DiscoverInside the Lab
Inside the Lab
Claim Ownership

Inside the Lab

Author: American Society for Clinical Pathology

Subscribed: 51Played: 475
Share

Description

ASCP's podcast for all things laboratory--if it's happening inside the lab, we're talking about it.
34 Episodes
Reverse
Every human has bias, as do the organizations we build. Despite commitments to diversity and inclusion, institutional bias lives on in every industry.  How does institutional bias show up in the field of pathology and laboratory medicine? And what can we do to affect change? On this episode of Inside the Lab, Dr. Dan Milner and Ms. Kelly Swails are joined by Ms. Tywauna Wilson, MBA, MLS(ASCP)CM, System Technical Director of Chemistry for CompuNet Clinical Laboratories and Founder of Trendy Elite Coaching and Consulting, Dr. Von Samedi, MD, PhD, Associate Professor in the Department of Pathology at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, and Dr. Mohamed Abdelmonem, DHA, MBA-HCM, MS, CLS, MLS(ASCP)SBB, Blood Bank and Transfusion Service Supervisor at Stanford Health Care, to discuss the book Erasing Institutional Bias: How to Create Systemic Change for Organizational Inclusion by Tiffany Jana and Ashley Diaz Mejias.  Our panelists share what they realized about recruiting, hiring, and advancement bias in their organizations (and the role they play in sustaining it) from reading the book. They explore how occupational bias presents in the field of pathology and laboratory medicine and what we can do to advocate for ourselves. Listen in for insight on recruiting allies without being perceived as a troublemaker and find out how you can take steps to erase institutional bias—whether or not you’re in a leadership role.  Topics Covered · An overview of the themes in Erasing Institutional Bias around how bias gets embedded in workplace cultures and what we can do to eliminate it · What our panelists realized about recruiting, hiring and advancement bias in their organizations from reading the book (and the role they play in sustaining it)· How occupational bias shows up in the field of pathology and laboratory medicine· How laboratory professionals and pathologists can work toward erasing institutional bias in our organizations· Conducting a holistic review of residency applications and adopting a blind hiring process· How realistic it is for us to succeed in erasing institutional bias without being in a leadership role Connect with ASCP ASCPASCP on FacebookASCP on InstagramASCP on Twitter Connect with Ms. Wilson Ms. Wilson on TwitterMs. Wilson on LinkedInConnect with Dr. Samedi Dr. Samedi on TwitterDr. Samedi on LinkedInConnect with Dr. Abdelmonem Dr. Abdelmonem on ResearchGate Connect with Dr. Milner & Ms. Swails  Dr. Milner on TwitterMs. Swails on Twitter Resources Erasing Institutional Bias: How to Create Systemic Change for Organizational InclusionInside the Lab in the ASCP Store 
The World Health Organization cites antimicrobial resistance, or AMR, as one of the top 10 global public health threats facing humanity. And according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, at least 2.8 million people in the U.S. contract an antibiotic-resistant infection every year—and more than 35,000 die. What do laboratory professionals need to know about the emerging data around antimicrobial resistance? And what can we do in the lab to support infection prevention and control? On this episode of Inside the Lab, our hosts Dr. Lotte Mulder and Ms. Kelly Swails are joined by Dr. Patricia Simner, PhD, D(ABMM), Associate Professor of Pathology at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and Director of the Medical Bacteriology and Infectious Disease Sequencing Laboratories at Johns Hopkins Hospital, Dr. Romney Humphries, PhD, D(ABMM), M(ASCP), Medical Director of Microbiology and Director of Infectious Disease Laboratories at Vanderbilt University Medical Center, and Dr. Lynn Bry, MD, PhD, Medical Director of Clinical Microbiology and Molecular Pathology at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Director of the Massachusetts Host-Microbiome Center at Harvard Medical School, to discuss antimicrobial resistance. Our panelists discuss the current fears surrounding emerging antibiotic resistance in the U.S. and explain how AMR is changing the way we practice medicine. They explore what lab professionals can do to navigate the workflow challenges in microbiology caused by antimicrobial resistance and describe the most worrisome resistance signatures in the emerging data. Listen in for insight on how to participate in efforts to combat emerging resistance and prepare your lab for an encounter with multidrug-resistant organisms. Topics Covered  · The biggest challenges around antimicrobial resistance facing the human population today · Current fears surrounding emerging antimicrobial resistance in the U.S.· What laboratory professionals can do to navigate the workflow challenges in microbiology caused by AMR· How labs can participate in regional, national, and global efforts to combat emerging resistance· Hope for combating antimicrobial resistance Connect with ASCP ASCPASCP on Twitter Connect with Dr. SimnerDr. Simner on TwitterDr. Simner at Johns Hopkins Connect with Dr. HumphiesDr. Humphries on TwitterDr. Humphries at Vanderbilt Connect with Dr. Bry Dr. Bry on TwitterDr. Bry at Brigham and Women’s Hospital Connect with Dr. Mulder & Ms. Swails Dr. Mulder on TwitterMs. Swails on Twitter Resources CDC Info on Antibiotic ResistanceWHO Fact Sheet on Antimicrobial ResistanceInside the Lab in the ASCP Store 
In general, consolidating several microbiology labs into one and automating our processes facilitates innovation and efficiency and creates a safer patient environment. But consolidation and total laboratory automation (TLA) also come with challenges. So, what do pathologists and laboratory professionals need to think about as we transition to centralized labs and implement TLA systems? On this episode of Inside the Lab, our hosts Dr. Dan Milner and Ms. Kelly Swails are joined by Dr. Sarah Buss, PhD, D(ABMM), Microbiology Director for Northern Light Laboratory and Instructor for the Medical Laboratory Science Program at the University of Maine, Dr. Karissa Culbreath, PhD, Medical Director of Infectious Diseases at Tricore Reference Laboratories and Associate Professor of Pathology at the University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center, Dr. Mark Fisher, PhD, Medical Director of the Bacteriology, Antimicrobials, Parasitology and Infectious Disease Rapid Testing Laboratories at ARUP and Assistant Professor of Pathology at the University of Utah School of Medicine, and Dr. Erin McElvania, PhD, Director of Clinical Microbiology at NorthShore University Health System and Clinical Assistant Professor of Pathology at the University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine, to discuss consolidation and total laboratory automation in the microbiology lab.  Our panelists share the pros and cons of consolidation efforts in terms of patient safety and laboratory quality, explaining what they do to promote clinician interaction when the microbiology lab is centralized. They describe three popular TLA systems and weigh in on the personnel changes and contingency planning required when bringing automation to the microbiology lab. Listen in for insight on the benefits of decentralizing technology in consolidated systems and learn what innovative features are likely to be added to TLA platforms moving forward. Topics Covered ·  What the term consolidation refers to in the laboratory and some examples of how multiple hospitals or health systems can be served by a single lab·  The pros and cons of consolidation efforts in microbiology in terms of patient safety and laboratory quality·  The factors that determine what tests remain at smaller community hospital labs ·  How potential cost savings inform the decision to execute on consolidation·  The importance of contingency planning in automated labsConnect with ASCPASCPASCP on Twitter Connect with Dr. BussDr. Buss at Northern Light HealthDr. Buss on LinkedIn Connect with Dr. Culbreath Dr. Culbreath on TwitterConnect with Dr. FisherDr. Fisher at ARUPConnect with Dr. McElvania Dr. McElvania on TwitterConnect with Dr. Milner & Ms. SwailsDr. Milner on TwitterMs. Swails on Twitter Resources Inside the Lab in the ASCP Store 
The principal tenet of medicine is to “first, do no harm.” And yet, the U.S. healthcare sector is responsible for 8.5% to 10% of global greenhouse gas emissions. What can we do in the clinical laboratory to deliver care with a smaller carbon footprint? On this episode of Inside the Lab, our hosts Dr. Dan Milner and Ms. Kelly Swails are joined by Dr. Ilyssa Gordon, MD, PhD, Associate Professor of Pathology and Medical Director for Sustainability at the Cleveland Clinic, Dr. Cassandra Thiel, PhD, Assistant Professor in the Departments of Population Health and Ophthalmology at NYU Langone Health, and Mr. James Connelly, CEO of My Green Lab, to discuss the carbon footprint of laboratories. Our panelists describe the healthcare sector’s impact on climate, and share what goes into conducting a life-cycle assessment and what it tells us about the environmental impact of a product or service. They explain how we can leverage the ACT label to promote sustainability in lab product manufacturing and explore how a shift in the supply chain compares to reducing consumption in an individual lab. Listen in for insight on applying the principles of reduce, reuse, and recycle to the clinical lab and find out how you can help minimize the carbon footprint of your lab. Topics Covered  · How the healthcare sector is responsible for as much as 10% of carbon emissions· What inspired a study around the carbon footprint of GI biopsies and the response they’ve gotten to their work· What goes into performing a life-cycle assessment and what it tells us about the environmental impact of a product or service· Leveraging the ACT label to choose sustainable products and ultimately influence lab product markets· Applying the principles of reduce, reuse, and recycle to the clinical lab· Why focusing on a shift in the supply chain makes a bigger impact than reducing consumption in an individual labConnect with ASCPASCPASCP on FacebookASCP on InstagramASCP on Twitter Connect with Dr. GordonDr. Gordon on LinkedInDr. Gordon at the Cleveland Clinic Connect with Dr. Thiel Dr. Thiel on TwitterDr. Thiel at NYUConnect with Mr. ConnellyMr. Connelly on LinkedInMy Green Lab Connect with Dr. Milner & Ms. SwailsDr. Milner on TwitterMs. Swails on Twitter Resources‘Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Gastrointestinal Biopsies in a Surgical Pathology Laboratory’ in the American Journal of Clinical Pathology‘A Different Kind of Laboratory Stewardship’ in the American Journal of Clinical PathologyInside the Lab in the ASCP Store 
S2E3: Workforce Policy

S2E3: Workforce Policy

2021-09-1447:33

The clinical laboratory workforce is crucial to the U.S. healthcare system, providing critical information in the diagnosis, treatment, and management of disease. And yet, the number of laboratory professionals continues to shrink. What can we do to reverse this trend? On this episode of Inside the Lab, Dr. Lotte Mulder and guest host Ms. Edna Garcia, Director of Scientific Engagement and Research at ASCP’s Institute for Science, Technology and Policy in Washington, DC, are joined by Ms. Susan Skillman, MS, Senior Deputy Director of the University of Washington Center for Health Workforce Studies, and Ms. Allyson Flores, MLS(ASCP)CM, Manager of Flow Cytometry and Hematopathology at Children’s National Hospital in Washington, DC, to discuss workforce policy. Our panelists describe ASCP’s ongoing research around wage and vacancy, including the most recent Clinical Laboratory Workforce report produced in conjunction with the University of Washington’s Center for Health Workforce Studies. They explain the most critical challenges facing our workforce today, exploring how to increase the visibility of careers in the lab, improve recruitment and retention, and promote diversity and inclusion in the field of laboratory medicine. Listen in for insight on how the pandemic is likely to shape the future of the profession and learn how you can help implement the innovative strategies proposed in the ASCP-UW CHWS report. Topics Covered  · ASCP’s ongoing research around wage and vacancy in the clinical laboratory profession· ASCP’s partnership with the UW Center for Health Workforce Studies on the most recent Clinical Laboratory Workforce Report · Critical challenges currently facing the clinical laboratory workforce· Why diversity is essential to the future of the profession and what we can do to recruit a more diverse clinical laboratory workforce· What attracted our panelists to laboratory medicine and how we might leverage those aspects of the career to address recruitment· Opportunities for institutions to communicate with local medical laboratory science programs around what trainees need to know· What the report teaches us about professional development opportunities and wage progression that might inform our practices moving forward Connect with ASCP ASCPASCP on FacebookASCP on InstagramASCP on Twitter Connect with Ms. Skillman Ms. Skillman on TwitterMs. Skillman at UW CHWS Connect with Ms. Flores Ms. Flores on TwitterMs. Flores on LinkedIn Connect with Dr. Mulder & Ms. Garcia Dr. Mulder on TwitterMs. Garcia on LinkedIn Resources ASCP’s Clinical Laboratory Workforce ReportInside the Lab in the ASCP Store 
Although the COVID-19 pandemic is far from over, it’s never too early to start planning for the next global health crisis. What have we learned as pathologists and laboratory professionals over the last 18 months? And how can we apply these key learnings to prepare for the next pandemic? On this episode of Inside the Lab, our hosts Dr. Lotte Mulder and Ms. Kelly Swails are joined by Dr. Omai Garner, PhD, Associate Clinical Professor and Director of Clinical Microbiology in the UCLA Health System, Dr. Karen Kaul, MD, PhD, Chair of the Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine at North Shore Research Institute and Clinical Professor of Pathology at the University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine, and Dr. Keith Jerome, MD, PhD, Head of the University of Washington Virology Laboratory and Professor at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Resource Center, to discuss the next pandemic. Our panelists share the lessons they’ve learned through the COVID-19 pandemic, describing the characteristics of their labs that proved beneficial and how the visibility of laboratory medicine shifted since the onset of the pandemic. They explore what tests or assays they might need to prepare for the next pandemic and offer insight on what we can do to ensure that labs have access to those resources. Listen in for Dr. Garner, Dr. Kaul, and Dr. Jerome’s take on what aspects of medical care improved as a result of the COVID response and learn why it’s crucial to remember that we’re still in the midst of the current crisis. Topics Covered  · The biggest lessons learned throughout the COVID pandemic· What the panelists would do differently in their own labs if they could do it over again· How public health officials and private health systems can work together to provide rapid and seamless lab testing in the future· What we can do to ensure that labs have access to the resources they need for the next pandemic· The increased understanding of the value of pathology and laboratory medicine in institutions and among the general public through COVID· What aspects of medical care improved as a result of the COVID response· The role the lab plays in the dissemination of reliable information and what we can do to improve· Why it’s crucial to remember that we’re still in the midst of the current pandemicConnect with ASCP ASCPASCP on FacebookASCP on InstagramASCP on Twitter Connect with Dr. GarnerDr. Garner at TwitterDr. Garner at UCLA Health Connect with Dr. KaulDr. Kaul on TwitterDr. Kaul at North Shore Connect with Dr. JeromeDr. Jerome on LinkedInDr. Jerome at the University of Washington Connect with Dr. Mulder & Ms. SwailsDr. Mulder on TwitterMs. Swails on Twitter ResourcesInside the Lab in the ASCP Store 
Pathology administrators are tasked with the recruitment, retention, and management of laboratory staff. But how do you attract personnel for hard-to-fill positions? And how do you help young pathologists and laboratory professionals advance their careers and become the next generation of leaders?  On this episode of Inside the Lab, our hosts Dr. Lotte Mulder and Ms. Kelly Swails are joined by Ms. Kelley Suskie, MHSA, FACMPE, Administrator for the Department of Internal Medicine at the University of Arkansas for Medical Science, Mr. John Baci, MBA, C-PM, Executive Director of Anatomic Pathology at Boston Children’s Hospital, and Mr. Martin Lawlor, Director of Finance and Administration for the Department of Pathology at Michigan Medicine, to discuss personnel management. Our panelists explain what administrators can do to prepare for the retirement cliff facing pathology, challenging laboratory professionals to mentor the next generation of leaders. They explore how personnel management differs in an academic versus clinical setting and offer strategies for networking in the pathology administration community. Listen in as our panelists share their most challenging personnel management experiences and get their advice on confronting bad behavior early on and holding people accountable for their actions as pathology administrators. Topics Covered  ·  Suggestions for recruiting and retaining personnel for hard-to-fill positions· Creating succession plans for the laboratory professionals ·  Preparing for the retirement cliff the pathology field is facing and developing the next generation of leaders· Why it’s better to help top performers advance and move on rather than hold them back· How to reconcile making yourself invaluable in the lab with empowering your team· How personnel management differs in an academic vs. clinical setting· Strategies for connecting with others in the community of academic pathology administration· The importance of both internal and external networking in the personnel management space· Challenging personnel management experiences· Developing the courage to confront bad behavior early on and hold people accountable for their actions· Our panelists’ advice around mentoring aspiring pathology administrators Connect with ASCP ASCPASCP on FacebookASCP on InstagramASCP on Twitter Connect with Ms. SuskieMs. Suskie on LinkedInMs. Suskie on Twitter Connect with Mr. Baci Mr. Baci at Boston Children’s HospitalMr. Baci on LinkedIn Connect with Mr. Lawlor Mr. Lawlor at Michigan Medicine Connect with Dr. Mulder & Ms. Swails Dr. Mulder on TwitterMs. Swails on Twitter Resources Inside the Lab in the ASCP Store 
Ep27: Digital Pathology

Ep27: Digital Pathology

2021-08-0301:00:58

Digital pathology refers to everything from a static image of a slide to a real-time broadcast image. So, what do laboratory professionals mean when we talk about using digital pathology? What infrastructure is necessary beyond the scanners themselves? And what is driving the adoption of digital pathology tools? On this episode of Inside the Lab, Dr. Dan Milner and guest host Dr. Joe Sirintrapun, MD, Director of Pathology Informatics at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, are joined by Dr. Orly Ardon, PhD, MBA, Science Manager for Digital Pathology Diagnostics at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center’s Pathology Department, Dr. Matthew Hanna, MD, Director of Digital Pathology Informatics at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, and Dr. Jochen Lennerz, MD, Associate Chief of Pathology and Medical Director of the Center for Integrated Diagnostics at Massachusetts General Hospital, to discuss digital pathology. Our panelists explore the barriers to widespread implementation of whole slide imaging, and discuss factors a laboratory should consider before investing in a particular digital pathology system. They explain how digital pathology can benefit laboratory professionals in microbiology, cytology, and hematopathology and describe how the pandemic accelerated the adoption of digital tools. Listen in for insights on incentivizing vendors to facilitate interoperability and learn how AI technology is driving the use of digital pathology. Topics Covered·       What pathologists and laboratory professionals mean by the phrase "digital pathology"·       Barriers to widespread adoption of whole slide imaging systems·       Important factors a laboratory should consider before investing in a particular digital pathology system·       How digital pathology can benefit laboratory professionals in areas like microbiology, cytology, and hematopathology·       Why decentralized, rural laboratories should consider using digital pathology·       How commercially available artificial intelligence drives the adoption of digital pathology·       Lessons learned around the adoption of a digital pathology platform for clinical use Connect with ASCPASCPASCP on Twitter Connect with Dr. ArdonDr. Ardon on LinkedInDr. Ardon on Google Scholar Connect with Dr. HannaDr. Hanna at Memorial Sloan KetteringDr. Hanna on TwitterDr. Hanna on PubMed Connect with Dr. Lennerz Dr. Lennerz at Massachusetts GeneralDr. Lennerz on LinkedInConnect with Dr. Milner & Dr. Sirintrapun Dr. Milner on TwitterDr. Sirintrapun on Twitter Resources Inside the Lab in the ASCP Store 
In medical circles, we say, “When you hear hoofbeats, look for horses, not zebras,” as a reminder that when people present with a given set of symptoms, the diagnosis is generally something common. But sometimes it IS a zebra, and patients sometimes DO have a rare condition like the one we’re exploring in this episode—breast implant associated lymphoma or BIA-ALCL. On this episode of Inside the Lab, our hosts Dr. Dan Milner and Ms. Kelly Swails are joined by Dr. Kirill Lyapichev, MD, Molecular Genetic Pathology Fellow at MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston, Texas, and soon-to-be Hematopathology Director at the University of Texas Medical Branch in Galveston, and Dr. Deniz Peker, MD, Associate Professor in the Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine at Emory University in Atlanta, Georgia, to discuss breast implant associated ALCL. Dr. Lyapichev shares the history of breast implants in general and BIA-ALCL specifically, walking us through two case studies of the entity with very different outcomes. Dr. Peker describes her approach to diagnosing breast implant associated ALCL, and our panelists explain the clinical signs associated with the rare condition. Listen in for insight on the treatment options available to patients and learn what pathologists need to know about the epidemiology of BIA-ALCL.  Topics Covered  · Two contrasting case studies of patients with breast implant associated ALCL· What we know about the epidemiology of BIA-ALCL and its relationship with chronic inflammation· Why BIA-ALCL is considered a very rare entity· Diagnosing BIA-ALCL and hesitations around making a diagnosis based on cytology alone· The role molecular clonality test plays in diagnosing BIA-ALCL and how common clonality is in published cases of the entity· How to recognize the clinical signs of breast implant associated ALCL· Insight on the history of breast implants in general and BIA-ALCL specifically· The excellent prognosis for patients diagnosed with BIA-ALCL in its early stages (and why reconstructive surgery patients with the condition are caught earlier than cosmetic cases)  · What treatment options are available for patients with breast implant associated ALCL· The latest developments in BIA-ALCL and why pathologists need to be familiar with it Connect with ASCP ASCPASCP on FacebookASCP on InstagramASCP on Twitter Connect with Dr. Lyapichev Dr. Lyapichev on TwitterDr. Lyapichev on LinkedIn Connect with Dr. PekerDr. Peker on TwitterDr. Peker at Emory Winship Cancer Institute Connect with Dr. Milner & Ms. SwailsDr. Milner on TwitterMs. Swails on Twitter Resources Thomas Cronin & Frank GerowInside the Lab in the ASCP Store 
The ASCP Board of Certification (BOC) is the gold standard of certification for pathologists and laboratory professionals. And while the committees who put together these exams don’t want candidates to fail, they DO want to ensure that the right people are caring for patients. With that standard in mind, how is a BOC exam put together? On this episode of Inside the Lab, our hosts Dr. Lotte Mulder and Ms. Pat Tanabe are joined by Ms. Kathleen Finnegan, MS, MT(ASCP)SHCM, retired Clinical Associate Professor and Program Director at the Department of Clinical Laboratory Sciences at Stony Brook University of New York and Member of the ASCP BOC Phlebotomy and MLA Committees, Ms. Karen A. Brown, MS, MASCP, MLS(ASCP)CM, Adjunct Professor at the University of Utah’s Department of Pathology, Medical Laboratory Sciences Division and Member of the ASCP BOC Research & Development Committee, and Mr. Walter Oliveira, MASCP, MLS(ASCP)CMSI, Medical Laboratory Manager at the University of Virginia Health System, Chair of the ASCP BOC MLA Certification Committee and Member of the BOC Flow Cytometry Specialty Exam Committee, to discuss the making of a BOC exam. Our panelists describe the duties and functions of each exam committee, walk us through the anatomy of an exam question, and weigh in on how questions are developed and maintained. Listen in for insight on the benefits of computer adaptive testing and how the practice analysis helps the BOC keep their certification exams fair and current. Topics Covered· The importance of earning an ASCP BOC certification and its benefits in terms of job prospects and professional success· The group within ASCP’s BOC that oversees exam preparation and how that group is organized· The anatomy of an exam question and why the BOC prefers comprehension, application and analysis questions over recall questions· How computer adaptive testing (CAT) works and its advantages · How the practice analysis ensures that BOC exams are fair, valid and legally defensible and how the data collected from practice analysis surveys informs the examinations· The exhaustive standard-setting process the BOC uses to determine an exam’s pass-fail line Connect with ASCPASCPASCP on Twitter Connect with Ms. FinneganMs. Finnegan at Stony BrookMs. Finnegan on LinkedIn Connect with Ms. BrownMs. Brown at the University of UtahMs. Brown on LinkedInConnect with Mr. OliveiraMr. Oliveira on TwitterMr. Oliveira on LinkedIn Connect with Dr. Mulder & Ms. TanabeDr. Mulder on TwitterMs. Tanabe on LinkedIn ResourcesASCP Board of CertificationNational Accrediting Agency for Clinical Laboratory SciencesInside the Lab in the ASCP Store 
Multiple companies are in the process of launching universal cancer screening (UCS) technologies. And while the ability to identify tumors earlier will be revolutionary, especially for for patients with less common cancers, there are still a lot of questions around how to read the reports and apply the results. So, what do pathologists and laboratory professionals need to know about these multicancer screenings and how such tests might affect our daily practice in the immediate future? On this episode of Inside the Lab, our hosts Dr. Dan Milner and Dr. Lotte Mulder are joined by Dr. Alarice Cheng-Yi Lowe, MD, FASCP, Cytopathologist, Surgical Pathologist, and Director of the Circulating Tumor Cell Lab at Stanford University, Dr. Jeff Gagan, MD, PhD, Molecular Genetic Pathologist, Assistant Professor of Pathology, and Medical Director of the Clinical Next Generation Sequencing Lab at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, and Dr. Maria Arcila, MD, Molecular Genetic Pathologist, Hematopathologist, and Director of the Diagnostic Molecular Pathology Laboratory at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, to discuss universal cancer screening. Our panelists explain why UCS isn’t a part of our current toolbox and what data we need before it can be integrated into standard cancer care. They weigh in on why it’s so difficult to confirm a positive UCS result and walk us through the challenges associated with interpreting multicancer screening reports. Listen in for insight on why pathologists need to be aware of USC technology, its capabilities, and limitations and why it's likely to shift the role laboratory professionals play on the clinical team moving forward. Topics Covered  · The rapidly evolving technology that allows us to evaluate a patient for many cancers in a single assay· Why USC isn’t part of the current toolbox now and the data needed to integrate it into standard cancer care· Challenges to confirm a positive UCS result and how such screenings might force patients into a stressful watch and wait process· Challenges associated with interpreting multicancer early detection reports and why getting comfortable with understanding molecular data is critical· Concerns around direct-to-consumer testing· How the rise of UCS is likely to shift the role laboratory pros play on the clinical team Connect with ASCPASCPASCP on FacebookASCP on InstagramASCP on TwitterConnect with Dr. LoweDr. Lowe at Stanford University Connect with Dr. GaganDr. Gagan at UT SouthwesternDr. Gagan on LinkedIn Connect with Dr. ArcilaDr. Arcila at Memorial Sloan KetteringDr. Arcila on LinkedIn Connect with Dr. Milner & Dr. MulderDr. Milner on TwitterDr. Mulder on TwitterResourcesInside the Lab in the ASCP Store Mayo Clinic Summit&
Ep 23: Hemovigilance

Ep 23: Hemovigilance

2021-06-0839:58

It is our duty as medical professionals to provide the safest blood possible for patients undergoing a transfusion. Hemovigilance is crucial in ensuring that the blood products we use are of the highest quality. So, how does the data collection and reporting process work? On this episode of Inside the Lab, our hosts Dr. Dan Milner and Ms. Kelly Swails are joined by Dr. Chester Andrzejewski, MD, Medical Director of System Blood Banking and Transfusion Medicine Services at Baystate Health in Springfield, Massachusetts, and Assistant Professor in the Department of Pathology at the University of Massachusetts Medical School, Ms. Lynne O’Hearn, MT(ASCP), Transfusion Safety Officer at Baystate Medical Center in Springfield, Massachusetts, and Mr. Karl G. Stein, BB(ASCP)CM, Lead Medical Technologist for OneBlood, Inc., and Manager of the Infusion Center at St. Joseph’s Hospital in Tampa, Florida, to discuss hemovigilance and how it fits into the larger culture of safety in medicine. Our panelists describe the complexity of data collection and how they streamline the reporting process. They weigh in on why transfusion services at every hospital should participate in hemovigilance regardless of size, discussing the benefit of being able to compare your data with that of other facilities. Listen in for insight on how hemovigilance data has inspired changes in policy and learn where you can find resources around initiating data collection systems in your lab. Topics Covered  ·  The concept of hemovigilance and how it fits into the larger culture of safety in medicine·  Why data collection for hemovigilance is so complex and how standardizing forms and leveraging databases streamline the reporting process·  The importance of developing relationships with nursing and IT to build reporting systems for transfusion medicine·  How hemovigilance reporting is mandatory in Massachusetts and the benefit of being able to compare your facility’s data with the rest of your state·  The value of integrating medical data systems on a national scale·  Resources on hemovigilance to initiate data collection systems in your lab Connect with ASCP ASCPASCP on FacebookASCP on InstagramASCP on Twitter Connect with Dr. AndrzejewskiDr. Andrzejewski at Baystate HealthConnect with Ms. O’HearnMs. O’Hearn on FacebookConnect with Mr. SteinOneBloodMr. Stein on LinkedIn Connect with Dr. Milner & Ms. SwailsDr. Milner on TwitterMs. Swails on Twitter Resources American Association of Blood Banks Hemovigilance ResourcesAABB Quick Reference Guide for the NHSN Hemovigilance ModuleInside the Lab in the ASCP Store 
Conflict in the workplace is not necessarily a bad thing. When managed well, it can lead to learning and improve an organization overall. But when conflict is managed poorly or not at all, it makes for a combative environment where people feel disrespected and can’t do their best work. On this episode of Inside the Lab, our hosts Dr. Lotte Mulder and Ms. Kelly Swails are joined by Dr. Karim E. Sirgi, MD, MBA, FCAP, Founder and CEO of Sirgi Consulting and President of the American Pathology Foundation, Dr. Marissa White, MD, Assistant Professor of Pathology at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and Member of the ASCP Diversity and Inclusion Committee, and Mr. Paul Chiou, MPH, SCT(ASCP), Faculty at the Department of Clinical Laboratory and Medical Imaging Sciences at Rutgers University and a 2015 ASCP 40 Under Forty Honoree, to discuss conflict in the workplace. Our panelists share the most common areas of conflict among pathologists and laboratory professionals, and describe how to distinguish between productive and unproductive or even discriminatory conflict. They weigh in on how diversity can both cause conflict and enhance our learning overall, explaining what microaggressions look like and how they compromise a safe working environment. Listen in for Dr. Sirgi, Dr. White, and Mr. Chiou’s insight on the relationship between conflict and burnout and learn what we can do to foster a healthy competition of ideas while resolving unproductive conflict in the workplace. Topics Covered  · How lack of leadership, communication, transparency and trust lead to conflict among pathologists and laboratory professionals· Why conflict in the workplace or learning environment isn’t always a bad thing· Distinguishing between productive conflict and conflict that is unproductive ordiscriminatory· How diversity both causes conflict and enhances our learning overall· What microaggressions look like and how they compromise a safe working environment· Our panelists’ personal experience with conflict in the laboratory workplace and how they resolved the situation· How chronic unresolved conflict impacts our health and causes burnout· Why knowing people as human beings is the best way to facilitate conflict resolution Connect with ASCPASCPASCP on FacebookASCP on InstagramASCP on Twitter Connect with Dr. Sirgi Sirgi ConsultingDr. Sirgi on Twitter Connect with Dr. White Dr. White at Johns Hopkins Connect with Mr. Chiou Mr. Chiou at RutgersMr. Chiou on LinkedIn Connect with Dr. Mulder & Ms. Swails Dr. Mulder on TwitterMs. Swails on Twitter Resources ASCP Diversity and Inclusion ResourcesInside the Lab in the ASCP Store 
An autopsy is the final chapter in a patient’s life. And while it can be a research tool, its underlying purpose is to give the family closure. So, what does the death certification process look like? How does the work of autopsy pathologists serve patients, their families, and the community at large? On this episode of Inside the Lab, our hosts Dr. Dan Milner and Ms. Kelly Swails are joined by Dr. Wendy Lavezzi, MD, Deputy Chief Medical Examiner for the Districts 5 and 24 Medical Examiner’s Office in Leesburg, Florida, Dr. Robert Padera, Jr., MD, PhD, Pathologist at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Associate Professor of Pathology at Harvard Medical School, Dr. Joneé M. Taylor, MD, MA, Deputy Medical Examiner for the District of Columbia’s Office of the Chief Medical Examiner, and Dr. Alex K. Williamson, MD, Chief of Autopsy Pathology at Northwell Regional and Associate Professor of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine at Zucker School of Medicine at Hofstra/Northwell, to discuss death certificates. Our panelists introduce us to the vocabulary of the death certification process, explaining who can legally certify a death and what mistakes non-pathology physicians make in filling out death certificates. They weigh in on what differentiates the work of a medical autopsy pathologist from that of a forensic autopsy pathologist and describe the particular challenges they all faced during the pandemic. Listen in for our panelist's insight on the shortage of autopsy and forensic pathologists and what we can do to address that need. Topics Covered  · Who can legally certify a death and when it’s appropriate to certify a death without an autopsy· What differentiates the work of a medical autopsy pathologist from that of a forensic autopsy pathologist, and when they might work together· Common mistakes non-pathology physicians make in filling out death certificates· What the terms “cause,” “mechanism,” and “manner of death” mean in the formal death certification process· The challenges in the death certification process during the pandemic· Disparity challenges around death certification in the pandemic and the distinction between dying with COVID and dying of COVID Connect with ASCP ASCPASCP on FacebookASCP on Twitter Connect with Dr. Lavezzi Dr. Lavezzi on LinkedIn Connect with Dr. PaderaDr. Padera on LinkedIn Connect with Dr. TaylorOffice of the Chief Medical Examiner, District of Columbia Connect with Dr. WilliamsonDr. Williamson at Northwell HealthBooks by Dr. Williamson Connect with Ms. Swails & Dr. Milner Ms. Swails on TwitterDr. Milner on Twitter ResourcesInside the Lab in the ASCP Store 
Ep20: Global Health

Ep20: Global Health

2021-04-2701:00:23

Pathologists and lab professionals in global health are working to achieve health equity for all people worldwide. But what does that look like in practice? What challenges do global health advocates face, and what resources do they need to do their work? Which factors influence their ability to help build sustainable health delivery systems in places where people currently lack access to care? On this episode of Inside the Lab, our hosts Dr. Lotte Mulder and Dr. Dan Milner are joined by Dr. Beatriz Hornburg, MD, Anatomic Pathologist and Cofounder of the CEDAP Laboratory in South Brazil, Dr. Dianna Ng, MD, Assistant Attending Physician at Memorial Sloan Kettering, Ms. Linda Cherepow, HT(ASCP)HTL, Founder of Global Histology Consulting and Cofounder of Swift Path Solutions in Uganda, Dr. Jane Brock, MD, PhD, Chief of Breast Pathology at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, and Dr. Timothy Amukele, MD, VP Global Medical Director for ICON plc, to share their experiences with global training programs for pathologists and laboratory professionals. Our panelists discuss their concerns around realizing sustainable interventions, recruiting the right volunteers, and securing the resources they need to do effective work in global health.  Topics Covered  ·  Challenges around understanding culture, finding the right local partners, and realizing sustainable interventions·  Strategies for recruiting local and international volunteers and why it’s important to establish a standard of training for global health volunteers·  What diseases our panelists see as major threats to global health that need our attention ·  Virtual teaching in the COVID era and how travel restrictions have affected work in global health Connect with ASCPASCPASCP on FacebookASCP on Twitter Connect with Ms. Hornburg Ms. Hornburg on Twitter Connect with Dr. Ng Dr. Ng on Twitter Connect with Ms. Cherepow Ms. Cherepow on LinkedIn Connect with Dr. Brock Dr. Brock on Twitter Connect with Dr. Amukele Dr. Amukele on Twitter Connect with Dr. Milner & Dr. Mulder Dr. Milner on TwitterDr. Mulder on Twitter Resources Inside the Lab in the ASCP StoreWorld Health OrganizationWHO’s Global Initiative for Childhood CancerWHO’s Global Strategy to Accelerate the Elimination of Cervical CancerWHO’s Global Breast Cancer Initiative 
For all of its faults, social media provides an extraordinary opportunity for pathologists and laboratory professionals to engage with each other as well as the general public. And if we are mindful about how we show up, platforms like Twitter give us a forum for networking, advocating for our profession, and sharing our work with the world. On this episode of Inside the Lab, our hosts Dr. Dan Milner and Dr. Lotte Mulder are joined by Ms. Dana Baker, MLS(ASCP)CM, Assistant Professor in the Department of Clinical Laboratory Sciences within the School of Health Professions at the University of Kansas Medical Center, Dr. Kamran Mirza, MD, MLS(ASCP)CM, Associate Professor of Pathology and Vice Chair of Education at Loyola University Health System in Maywood, Illinois, Dr. Sanjay Mukhopadhyay, MD, Director of Pulmonary Pathology at the Cleveland Clinic and Associate Editor of the American Journal of Clinical Pathology, and Dr. Sara Jiang, MD, Associate Professor of Pathology at Duke University and Director of the Duke Pathology Communications Group, to discuss how social media can benefit medical laboratory professionals. Our panelists offer advice around posting cases on social media, and discuss the challenges of creating and enforcing social media policies for pathologists and laboratory professionals. They weigh in on the potential pitfalls of social media and share their individual approaches to posting personal versus professional content. Listen in for insight on leveraging social media for educational purposes and learn how we can use social media to increase the visibility of medical laboratory professionals. Topics Covered  · The impetus to use social media for professional reasons and why busy lab professionals should take time to learn and use social media· Advice for posting cases on social media and why it’s crucial to be in compliance with your organization’s social media policies· Challenges around creating and enforcing social media policies for pathologists and laboratory professionals· How social media can open up professional opportunities and access to the global community of pathologists and laboratory professionals Connect with ASCP ASCPASCP on FacebookASCP on InstagramASCP on Twitter Connect with Ms. Baker Ms. Baker on TwitterConnect with Dr. MirzaDr. Mirza on TwitterConnect with Dr. Mukhopadhyay Dr. Mukhopadhyay on TwitterDr. Mukhopadhyay on YouTube Connect with Dr. JiangDr. Jiang on TwitterDr. Jiang on Facebook Connect with Dr. Mulder & Dr. Milner Dr. Mulder on TwitterDr. Milner on Twitter Resources ‘The Network That Never Sleeps’ in Lab MedicineASCP 40 Under FortyInside the Lab in the ASCP Store 
Seventy percent of medical decisions depend on laboratory results. And yet, pathologists and medical laboratory professionals received very little press coverage prior to the pandemic. Now that our work has been recognized, what can we do to keep that ball rolling? How can we expand Medical Laboratory Professionals Week beyond the walls of the lab and inspire our communities to celebrate with us? On this episode of Inside the Lab, our hosts Dr. Lotte Mulder and Ms. Kelly Swails are joined by Ms. Theresa Tellier-Castellone, EdD, MPH, MLS(ASCP)CM, Program Director at Our Lady of Fatima Hospital and Rhode Island Hospital, Dr. Melanie Johncilla, MD, Consultant Pathologist at Port of Spain General Hospital in Trinidad and Tobago and Medical Director at Global Pathology Solutions, and Mr. Aaron K. Odegard, MS, MLS(ASCP)CMSMCM, Medical Laboratory Technologist at Baptist Health in Jacksonville, Florida, and Chair of the ASCP Council of Laboratory Professionals, to discuss their plans for Medical Laboratory Professionals Week and the importance of celebrating the lab. Our panelists share how they recognize Lab Week outside the lab, offering insight how to engage the rest of the hospital staff and even the general public to celebrate with us. They weigh in on the psychological benefit of celebrating the work we do and describe how we might take advantage of the lab’s visibility during COVID to elevate Lab Week this year. Listen in for Ms. Tellier-Castellone, Dr. Johncilla, and Mr. Odegard’s favorite Lab Week memories and get their top ideas for celebrating our role as medical laboratory professionals and pathologists. Topics Covered  · Our panelists’ favorite Medical Laboratory Professionals Week games and activities· The challenges celebrating Lab Week in a resource-restricted setting · What to do to have Lab Week recognized outside the lab · How we might take advantage of the lab’s visibility during COVID to elevate Lab Week this year and invite the rest of the hospital staff to celebrate with us· The psychological benefit of celebrating the work we do as medical laboratory professionalsConnect with ASCP ASCPASCP on FacebookASCP on InstagramASCP on Twitter Connect with Ms. Theresa Tellier-CastelloneMs. Tellier-Castellone on LinkedInConnect with Dr. Johncilla Dr. Johncilla on LinkedInGlobal Pathology Solutions Connect with Mr. Odegard Mr. Odegard on TwitterMr. Odegard on LinkedIn Connect with Ms. Swails & Dr. Mulder Ms. Swails on TwitterDr. Mulder on Twitter Resources ASCP Resources for Celebrating Medical Laboratory Professionals WeekASCLS Resources for Celebrating Medical Laboratory Professionals WeekInside the Lab in the ASCP Store 
COVID-19 presents in a variety of ways, and hearing survivors’ stories helps us understand its complexities. For those of us who have experienced the virus firsthand, sharing our own stories helps us heal. On this episode of Inside the Lab, our hosts Dr. Lotte Mulder and Ms. Kelly Swails are joined by three ASCP Patient Champions. Ms. Cathrine Solomon, RN, Transplant Coordinator for Mount Sinai Health System in New York City, Ms. Lynnette Chakkaphak, MS, MT(ASCP), Director of Clinical Operations at St. Vincent’s HealthCare in Jacksonville, Florida, and Mr. Anthony Reed, CEO of Kidney Trails and kidney transplant recipient. Our panelists describe the COVID symptoms they experienced, explaining the steps they took to protect their families and how their backgrounds in healthcare informed the way they managed the illness. Listen in for Ms. Solomon, Ms. Chakkaphak, and Mr. Reed’s insight on making the decision to get vaccinated for the virus and learn about the role laboratory professionals play in saving people’s lives. Topics Covered  ·  Symptoms the panelists or their family members experienced that made them suspect they had COVID·  The long-hauler phenomenon·  How a background in laboratory medicine can help understand what was happening and ask the right questions·  The challenges of Mr. Reed’s COVID journey in light of his history as a transplant patient·  The steps our panelists took to protect themselves and their families from contracting the virus·  Ms. Solomon’s harrowing story of losing both parents to COVID while she suffered from the virus herself·  Ms. Solomon and Ms. Chakkaphak’s experience with COVID convalescent plasma donation·  The COVID treatments received during hospitalizations·  How Ms. Solomon’s experience as an RN informed her ability to navigate the virus·  Making the decision to get the COVID vaccine and the minor side effects experienced·  How COVID highlights the role laboratory professionals play in saving people’s lives Connect with ASCP ASCPASCP on FacebookASCP on InstagramASCP on TwitterConnect with Ms. Solomon Ms. Solomon on LinkedInMs. Solomon on Instagram Connect with Ms. Chakkaphak Ms. Chakkaphak on LinkedInMs. Chakkaphak on Twitter Connect with Mr. ReedKidney TrailsMr. Reed on LinkedIn Connect with Ms. Swails & Dr. Mulder Ms. Swails on TwitterDr. Mulder on Twitter Resources Inside the Lab in the ASCP StoreASCP Patient ChampionsAnthony’s COVID Experience on the Kidney Trails Blog 
Vaccines have revolutionized public healthcare, helping us eradicate a number of debilitating and deadly diseases. And yet, many people are hesitant to get vaccinated for COVID-19. So, how do the new Pfizer, Moderna, and Johnson & Johnson COVID vaccines work? And are they truly safe? On this episode of Inside the Lab, our hosts Dr. Lotte Mulder and Dr. Dan Milner are joined by Ms. Lindsey Clark, MPH, MLS(ASCP)CM, Assistant Professor in the Department of Laboratory Sciences at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Dr. Hana M. El Sahly, MD, Associate Professor of Molecular Virology and Microbiology and Infectious Diseases at Baylor College of Medicine, and Mr. Anthony Reed, Founder and CEO of Kidney Trails and ASCP Patient Champion, to discuss vaccine safety. Dr. El Sahly explains how the COVID vaccines work, walking listeners through the most common reactions to the Pfizer and Moderna iterations and describing how a vaccine’s safety is ensured—even when its release is accelerated via Emergency Use Authorization. Listen in for Ms. Clark and Mr. Reed’s insight on how they, as high-risk patients, made the decision to get vaccinated and learn what we can do to encourage vaccination among those with reservations. Topics Covered  · The four main categories of vaccines and why live, attenuated vaccines are not recommended for immunocompromised or immunosuppressed individuals· How mRNA vaccines deliver the code necessary to trigger an immune response and the most common local and systemic reactions to the Pfizer and Moderna mRNA vaccines· The rigorous testing and approval process for vaccines · Why COVID-19 vaccines received Emergency Use Authorization and how EUA differs from approval· Safety data the medical community is gathering as COVID vaccines are rolled out · Open questions around whether existing COVID vaccines protect against variants· Concerns of high-risk patients about getting the COVID vaccine · Why it’s crucial for people who’ve been vaccinated to continue social distancing and wearing masks until we’ve built herd immunity· Hesitations around getting vaccinated for COVID and what how to encourage vaccination among those with reservations Connect with ASCP ASCP ASCP on FacebookASCP on InstagramASCP on Twitter Connect with Ms. Clark Ms. Clark on LinkedIn Connect with Dr. El Sahly Dr. El Sahly at Baylor College of Medicine Connect with Mr. Reed Mr. Reed on LinkedIn Connect with Dr. Milner & Dr. Mulder Dr. Milner on TwitterDr. Mulder on Twitter Resources Inside the Lab in the ASCP StoreModerna’s COVID-19 Vaccine Clinical Trial DataPfizer’s COVID-19 Vaccine Clinical Trial DataASCP Patient Champions
Forty-five percent of all medical laboratory workers have more than 20 years of experience, while only 23 percent have been on the bench for five years or less. A retirement bubble is coming and burnout among lab professionals is high in light of the Coronavirus pandemic. What can we do to recruit more people for MLS programs? On this episode of Inside the Lab, our hosts Dr. Lotte Mulder and Ms. Kelly Swails are joined by Dr. Kristina Behan, PhD, MLS(ASCP)CM, Department Chair of Medical Laboratory Sciences at the University of West Florida, Mr. James Payne, MS, Phlebotomy and Laboratory Science Teacher at the WEMOCO Career and Technical Education Program in Spencerport, New York, and Ms. Susan Graham, MS, MT(ASCP), Department Chair and MLS Program Director of the Department of Clinical Laboratory Science at SUNY Upstate Medical University, to discuss recruitment for MLS programs. Our panelists share what they are doing as educators to increase the number of young people entering a career in laboratory medicine. Listen in for Dr. Behan, Mr. Payne, and Ms. Graham’s insight on MLS education in the post-COVID era and learn what we can do as lab professionals to boost enrollment in clinical laboratory science programs. Topics Covered · The four categories of stakeholders who share concerns around the sustainability of university-based medical laboratory sciences programs· Strategies for growing the number of graduates to fill vacancies in the laboratory· How the pandemic affected MLS programs and the resilience of students in laboratory medicine· The value of career fairs and sharing classroom activities with middle and high school teachers · How laboratory professionals can help boost enrollment in MLS programs by providing shadowing opportunities, hosting field trips and offering to do stories for local media Connect with ASCP ASCPASCP on FacebookASCP on InstagramASCP on Twitter Connect with Dr. Behan Dr. Behan at the University of West FloridaDr. Behan on LinkedIn Connect with Mr. Payne BOCES 2 CTE at WEMOCOMr. Payne on LinkedIn Connect with Ms. Graham Ms. Graham at SUNYMs. Graham on LinkedIn Connect with Ms. Jaworski Ms. Jaworski on LinkedIn Connect with Ms. Swails & Dr. Mulder Ms. Swails on TwitterDr. Mulder on TwitterResources Inside the Lab in the ASCP StoreASCP Patient Champions ProgramASCP Career Ambassador Programs 
loading
Comments 
Download from Google Play
Download from App Store