for their consideration, and some others are used to make suggestions.   First, I will present you the expressions and then, give you an example on how to use them.
On this week’s episode of the AOBE, we will be talking about pronunciation and giving you some tips on how you can improve your English pronunciation to help you sound more fluent.
Happy New Year 2022

Happy New Year 2022

2022-01-1329:11

Happy New Year 2022, in the first episode of the year we are looking at New Year’s resolutions and how you can make them, keep them and discuss them in social situations.
Year End 2021

Year End 2021

2021-12-2916:26

Listen in as Andrew shares his thoughts and reflections questions for the last episode of the year.  Don't miss the top ten most popular episodes of 2021.  Thanks for listening, it's been a really pleasure having you here.  https://theartofbusinessenglish.com/financial-vocabulary-1/ https://theartofbusinessenglish.com/ten-expressions-for-giving-opinions/ https://theartofbusinessenglish.com/start-participating-confidently-in-business-meetings-english-language-learners-guide/ https://theartofbusinessenglish.com/ten-dynamic-expressions-for-business/ https://theartofbusinessenglish.com/financial-vocabulary-3/ https://theartofbusinessenglish.com/how-to-give-and-respond-to-suggestions/ https://theartofbusinessenglish.com/how-to-add-emphasis-in-meetings-that-will-increase-your-influence/ https://theartofbusinessenglish.com/words-and-expressions-to-start-using-in-2021/ https://theartofbusinessenglish.com/differences-despite-in-spite-of-although/ https://theartofbusinessenglish.com/how-to-acknowledge-people-in-conversation/
In this week’s episode of the Art of Business English we are going to review ten prepositional phrases with “by” that you might find useful for business.
 In this week’s episode of the Art of Business English we are going to review ten prepositional phrases with “in” that you might find useful for business.
In this week’s episode of the Art of Business English we are going to review ten prepositional phrases with “at” that you might find useful for business.
Comments (1)

Mojtaba Reyhani

Adorable, British accent, I love your accent.

Dec 11th
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