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Learn all the basics of geology in our new conversational textbook - campGEO!Available here: geo.campcourses.comWe are on a break! But, we have so much great volcanology content from past episodes and interviews, we decided to release them all in a sequence.  Four parts will be coming at you over the next few weeks, with interviews from some of the top volcanologists out there in the field.  Let us know what you think!Remember you can Support Us Here,and share PlanetGeo with your friends and family!——————————————————Instagram: @planetgeocastTwitter: @planetgeocastFacebook: @planetgeocastSupport us: https://planetgeocast.com/support-usEmail: planetgeocast@gmail.comWebsite: https://planetgeocast.com/
Learn all the basics of geology in our new conversational textbook - campGEO!Available here: geo.campcourses.comWe are on a break! But, we have so much great volcanology content from past episodes and interviews, we decided to release them all in a sequence.  Four parts will be coming at you over the next few weeks, with interviews from some of the top volcanologists out there in the field.  Let us know what you think! Remember you can Support Us Here,and share PlanetGeo with your friends and family!——————————————————Instagram: @planetgeocastTwitter: @planetgeocastFacebook: @planetgeocastSupport us: https://planetgeocast.com/support-usEmail: planetgeocast@gmail.comWebsite: https://planetgeocast.com/
Learn all the basics of geology in our new conversational textbook - campGEO!Available here: geo.campcourses.comRemember you can Support Us Here,and share PlanetGeo with your friends and family!——————————————————Instagram: @planetgeocastTwitter: @planetgeocastFacebook: @planetgeocastSupport us: https://planetgeocast.com/support-usEmail: planetgeocast@gmail.comWebsite: https://planetgeocast.com/
Learn all the basics of geology in our new conversational textbook - campGEO!Available here: geo.campcourses.comIn today's episode, we continue with our series on 'So... You think you know plate tectonics?'  - Part 2.  Can you answer the following questions?   1- How do sedimentary rocks relate to plate tectonics?   2- How does plate tectonics explain or relate to the formation of metamorphic rocks?   3- How does plate tectonics relate to the formation of very important mineral resources?Jesse and Chris have a casual conversation centered around relating these questions to plate tectonics.  We would love feedback and / or listener questions regarding this episode or the series in general.  Enjoy!Remember you can Support Us Here,and share PlanetGeo with your friends and family!——————————————————Instagram: @planetgeocastTwitter: @planetgeocastFacebook: @planetgeocastSupport us: https://planetgeocast.com/support-usEmail: planetgeocast@gmail.comWebsite: https://planetgeocast.com/
Learn all the basics of geology in our new conversational textbook - campGEO!Available here: geo.campcourses.comYou can find out more about Cate Larsen and all her social media links  here at groovygeologist.com! Remember you can Support Us Here,and share PlanetGeo with your friends and family!Cate - aka - groovygeologist is a geo-communicator.  She utilizes the power of the internet to bring geology education to the masses.  She has a B.S. in geology and a passion for teaching.  Cate has her hands in a lot of things.  She hosts a weekly livestream called Rocks and Hops where she teaches more structured lessons while drinking a craft beer.  She also hosts a podcast called The Schist of It.  Jesse and Chris ran into Cate at the GSA meetings in Denver this past October.  We knew right away that this would be a great opportunity to look at geoscience education in a very unique way.  We hope you enjoy this entertaining interview.——————————————————Instagram: @planetgeocastTwitter: @planetgeocastFacebook: @planetgeocastSupport us: https://planetgeocast.com/support-usEmail: planetgeocast@gmail.comWebsite: https://planetgeocast.com/
Learn all the basics of geology in our new conversational textbook - campGEO!Available here: geo.campcourses.comOne day, I (Chris) walked into class and announced that we were beginning plate tectonics.  I was so excited to begin teaching this content.  The response from my students was not at all what I expected.  They let me know that they had all the plate tectonics they could handle in middle school and there wasn't anything left to learn.  They knew the 3 basic types of plate boundaries (kind of) - divergent, convergent, and the T-one.  I then started asking deeper level questions that tested their ability to apply this huge theory to make sense of the world around them.During lunch that day, I began writing a series of questions about the unifying theory of plate tectonics.  Needless to say, their understanding was skin deep and that's totally Okay.  I wanted to show that we can take a basic understanding and use it to make so much more sense of our world.  That "event" gave me the idea to do a series on PlanetGeo covering a deep dive into plate tectonics.  Jesse was not easy to convince.  He felt like it was too massive.  Anyway, I won and here comes the series.  In this episode, we answer the following questions:1.  How does plate tectonics explain the formation of basalt?2. How does plate tectonics explain the formation of andesite?3. How does plate tectonics explain the formation of granite?We hope you enjoy!Remember you can Support Us Here,and share PlanetGeo with your friends and family!——————————————————Instagram: @planetgeocastTwitter: @planetgeocastFacebook: @planetgeocastSupport us: https://planetgeocast.com/support-usEmail: planetgeocast@gmail.comWebsite: https://planetgeocast.com/
Learn all the basics of geology in our new conversational textbook - campGEO!Available here: geo.campcourses.comLink to: Barrenlands: The Epic Search for Diamonds in Canada'sToday, we get to interview author Kevin Krajick.  Below is a small sample of his credentials and accolades.Senior Editor Science News Communications, Columbia Climate SchoolAuthor at State of the PlanetWork has been featured in National Geographic, Newsweek, The New Yorker, Science, Smithsonian Mag, etcTwo time Winner of the American Geophysical Union's Walter Sullivan Award - excellence in science journalismFinalist for the National Magazine Award for Public ServiceWe were interested in interviewing Kevin because of his book on Searching for diamonds in the Northwest Territories in Canada.  This is a place near and dear to Jesse's heart because he does a lot of research up there.  The book is exceptional and reads more like a novel mainly because of two featured individuals: Chuck Fipke and Stewart (Stu) Blusson.  They are both Canadian geologists, prospectors, businessmen, helicopter pilot, etc.  Check the link below for the book.In addition to writing this book, Kevin is a writer for the Columbia Climate School (https://news.climate.columbia.edu/).  He has written on an impressive array of topic from climate, Earth science, and society.  We hope you enjoy this interesting interview.  Cheers.Remember you can Support Us Here,and share PlanetGeo with your friends and family!——————————————————Instagram: @planetgeocastTwitter: @planetgeocastFacebook: @planetgeocastSupport us: https://planetgeocast.com/support-usEmail: planetgeocast@gmail.comWebsite: https://planetgeocast.com/
Link to: Barrenlands: The Epic Search for Diamonds in Canada'sToday, we get to interview author Kevin Krajick.  Below is a small sample of his credentials and accolades.Senior Editor Science News Communications, Columbia Climate SchoolAuthor at State of the PlanetWork has been featured in National Geographic, Newsweek, The New Yorker, Science, Smithsonian Mag, etcTwo time Winner of the American Geophysical Union's Walter Sullivan Award - excellence in science journalismFinalist for the National Magazine Award for Public ServiceWe were interested in interviewing Kevin because of his book on Searching for diamonds in the Northwest Territories in Canada.  This is a place near and dear to Jesse's heart because he does a lot of research up there.  The book is exceptional and reads more like a novel mainly because of two featured individuals: Chuck Fipke and Stewart (Stu) Blusson.  They are both Canadian geologists, prospectors, businessmen, helicopter pilot, etc.  Check the link below for the book.In addition to writing this book, Kevin is a writer for the Columbia Climate School (https://news.climate.columbia.edu/).  He has written on an impressive array of topic from climate, Earth science, and society.  We hope you enjoy this interesting interview.  Cheers.Learn all the basics of geology in our new conversational textbook - campGEO! Available here: geo.campcourses.comRemember you can Support Us Here,and share PlanetGeo with your friends and family!——————————————————Instagram: @planetgeocastTwitter: @planetgeocastFacebook: @planetgeocastSupport us: https://planetgeocast.com/support-usEmail: planetgeocast@gmail.comWebsite: https://planetgeocast.com/
Learn all the basics of geology in our new conversational textbook - campGEO! Available here: geo.campcourses.comIn this episode, we tackle the confusing industry of "granite" countertops.  It's confusing because it seems as though all rock countertops are called "granite".  However, to a geologist, granite is a very specific type of rock and only a small percentage of countertops are actually granite.  There are maybe 5 or so major rock types that are all found in the "granite" countertop category.  We spend some time talking about each major type:Marble - this might be named accurately actually in most places.  Is it very white with no distinct grains showing?  Then it is probably marble.  Especially if it has long dark wavys streaksGranite - there is some real granite in there!  Does it have pink, white, grey, and a few black flecks in it?  Most of the grains are smaller than your fingernail? Then it may actually be granite.  Can be white - no pink, too.  Has to have some black flecks and some gray too. Pegmatite - Does it have really really large grains?  The size of your finger?  Grey, white, black, with crazy textures in between them?  It might be a pegmatiteSchist/gneiss - does it have a definite texture and pattern in one direction?  Are their little waves of light and dark wavy patterns? Are there big deep purple garnets in it or blue flakes?  What about dark and light bands with an overall darker color?  It could be gneiss or schist. Conglomerate - does it have a bunch of round or oblong grains in it of a variety of colors?  Could be a conglomerate - these are spectacular. There are others to be sure.  These are just the most common.We also talk about another type that is growing in popularity - Quartz counters.  They aren't actually quartz though.  We like this option a lot because it's a green product.  No rock was mined for the specific purpose of making countertops.  Quartz countertops are a form of engineered stone, made from ground-up particles of stone bound together with plastic resins.  About 90% of the material is Crushed up waste granite, marble, and natural stone or recycled industrial wastes such as ceramic, silica, glass, mirrors, etc.We hope you enjoy!——————————————————Instagram: @planetgeocastTwitter: @planetgeocastFacebook: @planetgeocastEmail: planetgeocast@gmail.comWebsite: https://planetgeocast.com/
Learn all the basics of geology in our new conversational textbook - campGEO!  Available here: geo.campcourses.comIn this episode, we dive into a very important topic that will play an increasing role in the climate change crisis.  Carbon (CO2) capture and storage (CCS) is a big geoscience problem, and a possible solution to climate change.  But, we need to understand these two terms well - it’s all about making rocks! The oceans capture carbon for us, but we want to help this process along.  In order to do that, we need to find ways to concentrate the Carbon because it's in such a low overall concentration in the atmosphere.  We discuss some of the ways companies are trying to speed up the concentration process.Once the Carbon is captured, we need to find ways to store it.  Rocks such as limestone in the ocean is a natural way for Carbon storage.  Again, we discuss some of the creative ways companies are researching to effectively store the captured carbon.  We hope you enjoy our discussion on the very important topic.——————————————————Instagram: @planetgeocastTwitter: @planetgeocastFacebook: @planetgeocastEmail: planetgeocast@gmail.comWebsite: https://planetgeocast.com/
Introducing campGEO

Introducing campGEO

2022-10-0327:30

Click this link to try campGEO today!geo.campcourses.comToday, we are very excited to launch campGEO - our conversational textbook to help you learn geology.  This is a structured and image-based approach to learning.  Geology is a visual field, so you need images to fully understand what we are talking about!  Now you have them.  Login to campGEO using the common social media logins, and access all our content for free!  You can also visit our website CampCourses where you can find the link and a QR code to share. Remember, if you like what we do here, share with your friends, leave us a rating and a review, and follow us on social media! www.campcourses.com——————————————————Instagram: @planetgeocastTwitter: @planetgeocastFacebook: @planetgeocastEmail: planetgeocast@gmail.comWebsite: https://planetgeocast.com/
Learn all the basics of geology in our new conversational textbook - campGEO!Available here: geo.campcourses.comThis is a link to the video of the Quick Clay Slide at Dissa video Dr. Alley references. This shows what can also happen to a glacier when it loses it's toe-hold as described in this episode.Dr. Richard Alley is a renowned glaciologist and paleoclimate scientist.  He is also widely regarded as one of the best professors at Penn State University.  Below is a list of his impressive credentials:National Academy of SciencesForeign Member of the Royal SocietyEvan Pugh University ProfessorshipPenn State’s top teaching awardPresidential Young Investigator AwardEarth - the Operator’s Manual - Briefed senators, international legislators, and a sitting US Vice PresidentPublished an unbelievable >310 papers/books/etcJoin us as we discuss climate change, glaciers, and sea level.  Much of his current research is on a Western Antarctic glacier called Thwaites Glacier.  It's been dubbed the doomsday glacier because of its likely impact on sea level.  Alley is a gifted speaker and uses  incredible analogies to paint a vivid picture. Another big part of the discussion is how Carbon is the thermostat control knob for our atmosphere.  We hope you enjoy the discussion.  We did!——————————————————Instagram: @planetgeocastTwitter: @planetgeocastFacebook: @planetgeocastEmail: planetgeocast@gmail.comWebsite: https://planetgeocast.com/
Learn all the basics of geology in our new conversational textbook - campGEO!Available here: geo.campcourses.com536 AD was not a good year to be to be a human - especially in Eastern Europe.  Below are some written descriptions of what it was like:Michael the Syrian, wrote: "[T]he sun became dark and its darkness lasted for one and a half years [...] Each day it shone for about four hours and still this light was only a feeble shadow [...] the fruits did not ripen and the wine tasted like sour grapes."A prefect of Italy at the time, wrote: "so we have had a winter without storms, spring without mildness, summer without heat."A roman politician wrote: “the sun had a buish color, the moon lost its luster and the seasons seem to be jumbled up together.Global temperatures fell by 2.5 degrees C (5 degrees F) on average.  The culprit was an Icelandic volcano that began eruption in early 536 AD.  This was punctuated by another eruption in 540, the bubonic plague in 541, and another eruption in 547 to round out one of the worst decades to be alive on Earth.  All of these events caused a combined effect that took the planet over a hundred years to recover.  In this episode, we discuss a little about the geology of Icelandic volcanoes and why they are so diverse.  However, the main focus is on the process of scientific discovery.  We dive into ice core analysis and tree ring data that helped researchers piece together the puzzle.Join Jesse and Chris as we discuss what might have been the worst year, decade, or century to be a human in modern times. ——————————————————Instagram: @planetgeocastTwitter: @planetgeocastFacebook: @planetgeocastEmail: planetgeocast@gmail.comWebsite: https://planetgeocast.com/
Learn all the basics of geology in our new conversational textbook - campGEO!Available here: geo.campcourses.comCanyonlands National Park is the (big) sibling to Arches - the geology is very similar but the view you get on that geology is completely different! Here we discuss some of the differences, and give a quick rundown of where to go to see some of that spectacular geology.  As always, send us any questions you may have! Like, Subscribe, and leave us a rating! ——————————————————Instagram: @planetgeocastTwitter: @planetgeocastFacebook: @planetgeocastEmail: planetgeocast@gmail.comWebsite: https://planetgeocast.com/
Arches National Park

Arches National Park

2022-09-0142:09

Learn all the basics of geology in our new conversational textbook - campGEO!Available here: geo.campcourses.comArches are an amazing geologic feature and they occur in very high density in Arches National Park - located in Utah! In this episode we discuss the regional geology of the area, the Paradox Basin, and then get into some of the detailed processes that form arches throughout the park! As always, send us any questions you may have! Like, Subscribe, and leave us a rating! ——————————————————Instagram: @planetgeocastTwitter: @planetgeocastFacebook: @planetgeocastEmail: planetgeocast@gmail.comWebsite: https://planetgeocast.com/
Learn all the basics of geology in our new conversational textbook - campGEO!Available here: geo.campcourses.comAfter a long break from recording, Chris and Jesse return to our studios to discuss our extremely busy summer.  Jesse recaps his trip to Hawaii where he saw some amazing geology.  He also talks about teaching field camp in Idaho to some of the Penn State undergrads.  His favorite though, was continuing his field research in the Northwest Territories of Canada.  He and his PhD student collected over 1,000 pounds of rocks.  When asked about his favorite rocks seen this summer, Jesse didn't hesitate - the ancient rocks in Northern Canada.  The toothpaste rocks won out over the much younger pahoehoe rocks of Hawaii.Chris talked about taking 26 high school seniors out West for 3 weeks on the field course that he teaches.  They went to the South Dakota Badlands, Black Hills, Devils Tower, Grand Tetons, Yellowstone, and Glacier National Park.  The floods that ravaged Yellowstone in early June didn't prevent the students from learning about the incredible geology of Yellowstone.  Following this, Chris returned to the West with his family to hike and climb.  They went to the flatirons of Red Rocks and then on to Long's Peak.  The Long's Peak granite was easily his favorite rock of the summer.  The rock is interesting because it is a porphyritic granite.  The huge phenocrysts are peculiar because they are not randomly oriented.  Instead, they are aligned in a preferred direction which is a topic of current research.  After leaving Colorado, Chris and family spent the next two weeks banging around in the Tetons.We wrap up the episode by discussing a couple of mineral pairs that can be confusing to identify in the field.  Join us as we have a casual conversation about some incredible geology!As always, send us any questions you may have! Like, Subscribe, and leave us a rating! ——————————————————Instagram: @planetgeocastTwitter: @planetgeocastFacebook: @planetgeocastEmail: planetgeocast@gmail.comWebsite: https://planetgeocast.com/
Learn all the basics of geology in our new conversational textbook - campGEO!Available here: geo.campcourses.comSand comes from chemical and/or physical weathering of rocks, and is critically important to our society! Most sand formation begins in the soil - soil has water to further break down the pieces. And the location where sand is formed plays a really important role in how useful sand is for concrete and ceramics.  Most beach sand and desert sand is too rounded to be used! As always, send us any questions you may have! Like, Subscribe, and leave us a rating! ——————————————————Instagram: @planetgeocastTwitter: @planetgeocastFacebook: @planetgeocastEmail: planetgeocast@gmail.comWebsite: https://planetgeocast.com/
Learn all the basics of geology in our new conversational textbook - campGEO!Available here: geo.campcourses.comToday we talk about the basic Principles of Geology - the basic observations that allow us to put geologic events in a relative order of when they occurred.  The five principles are 1) Superposition, 2) Original Horizontality, 3) Cross-cutting Relationships, 4) Inclusions, and 5) Correlation/Continuity.Armed with these five rules, you can understand a lot more about the history of the world around you! Like, Subscribe, and leave us a Rating! ——————————————————Instagram: @planetgeocastTwitter: @planetgeocastFacebook: @planetgeocastEmail: planetgeocast@gmail.comWebsite: https://planetgeocast.com/
Learn all the basics of geology in our new conversational textbook - campGEO!Available here: geo.campcourses.comLike, Subscribe, and leave us a Rating! ——————————————————Instagram: @planetgeocastTwitter: @planetgeocastFacebook: @planetgeocastEmail: planetgeocast@gmail.comWebsite: https://planetgeocast.com/
Learn all the basics of geology in our new conversational textbook - campGEO!Available here: geo.campcourses.comThe Earth is old...very old.  But, the Solar System is older! We discuss how we know the age of the Earth, what the age of a planet means anyways, and how planets form! Like, Subscribe, and leave us a Rating! ——————————————————Instagram: @planetgeocastTwitter: @planetgeocastFacebook: @planetgeocastEmail: planetgeocast@gmail.comWebsite: https://planetgeocast.com/
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