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Pierre-Octave Ferroud wrote his "Bergère Captive", a gorgeous and plaintive work for solo flute in July of 1921. You've probably never heard of Ferroud because he died a grisly pedestrian death when he stepped out into an oncoming car and was killed at the age of 36. It's a tragedy because if you listen to his colorful and inventive music you will understand why he won the attention  of Prokofiev, Poulenc and Stravinsky! His "Captive Shepherd" is musical storytelling at its best--full of imagination, a summery rainbow of colors, and deep emotion.Georg Philip Telemann, Fantaisie No. 12Pierre-Octave Ferroud,  JadePierre-Octave Ferroud, Bergère CaptiveAll flute pieces performed by  Karen Kevra Support the show
Johann Sebastian Bach was incredibly generous with the flute.  He wrote several full scale sonatas, gave the flute has starring roles in two of the Brandenburg concerti, and beautiful obbligato parts in countless arias, but there is just one solo partita. The slow movement from his A minor flute Partita-a Sarabande -is a dance form with both Arab and Spanish origins and has a silky, sensual quality. Imagine a kind of "dance of the seven veils. " Way back in 1583, King Philip II of Spain had  the Sarabande banned because it was said to ‘excite bad emotions’.Georg Philip Telemann, Fantaisie No. 12J.S. Bach Brandenburg Concerto #5 in D major, BWV 1050 mmt. 1 AllegroKaren Kevra-flute,  Lucy Chapman-violin Elizabeth Metcalfe-harpsichord  J.S. Bach "Schafe können sicher weiden" (Sheep may safely graze) from his Cantata BWV 208. Hyunah Yu-soprano, Karen Kevra & Kenichi Ueda-flutes  J.S. Bach, Prelude from Suite No. 1 in G Major, BWV1007, Edward Arron-celloAll flute pieces performed by  Karen Kevra Manuscript of J.S.Bach's Partita in A minor.www.capitalcityconcerts.orgSupport the show
"THE CHILDREN ARE PLAYING" is a tiny fairy-tale of a piece for solo flute written by Denmark's best-known composer Carl Nielsen in 1920 as incidental music for a play called "The Mother." The whimsical music is a tip of the cap to Hans Christian Andersen and sounds like kids on playground on a spring day--leaping and laughter and teasing and taunting with a mix of sun and clouds. Georg Philip Telemann, Fantaisie No. 12Claude Debussy, SyrinxCarl Nielsen, The Children are PlayingAll flute piece performed by  Karen Kevra Frank Loesser, I'm Hans Christian Andersen performed by Danny KayeArtwork: Sibylle von Olfers, Mother Earth and Her ChildrenSupport the show (https://www.patreon.com/user?u=42335511)
In this encore episode James Pease Blair, one of National Geographic's legendary photographers  talked about love, life, and legacy. Jim began his 32 year career at the National Geographic Society with a splash as staff photographer on board Jacques Cousteau's Calypso in 1962. As a photography student in the fifties at the Institute of Design in Chicago, he studied with Harry Callahan and Aaron Siskind, but it was his years as a summer intern with Roy E. Stryker, at the Pittsburgh Photographic Library that made the biggest impression on Jim. Jim Blair's artistry and empathy brought a new kind of humanity to National Geographic which went from being a travel and culture magazine to a  journal which included social and environmental images that revealed the soul of planet and its inhabitants.Don't miss this powerfully moving episode on the 91st anniversary of his birth.Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/user?u=42335511)
Nicholas Kitchen, one of the country's leading violinists is a founding member of the Boston-based Borromeo String Quartet. Nick is perhaps the most important protégé of the great Polish violinist Szymon Goldberg. Nick has been loaned his teacher's violin-- the Giuseppe Guarneri, Cremona, ca. 1730, "Goldberg-Baron Vitta" to play throughout his career. In his musical life, Nick was first nurtured by his musically hands-on parents and later through his mentorship with Goldberg.  Nick's rich and profound musical life is a beautiful paradox of old and new technology.Music credits:Schubert, Death and The Maiden String Quartet, Borromeo QuartetJP Sousa, Semper Fidelis, The President's Own Marine BandBeethoven, Violin Sonata, Op. 24 "Spring", Szymon Goldberg-violin, Lili Krauss-piano  JS Bach, Toccata and Fugue in D minor BWV 565, Hans-André Stamm-organBeethoven, Violin Concerto in D major, Op. 61, mmt. 3 Rondo,  Henryk Szeryng-violin, Hans Zender-conductorSchubert, Mass No. 5 in A Flat Major, D.678 - 4. Sanctus Choir of St. John's College, CambridgeJS Bach,  Fantasia and fugue in G minor BWV 542 - Van DoeselaarBeethoven, String Quartet, Op. 18, No. 1, Borromeo QuartetJS Bach, Adagio, BWV 1110, Nicholas KitchenKreisler, Liebeslied, Fritz KreislerHandel, Op. 1, No. 13 mmt. 1 D Major Sonata, Szymon Goldberg-violin, Gerald Moore-pianoPolish folksong for mandolinesJS Bach, Violin Concerto in E Major, BWV 1042: I. Allegro, Syzmon Goldberg-violinBeethoven, Violin Concerto in D major, Op. 61, mmt. 1, Syzmon Goldberg-violinMozart, Sonata for Piano and Violin in E Minor, K.304 - Tempo di minuetto, Syzmon Goldberg-violin and Radu Lupu-pianoMozart, Violin Concerto No. 5 in A Major, K219, mmt. 1Beethoven, String Quartet, No. 13, Op. 130,  Borromeo QuartetLouis Moyse, Second Sonata, Scherzo, Karen Kevra-flute, Paul Orgel-pianoStrauss, Don Juan, Op. 20, Berling Philharmonic, Von KarajanBeethoven, Symphony No. 9, mmt. 3 , Adagio molto e cantabile, FurtwänglerSupport the show (https://www.patreon.com/user?u=42335511)
Tony Barrand was born in England in 1945 but has lived most of his life in southern Vermont in the vibrant town of Brattleboro—a place that shines all the more brightly because of him. This Cornell PHD and Professor Emeritus of Boston University is not just an academic, but also a singer, dancer, and story-teller. What first grabs you is his way with words—he can give them weight, or make them sparkle depending on the point he is trying to make, but he uses words to greatest effect when he sings. His handsome  tenor voice really shines when joined by his singing comrades (John Roberts, Fred Breunig and Andy Davis) from the band Nowell Sing We Clear. This is top-notch exuberant music-making in a traditional style that will have you singing along, dancing, and entranced by the magic of the story-telling. Tony Barrand offers tales of his mentors and mentees, and plenty of music in this episode. Guaranteed to brighten your days during this darkest time of year. This is an encore episode from Christmas eve 2020.Special thanks to:Andy Davis, Keith Murphy and Becky Tracy, Amanda Witman, Peter Amidon, Sue Dupre, Kari Smith, Carol Compton, Carole Crompton, and Rachel BellMusic, courtesy Golden Hind MusicClick here to order  Nowell Sing We Clear: Songs & Carols for Midwinter & ChristmastideSupport the show (https://www.patreon.com/user?u=42335511)
In this short anniversary episode, Muse Mentors host Karen Kevra looks back on a year with a podcast, and a year without concerts.  She previews an upcoming concert by Boston's Borromeo Quartet and discusses Beethoven's transcendent Op. 132 A minor string quartet with Nicholas Kitchen, the first violinist of the Borromeo quartet.Credits:Kuhlau, Fantaisie in D major, Adagio - Karen Kevra-fluteBig Yellow Taxi - Joni MitchellBeethoven, Hymn Of Thanksgiving (String Quartet Op. 132, Movement III) - Borromeo Quartet  - Nicholas Kitchen, Violin; Kristopher Tong, Violin; Mai Motobuchi, Viola; Yeesun Kim, Cello)Beethoven party hat image:  Sharon Su Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/user?u=42335511)
Encore episode:  Rob Mermin ran off to join the circus in 1969 at the age of 19. He clowned with renowned European circuses, including England’s Circus Hoffman, Sweden’s Cirkus Scott, Denmark’s Circus Benneweis in the famous Circus Building by the Tivoli, and many more. It was his long mentorship with the iconic French mime Marcel Marceau that shaped him as a performer and inspired him to dream and make plans.  In 1987 he founded Circus Smirkus, the embodiment of Rob -- the touch of wonder, the charm, the story line, the mime and the humor. An enthralling story-teller, Rob Mermin  make you laugh and he'll make you cry with his stories of discovery and loss, and of course mentoring--first as a protégé and later through his own rich legacy of mentorship of some of the greatest circus performers on earth.   *****The accordion music was provided by Rachel Bell and includes Susan Kevra-clarinet, and Karen Axelrod-keyboards.Mozart PianoConcerto #21 licensed by Creative Commons.Rob Mermin's Parkinson's Pantomime Project.Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/user?u=42335511)Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/user?u=42335511)
In this encore episode of Muse Mentors, pianist Jeffrey Chappell reflects on his life and his formative relationship with his mentor the legendary Leon Fleisher. He addresses overcoming challenges and adversity through the lens of his teacher's career-altering medical condition. The episode closes with the voice of Leon Fleisher who offers powerful words to live by. Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/user?u=42335511)
Kerrin McCadden is a Poem

Kerrin McCadden is a Poem

2021-06-2501:03:31

Kerrin McCadden's new collection of poems called American Wake is made of the stuff of life --subjects like family, divorce, raising children, love and even her brother's tragic death by drug overdose are poignantly bound together by her strong Irish Heritage and her family's immigrant story. American Wake, is an actual term that refers to a kind of "Irish wake-style" farewell party that was thrown for Irish families the night before before they set sail for America. A lot of us dabble in ancestry and build family trees, but Kerrin McCadden has made it a way of life.  Kerrin is a National Endowment for the Arts fellow and has received the Sustainable Arts Foundation Writing Award, the Vermont Book Award, the New Issues Poetry Prize, and the Button Poetry  Prize.  Her poems have appeared in Best  American Poetry, American Poetry Review, New  England Review, and more. Her books are American Wake (2021), Keep This To Yourself (2020), Landscape with Plywood Silhouettes (2014).  Her mentors are poets David Budbill and Ellen Bryant Voigt.MUSIC CREDITS:Liz Carroll, The Drunken SailorLiz Carroll, A Day and An AgeSupport the show (https://www.patreon.com/user?u=42335511)
Lou Kosma was a bass player in the Metropolitan Opera Orchestra for 36 years. He grew up in Philadelphia in the fifties in a blue collar Italian American family - a loving home where the sound of Italian tarantellas  played on guitar and accordion spilled from the windows, and the smell of frying meatballs and Roma tomato sauce filled the air. Little did his working class family know that their son would one day ascend to one of the greatest orchestras in the world! But that full-time job wasn't quite enough for Lou Kosma who has been, for his whole life, a generous teacher, conducting an array of youth and community orchestras with warmth and passion. Lou was shaped by his mentor Edward Arian, a Renaissance man who had  three remarkable careers including a 20 year tenure as a bass player with the Philadelphia Orchestra. Arian lead an eight-week strike that got the musicians their first guaranteed 52- week salary. Lou  Kosma learned a thing or two from his mentor--determination, integrity, generosity, and love of music.   Support the show
James Pease Blair, one of National Geographic's legendary photographers  talks about love, life, and legacy. Jim began his 32 year career at the National Geographic Society with a splash as staff photographer on board Jacques Cousteau's Calypso in 1962. As a photography student in the fifties at the Institute of Design in Chicago, he studied with Harry Callahan and Aaron Siskind, but it was his years as a summer intern with Roy E. Stryker, at the Pittsburgh Photographic Library that made the biggest impression on Jim. Jim Blair's artistry and empathy brought a new kind of humanity to National Geographic which went from being a travel and culture magazine to a  journal which included social and environmental images that revealed the soul of planet and its inhabitants.Now in this late chapter of his life, Jim is contending with a lung condition that his reduced him to 35 percent breathing capacity, and yet he continues to live life with eyes and heart wide open. Don't miss this powerfully moving episode.MUSIC:Taps- Bugle Call: USMC Drum & Bugle CorpsHappy Birthday-Jazz Piano Arrangement by Jonny MayChicago- Frank Sinatra Juke- Little WalterGovernment Camp Song-Mary and Betty Campbell, Shafter FSA Camp, August 9, 1941There's a Pawn Shop on The Corner -Guy MitchellPittsburghTown-Pete Seeger The Aquarium, Carnival of the Animals-Camille Saint-SaensCalypso-John DenverNational Geographic 1964 - 1987 Full ThemeSupport the show (https://www.patreon.com/user?u=42335511)Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/user?u=42335511)
It can sound hyperbolic to make the claim that a person has changed the world and made it a better place. In the case of Eli Newberger, it is utterly true. Eli Newberger is equal parts music man and medicine man. He was the key prosecution witness in the trial of Louise Woodward, the British nanny convicted of second-degree murder in the death of an 8-month-old in Boston in1997. Later during the Archdiocese of Boston sex abuse scandal, he offered his expertise on the effects of abuse on children and their families. Eli Newberger's ground-breaking work resulted in the formation of the child-protection program at Boston Children’s Hospital, and he's the author of many publications including an important and accessible book on the development of character in boys called The Men They Will Become. Before Eli became a doctor, he was a musician. And perhaps it's because of music, that he became a doctor...Hear his inspiring origin story about his mentorship with the late New York Philharmonic principal tuba William Bell; his professional career in music, including his long tenure as a founding member of the New Black Eagle Jazz Band, and work with pianists Butch Thompson and Bob Winter; and his inspiring and generous work developing an El Sistema music program in the Berkshires.  MUSIC:Carolina Shout: James P. Johnson, piano  Cyrus the Great: US Air Force Band  Overture to Candide: New York Philharmonic  Yankee Doodle: Vivian Williams, Phil Williams, Howard Marshall, John Williams  Franck: Symphony in D minor: Berlin Philharmonic  Vaughan-Williams, Bass Tuba Concerto in F Minor: II. Romanza: Walter Hilgers  I'm Just Wild About Harry: Butch Thompson, Eli Newberger, and Jimmy Mazzy Carnival of Venice Variations: Carol Jantsch  Issa Keita, balafon (marimba) virtuoso, Bamako, Mali  Bugle Boy March: New Black Eagle Jazz Band  Arturo Márquez: Danzón Nº 2: Gustavo Dudamel at the Proms   Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/user?u=42335511)
Paula Robison was born in Nashville to an extraordinary family of actors, writers, dancers, and musicians. She grew up in Los Angeles not only playing the flute, but studying dance with Bella Lewitzky and theater with Jeff Corey. When she was twelve years old, music claimed her heart and she knew she wanted to be a flutist. Trained at the Juilliard School, she also studied flute with the great French flutist Marcel Moyse during her time in NYC.  Marcel's singing approach  and metaphorical and animated teaching style set Paula on fire and shaped her as a musician. Her trademark joie de vivre really shines in this episode which is chock full of music. To see photographs of Paula Robison and Marcel Moyse, go to: https://musementors.com/MUSIC:George Frederic Handel, Flute Sonata in F Major, Op. 1, No. 11, HWV 369: Allegro (Paula Robison-flute, Timothy Eddy-cello, Kenneth Cooper-harpsichord)Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, Flute Concerto No.1 in G major, K.313, Allegro maestoso, (Paula Robison-flute) Apanhei-Te, Cavaquinho! (Paula Robison-flute, and Romero Lubambo, Tiberio Nascimento, Sergio Brandão, Stanley Silverman, Cyro Baptista)Robert Beaser, Cindy, from Mountain Songs for flute and guitar (Paula Robison-flute, Elliot Fisk-guitar)Robert Beaser, Quicksilver, from Mountain Songs for flute and guitar Ol' Man River, Paul RobesonWade in the Water, Fisk Jubilee SingersRobert Beaser, Barbara Allen, from Mountain Songs for flute and guitarBenjamin Godard, "Valse" from Suite De Trois Morceaux, Op. 116 (Paula Robison-flute)Astor Piazolla, "L'Histoire du Tango": Nightclub 1960 (Paula Robison-flute, Elliot Fisk-guitar)Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, "Voi che sapete", from The Marriage of Figaro, K. 492 arranged for flute and string quartet by Nicholas Kitchen (Paula Robison-flute, and the Borromeo String Quartet)Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, Flute Concerto No.2 in D major, K.314, Allegro aperto (Marcel Moyse-flute)P.O. Ferroud - Bergere Captive from Trois pièces pour flûte seule (Marcel Moyse-flute)Albert Hammond - It never rains in Southern CaliforniaCamille Saint-Saëns, The Swan, Carnival of the Animals, (Marcel Moyse-flute, Louis Moyse-piano)Camille Saint-Saëns "Voliere" from Carnival of the Animals (Paula Robison-flute with The Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center Giuseppe Verdi, Il Trovatore, (Marcel Moyse-flute, Louis Moyse-piano)J.S. Bach Trio Sonata in G major Moyse Trio, BWV 1038, Largo (Marcel Moyse-flute, Blance Moyse-violin, Louis Moyse-piano)Rosemary Clooney and Vera Ellen, "Sisters" from White ChristmasTheobald Boehm, Variations sur un Air Tyrolien (Marcel Moyse-flute, Louis Moyse, piano)Claude Debussy, Syrinx (Paula Robison-flute)Georges Hüe, Fantasie (Marcel Moyse-flute, Georges Truc)Jean-Louis Tulou, Air Ecossais (Marcel Moyse-flute, Blance Moyse-violin, Louis Moyse-piano)Claude Debussy, "Prélude à l'aprés-midi d'un faune"  (Paula Robison-flute)J.S. Bach BWV 244-58 Aus Liebe will mein Heiland sterben, BWV 244, from the Saint Matthew Passion, Herbert Karajan conductingSupport the show (https://www.patreon.com/user?u=42335511)
In what could be the most important Muse Mentors episode ever, author and climate activist  Bill McKibben (who wrote The End of Nature one of the first books on global warming for the general public) talks about his childhood, teen-aged years as a journalist; and, before he even graduated from Harvard, an invitation from the late great editor  William Shawn to write for  The New Yorker Magazine. McKibben also discusses the impact the arts has in furthering the climate change movement, reflecting on  his appearances on The Colbert Report, David Attenborough's recent magnum opus film "A Life on Our Planet", and a celebration of Richard Power's cri de coeur novel The Overstory. Here's a chance to hear Bill's origin story, and to discover how he has become a muse and mentor the world over!Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/user?u=42335511)
The New York Times called David Dworkin, the maestro who "sparkles with high-spirited virtuosity."  This Jersey boy got his start in high school in the late 1940s with clarinet lessons at The Williamsburg (Brooklyn) Community House where he met his mentor the late Metropolitan Opera Orchestra clarinetist Ben Armato. That relationship nurtured David who went on to play in both the American Symphony and Met Orchestras, as well as to conduct orchestras across America and abroad.  In 2002 he created the acclaimed exercise program CONDUCTORCISE®, where "you feel the beat as well as the burn” (Times-Picayune) which has received rave reviews across the globe, and has been featured in the New York Times, Town & Country Magazine, and NBC’s Today Show. CONDUCTORCISE® was named one of North America's six most innovative active aging programs by the International Council on Active Aging. Music: Mozart Clarinet Quintet: Musicians from Marlboro (ensemble), Anthony McGill (clarinet)Brahms Clarinet Quintet:  Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center Support the show through our Patreon  page.Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/user?u=42335511)
Tony Barrand was born in England in 1945 but has lived most of his life in southern Vermont in the vibrant town of Brattleboro—a place that shines all the more brightly because of him. This Cornell PHD and Professor Emeritus of Boston University is not just an academic, but also a singer, dancer, and story-teller. What first grabs you is his way with words—he can give them weight, make them sparkle, or swirl depending on the point he is trying to make, but he uses words to greatest effect when he sings. His handsome I-cannot-get-enough-of-it tenor voice really shines when joined by his singing comrades (John Roberts, Fred Breunig and Andy Davis) from the band Nowell Sing We Clear. This is top-notch music-making in a traditional style that will have you singing along, dancing, and entranced by the magic of the story-telling. Tony Barrand offers tales of his mentors and mentees, and plenty of music in this episode. Guaranteed to brighten your days during this darkest time of year.Special thanks to: Andy Davis, Keith Murphy and Becky Tracy, Amanda Witman, Peter Amidon, Sue Dupre, Kari Smith, Carol Compton, Carole Crompton, and Rachel BellMusic, courtesy Golden Hind Music Click here to order  Nowell Sing We Clear: Songs & Carols for Midwinter & ChristmastideSupport the show (https://www.patreon.com/user?u=42335511)
Vermont visual artist Katie Runde was raised by Medievalist parents. This millennial with a Midas touch has been drawing as long as she was able to hold a crayon, playing saxophone since age eight, and theologizing since that day somewhere around age eleven when Mass stopped making neat story sense. An alum of the Eastman School of Music, she also holds a masters in religious studies from the University of Chicago Divinity School, a BA in folklore/ethnology and music from University College Cork in Ireland, and undertook two years’ apprenticeship with master realist painter Evan Wilson...and yet it seems it is her mother  who is her most enduring and important mentor. Visit Katie Runde's  instagram page, her website  and the Muse Mentors website to see her artwork.Support the show through our Patreon  page.Thumbnail image of Katie Runde by Caleb KennaAria, from The Goldberg Variations, BWV 988 of JS Bach performed by Jeremy Denk at the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum Boston, Massachusetts, Creative Commons licenseSupport the show (https://www.patreon.com/user?u=42335511)
Rob Mermin ran off to join the circus in 1969 at the age of 19. He clowned with renowned European circuses, including England’s Circus Hoffman, Sweden’s Cirkus Scott, Denmark’s Circus Benneweis in the famous Circus Building by the Tivoli, and many more. It was his long mentorship with the iconic French mime Marcel Marceau that shaped him as a performer and inspired him to dream and make plans.  In 1987 he founded Circus Smirkus, the embodiment of Rob -- the touch of wonder, the charm, the story line, the mime and the humor. An enthralling story-teller, Rob Mermin  make you laugh and he'll make you cry with his stories of discovery and loss, and of course mentoring--first as a protégé and later through his own rich legacy of mentorship of some of the greatest circus performers on earth.   *****The accordion music was provided by Rachel Bell and includes Susan Kevra-clarinet, and Karen Axelrod-keyboards.Mozart PianoConcerto #21 licensed by Creative Commons.Rob Mermin's Parkinson's Pantomime Project.Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/user?u=42335511)
Philadelphia-based illustrator Armando Veve is a Forbes 30 Under 30 list designee. He has been awarded three gold medals from the Society of Illustrators and gained international recognition when he was named an ADC Young Gun. His breath-taking and whimsical art has been commissioned by The New York Times, The New Yorker,  National Geographic, the New Republic, Penguin Random House, the Poetry Foundation, Scientific American Mind, Smithsonian Magazine, Village Voice, and Mother Jones.  That's just the short list. And, boy can he play the piccolo!  He talks about the intersection between life, art, and music in delightful and inspiring ways. Visit Armando Veve's instagram page and the Muse Mentors website to see his artwork. Click on these links  to see the artwork discussed in the podcast: New York Times Baby Heart Monitor image Truly Mango Lemonade images Rhode Island School of Design (RISD) recruitment poster Mechanical Botanical Special thanks to composer Mike Mower and Franceso Viola, whose brilliant piccolo playing graces this podcast episode.Widor, Romance for flute and piano, Karen Kevra-flute, Jeffrey Chappell-pianoSupport the show
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