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Jamil Jan Kochai joins Deborah Treisman to read and discuss “All Will Be Well,” by Yiyun Li, which was published in The New Yorker in 2019. Kochai is the author of two books, the novel “99 Nights in Logar,” which was a finalist for the PEN/Hemingway Award, and the story collection “The Haunting of Hajji Hotak,” which is a finalist for the National Book Award. He is currently a Hodder Fellow at Princeton.
Madeleine Thien joins Deborah Treisman to read and discuss “The Cafeteria in the Evening and a Pool in the Rain,” by Yoko Ogawa, translated from the Japanese by Stephen Snyder, which was published in The New Yorker in 2004. Thien’s books include the novels “Dogs at the Perimeter” and “Do Not Say We Have Nothing,” which won the Governor General’s Literary Award and the Scotiabank Giller Prize. 
Elif Batuman joins Deborah Treisman to read and discuss “Truth and Fiction,” by Sylvia Townsend Warner, which was published in The New Yorker in 1961. Batuman is the author of one book of nonfiction, “The Possessed: Adventures with Russian Books and the People Who Read Them,” and two novels, “The Idiot” and “Either/Or,” which was published earlier this year. She has been a staff writer at The New Yorker since 2010.
André Alexis joins Deborah Treisman to read and discuss “Waiting for Death in a Hotel,” by Italo Calvino, translated, from the Italian, by Martin McLaughlin, which was published in The New Yorker in 2006. Alexis’s novels include “Childhood,” “Days by Moonlight,” and “Fifteen Dogs,” which won the Scotiabank Giller Prize in 2015. 2022 © Italo Calvino, performed with permission of The Wylie Agency LLC.
Akhil Sharma joins Deborah Treisman to read and discuss “Zombie,” by Joyce Carol Oates, which was published in The New Yorker in 1994. Sharma is the author of the novels “Family Life” and “An Obedient Father,” which will be reissued in a revised version this month.
Rachel Kushner joins Deborah Treisman to read and discuss “Come Into the Drawing Room, Doris,” by Edna O’Brien, which was published in The New Yorker in 1962. Kushner is the author of three novels and most recently the essay collection “The Hard Crowd,” which was published last year.
Camille Bordas joins Deborah Treisman to read and discuss “A Father-to-Be,” by Saul Bellow, which was published in The New Yorker in 1955. Bordas’s novel “How to Behave in a Crowd,” was published in 2017
Sherman Alexie joins Deborah Treisman to read and discuss “Where I’m Calling From,” by Raymond Carver, which was published in The New Yorker in 1982. Alexie is the author of nineteen books of fiction and poetry, including “Blasphemy: New and Selected Stories” and the novel “Flight.”
Gish Jen Reads Grace Paley

Gish Jen Reads Grace Paley

2022-03-0101:00:585

Gish Jen joins Deborah Treisman to read and discuss “Friends,” by Grace Paley, which was published in The New Yorker in 1979. Jen is the author of nine books, including the novel “The Resisters” and the story collection “Thank you, Mr. Nixon,” which was published in February.
Alejandro Zambra joins Deborah Treisman to read and discuss “Loneliness,” by Bruno Schulz, translated from the Polish by Celina Wieniewska, which was published in The New Yorker in 1977. Zambra is a Chilean poet, novelist, and story writer whose most recent novel, “Chilean Poet,” will be published in English this month.
Kevin Barry joins Deborah Treisman to read and discuss “A Family Man,” by V. S. Pritchett, which was published in The New Yorker in 1977. Barry is a winner of the International Dublin Literary Award and the author of six books of fiction, most recently the story collection “That Old Country Music,” which came out in 2020.
Will Mackin joins Deborah Treisman to read and discuss “The Falls,” by George Saunders, which was published in The New Yorker in 1996. Mackin’s first book, “Bring Out the Dog,” was published in 2018 and won the PEN/Robert W. Bingham Prize for Debut Short Story Collection.
Ben Lerner joins Deborah Treisman to read and discuss “In the Name of Bobby,” by Julio Cortázar, translated from the Spanish by Gregory Rabassa, which was published in The New Yorker in 1979. Lerner is the author of seven books of fiction and poetry, including the novels “10:04” and “The Topeka School,” which was a finalist for the 2020 Pulitzer Prize in Fiction. 
Donald Antrim joins Deborah Treisman to read and discuss “The Balloon,” by Donald Barthelme, which was published in The New Yorker in 1966. Antrim is the author of three novels and the story collection “The Emerald Light in the Air.” His memoir, “One Friday in April: A Story of Suicide and Survival,” will be published this month. “The Balloon” (c) 1966, by Donald Barthelme, performed with permission of the Wylie Agency, LLC.
Rebecca Curtis joins Deborah Treisman to read and discuss “Confessions of a Shinagawa Monkey,” by Haruki Murakami, which was published in The New Yorker in 2020. Curtis is the author of the story collection “Twenty Grand: and Other Tales of Love and Money.”
Ann Patchett Reads Maile Meloy

Ann Patchett Reads Maile Meloy

2021-08-0101:11:1610

Ann Patchett joins Deborah Treisman to read and discuss “The Proxy Marriage,” by Maile Meloy, which was published in The New Yorker in 2012. Patchett is the author of eight novels, including “Commonwealth” and “The Dutch House,” which was a finalist for last year’s Pulitzer Prize.
Susan Choi joins Deborah Treisman to read and discuss “Found Objects,” by Jennifer Egan, which was published in The New Yorker in 2007. Choi is the author of five novels, including “My Education” and “Trust Exercise,” which won the National Book Award in 2019.
Ben Okri joins Deborah Treisman to read and discuss “The Rescue Will Begin in Its Own Time,” four short fiction pieces by Franz Kafka, translated from the German by Michael Hofmann, which were published in The New Yorker in June of 2020. Okri is the author of two dozen books of fiction, poetry, and nonfiction, including the novels “The Famished Road,” which won the Booker Prize in 1991, and “The Freedom Artist,” which was published in 2019.
Téa Obreht joins Deborah Treisman to read and discuss “Gallatin Canyon,” by Thomas McGuane, which appeared in a 2003 issue of the magazine. Obreht is the author of two novels, “The Tiger's Wife” and “Inland.”
Weike Wang joins Deborah Treisman to read and discuss “Katania,” by Lara Vapnyar, which appeared in a 2013 issue of the magazine. Wang's first novel, “Chemistry,” won the PEN/Hemingway Award in 2018.
Comments (44)

Arian Rubio Rivera

I enjoyed a lot this homage to my favorite writer. If this one can give you the chills I would like to know your input on "Usted se tendió a su lado". Not sure if it has been translated but definitely a must to grasp again his uncomfortable view in the mom-son relations. thank you.

Oct 17th
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Za Ba

Murakami's male protagonists--even in animal forms-- are so pretentious and self-assured; probably reflecting himself

Jul 25th
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Martha Morrison

Interesting story. Terrible reader. Monotone, no difference between ideas, voices, sentences. Can you pick people who read out loud well, or let someone else read for them??!

Jul 16th
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Anne McKeon

What a brilliant reading Hisham Matar did of this story. I was thoroughly engaged with it and the ensuing conversation was an educational addition for me. Thank you so much. I try to write myself (short stories) and learn so much from these conversations. With gratefulness for these podcasts.

Jan 18th
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Gordieh Alizadeh

The short story is Atwood at her best. Besides, Homes reads the story in a voice neither too plaintive and wailing nor too affected and distant; just as it should be. Thanks to Deborah Treisman and others who made this audio version possible. Best, Zakieh. A

Dec 4th
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Sarah Kitty

The after story discussion is always so enjoyable. I like Deborah's skepticism about the accidental fall in love moment of Bridey at the end of the story. I think Ann Patchett is a romantic, but not very practical.

Nov 5th
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Frederico Campos Freitas

What role William's interest in Physics play to the story? I felt like any element have played an important part to understand or appreciate the text, though I have a hard time trying to get this particular part together..

Aug 5th
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G de Almeida

I feel Kafka writes of the futility of our efforts… nothing we do really matters because what is going to happen will happen regardless of our big sharp knives or tiny hammers

Jul 23rd
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Solmaz Dolatzade

thanks for the story and the productive discussion. I wish the transcription was available here!

Jun 8th
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Shahrzad Hashemi

loved it

Feb 4th
Reply (1)

Angela Tsames

Kirsten Roupenian's vocal fry is unbearable. Sorry had to skip.

Aug 11th
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Saro Khezernezhad

nice thanks

May 3rd
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usernameeh

Thought it was a diary of a person with multiple personality disdorder but then again he talks when he's already dead so.

Apr 19th
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Ricky Kruger

Margaret Atwood Bible, amazing! also, this story was fantastic :-)

Apr 7th
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Dawn Howley

Please can we have more stories? A great help at the moment.

Mar 23rd
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Teresa Wilkinson

oh dear that monotone voice took all the colour and life out of the story what a shame

Mar 17th
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Amlan Sanyal

Great listen!

Jan 3rd
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Arpan Gupta

really hard to follow , but great story . thank you

Oct 25th
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Jason Weasly

why

Sep 3rd
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Wahoo Wahoo

My favorite episode. Greer's reading of the story is wonderful and brings the compelling characters to life. I will likely remember this reading for the rest of my life.

Aug 8th
Reply (1)
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