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GirlTrek's Black History Bootcamp
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GirlTrek's Black History Bootcamp

Author: Morgan Dixon + Vanessa Garrison

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GirlTrek's epic 21-day walking meditation series to remember where we came from and to gather strength for the road ahead. We celebrate Black stories and the lessons of our ancestors to help guide us through these uncertain times. Each episode, is a conversation on learning, living and elevating to our highest self with guidance from lessons of the past. Hosted by GirlTrek Co-founders Morgan Dixon and Vanessa Garrison. Produced by: Ebony Andrews
88 Episodes
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Monday, May 31st will make the 100th anniversary of one of the worst incidents of mass racial violence in the history of this country, the Tulsa Race Massacre. Over the course of two days, more than 100 residents of one of the most thriving and prosperous Black neighborhoods in the country were massacred by a violent white mob. They came seeking to destroy what these proud men and women had built – a community organized around shared values and cultural pride with deep economic roots and political power.This Monday, as a tribute, a rallying cry, and a call-to-action we invite you, your loved ones, and your community to take a walk with us in this special edition of our viral walking podcast. Together we will spend 60 minutes calling in the ancestors, honoring what was lost in Tulsa, and discussing how this movement plans to lead the rebirth of 1,000 Black neighborhoods starting this summer.This virtual walk can be experienced from wherever you are and will be led by GirlTrek Co-Founders, Vanessa and Morgan along with a special guest, Tamika Mallory.Disclaimer: We do not own the rights to the music or speech excepts played during this broadcast. Original content can be found here:Ella's Song| Sweet Honey in The Rock:https://open.spotify.com/track/0MTTqcQmbLW94gMLYMl95k?si=d4c79d0411914eeeA Meditation for Black Women | Monet Marshall and Nia Wilson:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Zgf2COTsFUAValarie Kaurs' Prayer:https://www.today.com/video/what-if-this-is-not-the-darkness-of-the-tomb-but-the-darkness-of-the-womb-watch-valarie-kaur-s-speech-917892675740
On September 12, 1992, Mae Jemison, became the first Black woman to fly into space. This Black woman genius, who can trace her family roots back to the plantations of Talladega County, Alabama, flew 190 hours, 30 minutes, 23 seconds, and orbited the earth 127 times. Listed among the items that she carried with her was a poster of the Alvin Ailey Dance Theater, a West African statue, a picture of pilot Bessie Coleman, and a banner reppin’ Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc. Mae Jemison is truly her ancestor’s wildest dreams. Her life is a masterclass in excellence, sprinkled with Black stardust. Come to this walk with anticipation. There is much to learn from this pioneer! Join GirlTrek’s Black History Bootcamp - 21 Cosmonauts at blackhistorybootcamp.com to receive specially curated emails with survival tips, speeches + dedicated songs to listen to for each episode. Together we will discover the stories of 21 women who were ahead of their time.Disclaimer: We do not own the rights to the music played during this broadcast. Original content can be found here:Alvin Ailey "Cry" with Yolanda Adams "Right on Be Free" | Black Girls Rock 2018:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xIAbeGLbXlcSaturn | Stevie Wonder:https://open.spotify.com/track/5RgWdJs6H52nMyZFQspQWH?si=ad8c70fbe3a84a20
On the very spot where the transatlantic slave trade began, in modern-day Angola, the most epic fight for liberation in our history was waged between the entire Portuguese Empire and one Black woman. Standing toe-to-toe. Them and her. Queen Nzinga. Say her name. We are the #daughters of Queen Nzinga Mbande. Queen of the Ambundu Kingdoms of the ruling family of Ndongo and great sovereign power of Matamba. Ohhh that’s delicious. Let it roll off your tongues: Nzzzzinga, Nzingha, Njinga. Her name alone defies the English alphabet, spelled differently across history. No matter how you spell her name, one thing is certain, trained in military precision and political warfare, young Nzinga defeated the colonizers, protected her people for 37 years, and set into motion a liberation movement that would ultimately defeat the colonizers. We will not be your slaves. Adjust your crowns queens, we’re going in. This is the greatest story never told. Join GirlTrek’s Black History Bootcamp - 21 Cosmonauts at blackhistorybootcamp.com to receive specially curated emails with survival tips, speeches + dedicated songs to listen to for each episode. Together we will discover the stories of 21 women who were ahead of their time.Disclaimer: We do not own the rights to the music played during this broadcast. Original content can be found here:Summertime | Angelique Kidjo:https://open.spotify.com/track/6ZoY4JuMpnTkQTLE8tYP5k?si=9f4aa8cf123f439dTry Me | Tems:https://open.spotify.com/track/2DYp6Gfu2JguZra6xL8IAV?si=9b3d681841e04baf
Today we tell the story of The United Order of Tents. A secret society of Black women that has operated for more than 100 years, providing shelter and services to people who were unable to care for themselves. It’s the story of Black women’s survival and resilience throughout time. When we look back to our grandmothers and ask, how did they make it? This is how. By relying on each other. By lifting as they climbed. Through mutual aid and support. This is the truth of who we are. Kind. Generous. God-fearing. Steadfast. Join us today to celebrate this legacy of sisterhood.Join GirlTrek’s Black History Bootcamp - 21 Cosmonauts at blackhistorybootcamp.com to receive specially curated emails with survival tips, speeches + dedicated songs to listen to for each episode. Together we will discover the stories of 21 women who were ahead of their time.Disclaimer: We do not own the rights to the music played during this broadcast. Original content can be found here:Completely Yes |  Sandra Crouch:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y1L3k9_q1S8Déjà vu | Teena Marie:https://open.spotify.com/track/7ecCOdHyhkWrQWbzDnHm6m?si=bIt-uAhVQdWAF_eB4SX6Vg&utm_source=copy-link
In 1965, Harry Belafonte said that Mahalia Jackson was "the single most powerful Black woman in the United States.” She could channel God’s power, transform a room, soften the hardest hearts, move the masses, and light fire to the faithful. That’s power. We are the #daughtersof Mahalia Jackson...and her voice rang louder than bullets and billy clubs. Crystal clear. Equal parts lullaby and lightsaber. Mahalia Jackson was our moral high ground - a spiritual portal. A “beam me up” before Star Trek had a name.  She mastered the ability to take us to a Rock that was higher. She rode a praise - in primordial tongues - through halls of injustice, and confused our cross-burning enemies. Singing “I'm gonna lay down my burden, down by the riverside.”  Singing, “I ain't a-gonna study war no more.” Singing, “Soon it will be done. Trouble of the world.”  Singing “Elijah Rock, shout, shout, shout. Elijah Rock comin' up, Lord.” Singing, "How I made it over,” and “You must be born again.”  Bearing the very souls of Black folks. Teaching us. Healing us. Actual pain medicine. Soothing the saints and the sinners alike. Reminding us all of our divine connection and of a transformational power that is bigger than fear. “I think fear is a sin,” she said. “And I can’t live in fear.”If you are wavering today. Walk with us. If the evidence of your life - your job, your health, your mind, your money, your man - is overwhelming your faith, walk with us. Listen to the clarion voice that mobilized our mothers and resolved our father’s fears. Black people have practices. We have methods, potions, and powers that connect us to Light in the darkest of times. We need those now. Keep the faith. Grab your sneakers. And come sing with us…Today, we walk in total agreement - as our foremothers walked before us in the Montgomery Bus Boycotts - for the total liberation of Black people everywhere. Join GirlTrek’s Black History Bootcamp - 21 Cosmonauts at blackhistorybootcamp.com to receive specially curated emails with survival tips, speeches + dedicated songs to listen to for each episode. Together we will discover the stories of 21 women who were ahead of their time.Disclaimer: We do not own the rights to the music or speech excerpts played during this broadcast. Original content can be found here:Coming In Hot | Andy Mineo, Lacrae:https://open.spotify.com/track/1kVYXfxTWSftIZtmYr6yH8?si=7asQJMgISNmsZYJu66ADaQElijah Rock - Live | Mahalia Jackson:https://open.spotify.com/track/4zYchkXbGeXtJ3T7Tq1elD?si=SY48AZn9QP6p7uVRcxgZwgNever Seen Before Footage of Mahalia Jackson and her Funeral:https://youtu.be/53A6DPWZ_i8How I Got Over | Mahalia Jackson:https://youtu.be/l49N8U3d0Bw
Alice Walker reached all the way back to bring forward the story that would forever change us in her seminal novel, The Color Purple. With her words, she gave voice and texture to the pain of Black women, tenderly explored the depths of it at every level, and then proudly walked us through a field of purple to show us our own strength and resilience. For every woman who ever uttered the words, “I’m poor, Black, I may even be ugly, but Dear God, I’m here! I’m here!” Today’s walk is for you. Beyond a book discussion, we will journey through the life of Alice Walker, her loves, her losses, her triumphs, and her defeats. Just the conversation we all need right now. Join GirlTrek’s Black History Bootcamp - 21 Cosmonauts at blackhistorybootcamp.com to receive specially curated emails with survival tips, speeches + dedicated songs to listen to for each episode. Together we will discover the stories of 21 women who were ahead of their time.Disclaimer: We do not own the rights to the music played during this broadcast. Original content can be found here:Maybe God Is Tryin' Tell You Somethin' | Quincy Jones:https://open.spotify.com/track/4JXiNTDq6OGkyp5aZ7X7cn?si=Ckbi4i4NQvqHXviG4uVD5QFreedom Time - Live | Lauren Hill:https://open.spotify.com/track/0kQ2DTgR9iAkIKoeoIHfn9?si=Lj9a6KFYTP2iZtF9kIMDVg
Dunham. The single word conjures connection. Katherine Dunham revolutionized dance in America. Her life was an undulating umbilical cord back to our Motherland. With a Ph.D. in anthropology, she studied sacred traditional dance techniques and offered Black people a technical way to exercise the trauma of separation from our spiritual inheritance. She was ancient and modern and we are her daughters. She taught us to love our bodies, our Blackness, our culture. And she dedicated her entire life - 96 years on the planet - to freeing Black people, starting with her own community in East St. Louis. Dunham’s impact on the world was deeply therapeutic. Boldly connective. A cultural revolution. There is no American modern dance movement without Katherine Dunham. She is the matriarch of Alvin Ailey AND The Dance Theater of Harlem. Because of her work, I fully understand the power of my own mother’s Holy Ghost dance. I understand that there is such a thing as full-body worship....that the African diaspora has to remember - or learn again - the art of riding Spirit to transform circumstance. And that healing and unifying our own bodies is a prerequisite to unifying our body politic. (Today’s episode is dedicated to Dr. Linda Goodrich, the Dunham-trained teacher in Sacrament who taught my 22-year-old, God-fearing body to root into the earth, roll with the wind, and rise with the sun. To emote, undulate, AND to perform the rites of our foremothers. Rites of generosity, gratitude, sensuality, fearlessness. There is a dance for them all.)Today, we invite you to experience the full-bodied legacy of Mrs. Katherine Dunham as we walk together in the community. Ashé.Join GirlTrek’s Black History Bootcamp - 21 Cosmonauts at blackhistorybootcamp.com to receive specially curated emails with survival tips, speeches + dedicated songs to listen to for each episode. Together we will discover the stories of 21 women who were ahead of their time.Disclaimer: We do not own the rights to the music played during this broadcast. Original content can be found here:Hot Boy | Bobby Shmurda:https://open.spotify.com/track/0rFke7eNFHbGuGJUdRgjB2?si=nAVuZ8IHTb2RyXqEICzjbAHalifu's Dunham Class Progression:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b_s2P-Bxl3EEICzjbAYe | Burna Boy:https://open.spotify.com/track/3FskQrDXcY24ur2fCvz35O?si=uh9M-Y-iR_u8B1Lj6sB-Lw
When you’ve got it. You’ve got it. And Dianna Ross has always had it, has always known she’s had it and has always known how to use it. The literal definition of Icon.  A Black woman who has dared to ask the universe for what she wants and clearly stands in expectation of receiving it. Grace personified. Elegance embodied. She rose like a Phoenix from the ashes of one of Detroit’s toughest neighborhoods to create a career and a life that has inspired millions around the world. The glamour. The movies. The romances. The clothes. The hair. The legacy of her family! Diana Ross is our royalty, and today we honor and celebrate her. Lace-up and walk with us. We’re going to do her proud. Join GirlTrek’s Black History Bootcamp - 21 Cosmonauts at blackhistorybootcamp.com to receive specially curated emails with survival tips, speeches + dedicated songs to listen to for each episode. Together we will discover the stories of 21 women who were ahead of their time.Disclaimer: We do not own the rights to the music played during this broadcast. Original content can be found here:Be a Lion | Diana Ross:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TPYAim8fGvM&list=PLKJzywEPMiCRUpFVLMGZdTZ3hAIxAK7XO&index=2Ain't No Mountain High Enough (Uncut) | Diana Ross:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A6yNlSyiBLE
This is the greatest spy story never told. The story of Mary Bowser, a formerly enslaved woman turned Union spy, who helped take down the confederacy before teaching at a school for free Black children. Then she disappeared off into the sunset. James Bond who?While made-up stories of white male valor and heroism dominate box offices and take up space on every channel, real stories of real heroes, like Mary Bowser, go untold. Until today!Today’s walk is dedicated to a woman whose name everyone should know. A woman so savvy and effective at her job as a spy that Confederate President Jefferson Davis complained that his mental state was collapsing under the strain of not being able to find the leak in his network. The story runs deep and serves as a testament to the bravery and courage of Black women. Women, who for centuries, have risked it all for the freedom of their people. Come to the Walk and Talk with anticipation. We’re spilling all the goods on this wartime hero.Join GirlTrek’s Black History Bootcamp - 21 Cosmonauts at blackhistorybootcamp.com to receive specially curated emails with survival tips, speeches + dedicated songs to listen to for each episode. Together we will discover the stories of 21 women who were ahead of their time.Disclaimer: We do not own the rights to the music played during this broadcast. Original content can be found here:Dreams | Solange:https://open.spotify.com/track/0deHsjyrgcKGMZzIuvawq3?si=PN6sVJlwR0GIfN_QzIObtgDéjà vu | Teena Marie:https://open.spotify.com/track/7p37jbu5FjiHlkXV4wEQei?si=rD44Y4DnQemvrodnlfgkIg
“She made it rain on grassroots integrationists in the South while giving the Kennedy brothers a tongue-lashing for their failure to protect the region’s African-Americans. She inspired a Nina Simone song. She was clocked by the Feds. She wore pearl earrings. She gave a generation of Black actors the roles that would define their careers. She bedded white people years before miscegenation was legalized. She pissed off American theater. She pissed off American theater critics. She named her home in upstate New York Chitterling Heights. Years before Stonewall, she penned letters of solidarity to the early lesbian publication The Ladder. She had a mean sense of humor that continues to defy the “serious activist” stereotype. She didn’t stop until her body made her stop.”  - Excerpt by Fonesca. Review of Sighted Eyes/Feeling Heart. Every aspect of Lorraine Hansberry’s life was fascinating, full of intrigue, and worthy of exploration. There is so much to talk about on today’s walk. Get ready to laugh, gasp, shout, and more as we honor the women who told the world there is nothing better than being young, gifted, and Black.Join GirlTrek’s Black History Bootcamp - 21 Cosmonauts at blackhistorybootcamp.com to receive specially curated emails with survival tips, speeches + dedicated songs to listen to for each episode. Together we will discover the stories of 21 women who were ahead of their time.Disclaimer: We do not own the rights to the music played during this broadcast. Original content can be found here:To Be Young, Gifted and Black | Nina Simone:https://open.spotify.com/track/67RKpDruBXMJgAmhJAivXr?si=X6I9XdANRFi_b7B-bU_xkwWake Up | Ledisi (ft. Sa-Roc):https://open.spotify.com/track/2YjUR0XRhaLa080fcd5r5t?si=FtX72MazTO2OqkGQrPw6EQ
Moms Mabley was brilliant at disrupting the status quo with perfectly portioned bits of truth. It is the recipe of so many Black mothers, aunties, and grandmothers. Closeted geniuses, with disarming side glances, glints of spiritual insight, and easy laughs filled with ancient discernment. We have a wealth of funny in our families and Moms Mabley showed it to the world. Dressed as a toothless grandmother - using the force and bravery of her own grandmother as inspiration - she disarmed the world with edgy comedic perfection. One-liners distilled in hard times. Loaded.  Waiting for just a minute of airtime to kill. Quick wit is survival. Moms Mabley survived the unsurvivable by becoming the funniest woman on the planet.  Let’s learn her magic. Join GirlTrek’s Black History Bootcamp - 21 Cosmonauts at blackhistorybootcamp.com to receive specially curated emails with survival tips, speeches + dedicated songs to listen to for each episode. Together we will discover the stories of 21 women who were ahead of their time.Disclaimer: We do not own the rights to comedy except played during this broadcast. Original content can be found here:My First Psychotic Break | Tiffany Haddish:https://open.spotify.com/track/3ol1RDEHaxfmdQ0UnA0wq3?si=oQREg_2ZTjaFbDhSpjIs8Q
She was born free on October 26, 1775. Kidnapped at 7. Stuffed in the bowels of a ship named The Phillis and enslaved by a Bostonian family named the Wheatley's. So that is what they called her, Phillis Wheatley. They stole her body and her name, but they could not steal her mind. She mastered the English language in mere months. Then Greek and Latin too. A genius. She went on to become the first Black woman or man in America to publish a book. It was a book of poetry. But do not reduce her to that. “Sir, I have taken the freedom to address your Excellency...Your generosity, therefore, I presume, will pardon the attempt.” She was cold with it. In a letter to George Washington in 1775, this stolen daughter of Africa immediately took up the fight for liberty at the dawn of The American Revolution. Washington wrote her back, “Madame, Please come. Your humble servant, General Washington.” He needed her. The peoples’ support. She had it. She was only 19. Thomas Jefferson hated her because - well - he was a white supremacist. Plus, she was smarter than them all. Let’s talk about it...Join GirlTrek’s Black History Bootcamp - 21 Cosmonauts at blackhistorybootcamp.com to receive specially curated emails with survival tips, speeches + dedicated songs to listen to for each episode. Together we will discover the stories of 21 women who were ahead of their time.Disclaimer: We do not own the rights to the music or speech except played during this broadcast. Original content can be found here:Lost One | Jay-Z:https://open.spotify.com/track/0okle8WwEB3BIcmUPYxnFg?si=_2CZhP13TT63Nw85cGwaFAAudio Reading - On Imagination | Phillis Wheatley:https://youtu.be/fdrckHU52T0Talking about a revolution | Tracy Chapman:https://open.spotify.com/track/1yo16b3u0lptm6Cs7lx4AD?si=uv-9WqdlTraI9FG1QSBb6Q
Today we call the names of the women who do the work. The women who sit on committees, who write papers, edit publications, build coalitions, canvass neighborhoods, attend city council meetings, read and reread all the books. The women who study, learn, and then pass on the knowledge to the rest of us – so that there is a record of what has been and a strategy for a way forward. You too are dreamers and weavers. You are the idea makers. You are the bullhorns and today’s walk is for you. Tune in today as we discuss the Combahee River Collective. We are here because of them.  Join GirlTrek’s Black History Bootcamp - 21 Cosmonauts at blackhistorybootcamp.com to receive specially curated emails with survival tips, speeches + dedicated songs to listen to for each episode. Together we will discover the stories of 21 women who were ahead of their time.Disclaimer: We do not own the rights to the music played during this broadcast. Original content can be found here:River | Leon Bridges:https://open.spotify.com/track/3hhbDnFUb2bicI2df6VurK?si=c2a98337c6de4418I'll Take You There | The Staples Singers:https://open.spotify.com/track/5YLnfy7R2kueN0BRPkjiEG?si=93dda173da204287
Hold the presses doggonit. Ain’t no way. Ain’t no waaaay! It’s Harriet Tubman Day!  Congress designated today, March 10th which is the day our foremother died in 1915, as a commemorative holiday. (Should we start a petition to make it a federal holiday? Like Veterans’ Day?...to honor the sacrifices and labor of Black women?  I ain’t playing. Think about it. Let's start by supporting this petition to accelerate the printing of Harriet Tubman’s portrait on the $20 bill!). Tune in today for a lively conversation and a special edition of Black History Bootcamp. We will break down 10 little-known facts about Harriet Tubman and will issue a very special call to action on how you can become the Harriet of your neighborhood this summer with GirlTrek. I promise you won’t want to miss this.Join GirlTrek’s Black History Bootcamp - 21 Cosmonauts at blackhistorybootcamp.com to receive specially curated emails with survival tips, speeches + dedicated songs to listen to for each episode. Together we will discover the stories of 21 women who were ahead of their time.Disclaimer: We do not own the rights to the music played during this broadcast. Original content can be found here:Stand up (From Harriet) | Cynthia Erivohttps://open.spotify.com/track/3wNNbf63xkxw9rIVWtFy7a?si=VF3436vDQ0OfdghxZ63EywCrown | Chika:https://open.spotify.com/track/7yewACUEo8jX7oLhSaNzBs?si=XVsV6HY7Sv2wg88d5ih17A
They tried to intimidate her. Tried to demonize her. Tried to silence her voice. They tried to do the same thing that they try and do with most young Black girl geniuses in this world – extinguish our fire. But, Sister Souljah could not be stopped. She spoke truth to power. Gave voice to generations of young Black youth, and continues to organize against systems of power and oppression. Today’s walk is a celebration. A virtual parade down the main street of every hood in America to honor the brilliance that comes from within. If you don’t know the story of Sister Souljah, if you don’t understand her impact, then you must learn with us today. In real-time let’s write the history that we want our daughters to know. Join GirlTrek’s Black History Bootcamp - 21 Cosmonauts at blackhistorybootcamp.com to receive specially curated emails with survival tips, speeches + dedicated songs to listen to for each episode. Together we will discover the stories of 21 women who were ahead of their time.Disclaimer: We do not own the rights to the music or speech except played during this broadcast. Original content can be found here:The Hate The Hate Produced | Sister Soulja:https://youtu.be/neNboHZ3paQThat one time when Sister Souljah schooled Cornel West:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JokCT0CAkE8Fight the Power | Public Enemy:https://open.spotify.com/track/1yo16b3u0lptm6Cs7lx4AD?si=uv-9WqdlTraI9FG1QSBb6Q
Let’s face it. Any time anyone mentions the name Nefertiti, we all picture the beautiful Iman in the Remember the Time video - or maybe you immediately go to the gold-plated knocker earrings that celebrate her glorious profile. ...but what do we reeeeally know about the Queen? Tune in today to learn exactly why there was a Nefertiti revival in every Black neighborhood in America circa 1991, precisely 3,000 years after her dramatic death in ancient Egypt. Roll your shoulders back and adjust your crown queens, this tribute Walk & Talk is going to be gooood.Join GirlTrek’s Black History Bootcamp - 21 Cosmonauts at blackhistorybootcamp.com to receive specially curated emails with survival tips, speeches + dedicated songs to listen to for each episode. Together we will discover the stories of 21 women who were ahead of their time.Disclaimer: We do not own the rights to the music or speech except played during this broadcast. Original content can be found here:Rebirth of Slick (Cool Like Dat) | Digable Planets:https://bit.ly/3sSUz7THow Many Mics | The Fugees:https://open.spotify.com/track/2lOnbK3gm1N6keYkUD3mis?si=cuTVy2QVRm6HcPfLjUT0LA
The original. Before Nikki, before Cardi, before Kim. Long before Young M.A. was seducing women out of their Fashion Nova, and Meg made that congressman clutch his pearls over WAP, there was Gladys Bentley. An open lesbian, a cross-dressing performer whose raunchy act and lewd lyrics were both the talk of the town and the hottest ticket around. A darling of the Harlem Renaissance, Gladys Bentley was once the richest Black woman in America. A blues singer who got her start singing at rent parties, she was a woman brave enough to love and live as she wanted - until the politics of the time and a brutal system of oppression, that has denied so many of us the opportunity to live in our truth, forced her back into the margins.Our stories are complex. Difficult. Not always redeemable to those who live in the black and white. Not always deemed worthy to be told if not pristine or above reproach. But not in this space. Here, amongst a tribe of women who come bearing our own scars, we make space for every story. And today we tell the story of Gladys, because it is spectacular and because it serves as inspiration for those who will come after her to plant their own flags in planets yet discovered. Can’t wait to walk with you today. Tune in live. This one will be worth it. Join GirlTrek’s Black History Bootcamp - 21 Cosmonauts at blackhistorybootcamp.com to receive specially curated emails with survival tips, speeches + dedicated songs to listen to for each episode. Together we will discover the stories of 21 women who were ahead of their time.Disclaimer: We do not own the rights to the music  played during this broadcast. Original content can be found here:Worried Blues | Gladys Bentleyhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ptIBk2PZK74 Back to the Streets | Saweetiehttps://open.spotify.com/track/3MEruRteiUZXkStfTlZqRn?si=Qrepmax0TcuH4odrXBeeRw
Her mother told her that she was singing before she could hold her head up. Calling at birth. An air bender. And on any given Sunday, if you walk through the right neighborhood at precisely the right time, you’ll hear it. ...just behind the smell of fresh laundry and the sizzle of Sazón, you feel it coming. "¡Azúuucar!" Every sound system must bow. The clap of her voice is more ancient than the rivers of Benin. Celia Cruz gave us pathways home. She was our clave, the pulse of our diaspora, our mother's lullaby, and Oya’s cry. “The Queen of Salsa'' stoked our collective imaginations and taught us to fly. And for that, we dedicate today’s walk to this cultural cosmonaut. Join GirlTrek’s Black History Bootcamp - 21 Cosmonauts at blackhistorybootcamp.com to receive specially curated emails with survival tips, speeches + dedicated songs to listen to for each episode. Together we will discover the stories of 21 women who were ahead of their time.Disclaimer: We do not own the rights to the music or speech except played during this broadcast. Original content can be found here:Quimbara - Zaire, Africa 1974 | Celia Cruz & The Fania All Stars: https://bit.ly/3sSUz7TBemba Colora Live | Celia Cruz:https://open.spotify.com/track/4fn2fJjnuu5vxR2sRw5D5t?si=fcVlBk4HTsSGBm6C40vLSA
This is the story that you need today. A royal story. A queen story. A story about taking up space, owning your gifts, and using your voice. A story about overcoming the worst to become the best to ever do it.  A history lesson on courage. A demonstration on Blackness. A journey through the life of the greatest singer of all time. This is the story of Aretha Franklin. Ain’t no way (ha!) you'll listen without getting your whole life. There is so much to be said and so much to learn from this woman who came holding a gift from God and used it to transform the world.Join GirlTrek’s Black History Bootcamp - 21 Cosmonauts at blackhistorybootcamp.com to receive specially curated emails with survival tips, speeches + dedicated songs to listen to for each episode. Together we will discover the stories of 21 women who were ahead of their time.Disclaimer: We do not own the rights to the music or speech except played during this broadcast. Original content can be found here:RESPECT | Aretha Franklin:https://open.spotify.com/track/7s25THrKz86DM225dOYwnr?si=x8NB7U_tTQSs5R2MN_83xADay Dreaming | Aretha Franklin:https://open.spotify.com/track/7L4G39PVgMfaeHRyi1ML7y?si=eq6zDjvwRJKXAySCyPeavw
She was mesmerizing. The very embodiment of liberation. Sexual...Political. Financial. Free... Josephine Baker taught desire to a colonized world. Her face, a masterclass. And her body - a disruption. At the dawn of silent films, her success rang in a renaissance, the jazz age - modernity itself. French women literally hurt themselves trying to achieve the Josephine Baker look. Shellacked hair. Copper skin. She was the most photographed woman in the world. And the most highly paid. A global superstar, yet - when she came home -Time Magazine called her a “buck-toothed negro wench.”  Never tolerate less than you deserve - she never did. Josephine Baker renounced her citizenship from America at the height of Jim Crow, refused to sing in front of segregated audiences, and once made a citizen's arrest of a white man in a dinner who was uncomfortable with her Blackness. Never settle. Be bigger, wilder, funnier, fuller, smarter, and more you. So today, we go beyond her banana skirt to understand exactly how Josephine Baker lived bravely. So bravely that Hitler’s Gestapo raided her home. So bravely that she earned the highest military honor in France. Josephine Baker was a war hero, an icon, a fearless Black woman. Truly free.  And for that, her name should be written in the stars. We dedicate today’s walk to her.Join GirlTrek’s Black History Bootcamp - 21 Cosmonauts at blackhistorybootcamp.com to receive specially curated emails with survival tips, speeches + dedicated songs to listen to for each episode. Together we will discover the stories of 21 women who were ahead of their time.Disclaimer: We do not own the rights to the music played during this broadcast. Original content can be found here:Desperado | Rihanna:https://open.spotify.com/track/4mCf3vQf7z0Yseo0RxAi3V?si=HLya96QwTqarM4EhTsmjUwSavage Remix | Megan Thee Stallion Ft. Beyoncehttps://open.spotify.com/track/5v4GgrXPMghOnBBLmveLac?si=Tp07x_ihTkm--JVpPpSifQ
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Comments (1)

MCJ

Yesssss Miss Lorraine!!! Thank you Girl Trek xoxoxo

Mar 18th
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