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This Week in Black History, Society, and Culture
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This Week in Black History, Society, and Culture

Author: Black and African Diaspora Forum United (BADFU)

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"This Week in Black History, Society, and Culture" is a weekly podcast produced by the Black and African Diaspora Forum United (BADFU) an interracial group of faculty at Monmouth University concerned about issues pertaining to the Black/African American experience. BADFU members will periodically interview scholars, authors, activists, and community leaders on matters related to the history, society, and culture of Black and African American communities in the United States (U.S.) and beyond. These podcast episodes are on a variety of subjects including, but not limited to, higher education, economics, criminal justice, reparations, mental health, history, science, gender, popular culture, women, and politics. A new episode will be released weekly on Monday mornings from September to May during each academic term.
19 Episodes
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In this episode, Dr. Hettie V. Williams interviews Dr. Anne-Marie Angelo about the British Black Panther Party. Angelo is a Senior Lecturer in American history in the School of Media, Arts and Humanities at the University of Sussex. Her forthcoming book with the University of North Carolina Press is entitled Black Power on the Move: Migration, Internationalism, and the British and Israeli Black Panthers is about the Black Power movements in the United Kingdom and Israel in order to understand how Black Power was transformed from an African-American movement to a global black freedom struggle.  
In this episode, Dr. Maryanne Rhett discusses race and comics in world history with Trevor R. Getz. Dr. Rhett is a Professor of World History at Monmouth University where she is the Director of the Graduate Program in History. She is the author of Representations of Islam in United States Comics, 1880-1822 (Bloomsbury Academic, 2021). Getz is a Professor of History in the Department of History at San Francisco State University. He is also the author of the award-winning text Abina and the Important Men: A Graphic History (Oxford University Press, 2011), principle content manager for the World History Project and the series editor for Oxford University Press’s Uncovering History series.
In this episode, Dr. Hettie V. Williams interviews Dr. Jonathan Daniel Wells about his new book The Kidnapping Club: Wall Street, Slavery, and Resistance on the Eve of the Civil War published by Bold Type Books in 2020. Wells is a Professor of History in the Department of Afro American and African Studies at the University of Michigan. This is a stunning book about a network of prominent New Yorkers including judges, businessmen and police officers who were a part of a “kidnapping club” in Antebellum New York that was involved in kidnapping African Americans and selling them into enslavement. The text is also about African Americans such as David Ruggles who fought back against the kidnappers while advancing civil rights for African Americans in the long struggle for freedom. 
Race and Policing

Race and Policing

2021-02-0840:07

In this episode, Dr. Marie Mele discusses race and policing with Dr. Lorenzo Boyd. Dr. Mele is an Assistant Professor at Monmouth University in the Department of Criminal Justice and her research focus is on victimization and intimate partner violence. She also worked for the National Institute of Justice and the Morris County Prosecutor’s Office as a victim advocate. Dr. Boyd is a nationally recognized expert in police-community relations and he is also an authority on urban policing. He is currently Vice President for Diversity and Inclusion and Chief Diversity Officer at the University of New Haven located in West Haven, Connecticut. 
In this episode, Dr. Walter D. Greason Dean Emeritus of the Honors School at Monmouth University, Associate Professor, and Chair of the Department of Educational Leadership interviews Grammy Award-winning composer Arturo O’Farrill about the Afro Latin Jazz Orchestra. The Afro Latin Jazz orchestra is a group led by O’Farrill that includes more than a dozen of the most notable Jazz musicians performing today. This group brings together the sounds of big band jazz and Latin music culture. O’Farrill is a jazz musician, composer, band leader and pianist noted for his influence on contemporary Latin jazz and Afro-Cuban jazz. He has several Grammy Award nominations and Grammy Awards including the Grammy for Best Latin Jazz Album in 2015. Andrew Andron composed and performed the music for this podcast. 
This is the first episode of a series of shows on Asbury Park and the impact of COVID-19 on the African American community in New Jersey. The series is part of a larger digital history project on African Americans in the history of Asbury Park, historically, a city with one of the largest Black populations in New Jersey called “Paradoxical Paradise: An African American Oral History and Mapping Project on Asbury Park.” Dr. Hettie V. Williams, the Director of this project, is in conversation in this episode with Professor Claude Taylor Lecturer in the Department of Communication and Program Director of the First to Fly Program. Taylor gives us terrific insight into his life growing up in Asbury Park and the impact that COVID-19 is having on the City. These programs were made possible through a grant from the Urban Coast Institute (UCI) at Monmouth University. Music for the show composed and performed by Andrew Andron. 
In this inaugural episode of season two, Dr. Hettie V. Williams is in conversation with Dr. Manuel Chavez, Lecturer in the Department of World Languages and Culture at Monmouth University, about his course Love, Life and Liberty and the philosophical contributions of Martin Luther King, Jr. Dr. Chavez is also the Director of the Philosophy Program at Monmouth. He uses King's important essay "Love Your Enemies" in his course, at Monmouth, discussed in this episode along with a broader discussion of King's ideas about the logic of love and the relationship between love, power and justice. 
Black Women in STEM

Black Women in STEM

2020-11-2252:26

In this episode, Dr. Hettie V. Williams, Assistant Professor of African American history at Monmouth University, is in conversation about Black women in STEM with Dr. Nikita Burrows, Assistant Professor of Chemistry, in the Department of Chemistry and Physics, at Monmouth University. Dr. Burrows is a chemist and her research focuses on chemistry education. She takes us through her journey as an international scholar from the Bahamas to the United States including some discussion of mentoring, the value of representation, and teaching pedagogy.  
In this episode, Dr. Hettie V. Williams, Assistant Professor of African American history at Monmouth University, is in conversation with Dr. Shirley Crenshaw, a science professional with several years of experience teaching at the college level, about her life on the pin-up pageant circuit. The vast amount of scholarly literature on pageant culture in the African American experience tends to focus on the American South but Dr. Crenshaw who hails from the Mid-West provides us with a different perspective. This discussion also covers issues of race, gender, and sexuality giving us some insight into how some Black women view life in the pageant world as an identity making resource. 
In this episode, Dr. Hettie V. Williams, Assistant Professor of African American history at Monmouth University, is in conversation with Dr. Karanja Keita Carroll, a social theorist, and lecturer in the Department of Black and Latino Studies at Baruch College (CUNY), about Black political prisoners in the United States (U.S.). Carroll goes into some detail about his work as a scholar who takes a multidisciplinary African centered approach to knowledge production and his work as a political activist involved with various associations seeking to secure Black equality.  
In this episode, Dr. Anwar Uhuru interviews Dr. Zaneta Rago-Craft about equity, inclusion and diversity on college campuses. Uhuru is an Assistant Professor of African American Literature in the Department of English at Monmouth University with research interests in Afro-Diaspora literature, critical race theory, and gender/sexuality theory. Rago-Craft is the Director of the Monmouth University Intercultural Center and she has many years of experience as an equity and diversity professional in higher education settings. 
In this episode, Monmouth University professors Hettie V. Williams, Walter D. Greason, and Anwar Uhuru discuss race and the U.S. presidential election of 2020. Hettie V. Williams is an Assistant Professor of African American History, Walter D. Greason is an Associate Professor, and Emeritus Dean of the Monmouth University Honor’s School, and Dr. Anwar Uhuru is an Assistant Professor of African American Literature. This episode is a conversation about race, racism, critical race theory, and the intersection of race, gender, and class in U.S. society and culture. 
In this episode, Dr. David Julius Ford, Assistant Professor in the Department of Professional Counseling at Monmouth University, is in conversation with Dr. Rufus Tony Spann, Assistant Professor in the School Counseling Program at the University of Southern California and Dr. Don Trahan, an equity, diversity and inclusion specialist, about racism amid the backdrop of COVID-19. Ford is a Licensed Counselor in North Carolina, Virginia, and New Jersey. He is also a Board-Certified Counselor and an Approved Clinical Supervisor. He began his career in Student Affairs and has ten years of counseling experience. These scholars articulate the multilayered dimensions of Black oppression and what it means to “hold space” while navigating white supremacy in the academy and beyond.  Note: This episode may have some sensitive language. 
In this episode, Dr. Katherine Parkin, Professor of History at Monmouth University interviews Dr. Traci Parker, Associate Professor in the W.E.B. DuBois Department of Afro-American Studies at the University of Massachusetts - Amherst.  Parker is a scholar of women’s history, racism, class, labor, capitalism, and consumer culture.  Lizabeth Cohen called her first book, Department Stores and the Black Freedom Movement: Workers, Consumers, and Civil Rights from the 1930s to the 1980s, "fascinating" and Victoria Wolcott heralds it as a "powerful and largely untold story."  In addition to talking about consumers and workers and civil rights, Parker also shares some of her new research, exploring marriage in the Black power movement.  This show can be listened to on Apple Podcasts or wherever you listen to your podcasts including on Spotify and Stitcher.
In this episode, Hettie V. Williams discuses the Black and African American influence on the Beatles with Dr. Kenneth A. Womack one of the nation’s foremost scholars of the band. Ken is a writer, literary critic, and music historian as well as a Professor of English and Popular Music at Monmouth University. He is the author of the bestselling book Solid State: The Story of Abbey Road and the End of the Beatles, John Lennon 1980: The Last Days in the Life, and Sound Pictures: The Life of Beatles Producer George Martin and several essays on literary criticism and four novels. 
In this episode, Dr. Walter D. Greason discusses African Americans in the history of New Jersey. Greason is a pioneering scholar in the field of African American history. His groundbreaking book Suburban Erasure: How the Suburbs Ended the Civil Rights Movement in New Jersey is one of the first complete scholarly surveys on African Americans in the history of New Jersey with a focus on the twentieth century. This show can be listened to on Apple Podcasts or wherever you listen to your podcasts including on Spotify and Stitcher.  
In this episode, Caine Jordan, Guy Emerson Mount, and David Johnson continue their provocative conversation about reparations. For them, there is no amount of monetary compensation that can repair the harm done to Black and African American communities in enslavement, Jim Crow and, more recently, as a result of mass incarceration. This is Part II of a two Part series on Reparations as Restorative Justice. 
In this episode, Guy Emerson Mount, Caine Jordan, and David Johnson discuss the idea of reparations and the Reparations Movement in the global African Diaspora with Hettie V. Williams. These scholars reframe the notion of justice “turning the idea on its head” and declare that monetary compensation for the injury of slavery, and racism more generally, can only be understood as a restorative on-going process or praxis. In other words, there is no amount of monetary compensation that can repair the harm that has been done to Black and African American communities worldwide. This is a two-part series. 
In this episode, Dr. Nicole Pulliam, Associate Professor of Educational Counseling at Monmouth University, interviews Dr. Nicolle Parsons-Pollard, Associate Provost for Faculty Affairs at Georgia State University. Parsons-Pollard has a wealth of experience in higher education as a Professor and administrator at various institutions including at Virginia Commonwealth University, Virginia State University, and Monmouth University to her current position at Georgia State University. Dr. Pulliam teaches courses on social justice, diversity, student affairs/college counseling, and human growth/development. She has more than 15 years of experience in higher education as a Professor, advisor, and career development specialist. Follow Nicole on Twitter @NPulliam_PhD and BADFU @bad_union for updates about our organization. 
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