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What Could Possibly Go Right?
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What Could Possibly Go Right?

Author: Vicki Robin

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In this interview series sponsored by Post Carbon Institute, Vicki Robin, activist and best-selling author on sustainable living, talks with provocative thought leaders about emerging possibilities and ways humanity might step onto a better, post-pandemic path.
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Christabel Rose Reed is a yoga teacher, yoga therapist, and activist. She is on a mission to link inner transformation with social change and empower people to embark on the entwined journey of inner and outer healing.In 2015, Christabel and her sister Ruby founded Advaya, the London-based system change initiative that organizes around the principles of radical regeneration and joyful revolution. Since then they have launched a media platform called EarthSpace and organized over 150 events including full-day immersions, panel discussions, retreats, pilgrimages, circles, and festivals.Christabel addresses the question of “What Could Possibly Go Right?” with thoughts including:That we need to engage more with our imaginations, to look beyond the false solutions that are being presented to us, and to “envisage the kind of future that we know deep down we want and that we know are possible.”That “our understanding of what our purpose is has been shifted, because so much of our stability has gone” and despite that, we could “harness this opportunity, this pause, in order to co-create futures that can truly thrive.”That online events can bring together more speakers and audiences across geographic limitations, giving "accessibility to new narratives and new stories."That despite their benefits, online events can sever the deeper human connection and community building that comes from meeting in-person.That we should avoid feeling overwhelmed by large scale in systemic change, instead focussing on our own small impacts we can make.That "cultivating the love within us, for each other and for this incredible life that we've been blessed with" can create a different world of creativity, fearlessness, compassion and joy.Resources- Regenerative Activism: https://www.regenerativeactivism.com - EcoResolution: https://advaya.co/my-eco-resolution- Guardians of the Forest course: https://advaya.co/events/series/guardians-of-the-forest Connect with Christabel Rose ReedWebsite: https://advaya.co Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/christabelrosereedyogateacher Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/christabel_roseFollow WCPGR on Social MediaFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/WhatCouldPossiblyGoRightPodcast​Twitter: https://twitter.com/buildresilience​Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/buildresilienceJoin our Patreon Community to receive bonus conversations with guests and "backstage" conversations between Vicki and other podcast hosts: https://www.patreon.com/vickirobinLearn more: https://bit.ly/wcpgr-resSupport the show (https://www.patreon.com/vickirobin)
Richard Heinberg is an author, Senior Fellow-in-Residence of the Post Carbon Institute, and widely regarded as one of the world’s foremost educators on the need to transition society off fossil fuels. His forthcoming book, POWER: LIMITS AND PROSPECTS FOR HUMAN SURVIVAL is now available for pre-order.Since 2002, Richard has spoken to hundreds of public, government, and business audiences around the world, and has made countless appearances on radio and television. He is the award-winning author of fourteen books and a recipient of the Atlas Award for climate heroes (2012) and the M. King Hubbert Award for Excellence in Energy Education (2006).He addresses the question of “What Could Possibly Go Right?” with thoughts including:That there are many definitions of power - energy transfer, ability, authority, domination.That the adoption of fossil fuels was the most consequential event in human history – providing many benefits, but at enormous cost of climate change, resource depletion, pollution and crowding out other species.That we have to relearn and apply the wisdom of power self-limitation, “in a way that enhances our experience of life”. That “native cultures, indigenous cultures, had ways of conserving resources and sharing resources and preventing some people from getting a lot more powerful than others.”That today’s social fabric is woven of vertical social power, whereas pre-agricultural societies were characterized by horizontal power of “we can all do this together”.That we need to consider: “How do we use power responsibly, in order to overcome some of these unhealthy systems of power that have gotten out of control?”Pre-order POWER: LIMITS AND PROSPECTS FOR HUMAN SURVIVAL: https://power.postcarbon.org/preorder/Connect with Richard HeinbergMonthly Museletter: http://bit.ly/pci-subscribeWebsite: https://richardheinberg.comFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/richardheinberg/Twitter: https://twitter.com/richardheinberg Follow WCPGR on Social MediaFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/WhatCouldPossiblyGoRightPodcast​Twitter: https://twitter.com/buildresilience​Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/buildresilienceJoin our Patreon Community to receive bonus conversations with guests and "backstage" conversations between Vicki and other podcast hosts: https://www.patreon.com/vickirobinLearn more: https://bit.ly/wcpgr-resSupport the show (https://www.patreon.com/vickirobin)
May East is a sustainability educator, spatial planner, and social innovator. Her work spans the fields of cultural geography, urban ecology, and women’s studies. Designated one of the 100 Global SustainAbility Leaders three years in a row, she leads a whole generation of regenerative designers and educators in 55 countries working with community-based organizations and intergovernmental agencies in the development of policy guidance and projects strengthening climate resilience, food security, and livelihood action.May addresses the question of “What Could Possibly Go Right?” with insights including:The importance of edge-work, ”not about the dying of the old world, or the emergence of the new world, but the edge between the two.”That edge isn’t marginal, but is actually at the center of change.The potential of ”ecotone” areas, the buffer zones in nature where different landscapes meet. These edges of high intensity and diversity provide conditions for new species and life.  Her coined concept of “sociotone”, recognizing that societies in tension is where new structures will emerge.That serendipity happens in the edge and that surprise is not a question of luck, it is a question of alertness and enactment to turn these into something useful.That we need to move beyond sustainability to regeneration. “We need to train ourselves to become regenerative practitioners at the edge, because if we maximize edge, we maximize diversity and potential of life.”Connect with May EastWebsite // Facebook // Twitter // InstagramFollow WCPGRFacebook // Twitter // InstagramJoin our Patreon Community to receive bonus conversations with guests and "backstage" conversations between Vicki and other podcast hosts.Learn more: https://bit.ly/wcpgr-resSupport the show (https://www.patreon.com/vickirobin)
Andrew Revkin is one of America’s most honored and experienced environmental journalists and the founding director of the new Initiative on Communication and Sustainability at Columbia University's Earth Institute.  He has held positions at National Geographic and Discover Magazine and won the top awards in science journalism multiple times, along with a Guggenheim Fellowship. Revkin has written acclaimed books on the history of humanity’s relationship with the weather, the changing Arctic, global warming, and the assault on the Amazon rain forest.He addresses the question of “What Could Possibly Go Right?” with thoughts including:That we need to be aware of narrative capture and being misled by stories or avoiding truth.That we should engage in more conversations with others who have different views, and stay in curiosity rather than debate. That we need to work through the trauma of recent times and “look for compassionate intervention in our traumatized psyches”.That the resilience of an ecosystem to environmental stress is a function of the diversity of responses and species; we need the “edge pushers”That like the “Serenity Prayer”, we should embrace “the perfect imperfectness of our nature as humans”.ResourcesArticle: “Complicating the Narratives” Article: My Climate ChangeVideo: We are perfect*: Andrew Revkin at TEDxPortland Article: My Lucky StrokeConnect with Andrew RevkinWebsite // Facebook // Twitter // InstagramFollow WCPGRFacebook // Twitter // InstagramJoin our Patreon Community to receive bonus conversations with guests and "backstage" conversations between Vicki and other podcast hosts.Learn more: https://bit.ly/wcpgr-resSupport the show (https://www.patreon.com/vickirobin)
Jodie Evans is the co-founder of CODEPINK and the after-school writing program 826LA. She has been a visionary advocate for peace for several decades. Whether in board rooms or war zones, legislative offices, or neighborhood streets, Jodie’s enthusiasm for a world at peace infuses conciliation, optimism, and activism wherever she goes.Jodie addresses the question of “What Could Possibly Go Right?” with thoughts including:That the war economy is in the structures around us that are violent, oppressive, extractive, and destructive. “We won't end war until we end the war economy”. That we need to lean into the peace economy, which is life, community, planet Earth, parenting, the commons, healing.The war economy thrives on alienation and self direction. The peace economy is about connection and community engagement.That we should not get caught in the “folly of fretting”. “Everything is about action because if we don't act, we let the banality and the brutality of it undermine our capacity to act.”The peace economy examples of sharing and abundance found in supporting homeless youth in Venice Beach and creating land trusts for commons to reemerge. That we should ask, “How do we use our wild imaginations together to create something absolutely fresh and new? What am I doing today to create the conditions conducive for life?”Resources21 ways to divest from a war economySafe Place for Youth (SPY)Lead with LandTwo Rivers FarmsGreenhorns (see also episode 18 https://www.resilience.org/stories/2020-10-13/what-could-possibly-go-right-episode-18-severine-von-tscharner-fleming/ )Soul Fire FarmConnect with Jodie EvansWebsite // Facebook // TwitterFollow WCPGRFacebook // Twitter // InstagramJoin our Patreon Community to receive bonus conversations with guests and "backstage" conversations between Vicki and other podcast hosts.Learn more: https://bit.ly/wcpgr-resSupport the show (https://www.patreon.com/vickirobin)
Victor Lee Lewis is a progressive life coach, trainer, speaker, and Founder of the Radical Resilience Institute. As a social justice educator, Victor brings a unique, socially progressive vision to the work of personal growth, personal empowerment, and emotional health. He addresses the question of “What Could Possibly Go Right?” with thoughts including:That many esteemed institutions and structures that we deeply believe in are counterfeit to what we really want and need.That humanity and life can’t bear another century of white supremacy, patriarchy, and Western enlightenment-based education. That “we need to unpack and detox our notions of freedom and liberty”, which has typically been construed in racial terms in the United States of America. That liberation is a nonlinear process and much has changed, even if progress isn’t always obvious.That this is an infinite game. “We're not trying to win it, we're not trying to complete it. We're in an infinite game that we want to keep going. I'm not trying to live forever. I'm trying to see that life lives forever.”That “as things fall apart, opening our hearts as well as our minds, and taking courage may yet carry us through.”ResourcesBook: "I Seem To Be A Verb" by Buckminster FullerBlog post: “An Easter Sermonette” by Vicki Robin https://vickirobin.com/an-easter-sermonette/ Current Conversations Episode #307 with Victor Lee Lewis https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=egZ9n7wtSxYConnect with Victor Lee LewisWebsite // FacebookFollow WCPGRFacebook // Twitter // InstagramJoin our Patreon Community to receive bonus conversations with guests and "backstage" conversations between Vicki and other podcast hosts.Learn more: https://bit.ly/wcpgr-resSupport the show (https://www.patreon.com/vickirobin)
Glacier Kwong is a political and digital rights activist born and raised in Hong Kong. She is the founder of the NGO Keyboard Frontline and is a Research Fellow at Hong Kong Democracy Council in the US. In self-exile in Germany, she is pursuing her PhD in Law at the University of Hamburg, with her research focusing on data protection and surveillance in Hong Kong and China. She addresses the question of “What Could Possibly Go Right?” with thoughts including:“We don't persist because we see hope. We only see hope when we persist.” Self-care is part of the revolution. “Activism, at its core, is fighting for the better livelihood of people,” so taking care of your well-being is aligned with these goals.We should honor the freedom and the privileges we have; use them well and not take them for granted.We should not suppress our feelings of sadness during our activism. Being upfront with these emotions shows our humanity and gives validation to others feeling the same way. “We have one million reasons to give up. But we only need one to continue the fight; that is, we know that what we're doing is right.”Connect with Glacier KwongTwitter // InstagramFollow WCPGRFacebook // Twitter // InstagramJoin our Patreon Community to receive bonus conversations with guests and "backstage" conversations between Vicki and other podcast hosts.Learn more: https://bit.ly/wcpgr-resSupport the show (https://www.patreon.com/vickirobin)
Alan AtKisson has been working professionally in sustainable development since 1988 and has been recognized internationally as a pioneering innovator and thought leader in the field. He currently serves as Assistant Director-General of Sida, the Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency, where he leads the Department of Partnership and Innovation. Alan is a musician and an author whose books include bestseller Believing Cassandra: How to be an Optimist in a Pessimist’s World.Alan addresses the question of “What Could Possibly Go Right?” with insights including:That sustainability concepts and the sustainable development sector are moving from cutting edge to mainstream.That the recent increase in digital meetings has made sector conversations more accessible and inclusive. “We both arrived through the same digital fibers, into the same digital space, speaking to each other on the same terms.” That the “entire financial system is at this tipping point moment of really embracing a sustainable development perspective, where the most influential leaders in the world are making public statements about diversity, environment and climate change.”That there’s power in long-term institutional change, driven by good people who work in government bureaucracies.ResourcesSustainable SeattleBook - “Believing Cassandra: How to be an optimist in a pessimist’s world” by Alan AtKissonSong - “Dead Planet Blues” by Alan AtKissonSwedish International Development Cooperation Agency (SIDA)Connect with Alan AtKissonWebsite // TwitterFollow WCPGRFacebook // Twitter // InstagramJoin our Patreon Community to receive bonus conversations with guests and "backstage" conversations between Vicki and other podcast hosts.Learn more: https://bit.ly/wcpgr-resSupport the show (https://www.patreon.com/vickirobin)
Kay Taylor is an evolutionary astrologer, author, and teacher who has been integrating soul-centered astrology with a range of healing wisdom for over 35 years. Author of Soul Path Way, Kay runs the Soul Path School to train individuals in intuitive mastery, psychosynthesis, and astrology. She maintains a thriving full-time consulting practice based in the San Francisco Bay Area.She addresses the question of “What Could Possibly Go Right?” with thoughts including:The shifts in consciousness in key periods of recent history, creating greater connection and awakening.That as old structures are coming down, we should “stay in our hearts, be love, and work with each other” as new structures emerge. That our global connectivity through the internet can be the “training wheels” for humanity’s growing physic capabilities.That we need to be careful with our thoughts, words and information with which we engage, directing those towards manifesting what we want to go right. That “it's essential for people who are feeling discouraged to come into small levels of gratitude. To connect to things that are outside that viewpoint, to see the beauty... all the ways that we can remind ourselves that most humans are truly good, and want the best for everybody.” That we can see bridges to scientific and rational realms, such as when considering planetary impacts on tides or looking at energy and particle movements.ResourcesBook: Soul Path Way by Kay TaylorRichard Tarnas, Archetypal Cosmology, and Deep HistoryConnect with KayWebsite // Facebook // LinkedInFollow WCPGRFacebook // Twitter // InstagramJoin our Patreon Community to receive bonus conversations with guests and "backstage" conversations between Vicki and other podcast hosts.Learn more: https://bit.ly/wcpgr-resSupport the show (https://www.patreon.com/vickirobin)
Hailing from Celina Tennessee, Trae Crowder is a standup comedian, writer, and self-proclaimed “Liberal Redneck.” Trae gained national attention (or notoriety, depending on your viewpoint) with his viral video rants and has been performing and touring his particular brand of Southern-fried intellectual comedy for over a decade.Trae addresses the question of “What Could Possibly Go Right?” through his socially aware comedic view, sharing thoughts including:That there’s inexorable positive progress in social issues over time, despite setbacks in the short-term.That each new generation makes advancements in social awareness; for today’s young people, “the default position seems to be one of wokeness.”That in spite of stereotypes, “in any given state, 40 something percent of people voted blue, but the state still shows up red on a map.”That when considering issues such as racism, the wider USA needs to avoid “using the South as a scapegoat, and in doing so, act like they don't have those problems where they live.” That we could all use more empathy to understand others’ perspectives and experiences in our day-to-day lives.ResourceswellRED podcastConnect with Trae CrowderWebsite // Facebook // Twitter // YouTubeFollow WCPGRFacebook // Twitter // InstagramJoin our Patreon Community by  April 13 to receive an invitation to Backstage with Vicki : A What Could Possibly Go Right? Zoomboree on April 14.Learn more: https://bit.ly/wcpgr-resSupport the show (https://www.patreon.com/vickirobin)
Ellen Bass is an award-winning poet, author, and a Chancellor of the Academy of American Poets. Her poems appear frequently in The New Yorker, American Poetry Review, and many other journals. Her poetry books include Indigo, Like a Beggar, The Human Line, and Mules of Love. Her nonfiction books include the groundbreaking The Courage to Heal: A Guide for Women Survivors of Child Sexual Abuse and Free Your Mind: The Book for Gay, Lesbian and Bisexual Youth. Bass founded poetry workshops at Salinas Valley State Prison and the Santa Cruz, California jails, and teaches in the MFA writing program at Pacific University. From her view as a poet, Ellen addresses the question of “What Could Possibly Go Right?” with insights including:There’s growing interest and diversity of poetry enthusiasts, in addition to increased accessibility and connection through our virtual communities now. “Poetry is so nourishing, and sustaining, and gives us a chance to grieve, and gives us a chance to celebrate.”The best poetry combines the personal with political.It's not what you do when you're getting to the end of your rope; it's what you do when you're AT the end of your rope.Poetry is about discovery and the process of being transformed. “Why I think most people write poems is so that at the end, they will not be the same person they were before they wrote the poem.”ResourcesLiving Room Craft Talks by Ellen BassBook: All We Can Save: Truth, Courage, and Solutions for the Climate Crisis edited by Ayana Elizabeth JohnsonConnect with Ellen BassWebsite // Facebook // Twitter // InstagramFollow WCPGR on Social MediaFacebook // Twitter // InstagramJoin our Patreon Community to receive bonus conversations with guests and "backstage" conversations between Vicki and other podcast hosts.Learn more: https://bit.ly/wcpgr-resSupport the show (https://www.patreon.com/vickirobin)
Dr. Jem Bendell is the Founder of the Deep Adaptation Forum and a Professor of Sustainability Leadership with the University of Cumbria. He works as a researcher, educator, and advisor on social and organizational change, with over 25 years of experience in sustainable development initiatives in over 20 countries. In 2018, he authored the viral Deep Adaptation paper, downloaded around a million times.Jem addresses the question of “What Could Possibly Go Right?” with thoughts including:That “people are changing their lives because of their anticipation of collapse, to relate more openly and wanting to do what's right, come what may.”That “holding space for each other and our difficult emotions has led to a new quality of engagement.” That Deep Adaptation invites people into a different way of talking about crisis response and emotions - fostering compassion, curiosity, and respect.That sustainable development may be a delusion, but we can ready ourselves for societal disruption to help others with our skills and networks.ResourcesAuroville intentional community, southern IndiaBook: “How Everything Can Collapse” by Momentum InstitutePaper: Deep Adaptation by Jem BendellInternational Scholars Warning on Societal Disruption and CollapseConnect with JemWebsite // Deep Adaptation Forum // Twitter // Facebook group Join our Patreon Community to receive bonus conversations with guests and "backstage" conversations between Vicki and other podcast hosts.Follow WCPGR on Social MediaFacebook // Twitter // InstagramLearn moreSupport the show (https://www.patreon.com/vickirobin)
New York Times best-selling author Kim Stanley Robinson joins Vicki Robin this week. Widely recognized as one of the foremost living writers of science fiction, Robinson is the author of more than twenty books, includingThe Ministry For The Future, the best-selling Mars trilogy, and the critically acclaimed Forty Signs of Rain, The Years of Rice and Salt, and 2312. In 2008, he was named a “Hero of the Environment” by Time magazine.From his perspective as a utopian science fiction writer, he answers the question of “What Could Possibly Go Right?” with thoughts including:That science fiction, literature, and arts have “become a kind of a necessary tool of thought for thinking our way forward”.The value of the Paris Agreement in ensuring the rights of future people and all living beings to a livable world.The risk of reaching wet-bulb temperature levels where a high enough heat and humidity combination is fatal to humans. That we do have enormous scientific and technological powers, but our inaction comes down to matters of capitalism and pursuit of monetary profit. “We're in an economic system that will not pay us to do the right things.”The idea of carbon coins and carbon quantitative easing for positive impact. The benefits of significantly increasing the world’s land surface left to animals.ResourcesBook: The Ministry For The Future by Kim Stanley RobinsonBook: Half Earth by E. O. WilsonBook: How to Blow Up a Pipeline: Learning to Fight in a World on Fire by Andreas MalmConnect with Kim Stanley RobinsonWebsite // FacebookJoin our Patreon Community to receive bonus conversations with guests and "backstage" conversations between Vicki and other podcast hosts.Follow WCPGR on Social MediaFacebook // Twitter // InstagramLearn moreSupport the show (https://www.patreon.com/vickirobin)
Michelle Singletary is an author and award-winning personal finance columnist. She writes the nationally syndicated personal finance column “The Color of Money”, which appears in The Washington Post. She is a frequent contributor to various radio programs and has appeared on national talk shows and television networks.She addresses the question of “What Could Possibly Go Right?” with thoughts including:That the joy of this pandemic could be a lasting effect on people reaching out and helping their neighbors; that people tend to rise to the occasion in emergencies and realize that we are all in this together. That on a financial level, the pandemic has revealed the minimal possessions we really need and that human contact is what we’re craving.That we need to resist the urge to narrow down to single sources of news and instead keep our minds open to other points of view. That none of us are successful if our neighbors remain in poverty.That there are ongoing impacts of intergenerational trauma for Black Americans, in addition to microaggressions, redlining, discrimination in hiring, and more.That you need to align your finances and resources to what you truly value.Connect with MichelleWebsite // Facebook // TwitterJoin our Patreon Community to receive bonus conversations with guests and "backstage" conversations between Vicki and other podcast hosts.Follow WCPGR on Social MediaFacebook // Twitter // InstagramLearn moreSupport the show (https://www.patreon.com/vickirobin)
Starhawk is an author, activist, permaculture designer and teacher, founder of Earth Activist Training, and a prominent voice in modern earth-based spirituality and ecofeminism. She answers the question of “What Could Possibly Go Right?” with thoughts including:The boost in people being politically engaged this past year, tuning up and caring for democracy “like an old creaky car”That more people paying attention to climate change and increasingly understanding the infrastructure changes and action that is neededThat turning to permaculture and regenerative land management is one of the key things we can do around climate changeThat fostering interconnection and compassion can help people avoid getting sucked into a “game version” of lifeThat “we have to offer a way for people to participate in reality, and feel themselves, and let them be heroes, to feel like we are doing something really great for the world, for each other, for our communities.”Connect with  StarhawkWebsite // Facebook // Twitter // Instagram Follow WCPGR on Social MediaFacebook // Twitter // InstagramJoin our Patreon Community to receive bonus conversations with guests and "backstage" conversations between Vicki and other podcast hosts.Learn more: https://bit.ly/wcpgr-resSupport the show (https://www.patreon.com/vickirobin)
The third set of What Could Possibly Go Right? kicks off with host Vicki Robin reflecting on past episodes, sharing her motivation for creating this series, and revealing what she hopes to find as we embark on a new set of interviews. Her thoughts include:That cultural scouts have this “carefully cultivated sense of looking squarely at reality and trying to pick a path, a critical path forward on behalf of the common good”.That cultural scouts have an educated sense of the future, with perspectives often gained through living at the margins.That justice is at the center of many interviews, whether it’s racial, economic, intergenerational, interspecies or ecological.That guests are framework-fluid, able to see more clearly by not being stuck in one story or worldview.Join our Patreon Community to receive bonus conversations with guests and "backstage" conversations between Vicki and other podcast hosts. Follow WCPGR on Social MediaFacebook // Twitter // Instagram Learn more:  http://bit.ly/wcpgr-resSupport the show (https://www.patreon.com/vickirobin)
Our host Vicki Robin reflects on the interview with media theorist and author Douglas Rushkoff, as heard on episode 28 of “What Could Possibly Go Right?”Connect with DouglasWebsite: rushkoff.comTwitter: twitter.com/rushkoffFollow WCPGR on Social MediaFacebook: facebook.com/WhatCouldPossiblyGoRightPodcastTwitter: twitter.com/postcarbonInstagram: instagram.com/postcarboninstitute/Learn more: https://bit.ly/pci-wcpgrseries   Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/vickirobin)
Douglas Rushkoff is an author and documentarian who studies human autonomy in a digital age. Named one of the “world’s ten most influential intellectuals” by MIT, his twenty books include the recently published Team Human, based on his podcast. Others include bestsellers Present Shock, Throwing Rocks and the Google Bus, Program or Be Programmed, Life Inc, and Media Virus. He also made the PBS Frontline documentaries Generation Like, The Persuaders, and Merchants of Cool. Rushkoff’s work explores how different technological environments change our relationship to narrative, money, power, and one another. Through this lens, he answers the question of “What Could Possibly Go Right?” including:That our immersion in online networking technologies is making us long for “organic kinship”, and causing overwhelm and distrust as our evolutionary social cues are missed.That what could go right is we emerge from this isolation and dominance of screens to being more willing to reconnect with other human beings in person, more readily establishing rapport, solidarity and mutuality.That civics is about feeling responsible for neighbors and community, even if you don’t always like them. That we “learn to see that unpredictability as the novelty and weirdness and joy of being a living entity in the now.”That we need to get rid of our addiction to exponential growth, extraction and repression of others, and refocus on the commons. Rather than “using the stick of devastation”, we use the “carrot” of fun to make working together more appealing than ongoing competition.The encouragement to: “Find the others. You don't have to do this in isolation. They're all over the place. Just look into people's eyes and you'll get that instant moment of recognition of, Oh, there's another one. Let's do this together.”ResourcesZebras Unite Platform Cooperative Movement Enspiral Network Extra readingThe Privileged Have Entered Their Escape Pods - Douglas Rushkoff on One Zero, Medium Connect with  Douglas RushkoffWebsite: rushkoff.comTeam Human: www.teamhuman.fmTwitter: twitter.com/rushkoffFollow WCPGR on Social MediaFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/WhatCouldPossiblyGoRightPodcastTwitter: https://twitter.com/postcarbonInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/postcarboninstitute/Learn more: https://bit.ly/wcpgr-resSupport the show (https://www.patreon.com/vickirobin)
Our host Vicki Robin reflects on her conversation with author and moral philosopher Kathleen Dean Moore, as heard on episode 27 of “What Could Possibly Go Right?”. Connect with Kathleen Website: riverwalking.comWebsite: musicandclimateaction.comFollow WCPGR on Social MediaFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/WhatCouldPossiblyGoRightPodcastTwitter: https://twitter.com/postcarbonInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/postcarboninstitute/Learn more: https://bit.ly/pci-wcpgrseries   Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/vickirobin)
Kathleen Dean Moore, Ph.D., is an Author, Moral Philosopher, Environmental Advocate. She served as Distinguished Professor of Environmental Philosophy at Oregon State University, where she wrote award-winning books about our cultural and moral relations to the wet, wild world and to one another. But her increasing concern about the climate and extinction crises led her to leave the university, so she could write and speak full-time about the moral urgency of climate action. Kathleen shares thoughts on What Could Possibly Go Right?  including:That “sometimes it feels like the whole world is burning to its foundations, but the foundations are still there, and they're holding a space for the future.”That “almost every major change in US history has been the result of a rising wave of moral affirmation,” of the “conscience of the streets”.That we need to remember our shared moral foundations, of the “human decency deep in the earth” and the ideals our nation aspires to.Using the Universal Declaration of Human Rights to call out the oil, gas and fracking industries for violations of human rights through contributing to climate change.The Blue River Declaration by an assembled group of philosophers, which asks “three fundamental questions... What is the world? What are human beings? And therefore, how shall we live?” That as human beings with imagination and understanding, “we have a responsibility to be the meaning makers of the universe.” ResourcesPermanent Peoples' Tribunal Blue River Declaration Book: Moral Ground: Ethical Action for a Planet in Peril by Kathleen Dean MooreBook: Great Tide Rising: Toward Clarity and Moral Courage in a Time of Planetary Change by Kathleen Dean MooreConnect with Kathleen Dean MooreWebsite: riverwalking.comTwitter: musicandclimateaction.comFollow WCPGR on Social MediaFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/WhatCouldPossiblyGoRightPodcastTwitter: https://twitter.com/postcarbonInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/postcarboninstitute/Learn more: https://bit.ly/pci-wcpgrseriesSupport the show (https://www.patreon.com/vickirobin)
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