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digital:works Podcast

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Digital:works Oral History Podcasts - Oral History interviews collected by trained volunteers are lovingly edited into radio documentary-style programmes and released in podcast format.
22 Episodes
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Episode 3 is called “Who Are Ya!”. Fans discuss how others have viewed their support for Brentford, often as eccentric, frequently with sympathy. They also remember some of the characters in the crowd as well as the importance of fanzines. There is an exploration of the less pleasant side of football, the violence, racism and homophobia but also how the crowd has changed in recent years, coming to reflect the area in which the club is based. We finish with some of the chants and songs that have rung out around the ground over the years, some general football songs, others much more specific to Brentford.Push Up Brentford is an oral history project set up to commemorate the last year the club will play at Griffin Park, their home for 116 years. We have interviewed fans, young and old, as well as players and managers to uncover their personal stories.We have created a fascinating living history of Brentford Football Club, starring the people who have made it such a special place over the years.The project is run by volunteers, many of them Brentford fans, and supported by Arts and Education charity, digital:works.The music was written and performed by Robb Johnson.The project was funded by National Lottery Heritage Fund and supported by Brentford Football Club.Produced by digital:works: www.digital-works.co.uk/Listen to the full interviews and find out more about the project at www.pushupbrentford.org.uk/
Episode 2 is called “The Big Match” and covers some of the ups and downs of supporting Brentford. You’ll hear stories of memorable games, home and away, along with a few people would rather forget. Rainy afternoons in Stockport, chocolate bars raining down on the pitch, picnics on sparse terraces, the joy of a chipped keeper and tales of some of Brentford's great rivalries over the years. Push Up Brentford is an oral history project set up to commemorate the last year the club will play at Griffin Park, their home for 116 years. We have interviewed fans, young and old, as well as players and managers to uncover their personal stories.We have created a fascinating living history of Brentford Football Club, starring the people who have made it such a special place over the years.The project is run by volunteers, many of them Brentford fans, and supported by Arts and Education charity, digital:works.The music was written and performed by Robb Johnson.The project was funded by National Lottery Heritage Fund and supported by Brentford Football Club.Produced by digital:works: www.digital-works.co.uk/Listen to the full interviews and find out more about the project at www.pushupbrentford.org.uk/
Episode 1 is called “The Kick Off”. It explores the early years of people’s support for Brentford, their family history, some going back to the 1920s, others who had to cope with being the only Brentford fan in a family of QPR supporters. There are stories of bunking in over turnstiles, of grandfathers banned from pubs around the ground, and hand-knitted bobble hats and scarves. People also recall their first ever match at Brentford, of 9-0 victories, huge crowds and the towering Royal Oak stand, but also of humiliating defeats and dwindling numbers on the terraces. Push Up Brentford is an oral history project set up to commemorate the last year the club will play at Griffin Park, their home for 116 years. We have interviewed fans, young and old, as well as players and managers to uncover their personal stories.We have created a fascinating living history of Brentford Football Club, starring the people who have made it such a special place over the years.The project is run by volunteers, many of them Brentford fans, and supported by Arts and Education charity, digital:works.The music was written and performed by Robb Johnson.The project was funded by National Lottery Heritage Fund and supported by Brentford Football Club.Produced by digital:works: www.digital-works.co.uk/Listen to the full interviews and find out more about the project at www.pushupbrentford.org.uk/
A podcast based on oral history interviews with London cabbies.Episode Three:In this third and final episode we explore some of the strange and naughty things that have happened in the back of a cab, the day to day challenges of the job, and what the future might hold for the London Taxi.The Sherbet Dab project was developed and run by digital:works. The interviews were undertaken by children and staff at St George the Martyr and Westminster Cathedral Primary Schools. The project was supported by The London Transport Museum, Unite the Union, Alf Townsend and all of the interviewees. Music was by Vincent BurkeThe project was funded by The National Lottery Heritage Fund and Unite the UnionTo listen to the full interviews or watch the documentary film visit: www.sherbetdab.org.uk
A podcast based on oral history interviews with London cabbies.Episode Two:Episode Two explores the cabbies first days at work, learning the tricks of the trade, and looks at the ups and downs of the relationship between cabbies themselves.The Sherbet Dab project was developed and run by digital:works. The interviews were undertaken by children and staff at St George the Martyr and Westminster Cathedral Primary Schools. The project was supported by The London Transport Museum, Unite the Union, Alf Townsend and all of the interviewees. Music was by Vincent BurkeThe project was funded by The National Lottery Heritage Fund and Unite the UnionTo listen to the full interviews or watch the documentary film visit: www.sherbetdab.org.uk
A podcast based on oral history interviews with London cabbies.Episode One:This episode explores the reasons cabbies became cabbies, the intense training they all need to undertake called “the knowledge” and the nerve-wracking oral examination system called “appearances”The Sherbet Dab project was developed and run by digital:works. The interviews were undertaken by children and staff at St George the Martyr and Westminster Cathedral Primary Schools. The project was supported by The London Transport Museum, Unite the Union, Alf Townsend and all of the interviewees. Music was by Vincent BurkeThe project was funded by The National Lottery Heritage Fund and Unite the UnionTo listen to the full interviews or watch the documentary film visit: www.sherbetdab.org.uk
A podcast based on oral history interviews with former printers and journalists. It covers the post-war heyday of Fleet Street as the home of the British newspaper industry up to the Wapping dispute which heralded a new era. Episode 5 explores the confrontations between the police and picketing print workers at Wapping and the effect new technology was having on the industry.The interviews were collected by children from St Matthew’s and St George The Martyr Primary schools as part of a project supported by St Bride Institute and the News International Dispute Archive.Archive audio courtesy of Andy Humphries and Dispute TV.Funded byNational Lottery Heritage Fund and Legends Publishing Visit the project website where you can watch the film made for this project.
A podcast based on oral history interviews with former printers and journalists. It covers the post-war heyday of Fleet Street as the home of the British newspaper industry up to the Wapping dispute which heralded a new era.  Episode 4 explores the lead up to the Wapping Dispute and what life was like on the picket line.The interviews were collected by children from St Matthew’s and St George The Martyr Primary schools as part of a project supported by St Bride Institute and the News International Dispute Archive.Archive audio courtesy of Andy Humphries and Dispute TV.Funded by National Lottery Heritage Fund and Legends Publishing Visit the project website where you can watch the film made for this project.
A podcast based on oral history interviews with former printers and journalists. It covers the post-war heyday of Fleet Street as the home of the British newspaper industry up to the Wapping dispute which heralded a new era. This is episode 3 and explores life on Fleet Street and the importance of the union to workers and working practices in the print.The interviews were collected by children from St Matthew’s and St George The Martyr Primary schools as part of a project supported by St Bride Institute and the News International Dispute Archive. Archive audio courtesy of Andy Humphries and Dispute TV.Funded byNational Lottery Heritage Fund and Legends Publishing Visit the project website where you can watch the film made for this project.
A podcast based on oral history interviews with former printers and journalists. It covers the post-war heyday of Fleet Street as the home of the British newspaper industry up to the Wapping dispute which heralded a new era. Episode 2 explores the sights, sounds and smells of working on a production line and what a typical day required to successfully publish a newspaper at the height of Fleet Street’s powers.The interviews were collected by children from St Matthew’s and St George The Martyr Primary schools as part of a project supported by St Bride Institute and the News International Dispute Archive.Archive audio courtesy of Andy Humphries and Dispute TV.Funded byNational Lottery Heritage Fund and Legends Publishing Visit the project website where you can watch the film made for this project.
A podcast based on oral history interviews with former printers and journalists. It covers the post-war heyday of Fleet Street as the home of the British newspaper industry up to the Wapping dispute which heralded a new era. Episode 1 explores the reasons people chose to work in the print, their apprenticeships and their early days in the many different jobs and tasks required to publish a newspaper.The interviews were collected by children from St Matthew’s and St George The Martyr Primary schools as part of a project supported by St Bride Institute and the News International Dispute Archive.Archive audio courtesy of Andy Humphries and Dispute TV.Funded byNational Lottery Heritage Fund and Legends Publishing Visit the project website where you can watch the film made for this project.
An Oral History of Boatyard Workers on the Tidal Thames.In Episode two we explore the skills, pride and joy, as well as the pain of working on boats; the business of running a boatyard; their decline on the Thames and the future of those that remain.The Thames has been the lifeblood of London since Roman times.And boats that have plied its waters have been built and maintained by skilled workers since then.We have interviewed workers that have worked in various boatyards along the river from the Thames Barrier in the East to Teddington in the west.Working with wood, steel, paint, saws, planes and blow torches, these are the stories of the men who have kept London afloat.The interviews were collected as part of the Thames Festival Trust’s Working River Project, produced by digital-works.This podcast was funded by the National Lottery Heritage Fund.
An Oral History of Boatyard Workers on the Tidal Thames.Episode one covers apprenticeships and the early days.The Thames has been the lifeblood of London since Roman times.And boats that have plied its waters have been built and maintained by skilled workers since then.We have interviewed workers that have worked in various boatyards along the river from the Thames Barrier in the East to Teddington in the west.Working with wood, steel, paint, saws, planes and blow torches, these are the stories of the men who have kept London afloat.The interviews were collected as part of the Thames Festival Trust’s Working River Project, produced by digital-works.This podcast was funded by the National Lottery Heritage Fund.
An Oral History of the Thames Lightermen Episode 3 reveals why they were called The Weekend Millionaires, the role of the Union in their working lives and the gradual decline of the working river.The profession has employed generations of Londoners with the lightermen carrying cargo and the watermen carrying passengers. Whilst the trade for watermen dwindled with the construction of bridges, the lightermen continued to grow with London's trade up until the 1960s when containerisation and then the closure of London's dockyards led to a decline in the trade. Today far fewer people work on the Thames but for those who do, or who have retired in the past 30-40 years, there remain vivid memories and important stories to tell. This film aims to share some of these. Funded byHeritage Lottery Fund, Unite the Union and The Company of Watermen and Lightermen Visit the project website 
An Oral History of the Thames Lightermen Episode 2 follows the lightermen as they become freemen of the River Thames and of the skills, joy, trials and tribulations of their working lives.The profession has employed generations of Londoners with the lightermen carrying cargo and the watermen carrying passengers. Whilst the trade for watermen dwindled with the construction of bridges, the lightermen continued to grow with London's trade up until the 1960s when containerisation and then the closure of London's dockyards led to a decline in the trade. Today far fewer people work on the Thames but for those who do, or who have retired in the past 30-40 years, there remain vivid memories and important stories to tell. This film aims to share some of these. Funded byHeritage Lottery Fund, Unite the Union and The Company of Watermen and Lightermen Visit the project website 
An Oral History of the Thames LightermenEpisode 1 explores the family history of Lightermen going back many generations, how they came afloat and the ups and downs of their apprenticeships.The profession has employed generations of Londoners with the lightermen carrying cargo and the watermen carrying passengers. Whilst the trade for watermen dwindled with the construction of bridges, the lightermen continued to grow with London's trade up until the 1960s when containerisation and then the closure of London's dockyards led to a decline in the trade. Today far fewer people work on the Thames but for those who do, or who have retired in the past 30-40 years, there remain vivid memories and important stories to tell. This film aims to share some of these. Funded by National Lottery Heritage Fund, Unite the Union and The Company of Watermen and Lightermen Visit the project website 
An Oral History of London Bus WorkersEpisode 3 explores some of the bus routes, garages and the social life around them. It also takes a look at the role of women workers, the unions and privatisation. --An oral history of the workers on the iconic London Bus, exploring the lives of drivers, conductors, cleaners, mechanics and inspectors. From the iconic RT and Routemaster buses to the current one-person-operated buses, London bus workers tell their stories, both funny and poignant but always informative and entertaining, of life on the buses. Funded byNational Lottery Heritage Fund and Unite the UnionVisit the project website
An Oral History of London Bus WorkersEpisode 2 explores the working life of bus drivers, inspectors and engineers, as well as the buses themselves. --An oral history of the workers on the iconic London Bus, exploring the lives of drivers, conductors, cleaners, mechanics and inspectors. From the iconic RT and Routemaster buses to the current one-person-operated buses, London bus workers tell their stories, both funny and poignant but always informative and entertaining, of life on the buses. Funded byNational Lottery Heritage Fund and Unite the UnionVisit the project website
An Oral History of London Bus WorkersEpisode 1 explores the reasons people came to work on the buses, their recruitment and training and the work of the bus conductor.--An oral history of the workers on the iconic London Bus, exploring the lives of drivers, conductors, cleaners, mechanics and inspectors. From the iconic RT and Routemaster buses to the current one-person-operated buses, London bus workers tell their stories, both funny and poignant but always informative and entertaining, of life on the buses. Funded byNational Lottery Heritage Fund and Unite the UnionVisit the project website
An Oral History of London's EvacueesOperation Pied Piper was the name of the plan designed to evacuate children from areas at risk from bombing and invasion.On 31st August 1939, three days before war broke out, an evacuation order was given for the next day and what followed was a massive logistical operation to move people to areas of safety. In the following three days an estimated 1.5 million people were moved on trains, buses and boats.The initial idea was to establish camps for children run by teachers but the government decided instead to use private homes as billets to host the evacuees. It was compulsory to receive evacuees and hosts would receive a weekly payment for taking children. Hosts were assessed on the basis of accommodation rather than suitability to look after children. It tended to be children from poor families who went to strangers as wealthier families were more likely to have friends and family in safe zones with whom their children could stay for the duration of the war. Evacuees also included young people aged 14-15 who became known as "Bevan boys and girls" who worked on the land and in coalmines.Evacuation was not compulsory but there was a huge government public information campaign to encourage those within designated areas to move to safety. Families did not wish to separate but the desire to keep loved ones close was countered by a desire to keep them safe.This documentary is part of a wider Oral History Project made by Furzedown and St Thomas's Primary Schools with digital:works.We are grateful to RBK&C's City Living, Local Life Golborne Ward Fund and the National Lottery Heritage Fund for financially supporting this project. Visit the project website
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