DiscoverOutlier Academy
Outlier Academy
Claim Ownership

Outlier Academy

Author: Daniel Scrivner

Subscribed: 13Played: 105
Share

Description

Every Tuesday, we share a conversation with one of the world's best entrepreneurs or investors. In each episode we dissect what they've mastered and how they got to the top of their field. We break down the tactics, tools, and routines you can put to use today. Including everything from favorite books, morning routines, exercise habits, time-management tricks, and so much more.

Subscribe now and start learning how the world's best got that way. For more, visit Outlieracademy.com.

39 Episodes
Reverse
“Don't knock it until you try it. What I mean by that is—you never know what's really going to work from an acquisition model, so you have to spend to learn, and have the willingness to lose money up front and test, iterate, and optimize to find what's actually working.” – Alex Iwanchuk Alex Iwanchuk is Co-Founder of Feals, a modern wellness brand of hemp-based CBD products. He previously worked with the same co-founders to create Ad Exchange, an affiliate marketing program that was later sold in a successful acquisition.  Show notes with links, quotes, and a transcript of the episode: https://www.danielscrivner.com/notes/alex-iwanchuk-outlier-academy-show-notes  Chapters in this interview: 00:00:06 – Alex’s background and first company, Ad Exchange 00:03:57 – Data-driven growth vs. intuition 00:08:39 – The end of Ad Exchange and the beginning of Feals 00:13:21 – Data-driven methodology for creating Feals and its product 00:16:18 – The efficacy of a CBD tincture 00:19:02 – The Feals direct-to-consumer model 00:20:40 – The importance of branding to the success of Feals 00:26:42 – Acquiring customers and launching a direct-to-consumer brand 00:35:45 – Working with co-founders on multiple companies 00:40:35 – Depression, anxiety, and the path to mental health 00:47:19 – The importance of a morning routine 00:51:15 – Exercise and fitness with Tonal 00:53:08 – Books recommended by Alex 00:54:29 – The definition of success   Sign up here for Outlier Academy Weekly, our Sunday newsletter that highlights the latest episode, expands on important business and investing concepts, and contains the best of what we read each week. Follow Outlier Academy on Twitter: https://twitter.com/outlieracademy. If you loved this episode, please share a quick review on Apple Podcasts. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
“When we're looking at single founders, there probably is one variable that rises a little bit and that we spent a great deal of time thinking about which is, are they an attractor? Can they attract the things they need to be successful?” – Ben Savage Ben Savage is General Partner at Clocktower Technology Ventures, a leading venture capital group focused on fintech investments. He is also Lead Partner for the private sector of Clocktower Group, a global macro investment firm. Before joining Clocktower, Ben co-founded Artivest, an online financial services startup, and spent years in the financial services field at Bridgewater Associates, Gjelina Group, and Bellfoundry Advisors. Show notes with links, quotes, and a transcript of the episode: https://www.danielscrivner.com/notes/ben-savage-outliers-show-notes  Chapters in this interview: 00:00:06 – Ben’s background and experience before Clocktower Group 00:03:02 – Ben’s learnings from the culture at Bridgewater Associates 00:12:35 – Clocktower Group and investing at the macro level 00:24:18 – Investing in human capital 00:31:36 – Focusing on fintech investing 00:35:16 – How fintech will save the world 00:43:53 – Why Clocktower does not invest in crypto 00:51:31 – Choosing not to lead deals gives Clocktower an edge 00:56:32 – On weaknesses and clear communication   Sign up here for Outlier Academy Weekly, our Sunday newsletter that highlights the latest episode, expands on important business and investing concepts, and contains the best of what we read each week. Follow Outliers on Twitter: https://twitter.com/outlieracademy. If you loved this episode, please share a quick review on Apple Podcasts. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
On Wednesday, June 9, you'll see that Outliers has a new name, as well as new artwork. Going forward, the show will be called Outlier Academy, and you can find us online at outlieracademy.com. Outside of the new name, artwork, and website, everything else will remain the same. Daniel Scrivner will continue to host the show, and we'll continue to interview the world's best entrepreneurs and investors. But make no mistake, we have big plans for the rest of this year. When we launched Outliers, we set out to profile people who have achieved remarkable success—and done so on their terms, by playing the game their way. This remains our mission today. We're now focused exclusively on success in business and investing, as both of these fields share a few unique traits that make them uniquely challenging. Those who succeed in these fields are extreme outliers, women and men who play the game their way, on their own terms. Our goal is to dissect what makes the world's best entrepreneurs and investors successful by studying both the professional and human performance sides of the equation—to help us all learn from the best and win the game our way. And we couldn't do any of that without you! So thank you for listening, subscribing, and being a part of our community. This remains day one for us… and we're only just getting started. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
“I think in tech, and in Silicon Valley in particular, people overvalue ingenuity, brilliance and innovation, and undervalue timing, luck and resilience.” – Ken Nguyen In this episode of Outliers, I’m talking with Ken Nguyen (@KendrickEsq) about how his company, Republic, is working to bring private investing to the masses.  Ken Nguyen is Co-Founder and CEO of Republic, a private investing platform for investors seeking high-growth potential. Ken studied at Berkeley, BU, and Oxford before starting his career in securities litigation with Goodwin Procter. He served as a Fellow at Stanford and as General Counsel at AngelList before founding Republic, which has facilitated over $350M in investments from over one million global community members. Ken is passionate about providing more access to investment opportunities in startups, real estate, crypto, and even video games. Show notes with links, quotes, and a transcript of the episode: https://www.danielscrivner.com/notes/ken-nguyen-outliers-show-notes  Chapters in this interview: 00:00:06 – Ken’s background and experiences that led to the founding of Republic 00:02:42 – The exponential growth of Republic and its investments 00:06:34 – Ken’s experience in securities litigation and his work at AngelList 00:11:25 – Regulation Crowdfunding, and how it affected Republic 00:21:12 – How investing and ownership has changed in recent years 00:27:44 – New investment opportunities through Republic and beyond 00:29:42 – Gumroad and Backstage Capital as Republic success stories 00:33:26 – Social validation as a benefit of investing 00:35:04 – The history of crowdfunding 00:39:06 – How technology blurs the geographical boundaries of investing 00:46:16 – The importance of timing, luck and resilience in entrepreneurship 00:52:45 – Resources Ken recommends for those getting started in investing 00:54:28 – Daily habits to keep focused 01:00:20 – Ken’s final words of advice for entrepreneurs and investors   Sign up here for Outliers Weekly, our Sunday newsletter that highlights the latest episode, expands on important business and investing concepts, and contains the best of what we read each week. Follow Outliers on Twitter: https://twitter.com/heyoutliers. If you loved this episode, please share a quick review on Apple Podcasts. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
“Great opportunities never have ‘great opportunity’ in the subject line.” – Scott Belsky In this episode of Outliers, I’m talking with Scott Belsky (@scottbelsky). After starting his career at Goldman Sachs, he left to found Behance which he later sold to Adobe. He’s now the Chief Product Officer at Adobe as well as a Venture Partner at the world-renowned venture capital firm Benchmark. Scott was an early investor in Uber, Pinterest, Carta, Flexport, Airtable, and sweetgreen. And finally, he’s the best-selling author of Making Ideas Happen: Overcoming the Obstacles Between Vision and Reality and The Messy Middle: Finding Your Way Through the Hardest and Most Crucial Part of Any Bold Venture. Scott is a modern polymath. We explore his journey from entrepreneur to investor, how he approaches investing in early-stage technology companies, as well as the lessons he’s learned at Benchmark, Adobe, and Behance. Chapters in this interview: 00:00:05 – Scott’s learnings from his start at Goldman Sachs 00:05:35 – On co-founding Behance, and attempting to manage the “most disorganized community on the planet” 00:09:15 – Tactics for entrepreneurs and their teams 00:13:26 – The transition from startup (Behance) to large company (Adobe) 00:16:29 – How the desire to buy an education led to Scott’s interest in investing 00:18:59 – Seeing an investment grow from Seed to IPO 00:22:47 – How design can move the needle for a business 00:28:21 – Scott’s foray into venture capital and finding his ideal role melding investing with company-building at Benchmark 00:34:04 – On writing Making Ideas Happen and The Messy Middle 00:39:11 – Startups avoiding the fate of the “one-hit wonder” 00:43:32 – Investment trends that Scott is focusing on 00:47:31 – Scott’s favorite failures   Show notes with links, quotes, and a transcript of the episode: https://www.danielscrivner.com/notes/scott-belsky-outliers-show-notes  Sign up here for Outliers Weekly, our Sunday newsletter that highlights the latest episode, expands on important business and investing concepts, and contains the best of what we read each week. Follow Outliers on Twitter: https://twitter.com/heyoutliers. If you loved this episode, please share a quick review on Apple Podcasts. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
“When customers ask for it, it's almost too late already. You should have already done it.” – Mark Terbeek In this episode of Outliers, we’re talking with Mark Terbeek about his investment process, advice for entrepreneurs, and the power of coaching. Mark Terbeek is a Partner at Greycroft, an early stage venture capital firm focused on investments in digital media. With experience as an analyst at McKinsey & Company Chicago, a board member for companies like Kontiki, BladeLogic, and Icertis, and a managing director at MK Capital, Mark has helped make Greycroft a leading investment firm in the media and technology spaces. Greycroft manages $1.1B and has made over 120 investments in companies like Thrive Market, Huffington Post, Shipt and Trunk Club. Show notes with links, quotes, and a transcript of the episode: https://www.danielscrivner.com/notes/mark-terbeek-outliers-show-notes  Chapters in this interview: 00:00:22 – Mark’s background at Goldman Sachs and McKinsey 00:07:59 – Mark’s foray into entrepreneurship and the VC world 00:16:43 – How the world of venture capital has changed over the past 20 years 00:20:01 – The patience needed to be a great investor 00:22:21 – Comparing enterprise vs. consumer venture capital investing and their trends 00:28:05 – Greycroft’s focus areas, including intelligent enterprise and vertical SaaS 00:35:15 – Why being API-forward is so important in modern tech companies 00:39:45 – Icertis and contract intelligence 00:46:19 – The allure of system of record software businesses 00:49:17 – Mark’s fundamental investment beliefs 00:55:45 – Advice for entrepreneurs and investors: it’s okay to be honest and vulnerable 01:02:11 – Resources for entrepreneurs and investors   Sign up here for Outliers Weekly, our Sunday newsletter that highlights the latest episode, expands on important business and investing concepts, and contains the best of what we read each week. Follow Outliers on Twitter: https://twitter.com/heyoutliers. If you loved this episode, please share a quick review on Apple Podcasts. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
“Don't try to be the best; try to be the only. If at all possible, you want to be doing something that you have trouble describing because there's not a name for it. That's a sign that you are working in the territory of the only." – Kevin Kelly In this episode of Outliers, I’m talking with Kevin Kelly (@kevin2kelly) of WIRED magazine about his newest project on Kickstarter, Vanishing Asia. A 1,000-page collection of photographs, the set of three over-sized books document his 49 years of travel across the continent. Kevin Kelly was the Founding Executive Editor of WIRED magazine and the Editor of Whole Earth Review. He’s also the author of several best-selling books, including Out of Control and What Technology Wants. His perspective on science and technology has been featured in writings for The New York Times, The Economist, and Time magazine, and he served as a futurist advisor for Steven Spielberg’s film, Minority Report. Kevin continues to produce content for his newsletter, Recomendo, his YouTube channel, and his weekly podcast, Cool Tools. Show notes with links, quotes, and a transcript of the episode: https://www.danielscrivner.com/notes/kevin-kelly2-outliers-show-notes  Chapters in this interview: 00:01:44 – The full-time job of managing a Kickstarter campaign 00:08:29 – The “1,000 true fans” concept 00:22:39 – Art by the pound and writing out loud 00:26:14 – The process of creating, compiling and culling photographs for Vanishing Asia 00:38:27 – The photos in Vanishing Asia that resonate the most with Kevin 00:44:45 – Kevin’s travel in Asia, and how he viewed its changes over time 00:51:59 – Kevin’s thoughts on how to embrace the future while retaining cultural values and beauty 00:58:49 – How Kevin's travel in Asia has affected his life 01:06:41 – Understanding the nuances of Asia and the power it will hold in the future   Sign up here for Outliers Weekly, our Sunday newsletter that highlights the latest episode, expands on important business and investing concepts, and contains the best of what we read each week. Follow Outliers on Twitter: https://twitter.com/heyoutliers. If you loved this episode, please share a quick review on Apple Podcasts. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
“You have no choice now—being a Swiss army knife and being able to learn on the fly. It's such an underrated skill. Everybody is so much of a specialist now, but I'd like to be a generalist. It isn't always a bad thing when you can deliver.” – Rob Petrozzo In this episode of Outliers, I’m talking with Rob Petrozzo (@robpetrozzo) about the past, present, and future of digital collectibles. We discuss the highs and lows of building a marketplace from the ground up, how ownership has become the new status symbol, and buying and selling in a world where time is currency. Rob Petrozzo is Co-Founder and Chief Product Officer at Rally, a marketplace for buying and selling equity shares in ultra-rare, collectible assets. Rob’s background in design led him to consult for Kanye West’s G.O.O.D. Music imprint under Sony BMG before he moved into the world of product design. He led design at ScrollMotion and KeyMe before creating Rally. Show notes with links, quotes, and a transcript of the episode: https://www.danielscrivner.com/notes/rob-petrozzo-outliers-show-notes  Chapters in this interview: 00:00:08 – Rob’s background in design and the music industry 00:08:32 – Digital collectibles, and ownership as a status symbol 00:11:40 – Investing in history, whether past, present or future 00:19:17 – The asset allocation model and investment priorities of the next generation 00:27:31 – The insights, trends, and legislation that led to the creation of Rally 00:33:44 – Changes in Rally in 2020 00:36:11 – The process of bringing museum-quality assets to the Rally platform 00:40:46 – Rally’s primary vs. secondary markets 00:45:35 – Handling physical assets in Rally’s retail store and warehouse  00:51:07 – Learnings through building a marketplace, and defining PSA 00:57:11 – The long-term approach to business building 01:03:28 – Rob’s own collectibles and personal mentors   Sign up here for Outliers Weekly, our Sunday newsletter that highlights the latest episode, expands on important business and investing concepts, and contains the best of what we read each week. Follow Outliers on Twitter: https://twitter.com/heyoutliers. If you loved this episode, please share a quick review on Apple Podcasts. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
“In a lot of ways, people are forgetting the lessons of technology just in general—big companies move slowly, and there's an innovator's dilemma. Outside perspective is generally the fastest way to innovate, and I think it's really exciting.” -- Everett Cook In this episode of Outliers, I’m talking with Everett Cook (@everettcookny) about macroeconomics, the importance of flexibility in building a business, and innovations in Fintech. Everett Cook is CEO and Co-Founder of Rho Business Banking, a collaborative banking platform for fast growing companies. Before launching Rho, Everett was a hedge fund manager at several New York funds, including Deutsche Bank, SAC Capital Advisors, and Taylor Woods Capital. His early entrepreneurial experiences (he started his first company at age 14) and his work under Michael Bloomberg led him to focus on building a fintech company that provides excellent service to startups and growing teams. Show notes with links, quotes, and a transcript of the episode: https://www.danielscrivner.com/notes/everett-cook-outliers-show-notes  Chapters in this interview: 00:00:10 – Everett’s background and learnings in startups and finance 00:04:55 – Investing as finding out how the world really works 00:13:15 – The differences between founding a company and investing in a company 00:18:53 – Making asymmetrical bets and being open to pivoting the business 00:21:31 – How Rho Business Banking empowers teams to work better with money 00:24:21 – What Rho offers that other banks do not 00:27:07 – Treasury management, digital currency, and a focus on excellent customer service 00:32:49 – Observations and predictions on the evolving fintech space 00:39:48 – Everett’s recommended books 00:42:11 – Everett’s advice for founders   Sign up here for Outliers Weekly, our Sunday newsletter that highlights the latest episode, expands on important business and investing concepts, and contains the best of what we read each week. Follow Outliers on Twitter: https://twitter.com/heyoutliers. If you loved this episode, please share a quick review on Apple Podcasts. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
“The most important thing is that technology evolves, but people don't. That's the biggest lesson of history—humans don't change.” – Simon Mikhailovich In this episode of Outliers, I’m talking with Simon Mikhailovich (@S_Mikhailovich) about why gold is important in the current economy, how it maintains purchasing power over time, and important lessons from financial history. Simon Mikhailovich is a contrarian investor and entrepreneur who is also the co-founder and lead manager of The Bullion Reserve (TBR), a private vehicle that enables investors to hold physical gold across multiple jurisdictions outside the financial system. Before starting TBR, he co-founded Eidesis Capital, was a Portfolio Manager at Falcon Asset Management, and with his deep understanding of financial history, predicted and profited from the financial crises of 2000 and 2008.  Show notes with links, quotes, and a transcript of the episode: https://www.danielscrivner.com/notes/simon-mikhailovich-outliers-show-notes  Chapters in this interview: 00:00:07 – Simon’s thoughts on gold’s role in the current financial market 00:07:19 – Why gold is important at this moment in time 00:14:22 – Cycles of financial euphoria 00:19:06 – The three ways to get out of debt 00:25:05 – Why holding physical gold is different and better than savings in other forms 00:30:46 – Gold is the ultimate insurance for bad financial outcomes 00:36:48 – Gold vs. other precious metals, and how gold is nature’s Bitcoin 00:41:58 – Should people invest in gold ETFs? 00:44:37 – Gold has no impairment risk or counterparty risk, and making money vs. preserving wealth 00:48:01 – How personal experience vs. historical experience affects our investment decisions 00:57:35 – How Simon has maintained an outlier point of view over time 01:03:37 – Simon’s recommended books on financial history   Sign up here for Outliers Weekly, our Sunday newsletter that highlights the latest episode, expands on important business and investing concepts, and contains the best of what we read each week. Follow Outliers on Twitter: https://twitter.com/heyoutliers. If you loved this episode, please share a quick review on Apple Podcasts. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
“I have two KPIs in how I operate now. Number one, customer delight. There is no business if the customers don't pay. The other piece is profitability.” – Michael Joseph In this episode of Outliers, I’m talking with Michael Joseph (@scratchkitchen) about building and scaling meal kit company Green Chef, the risk of Cloud Kitchens and delivery platforms, and the future of on-demand food. Michael Joseph is Founder and CEO of Scratch Kitchen, an entirely new approach to restaurants that offers multiple brands and food types—from salads to sandwiches and burgers—all under one roof. Scratch Kitchen is also takeout and delivery only, and uses proprietary data to inform what foods and brands they offer in each market. Before starting Scratch Kitchen, Michael built and scaled Green Chef (later sold to Hello Fresh), Door to Door Organics, and Mile High Organics. Along with his work in the food industry, Michael is an angel investor in companies like Lunchbox, Caper, MilkRun, and Spark Grills.   Show notes with links, quotes, and a transcript of the episode: https://www.danielscrivner.com/notes/michael-joseph-outliers-show-notes  Chapters in this interview: 00:01:04 – Michael’s background that led him to the on-demand food industry 00:07:56 – Current food trends and where they’ll go next 00:16:50 – The challenges of providing truly gluten-free food options 00:22:42 – Building and scaling Green Chef, a meal delivery service company 00:30:52 – Being successful in business means having multiple strengths 00:32:07 – Michael’s two-pronged approach to business success 00:38:17 – Building out the Scratch Kitchen model 00:56:17 – The Scratch Kitchen system for removing friction from on-demand food 01:05:40 – How Scratch Kitchen compares to a ghost kitchen 01:27:01 – The concept of food APIs   Sign up here for Outliers Weekly, our Sunday newsletter that highlights the latest episode, expands on important business and investing concepts, and contains the best of what we read each week. Follow Outliers on Twitter: https://twitter.com/heyoutliers. If you loved this episode, please share a quick review on Apple Podcasts. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
“I think the best investors are operators and the best operators are investors.” – Robert Cantwell In this episode of Outliers, I’m talking with Robert Cantwell about the world of modern ETFs, how great investors tend to think like founders, and why blockchain is his latest investment interest. Robert Cantwell is the Founder of Upholdings, the first hedge fund in the U.S. to convert into an ETF with the launch of Compound Kings (KNGS). Robert started his career as an Analyst at Elevation Partners, which was co-founded by U2’s lead singer Bono. He then worked at the long/short hedge fund Meru Capital before serving as Everlane’s CFO for 5 years. Robert founded Upholdings in 2019 and launched Compound Kings (KNGS) in 2020. To date, Compound Kings has dramatically outperformed the S&P 500. Show notes with links, quotes, and a transcript of the episode: https://www.danielscrivner.com/notes/robert-cantwell-outliers-show-notes  Chapters in this interview: 00:00:37 – Robert’s thoughts on the evolving ETF space 00:04:12 – Why a concentrated portfolio is important 00:10:19 – Robert’s business background that led him to found Upholdings 00:15:10 – Robert’s experience with Elevation Partners working with Bono 00:19:47 – Lessons learned as an investor vs. an operator 00:24:43 – Background on Compound Kings (KNGS) 00:32:27 – On share repurchases 00:37:58 – Inspiring investors 00:39:55 – On investing in Palm earlier in his career 00:44:21 – Why now is the worst time to invest in technology and innovation, aside from blockchain 00:51:49 – Why the best investors are operators and the best operators are investors 01:00:55 – Misconceptions about Chinese technology companies 01:13:50 – Upholdings’ investment process 01:18:53 – Mandates and regulations around ETFs 01:21:58 – Robert’s advice to investors   Sign up here for Outliers Weekly, our Sunday newsletter that highlights the latest episode, expands on important business and investing concepts, and contains the best of what we read each week. Follow Outliers on Twitter: https://twitter.com/heyoutliers. If you loved this episode, please share a quick review on Apple Podcasts. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
“The most important things that I do every day are to take walks after my meals and make sure that I sleep a full eight hours. Those two simple things, which require a lot of adjusting for your lifestyle, have an outsized impact over the years and decades as they compound.” – Josh Clemente In this episode of Outliers, I’m talking with Josh Clemente (@joshuasforrest) about the concept of metabolic health, the importance of feedback loops, and why our daily choices have such a huge impact on our overall health. Josh Clemente is the Founder and President of Levels, a metabolic fitness company that helps people see how their choices affect their health in real-time. Before founding Levels, Josh was the Lead Life Support Systems Engineer at SpaceX, where he led the development of pressurized life support systems aboard spacecraft. He’s also worked as a Senior Design Engineer at Hyperloop One and is a certified CrossFit Level 2 Trainer. In 2019, he founded Levels, which is a comprehensive app that uses constant glucose monitoring to provide easy-to-understand feedback on your diet, exercise, and daily activities.  Chapters in this interview: 00:00:29 – How Josh’s engineering background and role at SpaceX led to the creation of Levels 00:06:32 – How a ketogenic diet can affect your life expectancy 00:07:57 – The basics of ketones and ketosis 00:13:34 – How real-time data can help people choose the foods and activities that are healthiest for them 00:21:17 – Surprising insights from Levels customer data 00:31:01 – How Levels converts raw data into easy-to-understand scores 00:39:58 – Levels’ expected launch date 00:43:03 – Whether glucose alone is the best indicator of overall health   Sign up here for Outliers Weekly, our weekly Sunday newsletter that highlights our podcasts, business and investing concepts, and the best of what we read that week.  Follow Outliers on Twitter: https://twitter.com/heyoutliers  If you loved this episode, please share a quick review on Apple Podcasts. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
“What you need to do, I think, is constantly update your thesis as you go, which can allow for longer holding periods, because things do change. And at the same time, I go into investments with a multi-year horizon—but my thesis might be disproven fairly quickly.” – Dan Roller In this episode of Outliers, I’m talking with Dan Roller (@Dan_Roller) about the power of buy-and-build companies, investing in special situations, interesting value-oriented opportunities in SPACs, and how becoming a better investor is similar to training for an Ironman competition. Dan Roller is Founder and Chief Investment Officer of Maran Capital Management, a boutique, value-driven investment manager with a carefully crafted portfolio of companies, including Clarus, Scott’s Liquid Gold, Turning Point Brands, and Pure Cycle. Prior to starting his own fund, Dan honed his investment philosophy and process for over a decade working in research analyst and portfolio management roles at well-regarded hedge funds in New York City, including Credit Suisse First Boston and Impala Asset Management. Chapters in this interview: 00:01:45 – MOI Global 00:03:36 – Dan’s background and start in the investment world 00:11:20 – The formation of Maran Capital 00:14:59 – Choosing your hunting ground and creating structural advantages  00:21:21 – Researching and choosing companies to invest in 00:28:27 – How building investment knowledge is like training for the Ironman 00:32:17 – Examples and basics of buy-and-build companies 00:41:04 – How buy-and-build can go wrong 00:45:20 – Investing in Clarus and Turning Point Brands 00:51:40 – The value vs. growth debate 00:54:57 – Investing in SPACs 00:58:06 – Thesis drift and mental models 01:02:21 – Resources for learning about investing   Sign up here for Outliers Weekly, our Sunday newsletter that highlights the latest episode, expands on important business and investing concepts, and contains the best of what we read each week. Follow Outliers on Twitter: https://twitter.com/heyoutliers. If you loved this episode, please share a quick review on Apple Podcasts. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
“If there's one innovation in crypto, it's incentive structures that actually drive people to do things that benefit the whole. That is so huge. But these automated market makers create liquidity for the long tail. And so if everything is suddenly liquid, what happens there? What are the emergent results?” – Rennick Palley Rennick Palley is the Founder and Chief Investment Officer of Stratos Technologies. Prior to founding Stratos, Rennick worked as a Research Associate at Sanders Capital, which manages over $40 billion in global equities. To date, Stratos Technologies has made 16 investments with an aggregate transaction value of over $250 million into companies like Rezi, Tala, Dave, Compound Finance, and Clearbanc. In this second interview, Rennick and I zoom way out to discuss everything from the recent boom in SPACs to the world of DeFi protocols, and how crypto gets incentive structures right. For more, listen to the first part of this interview in Episode 19 of Outliers with Daniel Scrivner. In that episode we discuss the war of growth vs. value investing, the concept of reflexivity, and Stratos' approach to investing across the capital structure in early-stage technology companies. Chapters in this interview: 00:01:36 – What’s next for Stratos Technologies 00:03:16 – Why SPACs are the activist investing tool of the future 00:08:24 – What the youngest generation of investors want to invest in 00:12:30 – How SPACs can play by different rules when telling their story 00:19:48 – Exploring crypto and protocols built on top of Ethereum 00:32:52 – How Stratos helps DeFi protocols launch new markets   Sign up here for Outliers Weekly, our Sunday newsletter that highlights the latest episode, expands on important business and investing concepts, and contains the best of what we read each week. Follow Outliers on Twitter: https://twitter.com/heyoutliers. If you loved this episode, please share a quick review on Apple Podcasts. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
“I think every stock that has future growth can be value, and every stock that is value can also be growth. They go together.” – Rennick Palley Rennick Palley is the Founder and Chief Investment Officer of Stratos Technologies. Prior to founding Stratos, Rennick worked as a Research Associate at Sanders Capital — which manages over $40 billion in global equities. To date, Stratos Technologies has made 16 investments with an aggregate transaction value of over $250 million into companies like Rezi, Tala, Dave, Compound Finance, and Clearbanc. In Part 1 of this two-part interview, Rennick and I discuss the war of growth vs. value investing, the concept of reflexivity, and Stratos' approach to investing across the capital structure in early-stage technology companies. In Part 2, which will be released next week, we zoom way out to get Rennick's thoughts on everything from the recent boom in SPACs to his interest in DeFi movement and investing in the crypto space. Chapters in this interview: 00:00:16 – Rennick’s background and how he got started in investing 00:05:43 – Learnings from Rennick’s work at Sanders Capital 00:19:23 – Intro to Stratos Technologies 00:25:26 – Reflexivity in investing 00:30:02 – Capital structure, and how venture-backed tech is underlevered Sign up here for Outliers Weekly, our Sunday newsletter that highlights the latest episode, expands on important business and investing concepts, and contains the best of what we read each week. Follow Outliers on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Outliers If you loved this episode, please share a quick review on Apple Podcasts. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
“So what I do now is essentially help students escape from their education. That's my enterprise every year. And it's always fun, because they escape quite readily. They all know that what they're making in their classes is an artificial product that doesn't actually have any particular interest for anyone except them.” – Verlyn Klinkenborg  In this episode of Outliers, I’m talking with Verlyn Klinkenborg (@verlynklinkenborg) about what he’s learned from years of farm life, his reading habits, and why writing simply can be so difficult (hint: keep your sentences short). Verlyn Klinkenborg is the author of six books, including The Last Fine Time, winner of the American Book Award, and The Rural Life, a New York Times Notable Book of the Year. He was a member of the editorial board of The New York Times for 16 years, where he published a regular column on rural life. His articles have appeared in The New Yorker, Harper’s Magazine, Esquire, National Geographic, and Mother Jones. He has taught literature and creative writing at Fordham University, Bard College, and Harvard University, and most recently at Yale University. Show notes with links, quotes, and a transcript of the episode: https://www.danielscrivner.com/notes/verlyn-klinkenborg-outliers-show-notes   Chapters in this interview: 00:00:35 – Rural life and the “home place” 00:03:56 – Raising animals and eating meat 00:09:20 – Learnings from farm life and work 00:13.48 – Verlyn’s reading habits 00:19:51 – Physical vs. digital books 00:26:53 – Verlyn’s book Several Short Sentences About Writing 00:33:01 – What is academic prose? 00:38:21 – Why people should use shorter sentences in writing 00:42:56 – Finding rhythm in writing 00:47:01 – Self authorization and noticing the world around you 00:53:38 – Writing cliches that are untrue 00:58:16 – What to expect from a class with Verlyn 01:04:56 – Writing is rooted in experience more than language   Sign up here for Outliers Weekly, our weekly Sunday newsletter that highlights our podcasts, business and investing concepts, and the best of what we read that week.  Follow Daniel on Twitter: https://twitter.com/DanielScrivner If you loved this episode, please share a quick review on Apple Podcasts. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
“When you’re first starting a fund, you're going to spend your first five years, realistically, actively raising money from LPs—and that is your primary role. It is not interfacing with founders and helping entrepreneurs; that's a small piece. I think it's important that people realize: if you just want to work with entrepreneurs all day, join an existing fund.” – Andrew Dumont Andrew Dumont (@andrewdumont) is a CEO in Residence at Tiny Capital and the Founder of Curious Capital. He was previously the CMO of Bitly and an Entrepreneur in Residence at Betaworks. He’s spent his career building and growing companies like Moz, Seesmic (acquired by Hootsuite), Stride (acquired by Copper), and Tatango. He’s also an advisor at Techstars and Startup Weekend, and he writes for Inc. Magazine. Andrew was named one of Forbes’ 30 Innovators Under 30 in Marketing and was appointed an entrepreneurial delegate by the United Nations. In this episode, Andrew and Daniel discuss the pros and cons of venture capital, why some startups make it while others fail, and how investors can best serve founders. Show notes with links, quotes, and a transcript of the episode: https://www.danielscrivner.com/notes/andrew-dumont-outliers-show-notes  Chapters in this interview: 00:00:07 – Andrew’s start in the world of venture capital 00:06:38 – Why venture capital isn’t the best option for all startups 00:12:48 – Andrew’s work with Betaworks 00:18:41 – The truth about choosing companies to invest in 00:21:51 – Why companies succeed 00:24:52 – Andrew’s work with Tiny Capital 00:35:17 – Making an acquisition grow 00:40:19 – Getting started with investing  00:43:46 – The realities of managing a fund 00:50:44 – How investors can best help founders 00:56:05 – Why getting reps as investor is exciting   Sign up here for Outliers Weekly, our weekly Sunday newsletter that highlights our podcasts, business and investing concepts, and the best of what we read that week.  Follow Daniel on Twitter: https://twitter.com/DanielScrivner If you loved this episode, please share a quick review on Apple Podcasts. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
“There’s no way to stop these accidents from happening, but there’s a way to stop them from happening to you.” – Laurence Gonzales Laurence Gonzales (@deepsurvivalsm0) is an award-winning author of numerous books about the psychology and neuroscience of survival . In this episode, Laurence and Daniel discuss his newest book, The Chemistry of Fire, a collection of exploratory essays that feed into his work on survival. Laurence Gonzales is an award-winning author of several books, including Deep Survival: Who Lives, Who Dies, and Why, Surviving Survival: The Art and Science of Resilience, and Flight 232: A Story of Disaster and Survival. He received the Miller Distinguished Scholarship from the Santa Fe Institute in 2016, as well as two National Magazine Awards and the Distinguished Service Award from the Society of Professional Journalists.    Show notes with links, quotes, and a transcript of the episode: https://www.danielscrivner.com/notes/laurence-gonzales2-outliers-show-notes  Chapters in this interview: 00:00:09 – The concept of the chemistry of fire 00:03:43 – An adventure story of ice climbers on Mount Washington 00:09:26 – Why people keep going when they know they should turn back 00:14:14 – The importance of rules and systems for decision making 00:20:09 – The survival of a cross-country skier after a major mishap 00:25:52 – Laurence’s work with the Santa Fe Institute 00:36:37 – Words of wisdom for 2021    Sign up here for Outliers Weekly, our weekly Sunday newsletter that highlights our podcasts, business and investing concepts, and the best of what we read that week.  Follow Daniel on Twitter: https://twitter.com/DanielScrivner If you loved this episode, please share a quick review on Apple Podcasts. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
“Once we have a starting point and a target, we can start to evaluate, do we turn left, do we turn right? How do we measure success? Then that dynamic process never stops." – Brandon Johnson In this episode of Outliers, Brandon Johnson explains what a family office is, how he works with families to plan for and structure their wealth, and why it’s important to teach your children about finances and investing. Brandon Johnson is CEO and CIO of JFG Wealth, a financial group that oversees over $1.8B in wealth for families across the United States. He serves on the Boards of Trustees for the University of Denver, Children’s Hospital Colorado Foundation and ACE Scholarships, and he is co-founder and director of the Brandon & Wendy Johnson Family Foundation. Brandon regularly speaks at industry conferences across the country and is a thought leader in the Family Office and Wealth Management industry. Show notes with links, quotes, and a transcript of the episode: https://www.danielscrivner.com/notes/brandon-johnson-outliers-show-notes  Chapters in this interview: 00:00:39 – History of the Johnson Financial Group 00:08:30 – Brandon’s path to wealth management 00:12:50 – What is a family office? 00:15:38 – How JFG is different from other family offices, and the importance of a relational approach to wealth management 00:25:34 – Keys to successful family wealth management 00:37:32 – Teaching kids about saving, investing, and giving back 00:46:17 – JFG’s process for working with new families 00:53:52 – Working with families with investments as the final stage of the process 00:59:24 – The spectrum of risk and returns 01:08:29 – Diversification and recency bias 01:15:41 – Defining success 01:22:05 – Brandon’s favorite restaurants, as a Le Cordon Bleu-trained chef Sign up here for Outliers Weekly, our weekly Sunday newsletter that highlights our podcasts, business and investing concepts, and the best of what we read that week. Sign up here: https://www.danielscrivner.com/newsletter  Follow Daniel on Twitter: https://twitter.com/DanielScrivner If you loved this episode, please share a quick review on Apple Podcasts. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
loading
Comments 
Download from Google Play
Download from App Store