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Noisy Balls

Author: Marco Curralejo

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Welcome to Noisy Balls, a podcast brought to you by the Victorian Blind Cricket Association. We aim to inform, entertain, and keep you abreast of the goings on in blind cricket from around the world. Compelling discussion with fascinating people, highlighting the fact that no matter whether you are blind or visually impaired, this should never be a barrier for you to fulfill your sporting dreams.
15 Episodes
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Episode 13 of Noisy Balls sees me sit down with the VBCA Vice President Dan Pritchard.Dan has been involved in blind cricket since 2008 and he certainly is extremely passionate about ensuring that as many people who are blind and visually-impaired have the opportunity of participating in blind and vi sport.We explore Dan's life growing up, as well as the numerous blind cricket tournaments that Dan has been a part of, and this episode is all about ensuring that listeners to the show are aware that blind cricket, both with the Australian ball and the international ball, is very much alive and well down at Kooyong and that whether you are a current player or a past player, you are always welcome to come down and be a part of it all.If you are interested in either playing with the Aussie ball or giving the twenty20 a try, here are some ways in which you can get involved: Email the VBCA current Secretary, Jodie Hunter-Wilson, at secretary@vbca.org.au Send a message through to the Victorian Blind Cricket Association Facebook Page If you are ready to sign up straightaway, head on over to the Play Cricket website and fill in your details on their online form Finally, if you want to play for one of the three specific clubs, those being Glenferrie Lions, Burwood Warriors or St. Pauls, search on Facebook for any of those clubs and contact them directly on their page and they will go about getting you registered. A huge thanks to Dan for such an insightful interview and I wish you all the best as you go about breathing some life back into the VBCA and many congratulations for all the hard work you do each and every week to ensure that blind cricket continues to thrive in Victoria for many years to come.Noisy Balls is proudly sponsored by the Victorian Blind Cricket Association and we appreciate the VBCA's support as we bring in a new dawn in blind cricket podcasting. To Get In Touch with Noisy Balls: Shoot us an email to feedback@noisyballs.com and we will always respond and read your messages up on an upcoming show. Why not be a part of the conversation on the Noisy Balls Facebook Group and you can always follow us on the Noisy Balls Twitter Feed, where we will regularly update you with the goings on in blind cricket locally, nationally and internationally. To find out more about my other podcasting endeavours, I invite you to check out the Blind Tech Guys.  Support the show (https://pod.fan/noisyballs)★ Support this podcast ★
On episode 12 of Noisy Balls, I had an inspiring chat with a legend of the English game, Geoff Smith.Geoff played a massive role in the agreement for the BBS Primary Club Cup Final to be played at the Nursery Ground at Lords, an arrangement that ran from 1992 until 2008. Most of his playing career was for London Metro and for Sussex Sharks, he played a big part in starting the latter club.Geoff won the National League title and the BBS Cup during his playing career, doing so on many occasions. Geoff was a talented wicketkeeper batsman and played many internationals for Blind Cricket England And Wales.After Geoff was inducted into the blind cricket hall of fame, he stated “I have such wonderful recollections about my playing days. It’s right that I was as much involved off the field as on it. As WBCC General Secretary I wrote the Core Documents (governing rules and playing rules etc) for WBCC with some help from ICC (when they were still based at Lord's). I took over from Tony Hegarty who handed me a carrier bag with his collection of bits of paper when I was elected General Secretary in New Delhi in January 2002.The best working period for me as an official was with Tim Guttridge and Peter Donovan when I was General Sec, they were both very good and very easy to work with. My best playing moment for England was helping to get us home for our first victory against Pakistan in 2002. When I went in we needed 26 off 19 balls, amazingly and despite my ever present nerves, I hit my first ball for four! This surprised everyone especially me. We beat them twice that year an they went on to be world champions at the Chennai World Cup.I played for thirty years, my favourite colleagues and friends were Heindrich, David Samuels and John Garbett.”Thanks to Geoff for such an insightful chat and I appreciate you taking the time to pop on to this episode of the show.Noisy Balls is proudly sponsored by the Victorian Blind Cricket Association and we appreciate the VBCA's support as we bring in a new dawn in blind cricket podcasting. To Get In Touch with Noisy Balls: Shoot us an email to feedback@noisyballs.com and we will always respond and read your messages up on an upcoming show. Why not be a part of the conversation on the Noisy Balls Facebook Group and you can always follow us on the Noisy Balls Twitter Feed, where we will regularly update you with the goings on in blind cricket locally, nationally and internationally. To find out more about my other podcasting endeavours, I invite you to check out the Blind Tech Guys.  Support the show (https://pod.fan/noisyballs)★ Support this podcast ★
On episode 11 of Noisy Balls, I had the extremely enjoyable opportunity of chatting with someone that is certainly much loved and well known locally, nationally and internationally. I am of course talking about the brilliant blind cricket umpire Michael Clemens.Michael has an impressive resume to his name, with some of his qualifications including Bachelor of Business (RMIT), Diploma of Financial Planning (Deakin University), Diploma of Education (LaTrobe University), Graduate Diploma of Accounting and Finance (Monash University), Graduate Diploma of University Teaching and Learning (RMIT), and Masters of Accounting and Finance (VUT).Michael's many current and past portfolios include being a member of CPA Australia, director of TrainEd Consulting Group Pty Ltd, a registered tax agent, authorised representative of Integrity Financial Planners Pty Ltd, life member of the Victorian Blind Cricket Association, life member of the Carrum/Bonbeach Cricket Club, Victorian Blind Cricket Association delegate to Blind Sports and Recreation Victoria, financial advisor to Blind Cricket Australia, financial advisor to Loch Sport Golf Club Inc., former director and treasurer to the Caroline Chisholm Pregnancy Support Agency, and former director and treasurer for the Airport Golf Club Inc. (formerly the Tullamarine Country Club).Michael shared with us his history in blind cricket, his days as a cricketer himself, as well as discussing how things were many years ago when he became a father to Damian Clemens, an exceedingly accomplished blind cricketer in his own right.Michael, I appreciate you coming on to this episode of Noisy Balls and for so graciously giving up some of your valuable time in order to enlighten our listeners with your pearls of wisdom and having you on the show definitely made for a very memorable episode.Noisy Balls is proudly sponsored by the Victorian Blind Cricket Association and we appreciate the VBCA's support as we bring in a new dawn in blind cricket podcasting.   To Get In Touch with Noisy Balls: Shoot us an email to feedback@noisyballs.com and we will always respond and read your messages up on an upcoming show. Why not be a part of the conversation on the Noisy Balls Facebook Group and you can always follow us on the Noisy Balls Twitter Feed, where we will regularly update you with the goings on in blind cricket locally, nationally and internationally. To find out more about my other podcasting endeavours, I invite you to check out the Blind Tech Guys.  Support the show (https://pod.fan/noisyballs)★ Support this podcast ★
On the first bonus episode of Noisy Balls, we welcome the President of the Victorian Blind Cricket Association back to the pavilion, Lindsay Heaven.Lindsay popped on to the pod to update what has been going on with the VBCA board in terms of preparations for the upcoming season and also to let everyone know of the two grants that the team have applied for and successfully acquired and how this will effect those participating in the upcoming season.We also conversed on the exciting Woolworths Cricket Blast program that Daniel Pritchard is setting up inconjunction with Rohail Akter from Cricket Victoria and how this will allow junior blind cricketers to get out on the park and develop their blind cricketing skills.Thanks Lindsay for the update and we look forward to catching up in a few week's time with more news on what is going on at Kooyong and let's hope that we will all be playing cricket sooner, rather than later.Noisy Balls is proudly sponsored by the Victorian Blind Cricket Association and we appreciate the VBCA's support as we bring in a new dawn in blind cricket podcasting.   To Get In Touch with Noisy Balls: Shoot us an email to feedback@noisyballs.com and we will always respond and read your messages up on an upcoming show. Why not be a part of the conversation on the Noisy Balls Facebook Group and you can always follow us on the Noisy Balls Twitter Feed, where we will regularly update you with the goings on in blind cricket locally, nationally and internationally. To find out more about my other podcasting endeavours, I invite you to check out the Blind Tech Guys.  Support the show (https://pod.fan/noisyballs)★ Support this podcast ★
On Episode 10 of Noisy Balls, we headed back over to the UK and had a thoroughly entertaining, but  exceedingly informative natter with Blind Cricket England & Wales wicket keeper Dan Field.Dan has been an integral part of the Sussex Sharks VI cricket team for almost two decades and was picked to play for the UK men's VI cricket team back in 2006.We chatted about many and varied subjects in this episode, from Dan's thoughts on playing for Sussex, to the highs and lows of being a part of the national side.We even had time to ask Dan about his bowling prowess, and it may well surprise you, or perhaps not, that he has only ever bowled one over in the English colors and boy, what an over that turned out to be.It was clear to me, and I am sure it will be to you after you take a listen to this episode, that Dan is a thoroughly entertaining individual who certainly holds playing VI cricket near and dear to his heart and I thank you Dan for taking the time to chat with us and the team wishes you the best of luck as you go about forging an extremely successful career in blind cricket.Noisy Balls is proudly sponsored by the Victorian Blind Cricket Association and we appreciate the VBCA's support as we bring in a new dawn in blind cricket podcasting.   To Get In Touch with Noisy Balls: Shoot us an email to feedback@noisyballs.com and we will always respond and read your messages up on an upcoming show. Why not be a part of the conversation on the Noisy Balls Facebook Group and you can always follow us on the Noisy Balls Twitter Feed, where we will regularly update you with the goings on in blind cricket locally, nationally and internationally. To find out more about my other podcasting endeavours, I invite you to check out the Blind Tech Guys.  Support the show (https://pod.fan/noisyballs)★ Support this podcast ★
On this episode of Noisy Balls, I had the honour of speaking with Cricket Australia Diversity And Inclusion Specialist Aaron Dragwidge. Aaron has been one of the driving forces behind Cricket Australia’s Sport For All initiative and, in particular, their rapidly growing disability inclusion programs.  He is transforming Cricket’s approach to the inclusion of people with disability and has a passion for inclusion and human rights. Aaron has always been exceedingly passionate about inclusiveness for all disabled cricketers. “The National Cricket Inclusion Championships (NCIC) came about because we had three groups of cricketers with disabilities. Blind and low vision had national championships every two years, the Deaf and hard of hearing cricketers every four years, and cricketers with an intellectual disability didn’t have an opportunity. So, we brought it all under the one umbrella as a great celebration of cricket”. Having been involved with putting together the NCIC championships, Aaron states “This is about celebrating ability and talent in cricket. Lots of people walk past the games and ask, “what’s this game?”, so it’s really fantastic to be part of that and seeing the impact that has in a broader sense in the community”. Aaron believes that it’s really important to have sports at a national level to be inclusive. The impact that this has had on a number of players has been really huge. In a lot of cases it’s changed their lives and has allowed them to participate locally, nationally, and internationally. Aaron wants to ensure that our great game keeps continuing to grow. “Anyone who is keen to get involved in cricket, no matter what your ability is, you should contact your local cricket club or go on to the PlayCricket website, And if you’re interested in being involved in the National Cricket Inclusion Championships, jump on to the National Cricket Inclusion Championships website". I thank Aaron for joining me on this episode and for always being so accommodating with his time and I know that with all of his hard work and passion for disabled cricket, our game is definitely in very good hands for many years to come. Noisy Balls is proudly sponsored by the Victorian Blind Cricket Association and we appreciate the VBCA's support as we bring in a new dawn in blind cricket podcasting.   To Get In Touch with Noisy Balls: Shoot us an email to feedback@noisyballs.com and we will always respond and read your messages up on an upcoming show. Why not be a part of the conversation on the Noisy Balls Facebook Group and you can always follow us on the Noisy Balls Twitter Feed, where we will regularly update you with the goings on in blind cricket locally, nationally and internationally. To find out more about my other podcasting endeavours, I invite you to check out the Blind Tech Guys.  Support the show (https://pod.fan/noisyballs)★ Support this podcast ★
On this episode of Noisy Balls, I had the most delightful conversation with Cricket Victoria's inclusion and participation officer, Rohail Akhtar. Rohail has had a rather unusual life, starting in his younger years by living in Dubai, which is the most populous city in the United Arab Emirates (UAE) and the capital of the Emirate of Dubai. He then moved to Melbourne at a very young age and as you will find out, he has always had a great passion for cricket, both in playing the game, as well as coaching and mentoring his teammates to get the best out of themselves. Rohail is a hard working individual who is passionate about his causes, particularly in the sporting arena. Rohail has accumulated an extraordinary amount of work experience which belies his young age, including working at various organisations such as Melbourne City FC, Cricket Victoria, South Morang Cricket Club, Special Olympics Victoria, Velocity Brand Management and through his internship at Inner Melbourne VET Cluster. Rohail has developed skills which he believes will help him, including his ability to manage customers, as well as continuing to develop a high level of communication and interpersonal skills. Rohail’s main goal is to build a career in the sports industry, particularly amongst his main interests of cricket and Australian Football. Rohail takes pride in his reputation and experience within the industry, and believes that his hardworking manner provides tremendous value to the organisations he works for. I thoroughly enjoyed chatting with Rohail and it's clear that he will do magnificently as Cricket Victoria's inclusion and development officer and I certainly do appreciate Cricket Victoria for allowing me to chat with Rohail and for permitting me to put this episode together. Noisy Balls is proudly sponsored by the Victorian Blind Cricket Association and we appreciate the VBCA's support as we bring in a new dawn in blind cricket podcasting.  To Get In Touch with Noisy Balls: Shoot us an email to feedback@noisyballs.com and we will always respond and read your messages up on an upcoming show. Why not be a part of the conversation on the Noisy Balls Facebook Group and you can always follow us on the Noisy Balls Twitter Feed, where we will regularly update you with the goings on in blind cricket locally, nationally and internationally. To find out more about my other podcasting endeavours, I invite you to check out the Blind Tech Guys. Support the show (https://pod.fan/noisyballs)★ Support this podcast ★
On this episode of Noisy Balls, I spoke with someone who will probably be well known to some of you, especially if you are residing in the UK or you know a little bit about UK vi cricket. My guest this week is Justin Hollingsworth.Justin is currently studying and working at the University of East Anglia. As a part of his Sports Development course, he is able to work within the UEA Sports team as a sports ambassador.He is currently the vice captain of the England Visually Impaired cricket team and he certainly takes this role extremely seriously.Having played for the Warwickshire Visually Impaired Cricket Team prior to the side folding, Justin now captains the Metro side and hopes to be back out on the park next season.One thing that I certainly did not know is that Justin has a keen passion for throwing the Javelin and hopes to be picked up by GB Para pathway sometime down the track.I would like to Thank Justin for being such an enjoyable guest on this episode of the show and we wish you the best of luck as you go about fulfilling your dreams.Noisy Balls is proudly sponsored by the Victorian Blind Cricket Associationand we appreciate the VBCA's support as we bring in a new dawn in blind cricket podcasting.To Get In Touch with Noisy Balls: Shoot us an email to feedback@noisyballs.com and we will always respond and read your messages up on an upcoming show. Why not be a part of the conversation on the Noisy Balls Facebook Group and you can always follow us on the Noisy Balls Twitter Feed, where we will regularly update you with the goings on in blind cricket locally, nationally and internationally. To find out more about my other podcasting endeavours, I invite you to check out the Blind Tech Guys.  Support the show (https://pod.fan/noisyballs)★ Support this podcast ★
On this episode of Noisy Balls, I was privileged to speak with Mahantesh G Kivadasannavar. Mahantesh GK is the Founder Managing Trustee of Samarthanam Trust for the Disabled, President of Cricket Association for the Blind in India-CABI and World Blind Cricket Ltd (WBC). Being a blind cricket player himself who participated in many national tournaments during his cricketing days, he has always strived to boost the game. Having witnessed the struggles of blind cricket players in India, Mahantesh founded Cricket Association for the Blind in India which opened many opportunities for cricket enthusiasts. CABI organizes blind cricket tournaments from school to an international level providing the right platform for the young players. The organization trains and grooms the overall skill-set of the participants, who eventually stand on the international stage and prove that ability goes beyond disability. Through CABI, Mahantesh mentored the Indian Blind Cricket team who had brought home victory in every national and international world cup tournament played. 1st and 2nd T20 World Cup in 2012 and 2017, 4th and 5th ODI World Championship in 2014 and 2018, Asia Cup in 2016, Bilateral Series 2018 and Triangular Series in 2018. Owing to Mahantesh’ s cricketing ability and his expertise in the field he was elected as the President of the World Blind Cricket Ltd twice in a row. Mahantesh encourages young talent in the field and encourages the players to pursue cricket as a career. He advocates for the development of the game on every stage and looks forward to continuing to garner recognition for the game and the visually impaired players both locally and on the world stage. Mahantesh GK has also just released his autobiography entitled Eye Opener. You can now get your copy of Eye Opener from Notion Press, Amazon, Amazon India, Flipkart and on Kindle.Copies, including those printed in Braille, can also be ordered by emailing the Samarthanam Trust.I would like to thank Mahantesh GK for popping on to Noisy Balls and for allowing us to take up some of his valuable time in order to bring our world-wide audience up-to-date with the current goings-on in World Blind Cricket and we look forward to catching up in early December, where we will be able to update you with some major happenings following World Blind Cricket's AGM.Noisy Balls is proudly sponsored by the Victorian Blind Cricket Associationand we appreciate the VBCA's support as we bring in a new dawn in blind cricket podcasting.To Get In Touch with Noisy Balls: Shoot us an email to feedback@noisyballs.com and we will always respond and read your messages up on an upcoming show. Why not be a part of the conversation on the Noisy Balls Facebook Group and you can always follow us on the Noisy Balls Twitter Feed, where we will regularly update you with the goings on in blind cricket locally, nationally and internationally. To find out more about my other podcasting endeavours, I invite you to check out the Blind Tech Guys.  Support the show (https://pod.fan/noisyballs)★ Support this podcast ★
On this episode of Noisy Balls, I had the great pleasure of interviewing the totally blind radio and television commentator Dean du Plessis, who currently hosts his own very impressive podcast Dean At Stumps.Dean was born with tumors behind both retinas, destroying his eyesight before birth. He subsequently had both eyes removed, and currently wears glass eyes. Dean's brother Gary played first class cricket in Zimbabwe for the Mashonaland A cricket team. Dean started his love affair with cricket in 1991, when South Africa were re-admitted into the international cricketing fraternity and he was a student a boarding school in Worcester, South Africa. He used to spend his pocket money in calling up Radio One in Zimbabwe to know the scores, when the Zimbabwe national cricket team were given test status in 1992.Dean's obsession for the game saw him collect the home phone numbers of Dave Houghton, Grant Flower and Alistair Campbell and discuss cricket in length with them. His knowledge about the game impressed Ravi Shastri, who allowed Dean to sit in the commentary box. The commentators eventually started chatting with him, and asking for his opinions. His first stint as a commentator was when his childhood friend Neil Manthorp, who was doing radio commentary for ESPNcricinfo allowed him a 15-minute stint. Dean's knowledge impressed the Cricinfo team, who hired him for the rest of the series.His television debut was in 2003 with Mike Haysman during Zimbabwe's second one-day international with West Indies at the Queens Sports Club, in Bulawayo. He has travelled to South Africa and Bangladesh as part of the commentary team for different studios. He has also been a regular contributor and columnist for The Herald and The Daily NewsDean is wired to the stump microphone, and bases his commentary on the sounds that he picks up.I thank Dean for giving up some of his valuable time to be on the podcast and wish you much success as you continue on your cricket broadcasting career.Noisy Balls is proudly sponsored by the Victorian Blind Cricket Associationand we appreciate the VBCA's support as we bring in a new dawn in blind cricket podcasting.To Get In Touch with Noisy Balls: Shoot us an email to feedback@noisyballs.com and we will always respond and read your messages up on an upcoming show. Why not be a part of the conversation on the Noisy Balls Facebook Group and you can always follow us on the Noisy Balls Twitter Feed, where we will regularly update you with the goings on in blind cricket locally, nationally and internationally. To find out more about my other podcasting endeavours, I invite you to check out the Blind Tech Guys.  Support the show (https://pod.fan/noisyballs)★ Support this podcast ★
In the fourth episode of Noisy Balls, I had the great honour of speaking with a legend of the Sussex Sharks VI cricket team Ian (Tiny) Morris.Ian has led a rather unusual and varied life, starting off with him working in the bio chemistry field and leading right through to him now being employed for The Guide Dogs For The Blind Association (UK).He even manages to find time to be on his very own podcast Pompy Politics Podcast, so go and check that out for some quirky political narrative.Ian only came to be involved in VI cricket in 2002, as he knew nothing of blind sport before then. Ian's eye condition is Retinitis Pigmentosa (RP).Retinitis Pigmentosa (RP) is a group of rare, genetic disorders that involve a breakdown and loss of cells in the retina — which is the light sensitive tissue that lines the back of the eye. Common symptoms include difficulty seeing at night and a loss of side (peripheral) vision.RP is considered a rare disorder. Although current statistics are not available, it is generally estimated that the disorder affects roughly 1 in 4,000 people, both in the United States and worldwide.RP is an inherited disorder that results from harmful changes in any one of more than 50 genes. These genes carry the instructions for making proteins that are needed in cells within the retina, called photoreceptors. Some of the changes, or mutations, within genes are so severe that the gene cannot make the required protein, limiting the cell's function. Other mutations produce a protein that is toxic to the cell. Still other mutations lead to an abnormal protein that doesn't function properly. In all three cases, the result is damage to the photoreceptors.Photoreceptors are cells in the retina that begin the process of seeing. They absorb and convert light into electrical signals. These signals are sent to other cells in the retina and ultimately through the optic nerve to the brain where they are processed into the images we see. There are two general types of photoreceptors, called rods and cones. Rods are in the outer regions of the retina, and allow us to see in dim and dark light. Cones reside mostly in the central portion of the retina, and allow us to perceive fine visual detail and color.I would like to thank Ian for popping on to episode four of Noisy Balls and for telling us his thoroughly interesting story about his involvement in VI cricket, as well as for enlightening all of our listeners with his account on how he managed to be so positive with the news of his blindness at nineteen and to still go about achieving what he has since that period of his life.Noisy Balls is proudly sponsored by the Victorian Blind Cricket Associationand we appreciate the VBCA's support as we bring in a new dawn in blind cricket podcasting.To Get In Touch with Noisy Balls: Shoot us an email to feedback@noisyballs.com and we will always respond and read your messages up on an upcoming show. Why not be a part of the conversation on the Noisy Balls Facebook Group and you can always follow us on the Noisy Balls Twitter Feed, where we will regularly update you with the goings on in blind cricket locally, nationally and internationally. To find out more about my other podcasting endeavours, I invite you to check out the Blind Tech Guys.  Support the show (https://pod.fan/noisyballs)★ Support this podcast ★
On the third episode of Noisy Balls, I had the great privilege of interviewing Travis Zimmer, someone who many of our listeners will not know a great deal about, but after you hear his story, you will realise, how important his narrative is and it really will resonate with many of you, especially if you have struggled with the difficulties of being blind or visually-impaired and how you can go about moving your life forward in a positive, productive and meaningful way.Travis has only been involved in blind cricket for a very short time, but has already put his hand up to be fifth executive on the VBCA board. He has even achieved the great honour of playing for Victoria in this year's National Cricket Inclusion Championships and currently works as a Graphic Designer at Deakin University.Being a keen red ball cricketer in his youth, Travis also enjoyed participating in tennis and athletics, even going on to play some footy and, for many years, umpire in a local league. Pretty amazing for someone who was gradually losing his sight.Travis deals with a condition called usher syndrome.Usher syndrome is a condition characterized by partial or total hearing loss and vision loss that worsens over time. The hearing loss is classified as sensorineural, which means that it is caused by abnormalities of the inner ear. The loss of vision is caused by an eye disease called retinitis pigmentosa (RP), which affects the layer of light-sensitive tissue at the back of the eye (the retina). Vision loss occurs as the light-sensing cells of the retina gradually deteriorate. Night vision loss begins first, followed by blind spots that develop in the side (peripheral) vision. Over time, these blind spots enlarge and merge to produce tunnel vision. In some cases, vision is further impaired by clouding of the lens of the eye (cataracts). However, many people with retinitis pigmentosa retain some central vision throughout their lives.Researchers have identified three major types of Usher syndrome, designated as types I, II, and III. These types are distinguished by the severity of hearing loss, the presence or absence of balance problems, and the age at which signs and symptoms appear.I would like to thank Travis for coming on to Noisy Balls and telling us his account, which I know was something that was difficult for him to do, but we both feel that it was imperative that his story be toldNoisy Balls is proudly sponsored by the Victorian Blind Cricket Associationand we appreciate the VBCA's support as we bring in a new dawn in blind cricket podcasting.To Get In Touch with Noisy Balls: Shoot us an email to feedback@noisyballs.com and we will always respond and read your messages up on an upcoming show. Why not be a part of the conversation on the Noisy Balls Facebook Group and you can always follow us on the Noisy Balls Twitter Feed, where we will regularly update you with the goings on in blind cricket locally, nationally and internationally. To find out more about my other podcasting endeavours, I invite you to check out the Blind Tech Guys.  Support the show (https://pod.fan/noisyballs)★ Support this podcast ★
On the second episode of Noisy Balls, I was privileged to speak to long-time advocate and all-round nice guy Martin Stewart.I have to tell you all that this is an interview that I have been wanting to do for many years and I am absolutely delighted to have had the opportunity to speak with such a charismatic and insightful personality.Martin talked with me about his extremely painful childhood, the highs and lows when he played blind cricket for the Braille Blind Cricket Club, for Victoriaand for Blind Cricket Australia,the exceedingly difficult period in his life subsequent to the unfortunate train incident in 2002 and the tireless work that he does as National Individual Advocacy Officer at Blind Citizens Australia.Noisy Balls is proudly sponsored by the Victorian Blind Cricket Associationand we appreciate the VBCA's support as we bring in a new dawn in blind cricket podcasting.To Get In Touch with Noisy Balls: Shoot us an email to feedback@noisyballs.com and we will always respond and read your messages up on an upcoming show. Why not be a part of the conversation on the Noisy Balls Facebook Group and you can always follow us on the Noisy Balls Twitter Feed, where we will regularly update you with the goings on in blind cricket locally, nationally and internationally. To find out more about my other podcasting endeavours, I invite you to check out the Blind Tech Guys.  Support the show (https://pod.fan/noisyballs)★ Support this podcast ★
On the inaugural episode of Noisy Balls, we spoke with the now current president of the Victorian Blind Cricket AssociationLindsay Heaven and I have to say, I certainly learnt some things that I did not know about the great man and I appreciate him coming on and telling us more about his incredible journey.Lindsay told us all about his early years and how we was a very proficient hockey player, what drew him to Singapore, Brisbane and Sydney and his passion for ensuring that blind cricket continues to thrive in Victoria for a long time to come.Noisy Balls is proudly sponsored by the Victorian Blind Cricket Associationand we appreciate the VBCA's support as we bring in a new dawn in blind cricket podcasting.To Get In Touch with Noisy Balls: Shoot us an email to feedback@noisyballs.com and we will always respond and read your messages up on an upcoming show. Why not be a part of the conversation on the Noisy Balls Facebook Group and you can always follow us on the Noisy Balls Twitter Feed, where we will regularly update you with the goings on in blind cricket locally, nationally and internationally. To find out more about my other podcasting endeavours, I invite you to check out the Blind Tech Guys.  Support the show (https://pod.fan/noisyballs)★ Support this podcast ★
Noisy Balls - Trailer

Noisy Balls - Trailer

2020-09-1102:32

Introducing Noisy Balls, a blind cricketing podcast which I produce with the help of our members, for our members and supporters locally, nationally and internationally. Noisy Balls is proudly sponsored by the Victorian Blind Cricket Associationand we appreciate the VBCA's support as we bring in a new dawn in blind cricket podcasting.A huge thanks to Trav Zimmer for creating the artwork for the podcast, Scott Peucker for suggesting the name Noisy Balls and to Lindsay Heaven for planting the seed and allowing me to turn it into something which I know will be of value to many people. Keep an ear out for the first episode to hit your favourite podcatcher on the 18th of September 2020.To Get In Touch with Noisy Balls: Shoot us an email to feedback@noisyballs.com and we will always respond and read your messages up on an upcoming show. Why not be a part of the conversation on the Noisy Balls Facebook Group and you can always follow us on the Noisy Balls Twitter Feed, where we will regularly update you with the goings on in blind cricket locally, nationally and internationally. To find out more about my other podcasting endeavours, I invite you to check out the Blind Tech Guys.  Support the show (https://pod.fan/noisyballs)★ Support this podcast ★
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