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One day, the halls of Winchester Cathedral are filled with whispered prayers and holy songs. The next, they echo with the roaring of gunfire and hooves crashing over the tombs of holy men.The English Civil War was a conflict that spared neither the lowest of peasants nor the highest of kings. It was only a matter of time before the winds of war reached Winchester. In this episode, listen to a 'firsthand' account of the damage caused to Winchester Cathedral and the impact it had on the city.Alex Beeton, a third-year PhD student at Oxford University studying early modern British history, talks about the history of the English Civil War and the fascinating stories of the people involved.If you want to find further information on this episode or to listen to other episodes of Hampshire HistBites, visit our website.
At a glance, Winchester is a city preserved in history—sheltered from the winds of time and change. Upon closer inspection, you will discover that there are new stories and developments happening around every corner. It’s the job of Andrew Napier and a dedicated team of journalists to find these events and bring them to readers across the county.Week after week for 250 years, the Hampshire Chronicle has been a steadfast source of news. With the internet and social media becoming increasingly important elements of our lives, how has the Chronicle adapted? What are its plans for the future? Andrew Napier tells the story.If you want to find further information on this episode or to listen to other episodes of Hampshire HistBites, visit our website.
Over the course of centuries, how many times can one building change ownership? How many voices of the past echo within its rooms and halls? These are questions that Mark Udall, General Manager of King John’s House, seeks to answer as he joins our host, Richard North. Within the complex of historic buildings, traces of the past can be seen tucked away in shadowy corners and carved into stone walls. In this episode, Mark also talks about the effort to bring the past of King John’s House to life.If you want to find further information on this episode or to listen to other episodes of Hampshire HistBites, visit our website.
Black John was a free African carpenter who chose to make a living in Southampton at the turn of the 16th century. Dr Abdoulie Sanneh reveals John’s story and how he brought it to life with the Sarah Siddons Fan Club theatre performance company. Additionally, Dr Sanneh talks about his own story of coming to Southampton from the Gambia and founding The United Voice of African Associations (TUVAA), a non-profit organisation for blacks and Africans in Hampshire.If you want to find further information on this episode or to listen to other episodes of Hampshire HistBites, visit our website.
In the beautiful village of Amport, an owl hoots, and then a baker’s daughter pays a magical price for her cruelty. ‘The Baker’s Daughter of Amport’ is one of many local legends that Amanda Kane-Smith brings to life as a storyteller. Combining magic, mythical creatures, and real locations in the Test Valley, her book Test Valley Tales takes readers on a journey across history through fascinating stories and beautiful illustrations. Additionally, Amanda explores her work as a ‘Merry-go Round storyteller’ at events, festivals, libraries, and other locations across Hampshire.If you want to find further information on this episode or to listen to other episodes of Hampshire HistBites, visit our website.
In 1957, Master Brewer Dick Olding produced his last batch of beer and retired at the age of 81. Martin Bazeley and Matt Hallett join Julian Gerry to share Olding’s story, as well as the decades of history and tradition behind the brewing process. Keep listening to learn about the vital role of the brewery during the Second World War!This is our first episode of Season 8! If you want to find further information on this episode or to listen to other episodes of Hampshire HistBites, visit our website.
In this episode, the final one of Season 7 we join Fay Stevens, Adjunct Assistant Professor at the University of Notre Dame, and explore walking as a question. An archaeologist by training, Fay is interested in the potential of objects and the way we organise them to inspire wonder and stimulate both the individual mind and collective conversation. We can all create a ‘wunderkammer’ – a cabinet of curiosities – that mirrors our experience, emotions and environment as we go. In doing so, we follow in the footsteps of great antiquarians including Elias Ashmole and Sir John Soane, and engage with a rich heritage that lives not just in museums, but wherever we walk, collect and curate- even on our kitchen tables.If you want to find further information on this episode or to listen to other episodes of Hampshire HistBites, visit our website.
Hampshire Cultural Trust is an organisation that manages twenty-three museums, arts centres, and galleries across the county and cares for millions of historical objects. Chief Executive Paul Sapwell reveals what it takes to keep such a vast network of history and culture accessible to Hampshire’s residents. Additionally, he explores some exciting developments the Trust is undertaking, as well as a behind-the-scenes look at a fascinating partnership.If you want to find further information on this episode or to listen to other episodes of Hampshire HistBites, visit our website.
Hursley Park near Winchester is a private estate owned by the IBM. Here you will find new buildings and also an 18th-century Queen Anne style mansion in which - many of our listeners will recall - once saw spitfires built in the ballroom! Today’s story however is takes us back even further in time as once a grand Tudor house stood here, almost forgotten apart from a faint outline on the croquet lawn. In 2021, the Winchester Archaeology Rescue Group (WARG) was given exclusive access to excavate the site and learn more about what was hiding under the earth. Dave Key, the voluntary science historian at Hursley Park and Stuart Rippon, a member of WARG reveals the incredible discoveries they made.If you want to find further information on this episode or to listen to other episodes of Hampshire HistBites, visit our website.
As the RMS Titanic left Southampton on 10th April 1912, crowds filled the docks to wave goodbye to their friends and family. Many of the ship’s crew and passengers were Southampton natives who would never return to their city again. Mary Taylor, a Southampton tourist guide, leads listeners on a trail through Southampton to historic sites relating to the ship, reveals how the city mourned after the tragedy, and explores the real stories of passengers aboard the ill-fated journey.If you want to find further information on this episode or to listen to other episodes of Hampshire HistBites, visit our website.
For centuries, England has been known as one of the world’s strongest naval powers, but in the tumultuous age of Henry V, this fearsome reputation had yet to be forged. During the Hundred Years’ War, England and France waged a fierce war at sea. In this episode, Dr Ian Friel talks about Hampshire’s vital role in defending England and attacking France, as well as the brutal methods medieval sailors waged war on each other.If you want to find further information on this episode or to listen to other episodes of Hampshire HistBites, visit our website.
Join us for a fascinating insight into the history of the little-known Pear Tree Church in Southampton. From its peaceful position close to the eastern bank of the River Itchen, Pear Tree’s influence and intrigue stretch far wider than first jumps out to the eye. In fact, the Church represents the oldest place of worship anywhere in the world to have been intentionally constructed as a seat of the Anglican faith (rather than converted from use as a Catholic site, for example). What’s more, the sermon written for its consecration has gone on to have a worldwide impact, acting as the template for every service since conducted to inaugurate Anglican churches worldwide. Join us to hear how, and why this came to be.Stepping back from the grand and the global, there’s also a wealth of local history to discover in Pear Tree’s own story. In this episode, we’ll hear how the church has played a role in reflecting the ups and downs of its host city over the last four hundred years. Its roots were simple – though there’s rumour of a royal sapling somewhere along the way – and tell a story of a small community at the edge of a great maritime centre. Yet, over time, Pear Tree profited from growth, reinvention and the city’s evolution first into a bathing station and then a spa town at the heart of global merchant networks. Its fabric tells this story in their gradual aggrandisement.Nonetheless, there’s also a darker side to the site - a sorry tale of the sea and struggle for life. Within the Church’s walls lies a monument to one of Southampton’s young sons shipwrecked, killed by cannibals and eventually commemorated in the well-known novel The Life of Pi. This is no simple story - maritime tradition, family love and the history of English law are all woven within. Listen in for more.WARNING: THIS EPISODE INCLUDES REFERENCES TO CANNIBALISM, WHICH SOME LISTENERS MAY FIND DISTURBING.For more information about this episode, or to browse some of our other seasons, visit our website.
At first glance, the River Itchen appears to be nothing more than a quaint waterway without much history behind it. However, within its calm streams rests thousands of years of human civilisation. Elizabeth Proudman, a local historian and former Winchester tour guide, takes listeners on a tour through the city’s history and its ties to the River Itchen. Whether it’s flowing past Iron Age fortresses, a Medieval capital, or a modern city, the river has been an inseparable part of local history.This is our first episode of Season 7! To see maps, visual aids and to find out more about the waterways in Winchester, visit our website here.
In our last episode on chocolate, Andy Silen-McMillin joins Holly Marsden as they trace its journey across early modern Europe and its many uses as a product.When most people think of chocolate today, they think of hot chocolate or chocolate bars. However, did you know that it was once used as an aphrodisiac? Holly Marsden and Andy Silen-McMillin explore the recipes, uses, and products made with chocolate. For kings and queens in early modern Europe, chocolate was power, and power was everything. Discover how this fascinating link developed!On our website you will find more information about this episode including photographs, our fantastic show notes and a downloadable version of the transcript; visit our website by clicking here.Please note the HistBites team are taking a break over Christmas and January, but plan to return with a brand new season in February 2022. Already lots of podcasts have been recorded but if you know of a great Hampshire story or are a Hampshire based historian with a national or international story to share, do get in touch. We’d be delighted to hear from you, and maybe your story will appear in the first season of 2022.
Join us as we trace the fascinating journey of chocolate in the 17th, 18th and 19th centuries - from its arrival - not without issue - on Hampshire shores, to its place at the very centre of Stuart royal life. Guided on our way by Holly Marsden, a specialist on the life and times of Mary II, we hear how the Queen placed this bittersweet substance at the heart of her work to reshape the English Court, both physically and in terms of the ritual and image-making that projected power and prestige.On our website you will find more information about this episode including photographs, our fantastic show notes and a downloadable version of the transcript; visit our website by clicking here.
It’s that time of the year when Terry’s Chocolate Oranges and tins of Quality Streets are lining the shelves – but how much do you really know about the history behind chocolate?In the first of a three-part series, join Dr Gabrielle Storey and Johanna Strong as they explore the historical production process and chocolate’s journey to Europe. This episode sets the scene ahead of two subsequent episodes which will expand upon this topic to consider the history of chocolate in Hampshire, the use of chocolate in early modern court life, and different historical recipes and uses of chocolate. CONTENT WARNING:Please note that this episode will contain discussions of sensitive topics including enslavement and acts of violence. Any history of the development and production of chocolate must consider the impact it had on indigenous populations and how enslaved labour was exploited. This material may be distressing to some listeners, there is a transcript available if you would like to read this episode instead.On our website you will find more information about this episode including photographs, our fantastic show notes and a downloadable version of the transcript; visit our website by clicking here.
The UK’s historic walking trails have been used for millennia. Roman sandals have walked the same paths as modern trainers. But these routes are in danger of disappearing forever. Join Peter and Paul from the Hampshire Ramblers to learn how they’re being saved!2026 represents the deadline for retracing and reclaiming lost paths, and old rights of way, that have since dropped off the (latest) map in England and Wales. In this episode, we hear from two volunteers leading the effort to uncover what has been lost, and restore the rights of way to the map before time runs out. The project, ‘Don’t Lose Your Way’, aims to bring a nationwide community of volunteers together to review old maps of England and Wales, spot historic rights of way that no longer appear on the most modern plans, and support applications to have these ‘lost paths’ restored and preserved for posterity. On our website you will find more information about this episode including photographs, our fantastic show notes and a downloadable version of the transcript; visit our website by clicking here
Winchester is an old city filled with a rich and exciting history, echoes of the past can be seen all around as you walk through its streets - if you only know where to look. Join Instagrammer Miss_WinchesterUK as she highlights some of the unusual facts throughout the city: discover where you can walk in the footsteps of royals; what curious rhyme you can find on a gravestone at the Cathedral and where you can hear the whispers of a ghost. On our website you will find more information about this episode including photographs, our fantastic show notes and a downloadable version of the transcript; visit our website by clicking here
We've all heard the name and seen the logo but what is Hampshire Fare and what do they do? In this podcast, we go in search of answers and finds a quiet success story behind some of the best of what the county has to offer.This is our final episode of the Heritage Open Days 2021 festival, we plan to be back for Season Six in November 2021.  For more information visit our website by clicking here
Archives Galore!

Archives Galore!

2021-09-1728:57

All history ultimately depends on archives of some kind – documents, film, sound recordings and increasingly digital files. There is a huge range of such archives of all sizes and levels of sophistication. Often, to properly research a subject, it is necessary to “roam around” sources. This often comes up with some surprising finds. In this podcast, specially recorded for Heritage Open days local historian Barry Shurlock will attempt to show the richness of archives, with particular reference to Hampshire, but also more broadly.On our website you will find more information about this episode including photographs, our fantastic show notes and a downloadable version of the transcript; visit our website by clicking here
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