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Featured in this Episode: Johnny Cash Teaser: The story of the enigmatic “Man in Black” is a vast ocean that is impossible to cover every detail. But this three part series will attempt to further explain what listeners know about Johnny Cash, debunk a few myths, and uncover fascinating moments in his life that are lesser known. In essence, we’ll be looking further behind the curtain of the legend known as JR Cash than exceptional movies such as “Walk the Line” have portrayed.  Part 2 presents Johnny’s rise with Sun Records, the tumultuous years of his personal life and addiction, his turnaround, and when he first cleans up his act as a star. — Collaboration | Basic Folk Podcast  "Shine A Light" | Johnny Cash: The Life Follow American Songcatcher | Instagram Support Independent Programming! Join the Patreon Send a one-time donation through Venmo or PayPal Credits: Nicholas Edward Williams - Production, research, writing, editing, recording and distribution Source Credits: Johnny Cash: Johnny Cash: The Life | The Gift: The Journey of Johnny Cash | Official | Washington Post |  Live About | Britannica | Town and Country | History.com | KHQA | Biography | VC Star | El Paso Times | Classic Country | Culture Trip --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/americansongcatcher/support
Featured in this Episode: Johnny Cash Teaser: The story of the enigmatic “Man in Black” is a vast ocean that is impossible to cover and give every detail. But this three part series will attempt to further explain what listeners may think they know about Johnny Cash, broaden the understanding of his personal life, and uncover fascinating moments in his career that are lesser known, misunderstood, or flat out wild. In essence, we’ll be looking WAY behind the curtain of the legend known as JR Cash, far more than even exceptional movies such as “Walk the Line” have portrayed.  In part one, we'll navigate Johnny’s childhood, teenage years, and his initial rise with Sun Records. — Support Independent Programming Join the Patreon Send a one-time donation through Venmo or PayPal — Collaboration | Basic Folk Podcast  "Shine A Light" | Johnny Cash: The Life Follow American Songcatcher | Instagram | TikTok Credits: Nicholas Edward Williams - Production, research, writing, editing, recording and distribution Source Credits: Johnny Cash: Johnny Cash: The Life | The Gift: The Journey of Johnny Cash | Official | Grunge | Biography | Live About | Achievement.org | Cheat Sheet | Britannica | Action 5 News --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/americansongcatcher/support
S2:E5 // That Bad Man

S2:E5 // That Bad Man

2022-02-2101:09:27

Celebrating Black History Month!  Featured in this Episode: Traditional - “Stagger Lee” (:42) Memphis Minnie (15:45) Lightnin’ Hopkins (29:21) Taj Mahal (48:55) Teaser: This notorious murder story has been covered in more genres, by more artists and across more multi-media platforms than any other in history, while somehow remaining relatively obscure. She’s known as the queen of the country blues, and queen of the Chicago blues, though she got her start while homeless and playing on the streets full time in Memphis. One of the last links that remained of the original country blues past the folk and blues revival, this Texas bluesman’s personal life was shrouded in mystery during both pinnacles in his near 60-year career. Born of Caribbean descent, he would go on to be a liaison between cultures and sounds from all over the world, wrapping it all into a tight package that makes the blues feel like an altogether human experience. — Collaboration | Basic Folk Podcast  "Shine A Light" | Blues Foundation Follow American Songcatcher | Instagram Support Independent Programming | Join the Patreon or send a one-time donation through Venmo or PayPal Credits: Nicholas Edward Williams - Production, research, writing, editing, recording and distribution Jack Browning - Writer Ryan Eastridge - Writer Source Credits: Stagger Lee: Missouri Life | StaggerLee.com | American Blues Scene | StLouis-mo.gov Memphis Minnie: Black Past | Musicians Guide | 64 Parishes Lightnin’ Hopkins: Black Past | | Texas Monthly | Udiscovermusic | THSA.org Taj Mahal: Berklee Interview | Harlem World Magazine | Hawaii Public Radio | New York Times --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/americansongcatcher/support
Today on the program, I’m pleased to bring you a very special episode through American Songcatcher, sharing a wonderful podcast called Basic Folk in our feed. Now some of you may already be aware of these in-depth, honest interviews with host Cindy Howes, but I feel like the rest of you should get on board! Sure, there are many conversational podcasts out there, but Basic Folk sets itself apart with honest and complex conversations about the human experience witnessed from an artistic angle. Cindy's questions are not only well-researched and carefully crafted, but the artists featured are among the most revered in the American roots music scene today, some of which have been covered or will be covered by this podcast, including Amethyst Kiah, Oliver Wood, Tom Rush, Alison Russell and several others. One of Cindy and I’s favorite musicians, Chris Thile, stopped by Basic Folk several months back, and it seemed apropos to share their conversation since he was covered in Episode 1 of Season 2. Be sure to subscribe to Basic Folk wherever you get your podcasts! We'll be back with Episode 5 in two weeks! BF Links: Spotify Apple Music Official Site Instagram Facebook About Basic Folk: Basic Folk is a podcast with honest conversations between musicians and Cindy Howes, a well-versed public radio host and music curator, and guest host Lizzie No, a talented singer/songwriter. Basic Folk approaches interviews with warmth, humor and insightful questions. This podcast fosters the folk community and showcases a genre that is often misunderstood. Basic Folk features complex conversations about the human experience witnessed from an artistic angle. Our definition of “folk” is extremely broad, so you’ll hear interviews from Amythyst Kiah, Tom Rush, The Lumineers and many more. Basic Folk is dedicated to showcasing the best in folk and roots musicians including BIPOC musicians who have been excluded, or felt like they did not belong, in the folk world. Both Cindy and Lizzie bring unique perspectives to our honest conversations and are dedicated to changing the landscape and the gatekeepers of the folk music community. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/americansongcatcher/support
Featured in this Episode: Jean Ritchie (:28) Ola Belle Reed (17:48) Hazel Dickens & Alice Gerrard (35:41) Alison Krauss (55:54) Teaser: Her family is considered one of the wealthiest in the ballad tradition, preserving hundreds of songs from their lineage to Scotland in their home of Kentucky, and is single-handedly responsible for bringing the Appalachian dulcimer to prominence in America. Born in the mountains of North Carolina, she paved the way for both bluegrass music and old-time with her brother through their pioneering work at music parks, on the radio, and during the folk revival. They’re considered the first women to front a bluegrass band, and in their wake are generations of women thanks to their contributions. A child prodigy, she was signed to Rounder Records at 14 and now is one of the most decorated bluegrass and female musicians of all time, still turning heads today with her many collaborations. --- "Shine A Light" | Pretty Good For a Girl: Women in Bluegrass by Murphy Hicks Henry Follow American Songcatcher | Instagram Support | Join Patreon or send a one-time donation: Venmo // PayPal Source Credits: Jean Ritchie: KET | Library of Congress | NPR Ola Belle Reed: Blue Ridge Heritage | Arts.gov | NC Pedia | SML Hazel Dickens and Alice Gerrard: NY Times | Folkstreams | Official | BG Hall of Fame | Pinecone | Birthplace of Country Music Alison Krauss: NPR | Britannica | Grammy |  NY Times --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/americansongcatcher/support
S2:E3 // God's Golden Shore

S2:E3 // God's Golden Shore

2021-12-0501:25:32

Season 2, Episode 3 // God's Golden Shore Featured in this Episode: Traditional - “Man of Constant Sorrow” (:28) Ma Rainey (13:08) Bill Monroe (31:40) Patsy Cline (51:29) Bruce Molsky (1:08:17) Teaser: Thought to be rooted in the early hymns brought to America, this old-time folk song has reveled in the spotlight more than once in the roots music community, especially after being featured in the 2000 film “O’ Brother Where Art Thou.” A defining voice of the 1920’s and 1930’s, this female artist wrote the book on fashion, songwriting, and entrepreneurship while harnessing the soul of the blues in some of the earliest recordings of the genre. Dubbed the Father and creator of Bluegrass music, this mandolin aficionado learned how to weave the blues with old-time with piercing tenor mountain harmonies and blistering fast tempos. A life taken too soon, this woman’s voice epitomized country music for nearly a decade, and inspired generations of singers in her wake, even until today. A scholar, teacher and virtuosic fiddle and banjo player, he’s a quintessential “musician’s musician” and is widely considered among the premier ambassadors of America’s old-time mountain music. ⁠Listen to my new traditional record: FOLK SONGS FOR OLD TIMES’ SAKE Performances: “Man of Constant Sorrow” - Traditional (10:14) “Prove It On Me Blues” - Ma Rainey (28:26) “In the Pines” - Traditional (47:50) “Walkin’ After Midnight” 1:06:20 “Red Rocking Chair” | 1:20:48 --- "Shine A Light" | Cultural Equity Follow American Songcatcher | Instagram Support Independent Programming | Join the Patreon or send a one-time donation through Venmo or PayPal Source Credits: Traditional: Black Deer Festival | American Songwriter  Ma Rainey:  Women’s HIstory | National Museum AAH |  Black Past  Bill Monroe: Folkways | Britannica | Alan Cackett | Bluegrass HOF Patsy Cline: Grunge | Biography | Britannica Bruce Molsky: Official | WBUR | Banjo News --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/americansongcatcher/support
BONUS: Side B

BONUS: Side B

2021-11-0933:54

It’s a pleasure to bring you the second half of this special short series Side A // Side B, bringing some depth to the songs from my recently released traditional record “Folk Songs For Old Times’ Sake”. Today, we’re flipping the record over, and diving in to the history behind Side B. Side B Tracklist: Goin’ Down This Road Feelin’ Bad (Traditional) Saint James Infirmary (Traditional) Midnight Special (Traditional) Barbry Allen (Traditional) Mississippi River Blues (Jimmie Rodgers) Peggy-O (Traditional) Pay Day (Mississippi John Hurt) Vinyl Orders: Email AmericanSongcatcherPodcast@gmail.com OR Order through Bandcamp Listen on: Spotify Apple Music/iTunes Amazon Soundcloud Bandcamp This episode was produced, edited, recorded and distributed by Nicholas Edward Williams. ---- Praise for Folk Songs For Old Times' Sake: “I’ve got to say, I can genuinely appreciate another young folkie taking traditional tunes and truly making them their own. Nicholas’ voice sounds natural, unaffected, and without any trite attempts at emulation; rather, it seems wholly a product of his surroundings, with small nods to the phrasing and inflection that are the signatures of traditional American music. This is to say nothing of the sparse-yet-deliberate production of the songs themselves, with nothing sitting too far out front, nothing lost in the shadows, as if the listener found themselves in an empty country church with Williams simply playing to the steeple above.” - JP Harris As always, it’s Williams’ gentle laid back soothing vocals that win you over.” - FOLK RADIO UK "The guitar playing and vocal performance are fantastic, and I love the sparse production. I think people are gonna love this, it’s a great record.” - Oliver Wood (The Wood Brothers) “This record of well-known and well-loved folk songs is easy to like. With tasteful guitar arrangements and a voice that draws you right in, Nicholas has created recordings that roll along like a mountain stream.” - David Holt (PBS TV/Radio Host, Four-Time Grammy Winner and Banjoist for Doc Watson) --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/americansongcatcher/support
BONUS: Side A

BONUS: Side A

2021-11-0633:09

Since releasing the podcast, I’ve had a lot of people ask if the renditions at the end of each segment will be released, or streamable. Well I’m happy to say that over the last six months, I’ve been hard at work on a traditional record called Folk Songs For Old Times’ Sake, that is now available on all platforms, as well as limited edition vinyl. Several of these rearranged songs are traditionals, and some are from artists covered in the first season of this program. This is the first of a special two-part  short series called Side A / Side B, where you can get a little scope into the history behind each of the tracks, followed by the recordings themselves, some of which are stripped, and several of which feature accompaniment in clarinet, fiddle, banjo, upright bass, harmonies, lap steel, jug sounds, harmonica and stomp box. Side A Tracklist: Shake Sugaree (Elizabeth Cotten) East Virginia Blues (Traditional) Wish I Was A Mole (Traditional) Green Rocky Road (Dave Van Ronk/Bob Kaufman) Thinking Tonight of My Blue Eyes (The Carter Family) Railroad Bill (Traditional) Cotton Mill Girls (Traditional) Vinyl Orders: Email AmericanSongcatcherPodcast@gmail.com OR Order through Bandcamp Listen on: Spotify Apple Music/iTunes Amazon Soundcloud Bandcamp This episode was produced, edited, recorded and distributed by Nicholas Edward Williams. ---- Praise for Folk Songs For Old Times' Sake: “I’ve got to say, I can genuinely appreciate another young folkie taking traditional tunes and truly making them their own. Nicholas’ voice sounds natural, unaffected, and without any trite attempts at emulation; rather, it seems wholly a product of his surroundings, with small nods to the phrasing and inflection that are the signatures of traditional American music. This is to say nothing of the sparse-yet-deliberate production of the songs themselves, with nothing sitting too far out front, nothing lost in the shadows, as if the listener found themselves in an empty country church with Williams simply playing to the steeple above.” - JP Harris As always, it’s Williams’ gentle laid back soothing vocals that win you over.” - FOLK RADIO UK "The guitar playing and vocal performance are fantastic, and I love the sparse production. I think people are gonna love this, it’s a great record.” - Oliver Wood (The Wood Brothers) “This record of well-known and well-loved folk songs is easy to like. With tasteful guitar arrangements and a voice that draws you right in, Nicholas has created recordings that roll along like a mountain stream.” - David Holt (PBS TV/Radio Host, Four-Time Grammy Winner and Banjoist for Doc Watson) --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/americansongcatcher/support
S2:E2 // Oh Little Liza

S2:E2 // Oh Little Liza

2021-10-3001:18:50

Season 2, Episode 2 // Oh Little Liza Featured in this Episode: Traditional - “Lil' Liza Jane” (:28) Dock Boggs (11:22) Snooks Eaglin (25:54) Nina Simone (43:36) Billy Strings (1:04:18) Teaser: Today, this song is a standard in New Orleans brass bands as well as old-time music, but its earliest iterations started as a sea shanty. His three finger-style banjo picking was directly inspired by early African American string bands, and his early recordings helped standardize nearly a dozen old-time songs from the Cumberland mountain range. Blind at age one, he’s one of the most versatile and inspirational guitarists in blues music, and one of the least known, unless you’re from New Orleans. A renowned civil rights activist, arranger, singer, songwriter and pianist who covered a broad range of genres including classical, jazz, blues, folk, R&B, gospel and pop. At just 29 years old, this multi-instrumentalist has taken the traditional and progressive bluegrass world in the palm of his hand, and he’s only getting started. Listen to my new traditional record: FOLK SONGS FOR OLD TIMES’ SAKE Performances: “Little Liza Jane” - Traditional (9:25) “Wild Bill Jones” - Traditional (23:04) “Saint James Infirmary” - Traditional (39:42) “Sinnerman” - Traditional (1:02:01) “Walk on Boy” - Doc Watson (1:13:07) --- "Shine A Light" | Music Maker Relief Foundation Follow American Songcatcher | Instagram Support Independent Programming | Join the Patreon or send a one-time donation through Venmo or PayPal Source Credits: Traditional: Cultural Equity | Jazz Fandom  Dock Boggs: Dock Boggs - “Life in Music” | Encyclopedia.com Snooks Eaglin’: Nola.com | Blues access | All About Blues Nina Simone: Official Site | History Collection | Black past  Billy Strings: Rolling Stone | Acoustic Guitar | Official  --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/americansongcatcher/support
Season 2, Episode 1 // Ain't Gonna Study War No More Featured in this Episode: Traditional - “Down by The Riverside” (00:27) Mance Lipscomb (10:28) Ramblin’ Jack Elliot (23:31) Emmylou Harris (45:17) Chris Thile (57:27) Teaser: After the civil war, songs such as these were created and sung from Alabama to Ohio for a perilous journey through the Underground Railroad, where the enslaved were in pursuit of their freedom. He wasn’t a bluesman as much as a songster, known for his incredibly broad catalogue of songs and his front porch philosophizing. The student of Woody Guthrie, the father of Bob Dylan, the son who ran away to become a cowboy, and America’s purveyor of folk music at 90 years old today. She’s one of the most influential female singers of the 20th century, not just in country music but folk, pop and bluegrass, and is considered an American icon Widely considered the greatest mandolin player alive today, and perhaps to ever live, his acclaim reaches far and wide through several Grammy-winning projects and over 30 albums, despite only being 40 years old. Performances by the Host: “Down By The Riverside” - Traditional (8:16) “Take Me Back Babe” - Traditional (21:29) “Roving Gambler” - Traditional (42:37) “Angels Rejoiced Last Night” - The Louvin Brothers (55:08) “Bury Me Beneath the Willow” - Traditional (1:13:03) --- "Shine A Light" | Arhoolie Foundation Follow American Songcatcher | Instagram Support Independent Programming | Join the Patreon or send a one-time donation through Venmo or PayPal --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/americansongcatcher/support
For the final collaboration of the “Sitting In” miniseries, I’m excited to share a fantastic multi-instrumentalist, fluent in clawhammer banjo and slide blues guitar, named Cristina Vane. Born in Italy, and living many places overseas before arriving in America at 18 years old, Cristina accumulated a wealth of culture and a diverse range of songs before discovering her love for pre-war blues and the likes of the pioneers Skip James, Robert Johnson, Blind Willie Johnson and Rory Block who have all shaped her guitar technique and song catalogue. She worked at the famous McCabe’s Guitar Shop in LA, and studied finger-style guitar under her mentor Pete Steinberg before exploring country blues picking and old folk guitar styles on her own in the years that followed. She has said, “I’m essentially a rock kid who is obsessed with old music.”⁠ ⁠Cristina just released her debut full length record on April 2nd, titled "Nowhere Sounds Lovely", and American Songwriter premiered one track titled “Badlands” adding: “Like a young Bonnie Raitt, Vane sings from both her voice and her supple, bluesy guitar playing almost simultaneously–her sound as earthen as the South Dakota landscape…”⁠ Cristina shares a story of how she got into American Folk and Blues music outside America, and her quest to music preservation. Enjoy! Links: Cristina’s Official Site Stream Music Buy Music Follow Cristina on Social Media: Instagram Facebook --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/americansongcatcher/support
Today on the program will be my sixth guest for the “Sitting In” mini-series, Jody Carroll. Jody is a performer and songwriter who effortlessly creates bold interpretations of old Blues and American Folk music, and makes them his own improvisational musical journeys. He’s a finger-style and slide guitar master, and a soulful singer blending flavors of Blues, Folk, Mountain music, Jazz and Rock all together into a true power- packed gumbo. Raised on Willie Nelson and AM Country Radio in the late 60’s, he’s toured with or shared the stage with legends such as Buddy Guy, Honey Boy Edwards, R.L Burnside, Johnny Winter, John Mayhall, George Thorogood, Derek Trucks & Susan Tedeski, Robert Cray, Canned Heat, Robert Earl Keen, and Sonny Landreth just to name a few. No Depression magazine says “If there is one artist who embodies roots music to it's fullest, it has to be Jody Carroll" Jody was forever changed when he heard a collection of recordings from the Newport Folk Festival, between 1963-1965. This is a short story of his journey to and from there, enjoy. Links: Jody's Official Site Buy His Music Follow Jody on Social Media: Instagram Facebook -- Support American Songcatcher! Join the Patreon Community for as little as $3 a month! -OR- Send a one-time donation via: Venmo PayPal  --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/americansongcatcher/support
The fifth edition of the “Sitting In” miniseries features a new project by international touring Irish musician Dylan Walshe. Steeped in the traditions of folk, Irish, Blues, Singer-songwriter and roots music, Dylan has received wide acclaim from all over, including Dave King of Flogging Molly who has said that “The future of songwriting is safe in the hands of this man.” This episode features Dylan’s new music podcast, The Stirring Foot, and the first 20 minutes of a conversation he had with none other than Ramblin’ Jack Elliot, who Dylan first met at Tennessee’s Muddy Roots Music Festival back in 2015. If you’re not familiar with the legendary Ramblin’ Jack, you should be. Now 90 years old, he’s been described as the "son of Woody Guthrie & the father of Bob Dylan". They talked about trips to Ireland, Europe & the UK, The Clancy Brothers, Frank Zappa, Bob Dylan, Odetta, The Grateful Dead, Margaret Barry, Ewan MacColl, and Woody Guthrie. You can hear the entire show through the tags below, or by searching for “The Stirring Foot” wherever you get your podcasts. Enjoy! Follow on Instagram @dylanwalshe @AmericanSongcatcher Links: The Stirring Foot Dylan’s Official Site Ramblin Jack Elliott’s Official Site -- Support American Songcatcher! Join the Patreon Community for as little as $3 a month - https://www.Patreon.com/AmericanSongcatcher Send a one-time donation via: Venmo - https://www.venmo.com/AmericanSongcatcher PayPal - https://paypal.me/AmericanSongcatcher --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/americansongcatcher/support
Good people! I'm so pleased to share my fourth guest to embark on this “Sitting In” mini-series, a local legend in my neck of the woods, Chattanooga’s own Lon Eldridge. Harboring a unique blend of traditional pre-war blues, ragtime, jazz and swing, Lon has spent the last two decades evoking the styles of those who laid the framework of these genres, from the likes of Mississippi John Hurt to Robert Johnson to Blind Blake and countless other musical masters. He’s an avid collector of 78rpm records and restores old Victrola record players, and showcases his deep collection under the guise of DJ Passe. Lon’s also a member of a gypsy jazz and swing group called The 9th Street Stompers, who cull up the musical scenery of an era when the lines between swing, gypsy jazz, blues, rockabilly, and if all that wasn’t enough, he also has his own bolo tie business, Lookout Bolo Ties.⁠ For this collaboration, Lon expanded his skills once again to celebrate the work of Hawaiian steel guitarist Pale K. Lua, who was instrumental in bringing the unique sound to America at the turn of the century, before it was adopted by blues, western, bluegrass and country music starting in the 1920’s. Lon is the only person to assemble all of Pale’s recordings and release them as a complete set. Here’s his story, enjoy.⁠ Follow Lon: @dj_Passe  @bolo_knee Links: Pale K. Lua Complete Recordings  Lon's Official Website  --- Support American Songcatcher! Join the Patreon Community for as little as $3 a month - https://www.Patreon.com/AmericanSongcatcher Send a one-time donation via: Venmo PayPal --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/americansongcatcher/support
Hey Folks! I’m so pleased to share the 3rd act of this “Sitting In” miniseries with you, none other than the inimitable Willi Carlisle. A multi-faceted writer, performer, and instrumentalist, Willi has spent the last several years collecting folklore, playing or calling square dances, and working in the avant-garde. He’s a folksinger with a style forged in the fire of Ozark old-time, and has a masters degree in Poetry. He’s spent years in the woods with poets and old folk singers and he’s a queer-identifying storyteller whose musical stories hoot, stomp, and saunter through joys and troubles uniquely southern and timelessly true. He’s equally comfortable on banjo, accordion, fiddle, and guitar, and has earned accolades for his versatility with performances in the UK, Canada, and across the USA, appearing with acts like Dom Flemons, Mary Gauthier, Los Texmaniacs and more.  The Washington Post said that: "Carlisle has a poetry in describing songs passed down through generations as a most precious cultural commodity, and a passion and immediacy in performing them. Both down home and brainy, [Willi] is worth seeking out." The following is classic Willi. Short stories of the Ozarks told over a collection of sounds and from Willi’s pocket, followed by a talking’ blues piece called “Peculiar, Missouri”. Enjoy! Follow on Instagram: @WilliCarlisle  Link: Official Website  --- Support American Songcatcher! Join the Patreon Community for as little as $3 a month - https://www.Patreon.com/AmericanSongcatcher Send a one-time donation via: Venmo PayPal --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/americansongcatcher/support
Hey Folks! I’m thrilled to share the second part of the “Sitting In” mini-series, where I hand over the podcast reins to some of my folky friends, so that they can share a story that ties into music preservation and play a few songs in line with their story. My guest today is Sparrow, who along with her partner Keith, leads the Asheville, NC group The Resonant Rogues, who seamlessly weave the threads of old time, country, swing, folk and more into a beautiful tapestry that simultaneously showcases tradition and innovation. In late 2020, she was immersed in a month-long mentorship program at the John C. Campbell Folk School in Brasstown, NC, which has a fascinating history, curriculum and mission. This is a journal of her experience. Follow on Instagram: @ResonantRogues  @SparrowPants  @JohncCampbellFolkschool  Links: Official Website - John Campbell Folk School  --- Support American Songcatcher! Join the Patreon Community for as little as $3 a month - https://www.Patreon.com/AmericanSongcatcher Send a one-time donation via: Venmo  PayPal  --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/americansongcatcher/support
Today, I’m delighted to share the first “Sitting In” mini-series episode with you, where I’ve handed the podcast reins over to a music preservationist and performer. First up, is a story of the African American spiritual turned protest song called “We Shall Not Be Moved”, written and spoken by Matthew Sabatella. Matthew’s mission is to “connect people with music that is woven into the fabric of the United States”. He’s a singer, writer, multi-instrumentalist and award-winning old-time banjo player, music historian, leader of the Rambling String Band, and serves on the board of directors for Southeast regional chapter of Folk Alliance International. He’s also the founder of Ballad of America, an educational non-profit that not only provides and develops vital resources for preserving all of the songs and genres that have shaped America, but also travels to colleges and universities to give educational lectures and presentations to spread awareness of this important history directly down the generational ladder. I can’t wait to share all the “Sitting In” episodes with you over the next several weeks, they’re all very different, entertaining and educational. Matt’s also got a great radio voice, so enjoy! Follow on Instagram: @Balladofamerica  @ramblingstringband @sabatellamusic Links: Matthew Sabatella  Ballad of America  Rambling String Band  --- Support American Songcatcher! Join the Patreon Community for as little as $3 a month - https://www.Patreon.com/AmericanSongcatcher Send a one-time donation via: Venmo PayPal --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/americansongcatcher/support
Today I have the pleasure of sharing a conversation I had with multi-instrumentalist, singer and songwriter Jay Cobb Anderson, co-founder of the group Fruition, who has been making big waves in the major festival circuit during the last decade with blends of traditional sounds, contemporary folk and bluegrass, and most recently the roots of rock and roll. We talked about Jay’s busking journey, how he reached the other members of Fruition, how they developed their sound, about Bob Dylan and the wake he left for so many to dive into old music, how traditional music fits into his life today and the music he creates, some interesting stories and a few artists that I hadn’t heard of. -- Follow on Instagram: @JayCobbAnderson @fruitionpdx @tkandtheholyknownothings Jay's Musical Projects: Fruition - https://www.fruitionband.com/home TK and the Holy Know-Nothings - https://www.tkandtheholyknownothings.com/ Jay Cobb Anderson - https://www.jaycobbanderson.com/ --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/americansongcatcher/support
Today, I’m delighted to share a talk I had with mandolin prodigy and Grammy nominated multi-instrumentalist, singer and songwriter Sierra Hull. Accomplishing more in her first 28 years of life than most could over a few lifetimes, Sierra made her Grand Ole Opry debut at the age of 10, played Carnegie Hall at age 12, then landed a deal with Rounder Records at 13. Sierra was mentored by Alison Krauss and Chris Thile, she’s collaborated with all the big hitters in bluegrass from Ricky Skaggs, to Bela Fleck, Sam Bush, Jerry Douglass and Sturgill Simpson. Despite all those big names I threw out there, as you’ll hear Sierra could not be more humble. In early 2020, she released her fourth critically acclaimed record “25 Trips”, an inventive piece of work revealing her profound warmth as a storyteller, building off Sierra’s bluegrass roots and venturing into entirely new terrain. We talked about her childhood, small town living, the broad palette of music and bottomless well of traditional music, we geeked out on Tony Rice and Doc Watson, and Sierra shared r a few in depth wild stories that led her down the path she’s on. More on Sierra Hull:  Official - https://www.sierrahull.com/ Sierra and Husband Justin Moses "Little Liza Jane" - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2Eg2TotshKs -- Find American Songcatcher on Instagram - https://www.Instagram.com/AmericanSongcatcher Want to help this independent program chug along? Visit the Patreon page to find out how you can support for as little as $3 a month! https://www.Patreon.com/AmericanSongcatcher --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/americansongcatcher/support
Today, I have the pleasure of sharing a conversation I had with Oliver Wood. Since 2004, Oliver has been the frontman of The Wood Brothers, blurring the boundaries between folk, gospel, country-soul, and blues, earning an international audience and a Grammy Award-nomination along the way. Alongside his brother Chris Wood, of Medeski Martin and Wood, as well as percussionist Jano Rix, The Wood Brothers have embodied the future of roots music, while at the same time turning it on its head. Released yesterday, Oliver’s debut solo album, Always Smilin' reimagines his sharp songwriting, savvy guitar chops, and one-of-a-kind voice in a new light. He didn’t do it alone, as Jano Rix, Susan Tedeschi, Hiss Golden Messenger's Phil Cook, John Medeski, and several others also make appearances. Embracing the full range of his musical heritage, Always Smilin’ builds upon the blues and gospel sounds Oliver explored long before The Wood Brothers' formed, and galvanizes the roots music he's been making during the past two decades. We talked about his long history before starting The Wood Brothers with Chris, their shared wealth of music education from their musical father, how traditional music has informed The Wood Brothers and his solo project, geek out on some unknown roots musicians and much more. Enjoy! Listen to Oliver’s new solo record Always Smilin’ - https://oliverwoodmusic.bandcamp.com/album/always-smilin Official Website - https://www.oliverwoodmusic.com The Wood Brothers - https://www.thewoodbros.com -- This interview was made possible by the community on Patreon. For as little as $3 a month, you can directly support the team behind American Songcatcher make this program all it can be. Visit the Patreon site today and support if you have the means - https://www.Patreon.com/AmericanSongcatcher Follow AS on Instagram - https://www.Instagram.com/AmericanSongcatcher --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/americansongcatcher/support
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