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Psych Matters

Author: RANZCP

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Psych Matters is an informative and educational podcast by The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists. Psych Matters provides regular interesting topics for psychiatrists, psychiatry trainees and others with an interest in psychiatry.

Disclaimer:
This podcast is provided to you for information purposes only and to provide a broad public understanding of various mental health topics. The podcast may represent the views of the author and not necessarily the views of The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists ('RANZCP'). The podcast is not to be relied upon as medical advice, or as a substitute for medical advice, does not establish a doctor-patient relationship and should not be a substitute for individual clinical judgement. By accessing the RANZCP's podcasts you also agree to the full terms and conditions of the RANZCP's Website - RANZCP Website Terms of Use Agreement

Expert mental health information and finding a psychiatrist in Australian or New Zealand is available on the RANZCP’s Your Health In Mind Website - Your Health In Mind
27 Episodes
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In this episode of Psych Matters, authors of the 2020 Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists’ clinical practice guidelines for mood disorders, address some key aspects of translating and implementing the guidelines into clinical practice. These key areas were selected based on feedback received since the publication of the guidelines in January 2021, and include both practical aspects of clinical management, and novel treatments on the horizon. Speakers:Professor Gin Malhi – University of SydneyDoctoral Researcher Erica Bell – University of SydneyAssociate Professor Darryl Bassett – University of Western AustraliaProfessor Phil Boyce – University of SydneyProfessor Roger Mulder – University of Otago, ChristchurchProfessor Malcolm Hopwood – University of MelbourneSAGE JournalsMembers login to RANZCP.org and access journals. Search for these titles on the Journals website: The positioning of rTMSProfiling rTMS: A critical responseFeedback:If you have a topic suggestion or would like to participate in a future episode of Psych Matters, we’d love to hear from you. Please contact us by email at: psychmatters.feedback@ranzcp.orgDisclaimer: This podcast is provided to you for information purposes only and to provide a broad public understanding of various mental health topics.  The podcast may represent the views of the author and not necessarily the views of The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists ('RANZCP'). The podcast is not to be relied upon as medical advice, or as a substitute for medical advice, does not establish a doctor-patient relationship and should not be a substitute for individual clinical judgement.  By accessing The RANZCP's podcasts you also agree to the full terms and conditions of the RANZCP's Website. Expert mental health information and finding a psychiatrist in Australian or New Zealand is available on the RANZCP’s Your Health In Mind Website.
This episode of Psych Matters discusses the Australian psychiatric healthcare implications of the advent of Managed Care in Private Health Insurance with the recent emergence of a private company that can selectively contract with healthcare providers on behalf of insurers. The basic characteristics of managed care: selective contracting, financial incentives for performance and utilisation management present significant challenges for psychiatric care in Australia, especially in the context of the failures of managed care in the United States where it originated. Professor Jeffrey Looi and Dr William Pring present the healthcare policy background and discuss the clinical implications of managed care.Associate Professor Jeffrey Looi, MBBS Syd, MD ANU, DMedSc Melb, FRANZCP, AFRACMA, is a clinical academic neuropsychiatrist, in private and public practice, and Head of the Academic Unit of Psychiatry and Addiction Medicine at the Australian National University Medical School. Jeffrey leads the Australian, United States, Scandinavian-Spanish Imaging Exchange (AUSSIE) and the Consortium of Australian-Academic Psychiatrists for Independent Policy and Research Analysis (CAPIPRA). He has received multiple research and leadership awards including: a Fulbright Scholarship and Australian-Davos-Connection Future Summit Leadership Award. He is an co-author on more than 195 peer-reviewed papers, including research at the UCLA Medical School, Karolinska Institute and University of Melbourne.Dr Bill Pring  is a general psychiatrist who works predominantly in private practice, but was also been involved in consultation–liaison (Psychosomatics) psychiatry in the public sector for twenty–four years.  Bill served on the Victorian Branch of The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists (RANZCP) including as Branch General Councillor. Within the Australian Medical Association (AMA), Bill has served as Psychiatry Craft Group Representative on the AMA Federal Council and was the Chair of the Federal AMA Public Health and Aged Care Committee, and an AMA Observer on Private Mental Health Alliance (PMHA).SAGE JournalsMembers login to RANZCP.org and access journals. Search for this title on the Journals website: A clinical update on managed care implications for Australian psychiatric practiceFeedback:If you have a topic suggestion or would like to participate in a future episode of Psych Matters, we’d love to hear from you.Please contact us by email at: psychmatters.feedback@ranzcp.orgDisclaimer: This podcast is provided to you for information purposes only and to provide a broad public understanding of various mental health topics.  The podcast may represent the views of the author and not necessarily the views of The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists ('RANZCP'). The podcast is not to be relied upon as medical advice, or as a substitute for medical advice, does not establish a doctor-patient relationship and should not be a substitute for individual clinical judgement.  By accessing The RANZCP's podcasts you also agree to the full terms and conditions of the RANZCP's Website. Expert mental health information and finding a psychiatrist in Australian or New Zealand is available on the RANZCP’s Your Health In Mind Website.
In this episode of Psych Matters, Dr Andrew Amos is joined by Dr Manjula O'Connor and Dr Karen Williams for a second, more clinically oriented podcast on Coercive Control.Dr Karen Williams describes specific strategies used by male perpetrators to systematically destroy female partner’s sense of agency and eliminate alternative sources of social, emotional, and financial support. Dr Manjula O’Connor reports research showing how the learned helplessness associated with complete dependence on their abusers significantly increased the risk of suicide in a group of Australian women subject to coercive control. The podcast ends with a broad-ranging discussion including psychiatrists’ role in helping women achieve freedom from abuse by providing a trusted relationship, and the societal changes which are needed for a definitive solution.Some listeners may find the topic confronting. If you are worried about your own or others' wellbeing you can find crisis contacts on the RANZCP'S "Your Health in Mind" website.Disclaimer: This podcast is provided to you for information purposes only and to provide a broad public understanding of various mental health topics.  The podcast may represent the views of the author and not necessarily the views of The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists ('RANZCP'). The podcast is not to be relied upon as medical advice, or as a substitute for medical advice, does not establish a doctor-patient relationship and should not be a substitute for individual clinical judgement.  By accessing The RANZCP's podcasts you also agree to the full terms and conditions of the RANZCP's Website. Expert mental health information and finding a psychiatrist in Australian or New Zealand is available on the RANZCP’s Your Health In Mind Website.
This episode of Psych Matters discusses research conducted by the Consortium of Australian-Academic Psychiatrists for Independent Policy Research and Analysis (CAPIPRA), focused on improve mental healthcare delivery for patients and the community. The research addresses responses to various commissions and inquiries related to mental healthcare, as well as analysis of population datasets on mental healthcare. Professors Jeffrey Looi and Tarun Bastiampillai present their collaborative research.Associate Professor Jeffrey Looi, MBBS Syd, MD ANU, DMedSc Melb, FRANZCP, AFRACMA, is a clinical academic neuropsychiatrist, in private and public practice, and Head of the Academic Unit of Psychiatry and Addiction Medicine at the Australian National University Medical School. Jeffrey leads the Australian, United States, Scandinavian-Spanish Imaging Exchange (AUSSIE) and the Consortium of Australian-Academic Psychiatrists for Independent Policy and Research Analysis (CAPIPRA). He has received multiple research and leadership awards including: a Fulbright Scholarship and Australian-Davos-Connection Future Summit Leadership Award. He is an co-author on more than 195 peer-reviewed papers, including research at the UCLA Medical School, Karolinska Institute and University of Melbourne.Professor Tarun Bastiampillai, MBBS Adl, BMEDSc Adl, FRANZCP is a consultant psychiatrist and Clinical Professor at both Monash and Flinders University. Tarun is also a member of the Consortium of Australian-Academic Psychiatrists for Independent Policy and Research Analysis (CAPIPRA). He has served in several senior leadership roles, having been appointed SA Department of Health, Executive Director of Mental Health Strategy between 2015 to 2018. He is the recipient of the RANZCP 2020 Margaret Tobin Award for outstanding achievement in administrative psychiatry. He has published his research extensively including within, high-impact journals - JAMA, Lancet and Molecular Psychiatry.SAGE JournalsMembers login to RANZCP.org and access journals. Search for these titles on the Journals website: The productivity commission report on mental health: Recommendations with negative consequences for clinical care in public and private sectorsTertiary eating disorder services: is it time to integrate specialty care across the life span?National mental health policy and Australia’s ‘Deaths of despair’Other papers:Headspace, an Australian Youth Mental Health Network:Lessons for Canadian Mental HealthcareThe COVID-19 pandemic and epidemiologic insights from recession-related suicide mortalityWhen should governments increase the supply of psychiatric beds?Disclaimer: This podcast is provided to you for information purposes only and to provide a broad public understanding of various mental health topics.  The podcast may represent the views of the author and not necessarily the views of The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists ('RANZCP'). The podcast is not to be relied upon as medical advice, or as a substitute for medical advice, does not establish a doctor-patient relationship and should not be a substitute for individual clinical judgement.  By accessing The RANZCP's podcasts you also agree to the full terms and conditions of the RANZCP's Website. Expert mental health information and finding a psychiatrist in Australian or New Zealand is available on the RANZCP’s Your Health In Mind Website.
In this episode of Psych Matters, Dr Manjula O'Connor, Chair of the RANZCP's Family Violence Psychiatry Network, and Dr Karen Williams, Founder of the advocacy and support group Doctors Against Violence Towards Women, educate Dr Andrew Amos on the legal, clinical, and social functions of the recently established category of domestic violence known as coercive control. Dr O'Connor and Dr Williams explain that the new category was developed to protect a significant number of vulnerable women and children severely harmed by strategic manipulation leaving them entirely dependent upon predatory male partners, without necessarily suffering the grievous assaults or injuries previously required to trigger legal and social remedies.Disclaimer: This podcast is provided to you for information purposes only and to provide a broad public understanding of various mental health topics.  The podcast may represent the views of the author and not necessarily the views of The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists ('RANZCP'). The podcast is not to be relied upon as medical advice, or as a substitute for medical advice, does not establish a doctor-patient relationship and should not be a substitute for individual clinical judgement.  By accessing The RANZCP's podcasts you also agree to the full terms and conditions of the RANZCP's Website. Expert mental health information and finding a psychiatrist in Australian or New Zealand is available on the RANZCP’s Your Health In Mind Website.
In this episode of Psych Matters, Associate Professor Jeffrey Looi and Dr Rebecca Reay discuss Contemporary Research on Private Psychiatry and Psychological Services.Speakers:Associate Professor Jeffrey LooiAssociate Professor Jeffrey Looi, MBBS Syd, MD ANU, DMedSc Melb, FRANZCP, AFRACMA, is a clinical academic neuropsychiatrist, in private and public practice, and Head of the Academic Unit of Psychiatry and Addiction Medicine at the Australian National University Medical School. Jeffrey leads the Australian, United States, Scandinavian-Spanish Imaging Exchange (AUSSIE) and the Consortium of Australian-Academic Psychiatrists for Independent Policy and Research Analysis (CAPIPRA). He has received multiple research and leadership awards including: a Fulbright Scholarship and Australian-Davos-Connection Future Summit Leadership Award. He is an co-author on more than 180 peer-reviewed papers, including research at the UCLA Medical School, Karolinska Institute and University of Melbourne. Dr Rebecca ReayDr Rebecca Reay is a senior research coordinator and lecturer with the Academic Unit of Psychiatry and Addiction Medicine at the ANU Medical School. She also works as an Occupational Therapist in private practice in the ACT. Her research interests include trauma and posttraumatic stress symptoms in children, adolescents, and perinatal women. Other interests include the prevention and treatment of mental health problems in parents using Interpersonal Psychotherapy, couple therapy, mother-infant attachment work and group therapy.Links:A list of linked papers from Australasian Psychiatry for reference.https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/1039856221992634https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/1039856220975294https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/1039856220960381https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/1039856220961906Disclaimer: This podcast is provided to you for information purposes only and to provide a broad public understanding of various mental health topics.  The podcast may represent the views of the author and not necessarily the views of The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists ('RANZCP'). The podcast is not to be relied upon as medical advice, or as a substitute for medical advice, does not establish a doctor-patient relationship and should not be a substitute for individual clinical judgement.  By accessing The RANZCP's podcasts you also agree to the full terms and conditions of the RANZCP's Website. Expert mental health information and finding a psychiatrist in Australian or New Zealand is available on the RANZCP’s Your Health In Mind Website.
In this episode of Psych Matters, Dr Salam Hussain and Professor Paul Fitzgerald discuss Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation.Speakers:Dr Salam HussainSalam Hussain is a Consultant Psychiatrist at the Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital (SCGH), in the area of Consultation Liaison Psychiatry, Emergency Psychiatry, and a Lead Clinician for the Neuromodulation unit at the SCGH Day Procedure Unit. Adjunct Senior Clinical Lecturer at the School of Psychiatry & Clinical Neurosciences University of Western Australia. Salam is a  qualified psychiatrist trained in Western Australia and Fellow of the Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists, and International Fellow of the American Psychiatric Association. Salam is the Chair of Section of Electroconvulsive Therapy and Neurostimulation.Professor Paul FitzgeraldPaul Fitzgerald is Professor of Psychiatry at Monash University and Director of the Epworth Centre for Innovation in Mental Health based at Epworth Camberwell. He is a qualified psychiatrist, has a Masters of Psychological Medicine and research PhD.His main clinical and academic interest is in the development, evaluation and clinical translation of new therapies for mental health conditions. He has conducted over twenty clinical trials in depression, schizophrenia, obsessive compulsive disorder, PTSD, autism and Alzheimer’s disease along with over 50 experimental studies. He has established multiple clinical TMS services, is a founder and board member of TMS Clinics Australia, and established Australia’s first TMS clinical training program. He has had continual NHMRC grant support for almost 20 years and over $10 million in research support in the last 5 years.Links:Professor Paul B Fitzgerald - Transcranial Magnetic Stimulationhttps://www.paulbfitzgerald.com/tms.htmlRANZCP Section of Electroconvulsive Therapy and Neurostimulationhttps://www.ranzcp.org/membership/faculties-sections-and-networks/electroconvulsive-therapy-and-neurostimulationDisclaimer: This podcast is provided to you for information purposes only and to provide a broad public understanding of various mental health topics.  The podcast may represent the views of the author and not necessarily the views of The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists ('RANZCP'). The podcast is not to be relied upon as medical advice, or as a substitute for medical advice, does not establish a doctor-patient relationship and should not be a substitute for individual clinical judgement.  By accessing The RANZCP's podcasts you also agree to the full terms and conditions of the RANZCP's Website. Expert mental health information and finding a psychiatrist in Australian or New Zealand is available on the RANZCP’s Your Health In Mind Website.
In this episode of Psych Matters, Associate Professor Jeffrey Looi and his guests discuss a day in the life of private practice.Speakers: Associate Professor Jeffrey LooiDr Michelle AtchisonDr Gary GalambosLinks:Private psychiatry in Australia: reflections on career opportunities, benefits, and challengeshttps://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/1039856220978856RANZCP Section of Private Practice Psychiatry https://www.ranzcp.org/membership/faculties-sections-and-networks/private-practice-psychiatryDisclaimer: This podcast is provided to you for information purposes only and to provide a broad public understanding of various mental health topics.  The podcast may represent the views of the author and not necessarily the views of The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists ('RANZCP'). The podcast is not to be relied upon as medical advice, or as a substitute for medical advice, does not establish a doctor-patient relationship and should not be a substitute for individual clinical judgement.  By accessing The RANZCP's podcasts you also agree to the full terms and conditions of the RANZCP's Website. Expert mental health information and finding a psychiatrist in Australian or New Zealand is available on the RANZCP’s Your Health In Mind Website.
In this episode of Psych Matters, Dr Michael Gardner,  Associate Professor Robert Selzer and Dr Phoebe Gao discuss approaching the Critical Essay Question (CEQ).The CEQ examination assesses candidates’ ability to evaluate and critically appraise a proposition relevant to psychiatry, apply an evidence-based analysis and demonstrate a capacity for balanced reasoning.Disclaimer: This podcast is provided to you for information purposes only and to provide a broad understanding of various training and/or assessment topics.  The podcast may represent the views of the speakers and not necessarily the views of The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists ('RANZCP'). The podcast is not to be relied upon as formal advice or as a substitute for preparation.  By accessing The RANZCP's podcasts you also agree to the full terms and conditions of the RANZCP's Website.
In this episode of Psych Matters, Associate Professor Stephen Parker, Dr  Catherine Maud, Dr Karen Freier and Dr Roth Trisno share their own personal insights and opinions on how to prepare for Modified Essay Questions exam and are not necessarily the views of the Committee for examinations and the College.The Essay-style exam is a summative assessment and a Fellowship requirement of the RANZCP Fellowship Program.It is set at the standard expected at the end of Stage 3 and assesses the application of knowledge and the capacity for critical thinking.Disclaimer: This podcast is provided to you for information purposes only and to provide a broad understanding of various training and/or assessment topics.  The podcast may represent the views of the speakers and not necessarily the views of The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists ('RANZCP'). The podcast is not to be relied upon as formal advice or as a substitute for preparation.  By accessing The RANZCP's podcasts you also agree to the full terms and conditions of the RANZCP's Website.
In this episode of Psych Matters, Professor Gin Malhi and his guests  discuss The 2020 Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists clinical practice guidelines for mood disorders. This discussion is the 3rd in the series and focusses on  Management of Bipolar Disorder.Speakers:Professor Gin Malhi – University of SydneyDoctoral Researcher Erica Bell – University of SydneyAssociate Professor Darryl Bassett – University of Western AustraliaProfessor Greg Murray – Swinburne University of TechnologyProfessor Richard Porter – University of OtagoAssociate Professor Ajeet Singh – Deakin UniversityProfessor Malcolm Hopwood – University of MelbourneThe 2020 Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists clinical practice guidelines for mood disordersThe  guidelines provide up-to-date guidance regarding the management of mood disorders that is informed by evidence and clinical experience. The guidelines are intended for clinical use by psychiatrists, psychologists, primary care physicians and others with an interest in mental health care. The guidelines were developed by the Mood disorders committee: Gin S Malhi (Chair), Erica Bell, Darryl Bassett, Philip Boyce, Richard Bryant, Philip Hazell, Malcolm Hopwood, Bill Lyndon, Roger Mulder, Richard Porter, Ajeet B Singh and Greg Murray.Resources:The 2020 Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists clinical practice guidelines for mood disordershttps://www.ranzcp.org/practice-education/guidelines-and-resources-for-practice/mood-disorders-cpg-and-associated-resourcesDisclaimer: This podcast is provided to you for information purposes only and to provide a broad public understanding of various mental health topics.  The podcast may represent the views of the author and not necessarily the views of The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists ('RANZCP'). The podcast is not to be relied upon as medical advice, or as a substitute for medical advice, does not establish a doctor-patient relationship and should not be a substitute for individual clinical judgement.  By accessing The RANZCP's podcasts you also agree to the full terms and conditions of the RANZCP's Website. Expert mental health information and finding a psychiatrist in Australian or New Zealand is available on the RANZCP’s Your Health In Mind Website.
In this episode of Psych Matters, Professor Gin Malhi and his guests  discuss The 2020 Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists clinical practice guidelines for mood disorders. This discussion is the 2nd in the series and focusses on  Management of Major Depressive Disorder and Treatment Non-ResponseSpeakers:Professor Gin Malhi – University of SydneyDoctoral Researcher Erica Bell – University of SydneyProfessor Greg Murray – Swinburne University of TechnologyProfessor Phil Boyce – University of SydneyProfessor Phil Hazell – University of SydneyProfessor Malcolm Hopwood – University of MelbourneThe 2020 Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists clinical practice guidelines for mood disordersThe  guidelines provide up-to-date guidance regarding the management of mood disorders that is informed by evidence and clinical experience. The guidelines are intended for clinical use by psychiatrists, psychologists, primary care physicians and others with an interest in mental health care. The guidelines were developed by the Mood disorders committee: Gin S Malhi (Chair), Erica Bell, Darryl Bassett, Philip Boyce, Richard Bryant, Philip Hazell, Malcolm Hopwood, Bill Lyndon, Roger Mulder, Richard Porter, Ajeet B Singh and Greg Murray.Resources:The 2020 Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists clinical practice guidelines for mood disordershttps://www.ranzcp.org/practice-education/guidelines-and-resources-for-practice/mood-disorders-cpg-and-associated-resourcesDisclaimer: This podcast is provided to you for information purposes only and to provide a broad public understanding of various mental health topics.  The podcast may represent the views of the author and not necessarily the views of The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists ('RANZCP'). The podcast is not to be relied upon as medical advice, or as a substitute for medical advice, does not establish a doctor-patient relationship and should not be a substitute for individual clinical judgement.  By accessing The RANZCP's podcasts you also agree to the full terms and conditions of the RANZCP's Website. Expert mental health information and finding a psychiatrist in Australian or New Zealand is available on the RANZCP’s Your Health In Mind Website.
In this episode of Psych Matters, Professor Gin Malhi and his guests  discuss The 2020 Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists clinical practice guidelines for mood disorders. This discussion is the 1st in the series and focusses on  Classification, Diagnosis, Assessment and Formulation. Speakers:Professor Gin Malhi – University of SydneyDoctoral Researcher Erica Bell – University of SydneyProfessor Greg Murray – Swinburne University of TechnologyProfessor Phil Boyce – University of SydneyProfessor Roger Mulder – University of Otago, ChristchurchProfessor Richard Porter - University of Otago, ChristchurchThe 2020 Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists clinical practice guidelines for mood disordersThe  guidelines provide up-to-date guidance regarding the management of mood disorders that is informed by evidence and clinical experience. The guidelines are intended for clinical use by psychiatrists, psychologists, primary care physicians and others with an interest in mental health care. The guidelines were developed by the Mood disorders committee: Gin S Malhi (Chair), Erica Bell, Darryl Bassett, Philip Boyce, Richard Bryant, Philip Hazell, Malcolm Hopwood, Bill Lyndon, Roger Mulder, Richard Porter, Ajeet B Singh and Greg Murray.Resources: The 2020 Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists clinical practice guidelines for mood disordershttps://www.ranzcp.org/practice-education/guidelines-and-resources-for-practice/mood-disorders-cpg-and-associated-resourcesDisclaimer: This podcast is provided to you for information purposes only and to provide a broad public understanding of various mental health topics.  The podcast may represent the views of the author and not necessarily the views of The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists ('RANZCP'). The podcast is not to be relied upon as medical advice, or as a substitute for medical advice, does not establish a doctor-patient relationship and should not be a substitute for individual clinical judgement.  By accessing The RANZCP's podcasts you also agree to the full terms and conditions of the RANZCP's Website. Expert mental health information and finding a psychiatrist in Australian or New Zealand is available on the RANZCP’s Your Health In Mind Website.
Over the last few election cycles the RANZCP Board and its Presidents have pursued a conscious strategy of increasing efforts to communicate clear priorities to members and encouraging feedback on those priorities and other important issues. The COVID pandemic prevented delivery of the Presidential address as a centrepiece of the annual college congress, leading President John Allan to deliver an address at the virtual AGM in June. The address acknowledged the ongoing effects of the pandemic and the significant social disruption, but also highlighted the strong position of the RANZCP due to these years of strategic consolidation and the strong collaboration between staff and members.In this episode of Psych Matters, Dr Andrew Amos interviews Associate Professor John Allan about the Board's unchanged ambition to promote the health and welfare of the psychiatric community in Australasia.Associate Professor John Allan is the current President of the Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists (RANZCP). His term as President began in May 2019 and will conclude in May 2021.https://www.ranzcp.org/about-us/about-the-college/board/associate-professor-john-allanReferences:Australasian Psychiatry podcast with Professor Ernest Hunterhttps://journals.sagepub.com/page/apy/podcastsDisclaimer: This podcast is provided to you for information purposes only and to provide a broad public understanding of various mental health topics.  The podcast may represent the views of the author and not necessarily the views of The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists ('RANZCP'). The podcast is not to be relied upon as medical advice, or as a substitute for medical advice, does not establish a doctor-patient relationship and should not be a substitute for individual clinical judgement.  By accessing The RANZCP's podcasts you also agree to the full terms and conditions of the RANZCP's Website. Expert mental health information and finding a psychiatrist in Australian or New Zealand is available on the RANZCP’s Your Health In Mind Website.
Borderline personality disorder is a very important area where there is not only a lot of distress but also a loss of quality of life and shortening of life. In this episode of Psych Matters, Dr Nick Bendit joins experienced clinicians Associate Professor Sathya Rao and Associate Professor Josephine Beatson to discuss the nuts and bolts of working with the patient with BPD and to try to explode some of the myths. References:Half in Love with Death: Managing the Chronically Suicidal Patient (2007)https://www.bookdepository.com/Half-Love-With-Death-Joel-Paris/9780805860818Spectrum, Personality Disorder Service for Victoriahttps://www.spectrumbpd.com.au/Disclaimer: This podcast is provided to you for information purposes only and to provide a broad public understanding of various mental health topics.  The podcast may represent the views of the author and not necessarily the views of The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists ('RANZCP'). The podcast is not to be relied upon as medical advice, or as a substitute for medical advice, does not establish a doctor-patient relationship and should not be a substitute for individual clinical judgement.  By accessing The RANZCP's podcasts you also agree to the full terms and conditions of the RANZCP's Website. Expert mental health information and finding a psychiatrist in Australian or New Zealand is available on the RANZCP’s Your Health In Mind Website.
In this episode of Psych Matters Dr Andrew Amos and his guests Dr Kathryn Turner and Dr Jessica Henry discuss how health services can approach suicide prevention, and support of health staff who care for people at risk of suicide. No individual cases are mentioned, but some listeners may find the topic confronting. If you are worried about your own or others' wellbeing you can find crisis contacts on the RANZCP'S "Your Health in Mind" website.https://www.yourhealthinmind.org/get-help/first-steps-to-get-helpDisclaimer: This podcast is provided to you for information purposes only and to provide a broad public understanding of various mental health topics.  The podcast may represent the views of the author and not necessarily the views of The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists ('RANZCP'). The podcast is not to be relied upon as medical advice, or as a substitute for medical advice, does not establish a doctor-patient relationship and should not be a substitute for individual clinical judgement.  By accessing The RANZCP's podcasts you also agree to the full terms and conditions of the RANZCP's Website. Expert mental health information and finding a psychiatrist in Australian or New Zealand is available on the RANZCP’s Your Health In Mind Website.
In this episode of Psych Matters Dr Andrew Amos discusses the topic of The Role of Psychiatry in Treating Hepatitis C. His guests for this discussion are Dr Shalini Arunogiri and Dr Andrew Beckwith.Disclaimer: This podcast is provided to you for information purposes only and to provide a broad public understanding of various mental health topics.  The podcast may represent the views of the author and not necessarily the views of The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists ('RANZCP'). The podcast is not to be relied upon as medical advice, or as a substitute for medical advice, does not establish a doctor-patient relationship and should not be a substitute for individual clinical judgement.  By accessing The RANZCP's podcasts you also agree to the full terms and conditions of the RANZCP's Website. Expert mental health information and finding a psychiatrist in Australian or New Zealand is available on the RANZCP’s Your Health In Mind Website.
Planning for Continuing Professional Development by developing a Professional Development Plan allows for consideration of the many facets of the practice of psychiatry and how each element may be enhanced through Continuing Professional Development. Learning  activities may be planned with the aim of enhancing strengths, addressing issues, and to take advantage of opportunities for improvement in all aspects of practice. In this episode of Psych Matters, Dr Andrew Amos leads a discussion on How to develop a Professional Development Plan. Disclaimer: This podcast is provided to you for information purposes only and to provide a broad public understanding of various mental health topics.  The podcast may represent the views of the author and not necessarily the views of The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists ('RANZCP'). The podcast is not to be relied upon as medical advice, or as a substitute for medical advice, does not establish a doctor-patient relationship and should not be a substitute for individual clinical judgement.  By accessing The RANZCP's podcasts you also agree to the full terms and conditions of the RANZCP's Website. Expert mental health information and finding a psychiatrist in Australian or New Zealand is available on the RANZCP’s Your Health In Mind Website.
This episode of Psych Matters is the last of three episodes looking at perinatal and infant mental health. In this episode, Professor Anne Buist is joined by Dr Nick Kowalenko and Dr Matthew Roberts to discuss fathers during the perinatal period, their mental health challenges and the effects on the infant.References:SMS4dads provides new fathers with information and connections to online services through their mobile phones.www.sms4dads.comChildren of parents with mental illness - RANZCP Position Statement 56 - March 2016https://www.ranzcp.org/news-policy/policy-and-advocacy/position-statements/children-of-parents-with-mental-illnessLet’s Talk about children - Approach (3 pages) https://d35y27n9vd273n.cloudfront.net/UjhwrIj7mqfaHdgEAHH4lGIloeGU0zB8plfbjnz2.pdfLet’s Talk about infants and toddlers conversation log (0-2 years) – (4 pages)https://d35y27n9vd273n.cloudfront.net/xQWHSesIQThVTUfT0Dvr6cFxWSeiesMp7dauissx.pdfChildren’s Wellbeing link with Paternal MHhttps://theconversation.com/childrens-well-being-goes-hand-in-hand-with-their-dads-mental-health-102347MJA – Fathers Mental Illnesshttps://www.mja.com.au/journal/2013/199/3/fathers-mental-illness-implications-clinicians-and-health-servicesAIFS paper on Fatherhood and Mental Illness
This episode of Psych Matters is the second of three looking at perinatal mental illness. In this episode, Professor Anne Buist is joined by Professor Megan Galbally, Dr Adaobi Udechuku and Dr Rebecca Hill to discuss the latest research on perinatal mental illness and management challenges including medication for pregnant and lactating women.References:Burger, H;  Verbeek, T; Aris-Meijer, J et al. 2019 Effects of psychological treatment of mental health problems in pregnancy women to protect their offspring: randomised controlled trial. British Journal of Psychiatry  Galbally, M; Snellen, M (2020) Providing the Evidence for Managing Depression In Pregnancy. Pediatrics Galbally, M; Crabb, C;  Snellen, M. (2018) Designing research that can untangle the effects in pregnancy of pharmacological treatments for mental disorders. Lancet Psychiatry Galbally, M; Frayne, J; Watson, S; Snellen, M. (2018) Psychopharmacological Prescribing Practices in Pregnancy for Women with Severe Mental Illness: a multicentre study. European Journal of NeuropsychopharmacologyGalbally, M; Watson, S; Boyce, P; Nguyen, T; Lewis, A. (2020) The mother, the infant and the mother infant relationship: What is the impact of antidepressant medication in pregnancy. Journal of Affective Disorders Matthey, S. 2009 Are we overpathologising motherhood? Journal of Affective Disorders  Singal, S; Chateau, Struck, S et al. 2020 In Utero Antidepressants and Neurodevelopmental Outcomes in Kindergarteners. Pediatrics  Disclaimer: This podcast is provided to you for information purposes only and to provide a broad public understanding of various mental health topics.  The podcast may represent the views of the author and not necessarily the views of The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists ('RANZCP'). The podcast is not to be relied upon as medical advice, or as a substitute for medical advice, does not establish a doctor-patient relationship and should not be a substitute for individual clinical judgement.  By accessing The RANZCP's podcasts you also agree to the full terms and conditions of the RANZCP's Website. Expert mental health information and finding a psychiatrist in Australian or New Zealand is available on the RANZCP’s Your Health In Mind Website.
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