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Shoresides News

Author: Shoresides

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Shoreside News interviews your neighbors on the vital stories impacting our region. Through interviews, updates, and special programs we keep you engaged with local news from across the region.
33 Episodes
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Shoresides spoke with community organizer and Elizabeth City local Quentin Jackson about what is happening in Elizabeth City as the community  responds to the police killing of Andrew Brown.Support the show (https://shoresides.org/support/)
Sheresa Elliot, 31, of Beaufort, NC speaks about how her job as a therapist is informing her work as she continues to organize for Black Lives Matter in Beaufort, NC. Elliot had never worked on social justice issues before she organized nearly 500 people for Black Lives Matter protests within her town of about 4,000 last month. Elliot now is facilitating virtual town hall discussions with the Beaufort Police Department. Support the show (https://shoresides.org/support/)
Lily Nicole and her fellow protesters in Wilmington, North Carolina are getting organized. They started an activist group called the lowercase leaders, and they've got a permit to protest on the steps of city hall every day, from 8 in the morning to 9 at night, until June 6th of 2021. Nicole describes how the protests have evolved and lists some of the lowercase leaders' goals. She says they're staying motivated through the fatigue and emotion; they're harnessing their community's energy. And one thing is clear - the protesters are here for the long haul.Support the show (https://shoresides.org/support/)
"I used to not want to offend people. As a pastor, I want to be compassionate. I want to understand both sides, but I've found myself in the past few weeks, just really specifically in a clear and concise way, say, this is why I think this is racist." As the director of Walking Tall Wilmington, Randy Evans seeks to create interpersonal relationships with individuals experiencing poverty. After experiencing two very different protests, Evans speaks about how his thinking has changed.Support the show (https://shoresides.org/support/)
In the last 10 years, disasters like Matthew, Florence, and now COVID-19 have changed the fabric of Columbus County, North Carolina and its community. Wallyce Todd and Gerry Lenahan work at Community CPR, a nonprofit focused on disaster relief in the city of Whiteville - its county's seat. They talk about how their county is faring through the pandemic, while still working to support hurricane survivors. Gerry voices concerns over the hurricane season ahead and how it will affect people whose income has been affected by COVID-19.Broadcast from the Working Narratives studio, this series compiles community stories about COVID-19 from coastal North Carolina.Support the show (https://shoresides.org/support/)
This is an important message from the New Hanover Disaster Coalition: There is free testing for COVID-19 in New Hanover County.  All you have to do is call  910-798-6800 to talk with a nurse to setup an appointment.  That is 910-798-6800 to set up a free COVID-19 test in New Hanover County.  Support the show (https://shoresides.org/support/)
It’s been nearly two years since Hurricane Florence flooded the Maple Hill neighborhood in Pender County, NC. But Arlisha Hill's home is still far from repaired. Hill was ready to resume life as normal. She moved back into her partially repaired home this March – thinking construction would continue and she'd be living in a fully repaired home soon. Then, COVID-19 came. Construction on her home was brought to a halt in order to protect the volunteers and workers. Broadcast from the Working Narratives studio, this series compiles community stories about COVID-19 from coastal North Carolina.Support the show (https://shoresides.org/support/)
Jacqueline Hand has been repairing her home in from Hurricane Florence since September 2018. During those two years she has stayed with family, gone through the FEMA trailer program and then bought a travel trailer of her own – all while her home was still being repaired. Now, because of Covid-19, the nearly two-year repair process is on further hold.Support the show (https://shoresides.org/support/)
Kelly Spivey speaks about how she has seen the food insecurity conversation change during  COVID-19. Kelly's Community Pantry started to take the shame out of asking for help with groceries. The pantry is a public, unmanned neighborhood food cupboard providing free canned and boxed items. Now Spivey acts as a community organizer around food issues in her tight-knit town.Broadcast from the Working Narratives studio, this series compiles community stories about COVID-19 from coastal North Carolina.Support the show (https://shoresides.org/support/)
The mayor of Atlantic Beach, Trace Cooper, is preparing for a summer unlike he’s ever seen before. Cooper speaks to how the pandemic could disrupt – or boost – his small beach town's tourism economy. Cooper describes COVID-19 as a "one-two punch" for a coastal town still recovering from Hurricane Florence. Broadcast from the Working Narratives studio, this series compiles community stories about COVID-19 from coastal North Carolina.Support the show (https://shoresides.org/support/)
Chris Lamoreaux is a grocery store cashier in Morehead City, NC. Lamoreaux lives with his mother, who has an autoimmune disease. After work, Lamoreaux now self-quarantines in his bedroom. The national PPE shortage means that no gloves are available to Lamoreaux for handling customer cash at his register. Broadcast from the Working Narratives studio, this series compiles community stories about COVID-19 from coastal North Carolina.Support the show (https://shoresides.org/support/)
A fast food manager in coastal North Carolina discusses how her team has put their health and safety at risk during the coronavirus pandemic - to serve milkshakes and french fries. She says her team feels unsafe and scared, and their concerns aren't being taken seriously. Broadcast from the Working Narratives studio, this series compiles community stories about COVID-19 from coastal North Carolina.Support the show (https://shoresides.org/support/)
Le'Shawna Brunson-Smith says the stimulus bill won't be much of a help making up for the incoming she's losing during the coronavirus. Brunson-Smith is the owner of Ladies Hair Design on Castle Street in Wilmington, North Carolina. Since Governor Cooper ordered the shut-down of hair salons, she's been out of work. To make up for lost income, she's exhausting every avenue available to her. And little things - cooking with her daughters and seeing positive social media posts - are giving her hope.Broadcast from the Working Narratives studio, this series compiles community stories about COVID-19 from coastal North Carolina.Support the show (https://shoresides.org/support/)
Rebecca is normally a grade school teacher second, but with schools closed due to the coronavirus pandemic, she's delivering groceries for Instacart. Broadcast from the Working Narratives studio, this series compiles community stories about COVID-19 from coastal North Carolina. Support the show (https://shoresides.org/support/)
Diana Tootle, 58, lives in Morehead City, North Carolina. Tootle speaks to the intersection between Hurricane Florence and COVID-19 in her historically African American coastal community. Broadcast from the Working Narratives studio, this series compiles community stories about COVID-19 from coastal North Carolina.Support the show (https://shoresides.org/support/)
Michael Turner, 42, is a math teacher at West Carteret High School in Morehead City, North Carolina - a rural, coastal town of 9,000 people. He runs the food pantry which supplements free & reduced lunch with take-home groceries. Now his job is  to find and fulfill the gaps or 'soft spots’ in school food delivery during COVID-19. Broadcast from the Working Narratives studio, this series compiles community stories about COVID-19 from coastal North Carolina.Support the show (https://shoresides.org/support/)
James (Jim) Wall is 75 and currently in quarantine with his step-grandchildren. Wall is a retired attorney and disabled veteran who lives in Wilmington, North Carolina. He suffers from a heart condition and diabetes, and needless to say - he's part of the population most vulnerable to coronavirus. Still, he's staying positive, taking precautions, and making the most of the down time with family. Broadcast from the Working Narratives studio, this series compiles community stories about COVID-19 from coastal North Carolina.Music by Ketsa. Editing by Working Narratives team.Support the show (https://shoresides.org/support/)
Yasmine is a single mother living in coastal North Carolina. Since her restaurant closed, she's been out of work - but she's making the most of her time with her daughter. She reflects on how her day-to-day has and will continue to change in lieu of the COVID-19 pandemic. She's changing up her routine at home and keeping busy. And she's thinking about how this pandemic will continue to affect her financially. Broadcast from the Working Narratives studio, this series compiles community stories about COVID-19 from coastal North Carolina.Music by Ketsa. Editing by Working Narratives team.Support the show (https://shoresides.org/support/)
Melvin Dunn, 41, is a shrimper in Beaufort, North Carolina. Dunn lost a shrimp season with Hurricane Dorian last September and now faces further impacts from COVID-19 on the seafood industry. Dunn is from the South River – a predominantly black coastal community in Beaufort, NC. With increasingly intense hurricanes affecting his catch, Dunn decided to transition to a seafood truck delivery service after Hurricane Dorian last September. Now COVID-19 might change that.Broadcast from the Working Narratives studio, this series compiles community stories about COVID-19 from coastal North Carolina. Music by Ketsa. Editing by Working Narratives team.Support the show (https://shoresides.org/support/)
David at the Intergroup office in Wilmington, North Carolina describes how COVID-19 is affecting Alcoholics Anonymous meetings in the area. David explains how the coronavirus is impacting participants of Alcoholics Anonymous and how it may continue to affect groups and meetings in the near future. He talks about how the virus is different from natural disasters like hurricanes, which AA groups in coastal Carolina endure almost yearly.Broadcast from the Working Narratives studio, this series compiles community stories about COVID-19 from coastal North Carolina.Music by Ketsa. Editing by Working Narratives team.Related WebsiteSupport the show (https://shoresides.org/support/)
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