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Our Numinous Nature

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Our Numinous Nature is a collection of reverential stories about nature & its effect on our souls. We’ll be hearing from folks with a deep connection to the natural world, from herbalists to hunters, wildlife rehabilitators to trappers, artists to homesteaders... The hope is to weave together these disparate lifestyles through tales of profundity, love, and awe. Find a comfy log and join us at the sonic campfire.
24 Episodes
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Danny Doughty is a visionary folk artist in Onancock, Virginia on the Eastern Shore. The son of a waterman & a teenage bride, Danny grew up in abject poverty on Willis Wharf creek where he found himself in a dark, isolated, & brutal world of extreme dysfunction & abuse. We hear about where the imagery of his paintings comes from; the peace he feels when consumed in his art; and how the African American women his father peddled fish to showed him a profound spirituality that freed him from his hellish life. For his story, Danny paints us a harrowing & intensely disturbing picture of just what that childhood hell was like around his father's clam house down at the wharf. And yet, out of the darkness Danny has found light. We hear about his adolescent art made from scavenged materials; an anecdote about women fishing with hand lines; a regional ol' wives' tale about cracked cake; and get an overall feeling of a profound hope that transcends suffering. The golden light of this episode is the healing power of creativity, art, and self-expression. Check out Danny's paintings & gallery in Onancock. And watch the PBS short film about him and his work. Follow Our Numinous Nature & my naturalist illustrations on InstagramCheck out my shop of shirts, prints, and books featuring my artContact: herbaceoushuman@gmail.com
Alpheus Chewning is a Virginia Beach author, folklorist, ghost-walk guide, and living historian with a focus on Chesapeake Bay pirates, the Civil War, & regional hauntings. In this episode we get a taste of what it would have been like aboard a pirate ship during the Golden Age of Piracy [1680 - 1730]. We learn about their egalitarian ethics, ship contracts & recruitment; what they ate; how they slept; using the bathroom; their clothing; flag pictograms & symbolism; superstitions & common phrases; the dividing of treasure; and of course, their brutal yet creative guerrilla battle tactics. When it comes to story time, Al recounts the tale of Blackbeard's curse upon the legendary treasure buried at today's First Landing State Park. His second story, which also blends history & folklore & dates to the early 18th century, is a potent parable about a beautiful & eccentric animal-whisperer/plant healer who was accused of being a witch by her neighbors. The last third of the episode is dedicated to local hauntings: ghosts' participation in a Civil War reenactment; a profound theory about past lives, & more. From the first colonist ships, to Indian graves & pirate battles, we end back at the storied First Landing State Park as Al speaks of his paranormal investigation of a young woman's ghost. Pirates, witches, and ghosts, this episode is beach campfire gold!  Check out Al's Histories & Haunts Facebook, his books on Virginia Beach, and if you're in the area, join one of his guided ghost walks. To learn more, watch Al's cameo in The Pirates of the Chesapeake Bay documentary or read his recommendation of the best book on the topic.  Follow Our Numinous Nature & my naturalist illustrations on InstagramCheck out my shop of shirts, prints, and books featuring my artContact: herbaceoushuman@gmail.com
Paul Murdoch is an amateur paleontologist, fossil hunting guide, ghost hunter, and certified Chesapeake Bay Storyteller operating out of Calvert County, Maryland on the bay's western shore. A highly engaging educator, Paul teaches us about the comet impact that formed the bay [35 million years ago] and why the Calvert Cliffs region is renowned for fossils of the Miocene epoch [8-22 million years ago] . We learn about long extinct, ancient whales, dolphins, sharks, and mollusks while getting some tips on how to read a fossil's story & fossil hunting etiquette. In the first of Paul's stories, he recounts his most significant find, the skull of an undiscovered species of squalodon [a shark toothed whale]. Then we switch gears from fossil hunting to ghost hunting!!! With a deep historical knowledge Paul talks about spending the night at haunted lighthouses and Civil War prisoner camps. For his second tale, he shares a riveting & chilling archeological ghost story about his involvement digging up the bones of Irish railroad workers, bringing to light a malevolent, historical coverup. Wrapping up this excellent episode we hear about: how the dead can speak, banding monarch butterflies, and what to expect on one of Paul's guided hunts.  If you're in the Chesapeake Bay area check out Paul's guided fossil hunting trips: Chesapeake Heritage And Paleontology Tours. Read about & see pictures of his significant finds: Squalodon [shark tooth whale] & Eurhinodelphis [long-snouted dolphin]. Follow Our Numinous Nature & my naturalist illustrations on InstagramCheck out my shop of shirts, prints, and books featuring my artContact: herbaceoushuman@gmail.com
Teresa Boardwine is a registered herbalist with the American Herbalist Guild, as well as a teacher and the founder of Green Comfort School of Herbal Medicine in Washington, Virginia. In this fluid & truly magical episode we take a metaphorical [& metaphysical] walk down to the river behind Teresa's home for a glimpse into wild medicinal plants, history, and spirit. We learn about wild yam & its connection to birth control; bloodroot's use in Listerine, marshmallow root for acid reflux; outdoor sacred spaces; Rudolf Steiner's childrearing philosophy; and much more. For story time, Teresa tells of crossing the witch-hazel threshold on the banks of the river where she's baptized her daughter. From there we're in the land of spirit hearing about plant journeys, a red clover fairy, and her circle of spirit guides. Coming to the end of this wild river ride, we do some folklore hunting for "murkles" [aka morels] & get a tasty stinging nettle pesto recipe. Do not miss this swift, joyous, ephemeral, and enchanting episode! Check out Teresa's Instagram and visit Green Comfort to learn more about her herbal school in the Blue Ridge Mountains. Follow Our Numinous Nature & my naturalist illustrations on InstagramCheck out my shop of shirts, prints, and books featuring my artContact: herbaceoushuman@gmail.com 
Ron Boehme is a sporting dog enthusiast, breeder, wingshooter, & host of the popular The Hunting Dog Podcast. While a resident of Michigan, Ron has a 2nd-home in the Shenandoah Valley where I was able to catch him passing through for a fascinating & passionate episode about the bond between hunter and dog. We begin with a rundown on hounds, pointers, and retrievers - the three categories of hunting canines - and hear how they're imbued with a rich history, culture, and most amazingly, a symbiotic bond with their human masters that dates back at least 10,000 years. If you have a pet lab or beagle or dachshund, then I hope you’ll enjoy learning about the wilder nature of your canine companions. When it comes to story time, Ron tells of his adventuresome boyhood in the only patch of wilderness a kid could find in Chicago: the graveyards… With the joyously mischievous qualities of Mark Twain, Ron's storytelling transports us into a 1960's world of building forts, evading cemetery security, mail-order home taxidermy, and pursuing game amongst the tombstones. To close this soulful episode, we end with a lot of heart as Ron speaks to the emotional burden of being a dog owner - the tragic knowledge that you’ll outlive your closest companions and how that connects us to our own mortality.  Check out Ron on Instagram to see his life with sporting dogs, listen to his podcast, and visit his website for further info, including his new online dog training workshop.Follow Our Numinous Nature & my naturalist illustrations on InstagramCheck out my shop of shirts, prints, and books featuring my artContact: herbaceoushuman@gmail.com 
Caroline Seitz - aka Cobra Caroline - is a Northern Virginia wildlife educator specializing in reptiles & amphibians. While her vocation is to teach kids to love nature, this fun & educational & infectiously joyous episode is for all ages. We begin by covering the timely news on "herpetological spring": salamander migrations, spring peepers, vernal pools, gorging snakes, regional salamander biodiversity & population threats, gelatinous egg masses, and how-to locate some amphibian action near you in the remaining weeks.  Having owned & cared for dozens of rescue animals, Caroline shares her personal, ethical journey evolving beyond live shows to a more creative new venture. One of the most interesting parts of this episode is hearing how different ages respond to snakes, from kids, to teenagers, and finally adults. Then we get into her brief stint as a snake removal technician & joining her brother's conservation work with Hawaii's hawksbill sea turtles. In closing, Caroline shares a heart-warming story about her parents: how their nurturing of her childhood passion for reptiles & amphibians led to a lifetime of animal shows from age 9 to present day.Check out Caroline's Kid's Nature Shows to book an in-person or virtual event for your kiddos. And follow along via Instagram & Facebook for fun facts about reptiles & amphibians.Follow Our Numinous Nature & my naturalist illustrations on InstagramCheck out my shop of shirts, prints, and books featuring my artContact: herbaceoushuman@gmail.com 
Greg McCoy is a Virginia caver specializing in vertical caving [similar to rock-climbing rappelling but into a black hole...]. In this educational episode we get an introduction to all things caving: the difference between a spelunker & a caver; horizontal & vertical caving; white nose syndrome  [a fungus devastating to bats]; pouring dye into cave streams to test ground water; what sorts of cave critters one might see; and the extreme nature of cave rescue. We hear exciting anecdotes about regional discoveries ranging from ancient bones to burial sites and artifacts. Greg describes two of his caving trips, one about descending a 586-ft pit in Ellison's Cave in Georgia  [click to see epic pictures!]. Nearing the end we hear a bit about cave diving and wrap it up with some McCoy family history. Having descended from coal miners, Greg went to college to escape a miner's life, and yet he's spent a lifetime underground for work & for recreation! Find your regional caving club [called a grotto] to reach out & join a caving excursion near you.Follow Our Numinous Nature & my naturalist illustrations on InstagramCheck out my shop of shirts, prints, and books featuring my artContact: herbaceoushuman@gmail.com 
Frank Escalona is a Chilean-born avid outdoorsman - backpacker, fisherman, hunter, adventurer - whose outdoor life has stretched from Patagonia, to Washington's Cascade Range, and now Virginia's Blue Ridge. The themes of this episode are adventure, mentorship, and facing dangerous megafauna. Pre-interview I read a lesson from a 19th-century mentor to his mentee: a shikari's [an Indian hunter] story about ignoring bad omens that led to a violent run in with a tiger.  Our interview begins with Frank's "sumptuous" childhood in Valparaíso [a port city on Chile’s coast] and his emigration to Seattle [at the time a lumber town] where he met a woodsman mentor who took him on his first big game hunt, for black bear, at age 14 in the blueberry fields of the Cascade Range. While discussing human wildness & the motivation for pursuing potentially dangerous animals beyond the inherent value of their meat, Frank recounts a harrowing story about his Patagonian fisherman friends & their conflict with a man-eater. As hunter's mature, they often seek difficulty & depth, and for Frank that means learning the Zen of archery. We hear what he's learned from his recent traditional bow practice. Coming full circle, the episode ends with how working with master craftspeople from tailors to gunmakers adds to the aesthetic ritual of the hunt and connects back to Frank's childhood in the Valparaíso markets. Follow Our Numinous Nature & my naturalist illustrations on InstagramCheck out my shop of shirts, prints, and books featuring my artContact: herbaceoushuman@gmail.com 
Susan Leopold, PhD of Linden, Virginia is an ethnobotanist, plant advocate, and the executive director of United Plant Savers [a non-profit focused on the conservation of medicinal plants]. The theme of this episode is history: a post-civil war connection to Susan's property, her Patawomeck ancestry [including the Pocahontas controversy], and the centuries-old ginseng trade which is currently linked to a shadowy herbal black market. She teaches us about plant conservation, the at-risk tool, sandalwood, osha, and related botanical issues. When it comes to story time, Susan shares her personal experience living in the Amazon jungle where she received a potent ayahuasca message and gathered folklore from the indigenous group she lived with during her ethnobotanical study. Upon returning home she was startled to find similar themes in the folktales of Virginia's Bull Run Mountains. In closing, Susan explains her specially crafted spagyric hemp products grown right here on her property and I recount our synchronistic trip to Carl Jung's lakeside castle, Bollingen Tower, in Switzerland. Check out United Plant Savers on Instagram and become a member to receive the annual Journal of Medicinal Plant Conservation. For a behind-the-scenes look follow the United Plant Savers botanical sanctuary in Ohio. For Susan's CBD hemp products, visit her Paris Apothecary online store. And for more information regarding Virginia's Patawomeck tribe click the link. Follow Our Numinous Nature & my naturalist illustrations on InstagramCheck out my shop of shirts, prints, and books featuring my artContact: herbaceoushuman@gmail.com 
Having no guest for this episode, we spend a rainy, snowy early winter morning reading stories by the fire. First we start locally, with two short folk tales from my mountains about spirit dogs and 'jack-ma-lanterns' read from  Virginia Folk Legends edited by Thomas E. Barden.  Next, I find the answer to my question about otter edibility in Norse mythology through a misadventure of Odin  & Loki who must fill a magician's otter pelt with gold, read from The Norse Myths retold by Kevin Crossley-Holland.  Then we visit the words of a great oracle, Clarissa Pinkola Estés to hear about the powerful feminine archetype of The Bone Collector read from Women Who Run with the Wolves. We wrap up this winter episode with a heartwarming bowl of turtle medicine soup from Wildwoods Wisdom: Encounters with the Natural World by the legendary Appalachian naturalist & folklorist Doug Elliott.  Check out these wonderful reads through the links above.Follow Our Numinous Nature & my naturalist illustrations on InstagramCheck out my shop of shirts, prints, and books featuring my artContact: herbaceoushuman@gmail.com 
Donna La Pré of Washington, Virginia is a Biodynamic gardener, artist, herbalist, small-batch skin care producer, natural dyer, and perfumer - all under the umbrella of her home business, Tender Flower. Seated outside the charming potting shed in her autumnal garden, we begin by hearing about Donna's ancestry followed by how the philosophy of Rudolf Steiner [anthroposophy] clicked on a deep level, inspiring her spiritual path & Biodynamic gardening in which she grows 85% of the herbs and flowers used in her products. Skimming over her many vocations, we settle into a thought-provoking discussion on aromatherapy, perfumery, and incense. As the interview deepens, Donna is gracious enough to let us peek into her world: one inhabited by nature spirits, elementals, gnomes, fays, and other beings unseen by most. This engrossing episode ends on a trilogy of synchronistic short stories about the loss of both her father & her cat named Sassafras, as well as the rescue of a bleating fawn on a stormy night. Check out Donna's Tender Flower store & classes as well as her Instagram. Follow Our Numinous Nature & my naturalist illustrations on InstagramCheck out my shop of shirts, prints, and books featuring my artContact: herbaceoushuman@gmail.com 
Katie McMillan Crutchfield is the chef & owner of The Dancing Bear Cafe: a renovated chicken hatchery nestled in the corn fields of Corder, Missouri amongst her old farm house, 2 AirBnB rentals, 13 peacocks, 5 horses, 5 cats, 7 dogs, a multitude of chickens & ducks, one pig & a pony. And then there’s the wildlife…orphaned raccoons, killer foxes, and leaderless coyotes. In this fun and kooky episode we hear what life is like at Katie’s plant & animal oasis; a peaceable kingdom surrounded by never-ending ag fields where crop dusting planes roar overhead & cancer is commonplace. When it comes to story time it might as well be the beginning of a whimsical children’s book: two tales from the time when Katie - at a life crossroads & very much alone - moved into an abandoned farm house with no doors where she lived with her animal friends both domestic & wild.  And as her reputation in the community grew, she became the unofficial, local wildlife rehabilitator working with the likes of barred owls, pileated woodpeckers & possum joeys.  Today, all the farm's outbuildings have a new life: the dilapidated chicken hatchery is now a destination fine-dining restaurant, and a railroad shanty from the ol’ coal mine behind the property is a charming AirBnB cottage. This episode is further proof that you can build your own version of a happy & unique life.Check out Katie's restaurant Dancing Bear Cafe on Facebook & Instagram. And next time you're passing through Missouri, book one of the AirBnBs at her farm:  Artist Cottage or The Pond House.Follow Our Numinous Nature & my naturalist illustrations on InstagramCheck out my shop of shirts, prints, and books featuring my artContact: herbaceoushuman@gmail.com 
Chuck Bonner is a family-taught paleontologist & artist hailing from the chalk beds of Western Kansas: once an ancient ocean teaming with large swimming & flying reptiles, fish, sharks, and turtles. He and his wife live off-the-grid in an old chalk church they've renovated into a fossil gallery a few miles down the road from Little Jerusalem Badlands State Park. We begin by learning why this landscape makes for such good Cretaceous fossil hunting & get a glimpse of what a hunt in the chalk beds is like. Chuck shares two memorable "fossil fishing" stories: the first about a pteranodon skull found when he was only 15; the second about how his family name [Bonner] has been forever immortalized by science.  After story time, Chuck gives us a tour of his workshop. Did you know Indiana Jones was based on a real life, legendary paleontologist [not an anthropologist]? And if you're like me, I found it extremely helpful to reference the illustrations & fossil photos on Chuck's website for a clear mental picture of what these ancient animals looked like.Check out Chuck & his wife's gift shop, fossil & art gallery: Keystone Gallery. And watch the Bonners at work in their fossil beds in NOVA's Making North America: Life.Follow Our Numinous Nature & my naturalist illustrations on InstagramCheck out my shop of shirts, prints, and books featuring my artContact: herbaceoushuman@gmail.com 
Tyler Chadwell-English - a charismatic librarian & folklorist with a masters in folklore & museum studies from George Mason University - lights our imagination with all-things Appalachian witchlore! We begin with me sharing my own personal story of Brooklyn witches & a possession experience that left me white as a ghost. Once the interview commences, Tyler teaches us about the three types of Appalachian witchcraft: white witchery, black witchery, and witch doctoring; followed by the various sub-genres of witches: the water witch, shapeshifter, bloodstopper, and granny woman.  We hear four local folktales about: troublesome cats in a mill, a widower’s haunted lilac bush, a mysterious hitchhiker, and a lock of hair in a shoe.  Then it's time to dust off our old brooms & Bibles as we learn a handful of regional ways to protect our homes from witches & evil spirits. The conversation creeps through Grimms, the connection between the queer & occult communities, and if folktales should be believed as truth. Make sure to stick around till the very end as Tyler shares two of his personal spooky stories: one about the death of an old cat lady, the other about a mysterious occurrence with a rose during a harrowing car wreck. This is the bewitching Halloween special I had prayed for!Check out the West Virginia Folklife Center and the books mentioned by Tyler throughout the episode: Witches, Ghosts, and Signs: Folklore of the Southern Appalachians;  Signs, Cures, and Witchery: German Appalachian Folklore, and The Telltale Lilac Bush and Other West Virginia Ghost Tales.Follow Our Numinous Nature & my naturalist illustrations on InstagramCheck out my shop of shirts, prints, and books featuring my artContact: herbaceoushuman@gmail.com 
Joanne Bauman of Topeka, Kansas is a yarb woman and the host of Mother Earth News' "Heirlooms & Herbals" podcast. Coming from a long line of plant people - Appalachians, an Oglala Lakota medicine woman & a pharmacist father - Joanne encourages us to foster a relationship with the land. She instructs us on how we might give an offering of herbs or our hair to the plants and animals we aim to forage and hunt. We hear about mullein torches, elderberry folklore, herbs specific to the prairie, and 'the doctrine of signatures': an ancient tool for determining a plant's medicinal properties. Joanne then shares a powerful story about both healing the land and intergenerational trauma surrounding Lt. Colonel George Custer, the Lakota & Cheyenne of the Black Hills, and The Battle of the Greasy Grass [aka The Battle of the Little Bighorn]. Perhaps one of the highlights of this entire podcast series comes after her story, we have the great honor of hearing Joanne sing a Lakota horse song. Wow!!! We finish up our backyard garden conversation listening to Joanne's experiences studying psychology & working with folks' dis-eases of the psyche. In closing, Joanne gives us a fun, yet precise tip about the real meaning of the word "guru."Check out Joanne's Prairie Magic Herbals & her Heirlooms & Herbals Podcast Follow Our Numinous Nature & my naturalist illustrations on InstagramCheck out my shop of shirts, prints, and books featuring my artContact: herbaceoushuman@gmail.com 
Deputy Stan White is a deputy sheriff, trapper, & fur buyer in Barry County in the Missouri Ozarks.  As a darkening storm swirls in the background, Deputy White speaks to his county’s rising drug-use, homelessness, & domestic violence as well as the changing collective feeling amongst the locals. He tells us a little bit about the fur market: from beaver castors to mink farming, 70's coons to western bobcats. We hear about growing up trapping with his father and uncle, and how setting his first trapline was an exercise in facing fear and possibly a rite towards manhood. Approaching story-time, our tastebuds wonder as muskrat meat, bobcat back straps and baked possum are brought to the table. Deputy White's first story illustrates the archetypal tension of fathers & sons; his second speaks to animal temperaments from a cantankerous cottonmouth to a stoic bobcat that seemed to act against its fiery nature.  Follow Our Numinous Nature & my naturalist illustrations on InstagramCheck out my shop of shirts, prints, and books featuring my artContact: herbaceoushuman@gmail.com 
Victoria Fillmore of Cedar Hill Homestead is a community herbalist in the wooded hills of central Tennessee where she homesteads with her husband, son, chickens, goats & herbs. We start our convo hearing about a rat snake in the chicken coop, the Foxfire books, poke sallet, experimenting with poisonous plants and capturing wild yeast. Then there's a massive shift from light plant talk to deep wisdom: Tori shares the story of her deceased mentor [a Lakota elder named Hawk] and his lesson-learned-too-late about dissipating others' negative energy. From there we are in the realm of animism, cleansing practices, and messages from the dead.Check out Cedar Hill Homestead on Instagram & Facebook.Follow Our Numinous Nature & my naturalist illustrations on InstagramCheck out my shop of shirts, prints, and books featuring my artContact: herbaceoushuman@gmail.com 
Lynn Faust - The Lightning Bug Lady - is a Tennessean naturalist and citizen scientist who has written the first ever North American guidebook on lightning bugs: Fireflies, Glow-worms, and Lightning Bugs. She has consulted in-the-field on numerous nature documentaries including BBC's new Seven Worlds, One Planet and their 2015 Life That Glows as well as Netflix's Night on Earth. This super folky episode is much more than Lynn's lightning bug 101; we hear about sailing the world, Appalachian packrats, firefly folklore, working with David Attenborough, glowing mushrooms, digging mayapple, and stolen sang. Quite the raconteur, Lynn shares multiple stories, the first about her discovery of a synchronous Smoky Mountain lightning bug, another about her granny neighbor who warned of the blue ghosts that haunt Lynn's property, followed by a series of moth synchronicities surrounding her brother's sudden death, and finally, to end this glorious episode, how her son was stalked by an aggressive mountain lion. This one is a must listen!Check out Lynn's firefly guidebook and the BBC trailers for Life That Glows and Seven Worlds, One Planet. Follow Our Numinous Nature & my naturalist illustrations on InstagramCheck out my shop of shirts, prints, and books featuring my artContact: herbaceoushuman@gmail.com 
Michael Fies is a wildlife biologist & the furbearer project leader at Virginia's Department of Wildlife Resources [formerly known as Virginia Department of Game & Inland Fisheries]. Furbearers are defined as animals with commercial fur value ranging from the tiny least weasel, the mighty beaver, and mischievous raccoon, to the elusive bobcat and trickster coyote. Mike shares how his grandfather's love of the outdoors & their rabbit beagle led to his 37-year career in wildlife. This is an educational episode where we discuss a wide range of topics: the little known squirrel-sized spotted skunk; fox-sized weasels [fishers] making their way from West Virginia; restoring river otter populations; scat IDing; skunk essence; a gruesome tree full of coyote corpses; and even eastern mountain lions. Mike clears up misconceptions about trapping; how it is not only humane when following Best Management Practices, but can be beneficial to wildlife management, followed by his thoughts on how Native Americans may have used naturally made traps. Mike tells two fun stories from his career: one about a backyard skunk and the other about dealing with a mountain lion call. And before this educational interview, we read a potent and timely Cherokee legend about the ghostly flower [Indian pipe] that grows where friends and family quarrel. Check out Mike's work on the spotted skunk and the department's nature-loving Instagram. Follow Our Numinous Nature & my naturalist illustrations on InstagramCheck out my shop of shirts, prints, and books featuring my artContact: herbaceoushuman@gmail.com 
Forrest Green Farm in Louisa, Virginia is the no-spray, beyond-organic family farm of Krista & Rob Rahm. They pasture raise cows, pigs, and chickens, and grow heirloom veggies and an impressive array of medicinal herbs. The theme of this episode is family. We talk with Krista about finding their run down farm house and how her son's learning disability led to herbalism & homeschooling. She shares what it's like to raise kids on a farm and her feelings about abandoning a career-oriented life for self-sufficiency and nature. From her husband Rob, we hear about slingshot hunting as a kid, fox trapping with their son, and get a practical tip for folks who want to try farming. Most interestingly is how the Rahms use their intuition: how Rob constantly reads the signs of the farm while Krista receives enlightening information from her plants. We culminate with their experience dealing with the bee stings that nearly took Rob's life. Check out Forrest Green Farm on Instagram & Facebook.Follow Our Numinous Nature & my naturalist illustrations on InstagramCheck out my shop of shirts, prints, and books featuring my artContact: herbaceoushuman@gmail.com 
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