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Race & Gender Unfiltered with Daniel Edmund
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Race & Gender Unfiltered with Daniel Edmund

Author: Daniel Edmund

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Race & Gender Unfiltered is a podcast pursuing social change through social healing. It explores the opportunities for personal and collective growth as well as systems change through deep thinking, self-expression and compassionate truth telling in all of their forms. You can find out more about Daniel at danieledmund.com. Follow him on Instagram: @danieledmund and Twitter: @daniel_edmund
26 Episodes
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This episode I speak with Jeremy Herte who is the Host and Founder of Let's Talk Bruh. Let’s Talk Bruh is a platform that creates content around Black masculinity and the impact of patriarchy in Black communities. The goal of his content is to create interactive, healing, and learning experiences with his audience, primarily Black men and male socialised folks of all sexual orientations and gender identities.We speak about his journey starting Let’s Talk Bruh, platonic male intimacy between Black men Black men healing and divesting from patriarchy.To find out more about Jeremy you can find him on instagram @jherte and the Let’s Talk Bruh instagram page @letstalkbruh.
This episode I recite the poem ‘Who Will Cry For the Little Boy’ by Antwon Fisher. Antwone Fisher (born August 3, 1959) is an American director, screenwriter, author, and film producer. His 2001 autobiographical book Finding Fish was a New York Times Best Seller. The 2002 film Antwone Fisher  was written by Fisher and directed by Denzel Washington.Fisher was born in prison to a single mother. His father, Edward Elkins, had been shot dead by a jealous girlfriend two months earlier. Antwone was placed in a foster home weeks after he was born, and remained in foster care through most of his childhood. After living with a foster mother for two years, Fisher was taken away from her. He was then placed into another foster home with a family named the Picketts. He spent 14 years of his childhood with the Picketts and was abused physically, verbally, and sexually. Fisher reports his earliest memories are of being sexually abused, beaten, tied up and left in a basement for hours, sometimes days and the abuse left him in a state of paranoiaHe was then removed from the Pickett home after having a fight with his foster mother. Antwone was sent to George Junior Republic School, a discipline school for boys, from which he graduated before he joined the United States Navy.[1]Fisher joined the U.S. Navy to escape homelessness. Fisher spent 11 years in the Navy. Here, he met Lt. Commander Williams, a psychiatrist who helped him work through his emotional traumas. And this is the story we see played out in his debut film Antwon Fisher. Fisher now resides in Cleveland, Ohio with his wife LeNette and his children.
This episode I recite a short passage from James Baldwin’s book ‘The Fire Next Time’. I know it's a very short passage. I was considering reading more but that particular part resonated with me. Also, the length of something doesn’t always equate to its depth and I think that’s one of the great things about quotes and short passages.
This episode is Part 2 of my conversation with author, speaker and sacred activist Maya Kalaria. In this episode we speak about the challenges and realities of being a person of colour in a romantic relationship with a White person. To find out more about Maya Kalaria and her work you can visit mayakalaria.com. Also, Maya’s new book Half Woman Half Grief is out now and can be purchased through her website as well. 
This episode is Part 1 of my conversation with author, speaker and sacred activist Maya Kalaria. In this episode we speak about the challenges and realities of being a Person of Colour in a romantic relationship with a White person. It’s great to have Maya back on the show with me, I always value our time together. Please stay tuned for part 2 of our conversation. To find out more about Maya Kalaria and her work you can visit mayakalaria.com. Also, Maya’s new book Half Woman Half Grief is out now and can be purchased through her website as well.
This episode is Part 2 of my conversation with Dr. Mena Fombo who is a global speaker, diversity and inclusion facilitator, coach and consultant. She has over 15 years experience working within the voluntary sector, community organisations and educational establishments across Europe, the USA, Africa and South Asia and is currently an International Ambassador for the city of Bristol here in the UK.In 2017 she became a TEDxBristol speaker with the thought provoking No. You Cannot Touch My Hair campaign and talk of the same name. Her TEDx talk is now on the main TED.com website and has been viewed over 600,000 times. She was later awarded from the University of the West of England an Honorary Doctorate of Business Administration for services to Gender and Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic equalities work in 2019. Later the year she was voted woman of the year by Bristol247.In this conversation I speak to Dr. Mena about her experiences as a Black woman growing up in the UK as well as her life as an activist, speaker and all the other incredible hats she continually wears. This is a conversation between two colleagues but also two friends.
This episode is Part 1 of my conversation with Dr. Mena Fombo who is a global speaker, diversity and inclusion facilitator, coach and consultant. She has over 15 years experience working within the voluntary sector, community organisations and educational establishments across Europe, the USA, Africa and South Asia and is currently an International Ambassador for the city of Bristol here in the UK.In 2017 she became a TEDxBristol speaker with the thought provoking No. You Cannot Touch My Hair campaign and talk of the same name. Her TEDx talk is now on the main TED.com website and has been viewed over 600,000 times. She was later awarded from the University of the West of England an Honorary Doctorate of Business Administration for services to Gender and Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic equalities work in 2019. Later the year she was voted woman of the year by Bristol247.In this conversation I speak to Dr. Mena about her experiences as a Black woman growing up in the UK as well as her life as an activist, speaker and all the other incredible hats she continually wears. This is a conversation between two colleagues but also two friends.
This episode is the first episode of season 2. I share some of my thoughts on what’s resonating most with me regarding the year ahead and where the Race & Gender platform will be heading.
This episode is the last episode of 2020. I’m fortunate to have Global Programmes Lead, Facilitator and Poet Josiane Smith with me as I reflect on some of the previous episodes of this year as well as the themes and emotions this year has brought up for me.
This episode is part 1 of my conversation with Architectural Engineer and Innovation Consultant Ranya Bakr. We speak about the impact of the 2003 US & UK invasion of Iraq, the negative stereotypes that have been placed on Iraqi people and the trauma many of them still experience to this day.
This episode I recite an excerpt by Howard Thurman from his book ‘For the Inward Journey’. Howard Thurman was an American author, philosopher, theologian, educator, and civil rights leader. As a prominent religious figure, he played a leading role in many social justice movements and organisations of the twentieth century. He is revered by many and was the mystic who counselled civil rights leaders such as Martin Luther King Jr.
This episode is Part 2 of my conversation with my father Bishop Dexter Edmund Sr who has been in Christian ministry for over 35 years. We speak about what People of Colour who are currently at churches that don’t actively support their communities can do during this time, my personal challenges with the Christian faith, and the hurts that live inside my father.
This episode is Part 1 of my conversation with my father Bishop Dexter Edmund Sr who has been in Christian ministry for over 35 years. We speak about his experience being a first generation Afro-Caribbean living in the UK, how people of colour can begin detangling colonial mindsets from the version of Christianity many of them have been given and we also explore the lack of support some White Christians have given to progress the equity and equality for people of colour.
In this episode I speak about the realities of Breonna Taylor's murder and what it highlights about Black people's relationship with White people and White authority. I also read some staggering statistics about the UK criminal justice system that bring light to the oftentimes unspoken experiences of how Black, Asian and other Minoritized people engage with law enforcement in the UK. To see the full Lammy Report that is mentioned in this episode you can find it here: https://bit.ly/36lzGKD. This episode is dedicated to Breonna Taylor as well as her friends and family. 
In this episode I read an excerpt from Martin Luther King Jr's book 'Where Do We Go from Here - Chaos or Community?' In this passage King discusses the role White Liberalism plays in the progress of the Black Community and also its oppression. 
In this episode I speak with Author, Speaker and Sacred Activist Maya Kalaria about her experiences with racial grief and trauma as an Indian woman living in the UK. We also speak about the impact of colonialism in modern day and reconnecting with indigenous ways of living. Maya closes the show by gracing us with a read of one of her poems from her new book 'Half Woman Half Grief'. This is part 2 of 2. For more information on Maya you can check out her website mayakalaria.com.
In this episode I speak with Author, Speaker and Sacred Activist Maya Kalaria about her experiences with racial grief and trauma as an Indian woman living in the UK. We also speak about the impact of colonialism in modern day and reconnecting with indigenous ways of living. This is part 1 of 2. For more information on Maya you can check out her website mayakalaria.com.
In this episode Daniel explores how the female inspirations in his life have been pivotal for his development as a man, and how society oftentimes discourages men from straying away from masculine norms.
In this first episode Daniel discusses why Marc Quinn’s Black Lives Matter statue needed to come down and how he exploited Jen Reid, the Black community and the city of Bristol by putting it up. To find out more about Daniel visit his website danieledmund.com. You can also follow him on Instagram: @danieledmund and Twitter: @daniel_edmund
This episode I speak with Taimour Ahmed who is the founder of Expert By Experience, a volunteer-led multimedia platform dedicated to looking at mental health in South Asian communities from an intersectional and critical lens. As a mental health advocate, he came up as a young writer in online publishing with the company Media Diversified from its inception. Nowadays he can be found either working away at EBE or cooking Pakistani dishes. Taimour and I speak about his experience growing up in Pakistan and moving to the UK, challenges South Asian men experience, as well as men processing anger.To find out more about Taimour visit expertbyexperience.uk. 
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