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Hardcore Humanism with Dr. Mike
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Hardcore Humanism with Dr. Mike

Author: Dr. Mike

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Clinical psychologist and life coach, Dr. Mike Friedman delves deep with free-thinkers: musicians, artists, activists, writers and others who have broken free from societal and cultural expectations and have overcome obstacles to pursue their passion and purpose. Let their stories inspire and motivate your own journey to self-discovery.
45 Episodes
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Linda Perry

Linda Perry

2021-06-2122:18

Today on The Hardcore Humanism Podcast we are talking with the musician, singer-songwriter, entrepreneur and philanthropist Linda Perry. Now, many of you know Linda as the leader of the band Four Non-Blondes and their big hit “What’s Up.” And for years, Linda has also been a prolific songwriter for other artists, writing hit songs like “Get The Party Started,” which was performed by Pink and “Beautiful” performed by Christina Aguilera. Linda has been such an accomplished songwriter that in 2015 she was inducted into the Songwriters Hall of Fame. Most recently, Linda has partnered with the Repost by SoundCloud marketing and distribution platform to develop independent artists. And she just helped curate the Rock and Relief concert series to raise money for CORE (Community Organized Relief Effort), a non-profit organization dedicated to crisis response, including providing access to COVID vaccines and testing during the pandemic.Over the years, as I heard about everything Linda is doing, the word that always came to my mind was empowerment. It was always so impressive to recognize that she just kept working and in so many different ways, on so many different levels. And in the Hardcore Humanism therapy and coaching program, our goal is to empower you to find your purpose, and work hard to achieve that purpose so that you can lead a fulfilling and authentic life. And when I hear about someone like Linda, I think, that’s exactly the type of person we want on The Hardcore Humanism Podcast, so we can learn some of the nuances of how someone like Linda is able to be so consistently be productive and purpose-driven over the course of decades in her career.There’s so much that we can take away from the conversation with Linda, but there are three major things I wanted to highlight. The first is that Linda describes how regardless of whatever barrier she faces, she is determined to keep going. And this is so important when we are pursuing a purpose-driven life. The results we want may or may not always happen, but we have to keep putting in the effort to give ourselves the best chance to achieve our goals. Second, we talk about how even though Linda is a hard charger, and really kicks ass in her career, she tries not to lose sight of one of the most important things that drives an artist and philanthropist, which is empathy.  And so, we hope that as people become the Hardcore Humans they want to be, they are understanding and empathic rather than critical and judgmental of others wherever they are on their journey.And finally, and perhaps relatedly, Linda talks about one of the unfortunate downsides of being a driven and high achieving person. As we push ourselves to succeed, we can run the risk of that enthusiasm and drive turning into self-criticism and despair if we don’t achieve our goals. But we hope that just as you are understanding and empathic with others, you are similarly gentle and kind with yourself as you pursue your life goals.*****Newsletter: https://lp.constantcontactpages.com/su/GBmf0iU/HardcoreHumanismSignUpInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/hardcorehumanism/Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/HardcoreHumanism/Twitter: https://twitter.com/hardcorhumanismLinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/hardcore-humanism
Tim Booth of James

Tim Booth of James

2021-06-0751:27

What’s up Hardcore Humans! This week on The Hardcore Humanism Podcast we are talking with musician, singer songwriter Tim Booth of the band James. James has a new album out now called All The Colours of You. And one of the themes addressed in this album is how we understand and cope with existential angst or fear of death. And this fear can be such a powerful force in people’s lives, to the point where it’s overwhelming. In the worst cases it can cause us to worry constantly, panic and even fall into depression as we struggle with the concept of death. During our conversation, Booth talks about this issue in a couple of ways. First, he talks about managing existential angst in terms of pursuing his music. And one of the things Tim describes is the importance of improvisation and getting into a state of flow as he and his band create new music and perform. Tim also discusses how he has spent a great deal of his life exploring different methods of coping with feelings like anxiety or depression that may emerge from existential angst. Tim shares his experiences using therapy, meditation, dance and psychedelic drugs under the guidance of a shaman as ways of exploring his emotions and beliefs in his ongoing process of evolving and growing. One of the most important takeaways that we can have in our own exploration of a fear of death is that there are many possible ways that we can cope. There are medications, therapies, thoughts and behaviors that all may play a role in our unique exploration and management of our fear. And this can be an ongoing process in our life as we pursue our purpose. The key is to be open-minded to different options and see which approach works best for each of us, and which makes us feel that we are living our best and most authentic life. *****Newsletter: https://lp.constantcontactpages.com/su/GBmf0iU/HardcoreHumanismSignUpInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/hardcorehumanism/Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/HardcoreHumanism/Twitter: https://twitter.com/hardcorhumanismLinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/hardcore-humanism 
This week on The Hardcore Humanism Podcast we are talking with musician, singer and songwriter Tim McIlrath of the punk rock band Rise Against. Rise Against is known for being very outspoken on a range of social justice issues such as animal rights and environmentalism. One of the themes of their new album Nowhere Generation is the disparities that exist in our society.  There are intense disparities that exist in this world for people based on race, gender, sexual orientation, religion and economic resources. So not everyone gets the same access to education, health care, jobs, healthy food and clean air among other things. One of the core principles of humanism and humanistic psychology is that all people have value, and it is our job as individuals and as a society to help people realize their potential in life. So these disparities that exist run counter to what we hope for in a humanistic society. And then the question is when we face these types of disparities – and we see that there are systems in place that interfere with our ability and the ability of others to achieve purpose in life, what do we do?McIlrath talks about addressing the issue of disparity on two fronts. The first is the concept of agency – empowering people to find their purpose in life and work to achieve it no matter what obstacles they face. This is a very core tenet of punk rock – the idea that our ideas, hopes and dreams matter, even if we are marginalized in some way. And the second front McIlrath talks about is taking on the system – identifying and challenging the structures that exist that interfere with people having equal opportunity to live the lives they want. And what’s particularly important is that we can do both. We can work both to find the agency to build the life we want and to change the system and structures that hold people back. And these concepts that McIlrath discusses are so very much in line with core humanistic principles – that everyone has value. And it is our goal as individuals to work towards our purpose in life and to help others do the same.*****Newsletter: https://lp.constantcontactpages.com/su/GBmf0iU/HardcoreHumanismSignUpInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/hardcorehumanism/Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/HardcoreHumanism/Twitter: https://twitter.com/hardcorhumanismLinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/hardcore-humanism
Paula Cole

Paula Cole

2021-05-1742:44

This week on The Hardcore Humanism Podcast we have Grammy Award winning musician, singer, songwriter and producer Paula Cole. You may know Paula from some of her greatest hits such as “Where Have All The Cowboys Gone” and “I Don’t Want To Wait.” And Paula has a new album out May 21st called American Quilt that you can preorder now.One of the most important principles of humanistic psychology is the fundamental value of human beings and the hope that they will self-actualize, meaning that they find their authentic purpose and achieve it. And one of the most important things that we try to do as humanistic therapists is to remove the barriers that interfere with someone finding their authentic self. And unfortunately, a very powerful force that interferes with people pursuing their purpose in life is stereotyping. Over the course of her career and life, Cole has consistently written and spoken out about the harmful effects of sexism in our society. And in our conversation, Cole talks in particular about how sexism has interfered with her ability to find her authentic voice both personally and professionally. Cole explained how she understands and confronts this bias. And one of the things that was really interesting to hear about was what Paula refers to as her “jazz self.” And that is something that is a deep and enduring yearning to be improvisational. It is a drive to explore new forms of expression and ways of looking at the world. It’s the exact opposite of the limits that stereotypes and bias have put on her. And if we can take a cue from our favorite artists like Cole and think about how we can be open-minded and creative in our own life, we can challenge the biases that others have for us as we shatter barriers and pursue our purpose in life.*****Newsletter: https://lp.constantcontactpages.com/su/GBmf0iU/HardcoreHumanismSignUpInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/hardcorehumanism/Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/HardcoreHumanism/Twitter: https://twitter.com/hardcorhumanismLinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/hardcore-humanism
This week on The Hardcore Humanism Podcast we are talking with musician, vocalist and songwriter Myles Kennedy. You may know Myles best as the lead vocalist and guitarist for the hard rock band Alter Bridge, as well as the vocalist on all of guitar legend Slash’s solo records. And now Myles has his own solo album out on May 14th called The Ides of March.One path to leading a healthy and happy life is the ability to identify and pursue our purpose. And ideally, a purpose-driven life can be fulfilling in and of itself, even if we don’t achieve all of our tangible goals. The fulfillment and satisfaction come from having a purpose and putting a process into place to strive for it so that we can live a life that is authentic to us.That being said, we are still human beings and if we have a specific goal in mind, it can be frustrating if we don’t see results immediately. In fact, one of the biggest barriers to achieving our purpose in life is when we assume that it should take a specific amount of time, or happen in a certain way. But oftentimes it can take years, or even an entire lifetime to achieve our specific goals. And we need to accept that while our effort to pursue our purpose must remain strong and consistent, the attainment of a specific goal may take longer than we’d expected or hoped.Which brings us to Myles Kennedy. What was interesting about my conversation with Myles is that he exudes rock star – he’s a handsome guy, has a fantastic voice and is a great guitar player. So, to be honest I naturally assumed that things worked out for him kind of quickly. But in our conversation, Myles explained how it took him years to build a career in music. And during that time, he often questioned whether things would work out for him as he had hoped professionally.But Myles talks about how he was able to work through his self-doubt to pursue his purpose in music -- a really interesting and exciting concept that he calls “soul investing.” And what Myles is talking about is the perseverance that we need when we pursue our purpose – that investment we make in our authentic self over time. And this is not easy, as the tangible rewards don’t come immediately. But we have to constantly be asking ourselves as Myles did, “How badly do we want it?” And that soul investment will not only make it more likely that we will achieve our purpose-driven goals, but also give is a feeling of fulfillment no matter what the outcome.*****Newsletter: https://lp.constantcontactpages.com/su/GBmf0iU/HardcoreHumanismSignUpInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/hardcorehumanism/Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/HardcoreHumanism/Twitter: https://twitter.com/hardcorhumanismLinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/hardcore-humanism
Nancy Wilson of Heart

Nancy Wilson of Heart

2021-05-0428:49

Today on The Hardcore Humanism Podcast, we are talking with musician, vocalist and songwriter Nancy Wilson - founding member of the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame inducted band Heart. Heart gave us such amazing songs as “Magic Man,” “Barracuda,” “Crazy On You,” “Never,” “Alone” and “These Dreams.” And now Nancy is coming out with her first solo album titled You And Me.The title track on the album, “You and Me,” is Nancy’s tribute to her late mother, Lois, who struggled with Alzheimer’s. During our conversation, Nancy recalled her family's wartime experiences and drew similarities between this past year with the pandemic and life during a war. She spoke with great admiration and love for her mother. In one story, she shares how her mother took Nancy, at age 2, and her siblings, both 4 years old, on a ship to Taiwan where her father was stationed as a Marine. She described how the ship had no rails and this became a metaphor for Nancy in understanding the strength of her mother and the safety she always provided. One of the most difficult things about life is that at times it feels like there are no rails. And when we feel that vulnerability, we often turn to people we love to provide that comfort and security as they help us pursue our purpose in life. A core principle of humanistic psychology is that to find fulfillment we must seek to self-actualize or become the best version of ourselves as we pursue our purpose. Albert Maslow hypothesized that in order to reach self-actualization, we must first satisfy our “love and belonging” needs. Ironically, as we build connections to gain that sense of love and belonging, we must also simultaneously risk losing them whether through breakup, distance or death. However, in this album, Nancy shares with us how her relationship with her mother is still something that comforts her and drives her in her life, music and purpose. During our conversation, Nancy describes how she still feels her mother’s presence in her life. She talks about how a loved one’s energy never stops and is not gone, but rather continues like “ripples on the water.” And those ripples reverberate throughout time and our lives, still providing us that comfort in a life with no rails.*****Newsletter: https://lp.constantcontactpages.com/su/GBmf0iU/HardcoreHumanismSignUpInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/hardcorehumanism/Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/HardcoreHumanism/Twitter: https://twitter.com/hardcorhumanismLinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/hardcore-humanism
Today on The Hardcore Humanism Podcast, we are talking with Adam Weiner – vocalist, musician and songwriter for the band Low Cut Connie. During quarantine, Adam and Low Cut Connie have been live streaming a show called Tough Cookies, a combination of a talk show, concert series and support group for people during the pandemic. And the show has been so successful and had so many great performances that they are putting out an album of the cover songs they performed during the broadcast called Tough Cookies: The Best of the Quarantine Broadcasts. The album will arrive May 19th, and is available to preorder digitally and on CD and vinyl.One of the reasons that Low Cut Connie’s music so compelling is that Weiner will often write songs about or from the perspective of people who have been marginalized or “forgotten” in our society. Weiner points out in our discussion that much of our society seems to glorify celebrity, wealth or mainstream social status at the expense of people who do not fit into one of those exalted categories. And this process emerges at a very young age, where it feels as though the world is made up of “cool” kids and not so cool kids. The cool kids get rewarded with popularity and having the attention and admiration of other kids and maybe even teachers and parents. They get the benefit of the doubt if they do something wrong. And there’s a sense, either implicitly or even explicitly that we should all try to be one of the cool kids, or at least participate in the admiration.One of the key goals humanistic psychotherapy is to provide people who may feel marginalized with the unconditional positive regard that they need in order to push back against those societal pressures. And by pushing back, people can often come to understand who they really are and what they want to do in their life. One of the biggest barriers that we face is trying to be authentic in the face of so many pressures to be otherwise.And what Adam talks about was how he recognized that he didn’t want to conform and be cool in that sense of the word. And when choosing his friends, he gravitated towards people who were more on the fringes. As Adam got older, he was able to dig deeper into the ways that he felt uncool and marginalized. He not only expressed this in his art and performances, but he also found a community of likeminded people who similarly rejected conventional notions of cool in favor of more individuality and authenticity. And Adam’s lesson is crucial for anyone who has felt marginalized, stigmatized or "uncool."*****Newsletter: https://lp.constantcontactpages.com/su/GBmf0iU/HardcoreHumanismSignUpInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/hardcorehumanism/Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/HardcoreHumanism/Twitter: https://twitter.com/hardcorhumanismLinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/hardcore-humanism
This week on The Hardcore Humanism Podcast  we are talking with Marc Labelle, vocalist of the hard rock band Dirty Honey. In 2019, Dirty Honey became the first unsigned band ever to be #1 on Billboard’s Mainstream Rock chart with their song “When I’m Gone.” In our discussion, Labelle talks very specifically about his purpose and what has guided a lot of his decision making, which is a passion for music. There is mounting evidence that people who have a strong sense of purpose experience improved physical and emotional health. A strong sense of purpose can also be the key to self-actualization – or the complete realization of one’s potential -- a concept that humanistic theorists such as Albert Maslow feel represent the essence of thriving as a human being. Thus, understanding how we can discover and nurture a strong sense of purpose may be an important pathway towards optimal health and well-being.Labelle shares the story of how he went to California with no job, no home, and no band to pursue his passion for music. And for a long period of time, he lived in his car or on friends’ porches to get by. During this time, he was able to build a schedule that reflected his needs not just to survive but also to pursue his music career, including songwriting, band practice and playing shows. What makes Labelle’s and Dirty Honey’s accomplishments thus far even more impressive is that they are doing everything without a record label, which means that he and his band are engaged in a great deal of the business of the band that is often handled by a record label. They are an independent band that is building from the ground up – and having great success so far.And all the while, what guides Labelle’s decisions – including who he wants in his band and as supportive people around him -- is a passion for music. That is the glue for him. He needs to be in a band with and surrounded by people who support that passion he feels and his purpose in music. And when we have that purpose – that commitment to something that feels bigger than ourselves – it can help us overcome adversity whether living in our car or trying to become rock stars as an independent band.*****Newsletter: https://lp.constantcontactpages.com/su/GBmf0iU/HardcoreHumanismSignUpInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/hardcorehumanism/Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/HardcoreHumanism/Twitter: https://twitter.com/hardcorhumanismLinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/hardcore-humanism
This week on The Hardcore Humanism Podcast, we talk with musician, vocalist and songwriter William Duvall. Many people know Duvall as a member of the legendary rock band Alice in Chains. Duvall has been in the band for over a decade, during which time they put out albums such as Black Gives Way To Blue, The Devil Put Dinosaurs Here, and Rainier Fog. But before he joined Alice In Chains, Duvall was in several previous bands, including being a founding member of the Atlanta hardcore punk rock band Neon Christ. And Duvall has just revealed that Neon Christ is reissuing a deluxe release of the band’s material from 1984 – a co-release between Southern Lord and DVL Recordings to celebrate Record Store Day (June 12th).This deluxe release was a wonderful opportunity for Duvall to share the story of how Neon Christ was formed and the obstacles he, his friends and band mates faced to realize their dream. And one of the most notable features of that story was the sheer determination that Duvall and Neon Christ showed in order to achieve their goals. The term “determination” can be defined as being resolved to carry out one’s purpose in life. Research suggests that people who have a stronger sense of purpose have increased longevity and healthier behaviors as well as increased work productivity and improved emotional coping. TDuvall pursued his hardcore punk purpose with Neon Christ in 1980’s Atlanta Georgia when there was barely any kind of punk rock scene. Duvall discovered his need to express himself authentically. And despite having no initial support, Duvall shares how he pursued this purpose through a singular focus on working hard to form Neon Christ and build a broad community of like-minded people. And while Duvall is now a full-fledged rock star in a legendary band, achieving both commercial and critical success, one of the most notable things about his journey with Neon Christ was how he dedicated himself to his purpose before having any sense that it would be “successful” in the conventional sense. We may not all become big-time rock stars. But if we pursue our passion, work hard to achieve it and build a supportive community around us, we can find excitement and fulfillment like we heard from Duvall.*****Newsletter: https://lp.constantcontactpages.com/su/GBmf0iU/HardcoreHumanismSignUpInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/hardcorehumanism/Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/HardcoreHumanism/Twitter: https://twitter.com/hardcorhumanismLinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/hardcore-humanism
What’s up Hardcore Humans! Today on the Hardcore Humanism Podcast we are talking with Sean Long – guitarist and founding member of the metalcore band While She Sleeps. Metalcore is an intense genre of music that combines heavy metal and hardcore punk. While She Sleeps has been making fantastic metalcore music for 15 years, and they have a new album coming out called Sleeps Society. The album includes the track, “You Are All You Need,” a song that Loudwire just raved, “is more proof that While She Sleeps are defining the current era of metalcore.”The theme of the song “You Are All You Need” and the topic of the conversation with Long is validation. Specifically, how we can provide ourselves with the validation we need in our life rather than rely on other people to provide that validation. When we feel validated we feel more centered and sure of how we feel and who we are. Emotional validation becomes a strong basis upon which to build a sense of purpose and work for the life we want. But if we do not receive the validation we need, over time we start to doubt our sense of our own reality, become disconnected from who we are and our purpose in life. In extreme cases it gets to the point where we feel nullified – like we don’t matter as human beings.During my conversation with Long, we explore the dangers of relying on external validation. And he shares the story of one of their shows where the attendance was far less than expected or hoped for. He was able to validate his feeling of being disappointed. It’s natural as you’re building your career in music to want as many people as possible at a show. And by validating his feelings, Long talked about how he was able to then connect to his music in that moment and just concentrate on playing the best show he could, regardless of how many people were there. So, take the external validation when it comes – allow yourself to feel good about it. And always do your best to build a community to support you. And always remember that your emotions and purpose are your own – it can neither be fully validated by others, nor can it ever be taken away. Connect with yourself, your purpose, and how you want to work hard to build the life you want no matter who is in your corner at a given point. And give yourself that internal validation you need to build the life you want.So, let’s check out what Long has to say!*****Newsletter: https://lp.constantcontactpages.com/su/GBmf0iU/HardcoreHumanismSignUpInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/hardcorehumanism/Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/HardcoreHumanism/Twitter: https://twitter.com/hardcorhumanismLinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/hardcore-humanism
Hopsin

Hopsin

2021-03-3029:44

What’s up Hardcore Humans! Today on The Hardcore Humanism Podcast we talk with Hip Hop artist Hopsin. As an artist he has written, performed, and produced many singles, mixtapes and albums, including the “Ill Mind of Hopsin” song and video series. Hopsin is also the founder of the record label and merch line Undercover Prodigy. During this conversation, we talk with Hopsin about how he charted his own path to becoming an independent artist and entrepreneur.And specifically, we talk with Hopsin about how he needed to be an independent thinker in order to find his unique path to pursuing his professional goals. Unfortunately, sometimes having an independent mind isn’t necessarily easy or comfortable. Often, people who are independent and divergent thinkers – whether they are innovative in art, science or business – are discouraged from their path because it clashes with familial expectation or norms in a society. Unfortunately, many of us succumb to this pressure and do in fact become discouraged from pursuing our purpose in life.During our conversation, Hopsin focuses on how he was able to chart his own path by being artistically creative and innovative in his business model. In order to do so, Hopsin had to do something which is often very difficult – keep focused on his sense of purpose – which was to make great music and reach his fans, rather than on only achieving an intermediate step such as being signed to a major label. And as Hopsin was developing his music and stage performance, he was also examining which business models worked best to connect with his fans. Ultimately, Hopsin decided to create his own independent label – Undercover Prodigy – to serve as the vehicle for sharing his music and developing his other entrepreneurial ventures. Further, Hopsin explained how he was able to build a business culture around him that supported rather than hindered his professional goals. Whatever our career and personal paths may be, musician or not, we can learn lessons from Hopsin’s experiences that we can apply to charting our own unique life course.*****Newsletter: https://lp.constantcontactpages.com/su/GBmf0iU/HardcoreHumanismSignUpInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/hardcorehumanism/Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/HardcoreHumanism/Twitter: https://twitter.com/hardcorhumanismLinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/hardcore-humanism
Neil Fallon of Clutch

Neil Fallon of Clutch

2021-03-2329:56

This week on The Hardcore Humanism Podcast we talked with Neil Fallon – founding member, vocalist and songwriter of the legendary rock band Clutch. In a review of Clutch’s album Book of Bad Decisions (2018), Rolling Stone describes Clutch’s music as “bluesy, riff-centric hard rock with hints of psychedelia and punk, topped off by the gravelly roar of wildly charismatic front man Neil Fallon.” And yet as compelling as Clutch’s music is, one of the most striking qualities of the band is that Clutch has not only retained the same band members for thirty years, but they have also built one of the most passionate and devoted fan bases in rock music. When people talk about Clutch it goes way beyond music they love. They talk about Clutch as the soundtrack of their lives – and remember some of the most important moments in their lives as they relate to Clutch albums and shows. Even for those of us who are not in a band, there’s a lot to be learned from Fallon and Clutch about how to build a supportive community around us. Because one of the most important things that we can all do in our quest to develop a fulfilling and purpose-driven life is to build a culture around us that supports our hopes, our dreams – our vision of who we are and what we want to achieve. Hardcore Humanism therapy and coaching has its foundation in Humanistic psychology. And humanistic psychologists such as Albert Maslow have posited that in order to lead a self-actualized life, we must build strong social connections. And decades of research supports the notion that having a strong social support network predicts improved physical and mental health. And yet while we have ample evidence that a strong support network improves our health and well-being, most of us aren’t sure of how to go about building a community around us that is optimal for our needs. And while Fallon acknowledges that he and the band did not consciously orchestrate the connection the band has with its fans, he was able to retrospectively point to some possible factors that contributed to their unique and loyal relationship. We hope that as you check out what Fallon has to say, you can apply lessons from his life to yours and learn to build strong, supportive social networks that will help you achieve your own life’s purpose!*****Newsletter: https://lp.constantcontactpages.com/su/GBmf0iU/HardcoreHumanismSignUpInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/hardcorehumanism/Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/HardcoreHumanism/Twitter: https://twitter.com/hardcorhumanismLinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/hardcore-humanism
What’s up Hardcore Humans! This week on The Hardcore Humanism Podcast I was thrilled to talk with Jacoby Shaddix – founding member, vocalist and songwriter of the band Papa Roach. Papa Roach has been making great music for over 25 years and have sold over 30 million albums. Papa Roach’s music has been classified as “nu metal” – a sub genre of heavy metal music that combines metal with other genres, including Hip Hop, Emo and Alternative Rock. Not only is Papa Roach considered one of the best nu metal bands of all time, but also their album Infest (2000) is considered one of the greatest nu metal albums of all time, and their song “Last Resort” is considered one of the greatest nu metal songs of all time. Pap Roach is celebrating their career with their greatest hits album Greatest Hits Volume 2 – the Better Noise Years.One of the core goals of humanistic approaches to psychotherapy is to provide a safe space for an individual to identify the various internal and external forces that interfere with their ability to self-actualize and live an authentic and purpose-driven life. Oftentimes, one such force is the negative judgment that we put on ourselves and that others put on us as we struggle. When we are self-critical, we judge ourselves with harsh negative thoughts that are demeaning rather than supportive.  Predictably, this self-criticism can be harmful, in part because people who are self-critical may not feel they deserve the care they need to treat their mental illness. Shaddix has been a strong and consistent mental health advocate, challenging the stigma of mental illness and supporting compassionate and kind treatment for people. And in our discussion, he explains his long history of struggling with depression and substance dependence, as well as the harsh self-criticism he engaged in that worsened his condition. Shaddix then also explained an alternative approach that he has been using where he engaged in more acceptance and forgiveness rather than harsh judgment and self-criticism. As we struggle to break through barriers on our purpose-driven path, we need to be respectful of ourselves and make sure we don’t lose sight of how difficult that struggle can be. This is what humanistic psychologists referred to as unconditional positive regard – whereby we don’t think of people as less human or less worthy of respect and support during difficult times.Once Shaddix was able to approach his depression and addiction with kindness rather than judgment and criticism, he was able to then take the next action steps that he needed to take care of himself during this tough time. This includes being open and honest with his bandmates, letting them know he needed some time to take care of himself. And he committed to a self-care routine that included prayer, reading, writing and meditation to help him stabilize.*****Newsletter: https://lp.constantcontactpages.com/su/GBmf0iU/HardcoreHumanismSignUpInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/hardcorehumanism/Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/HardcoreHumanism/Twitter: https://twitter.com/hardcorhumanismLinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/hardcore-humanism/
Today we are thrilled to be talking with Alan Robert, whom many of you know as the bassist/songwriter for the heavy metal band Life of Agony. And a few years back, Rolling Stone rated Life Of Agony’s River Runs Red album one of the greatest heavy metal albums of all time, which I appreciated as the song River Runs Red is one of my favorite songs of all time. And Alan is also the creator of the best selling coloring book series The Beauty of Horror and just announced the newest edition of the series, The Beauty of Horror 5: Haunt of Fame. Now at Hardcore Humanism, our goal is to help you apply some of the core principles of humanistic psychology so that you can break free from the conventions and expectations that others may put on you, or that you may put on yourself, find your purpose in life and work hard to achieve it. Alan has dedicated himself professionally to a lifetime of artistic expression and has had great success in different mediums. But one of the themes that cuts across much of Alan’s work is the exploration and embrace of horror. And so I wanted to talk with Alan about the psychology of horror as a genre and theme. And one of the reasons this concept is so important to Hardcore Humanism is because horror, whether in art, music, or film, is often dismissed as frightening, harmful and ultimately damaging, because it explores terrifying themes. And thus people who enjoy this art form are often stigmatized as somehow being damaged or dangerous. But for fans of horror, it is in fact the extreme nature of the art that ultimately can be a safe and healthy form of emotional validation, exploration and expression. And Alan’s ability to bring the energy and thematic content of horror into a very new medium – coloring books – gives perhaps an entirely new population an opportunity to safely understand and experience challenging emotions, while also challenging the stigma that horror and horror fans sometimes carry. *****Newsletter: https://lp.constantcontactpages.com/su/GBmf0iU/HardcoreHumanismSignUpInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/hardcorehumanism/Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/HardcoreHumanism/Twitter: https://twitter.com/hardcorhumanismLinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/hardcore-humanism/
Mod Sun

Mod Sun

2021-02-1049:19

This week we welcome singer-songwriter, multi-instrumentalist and visual artist, Mod Sun to  the Hardcore Humanism Podcast. Mod has a new solo album out called Internet Killed The Rockstar which can be preordered now and is set to release February 12, 2021.Now as a child of the 80’s, when I heard about Mod’s album, I immediately harkened back to my youth and watching the first video ever to appear on MTV - The Buggles song “Video Killed The Radio Star.” And what was so compelling about that song was that it was signaling to the world that there was a new era of how we think about and relate to music and our rock stars. Specifically, through the use of visual imagery and story-telling, musicians were now able to think of and present themselves in a more complex, multi-dimensional way. And this was another step in the ongoing evolution of how artists related to the world.And it was that same revolutionary spirit that drove the conversation Mod and I had, where he talked about how his own artistic path involves deconstructing and reconfiguring the definition of what it means to be a rock star. Specifically, Mod explained how the predominant definition of what it means to be a true “artist” was to push oneself – physically, emotionally – to the very edge in order to explore the outer limits of one’s creativity. As Mod points out, this lifestyle would often be done at the expense of one’s health and well-being, including drug use and working for days on end with little sleep. But Mod then went on to described expanding the concept of what it means to be a “rock star” to one where health and creativity are not at odds but are rather synergistic in building a sustainable and productive artistic career. Now at Hardcore Humanism, we try to apply the principles of humanistic psychology to help people find their purpose and work hard to achieve it. And one way of understanding Mod’s path is to consider it in the context of a theory of one of the founders of humanistic psychology – Albert Maslow. Maslow’s motivational theory called the “hierarchy of needs” often depicted as hierarchical levels within a pyramid. From the bottom of the hierarchy upwards, the needs are: physiological (food and clothing), safety (job security), love and belonging needs (friendship), esteem, and self-actualization. Needs lower down in the hierarchy must be satisfied before individuals can attend to needs higher up. Often, artists will bypass “safety” needs such as health and well-being in the pursuit of creativity. And consistent with Maslow’s theory, what Mod is saying is that for him, true self-actualization cannot be attained without first taking care of his safety needs through sobriety, sleep and exercise, as he simultaneously pursues his creative path. And just as there are many ways to be a rock star, there are many ways to be a spouse, parent, friend, family member, artist, entrepreneur, athlete or worker. Whatever your authentic path is, don’t let the expectations of others or the limits you may put on yourself dictate who you can be. *****Newsletter: https://lp.constantcontactpages.com/su/GBmf0iU/HardcoreHumanismSignUpInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/hardcorehumanism/Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/HardcoreHumanism/Twitter: https://twitter.com/hardcorhumanismLinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/hardcore-humanism/
John Carter Cash

John Carter Cash

2021-02-0423:05

What’s up Hardcore Humans! In this episode, we are thrilled to be talking with John Carter Cash. John is music royalty – the only child of the legendary Johnny Cash and June Carter Cash. John himself has worked for years as a music producer and has his own band, The Cash Collective, which recently put out a new album in 2020 called Hey Crow! Now for many of us, one of the first places from which we draw a sense of who we are as people is from our family. There are many ways that our family may influence how we see ourselves. That is because as we are figuring out who we are in the world. We are also figuring out who they are, how we feel about them and how they feel about us. Often, we feel that our parents represent a framework for understanding our own lives. And this framework can be constructive as our parents create the context for us to learn about ourselves, grow and thrive. But our parents can also be the first place where we feel that there are barriers in our life as they may have different ideas about who we should be and how we should live our life. As an example, a discrepancy between how we want to live our lives and what our parents want for us may manifest in criticism or even hostility. These processes can be very damaging and even leave us at risk for relapse if we struggle with mental illness.  And so, it’s often a balance to figure out how to appreciate, learn from and emulate our parents while also recognizing the ways that we want to live our lives that may be different from their expectations. Now this process can be complicated enough under more conventional circumstances. But when your parents are music legends it can become confusing as to how you see yourself in the world when they are such a huge part of it. And so, I was curious as to how this process played out for someone like John in his personal development as he explored and carved out his own identity.  One of the interesting insights that emerged from the conversation with John was how he feels that his parents helped him balance having humility while striving for success. There has been increasing interest in the role of humility as a construct that is associated with improved well-being. As an example, one nationwide survey of 3010 participants suggested that humility serves as a buffer – protecting us in part against the negative effects of stress on well-being. Now in developing our own identity and sense of purpose, many of us feel like we have to make a choice – be humble and limited in our ambitions or be somewhat arrogant – even if just privately -- and want to take over the world. And John really talks about another option, where one can continue to remain humble and grounded while having aspirations to do great things. In some ways that’s one of the best ways we can connect with ourselves – stay grounded in who we are while at the same time have an eye on using that very humility as an engine for striving to better ourselves and our lives.  *****Newsletter: https://lp.constantcontactpages.com/su/GBmf0iU/HardcoreHumanismSignUpInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/hardcorehumanism/Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/HardcoreHumanism/Twitter: https://twitter.com/hardcorhumanismLinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/hardcore-humanism/
This week on The Hardcore Humanism Podcast, we talk with Jake Luhrs, vocalist of the band August Burns Red. August Burns Red has a new album out called Guardians. In their review of the album, Kerrang! raves, “An explosion of airtight technicality gouged with deceptively infectious grooves … every moment maintains a pulse-pounding high. And they just dropped a brand-new video for the song “Standing in the Storm” which Loudwire called “hard hitting but heartfelt.”In addition to his music, Luhrs has launched YourLife Gym. It’s the first I’ve ever heard of this concept, which is a gym that focuses on both physical and mental health. So, in addition to the equipment, classes and trainers found in traditional gyms that focus on physical fitness, there are classes and trainers that focus on mental health including mindfulness classes and mental health coaching sessions. This is a really exciting innovation because we know that exercise is effective in helping to improve both physical and mental health. But we may be missing more of an opportunity to improve one’s well-being by not giving people who come to a gym the opportunity to work out their mind as well as their body. There is so much to take away from the conversation with Luhrs. One of the main issues that Jake discusses is that struggling with a mental health issue such as depression can spark a spiritual crisis. We can lose faith in everything – in ourselves, our friends, our family, the world around us and our higher power because nothing feels right and we have no hope that it ever will get better. And we lose faith in a world that could allow us to be in such severe emotional pain. As an example, one study of 122 participants from a sample of adult patients in an urban primary care clinic found that lower levels of spirituality such as belief in a higher power and importance of prayer were associated with higher levels of depression.  And it was really inspiring how with all of the stressors that Jake faced in his life, he never gave up trying to find his path to spirituality and purpose. He looked to music and his faith in a higher power and these helped him during his dark times. And he’s now living out that purpose with the YourLife gym where he helps people who also may be struggling. Jake’s path is consistent with a growing focus on the potential benefits of adding spiritual components to more conventional treatments for depression.A practical takeaway from Luhrs’ story is that sometimes when we feel that we are consumed by darkness, a way to let in a little light is to do one tangible kind thing for ourselves. Maybe talk with a trusted friend about our struggles, listen to music that helps us feel better or take up exercise to strengthen our body and boost our mood. And we can also look outside ourselves to be kind and helpful to others. That kindness may be what gets us through and what keeps our faith in ourselves and humanity. *****Sign up for the Hardcore Humanism Newsletter: https://lp.constantcontactpages.com/su/GBmf0iU/HardcoreHumanismSignUpFollow Hardcore Humanism: Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/hardcorehumanism/Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/HardcoreHumanism/Twitter: https://twitter.com/hardcorhumanismLinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/hardcore-humanism/
Dr. Mike talks with Heidi Shepherd and Carla Harvey of Butcher Babies about how they overcame marginalization in the form of sexism and racism. They also discuss overcoming the judgments of others about who they were and who they should be. Check out their new song, “Sleeping with the Enemy,” to be included in their fourth studio album scheduled for release in early 2021.*****Sign up for the Hardcore Humanism Newsletter: https://lp.constantcontactpages.com/su/GBmf0iU/HardcoreHumanismSignUpFollow Hardcore Humanism: Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/hardcorehumanism/Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/HardcoreHumanism/Twitter: https://twitter.com/hardcorhumanismLinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/hardcore-humanism/
Dennis DeYoung of Styx

Dennis DeYoung of Styx

2021-01-1238:29

Dr. Mike talks with Dennis DeYoung, solo artist and former front man of the progressive rock band Styx. Dennis recently released a new album 26 East Volume 1, and pandemic permitting will be touring to celebrate the 40th anniversary of the classic Styx album The Grand Illusion. Dennis talked about the hard realities of becoming a professional musician, how he was driven by a fear of failure, and whether success ultimately cured him of that fear. Sign up for the Hardcore Humanism Newsletter: https://lp.constantcontactpages.com/su/GBmf0iU/HardcoreHumanismSignUpFollow Hardcore Humanism: Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/hardcorehumanism/Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/HardcoreHumanism/Twitter: https://twitter.com/hardcorhumanismLinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/hardcore-humanism/
Des Rocs

Des Rocs

2020-12-1829:31

This week on The Hardcore Humanism Podcast we talked with singer, songwriter and musician Des Rocs. Des was originally in a band Secret Weapons, which was signed to Epic Records. Secret Weapons put out an album in 2016 and toured with bands such as Panic at the Disco, Fall Out Boy and Weezer. Des has now gone out on his own as a solo artist and has already toured with bands such as The Struts and Muse. And Des has a new EP out called This Is Our Life released on the 300 Entertainment record label.One of the most prominent themes of the conversation with Des was the transformative power of music in people’s lives. Des talked about how important music has been to him both on a personal level throughout his life, and more recently on a professional level in his chosen career path. And it’s not just any music; Des unabashedly embraces the power of big stadium rock music to inspire and motivate people.So Is Des right? Can big stadium rock change our lives for the better? Well for starters, Des describes how big rock star dreams have inspired him personally and professionally. For example, Des described how even when he was a new artist playing small venues, he approached the shows “thinking that I'm Bruce Springsteen playing to 80,000 people.” And that big stadium mentality seems to have paid off; none other than The Rolling Stones tapped Des to open for them at one of their shows on their stadium tour in 2019.To be sure, the power of music seems to be that it can be appreciated across many genres and in different ways. You can connect with music by listening to it, playing it, dancing to it, even talking or writing about it. So, what value does big stadium music have to offer? One possible line of research that may help elucidate the answer to that question is research on “awe.” Awe has been defined as a feeling of reverence and respect, mixed with a feeling of wonder. Research is investigating whether awe suggests that it might improve one’s sense of well-being.As stadiums are often described as “awe-inspiring,” we can begin to wonder whether the sense of awe that comes from large shows mimics the feeling that people have with experiences of nature and spirituality. Sign up for the Hardcore Humanism Newsletter: https://lp.constantcontactpages.com/su/GBmf0iU/HardcoreHumanismSignUpFollow Hardcore Humanism: Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/hardcorehumanism/Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/HardcoreHumanism/Twitter: https://twitter.com/hardcorhumanismLinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/hardcore-humanism/
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M Morr

dude your podcast us phenomenal. just what i needed.

Jan 14th
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