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This episode is especially for our youngest regular listener to the podcast, Rory, who had her 6th birthday a couple of weeks ago. So tonight, we explore the narrowboat Erica and what it is like to live on a boat, and then, especially for Rory listen to a story about another little girl who met some rather strange and wonderful people.   Journal entry: 29th September, Thursday.“The reservoir is grey and slabby today, Crests form on wavelets the colour of old ice.Ghosting veils of low cloud sweep mizzly rain On a wind that lifts the gulls and redeems my world With their cries.”Episode Information:This episode is dedicated to Rory Braso (aged 6) who lives in Massachusetts, USA – and, of course, her dad, MJ.Photographs of the Erica can be found on our website at noswpod.com. For more information about Nighttime on Still WatersYou can find more information and photographs about the podcasts and life aboard the Erica on our website at noswpod.com. It will also allow you to become more a part of the podcast and you can leave comments, offer suggestions, and reviews. You can even, if you want, leave me a voice mail by clicking on the microphone icon. General DetailsIn the intro and the outro, Saint-Saen's The Swan is performed by Karr and Bernstein (1961) and available on CC at archive.org. Two-stroke narrowboat engine recorded by 'James2nd' on the River Weaver, Cheshire. Uploaded to Freesound.org on 23rd June 2018. Creative Commons Licence. Piano and keyboard interludes composed and performed by Helen Ingram.All other audio recorded on site. ContactFor pictures of Erica and images related to the podcasts or to contact me, follow me on:Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/noswpodInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/nighttimeonstillwaters/Twitter: https://twitter.com/NoswPodI would love to hear from you. You can email me at nighttimeonstillwaters@gmail.com or drop me a line by going to the nowspod website and using either the contact form or, if you prefer, record your message using the voicemail facility by clicking on the microphone icon. 
This week much of the country fell silent for a while and that stillness was the occasion for a chance encounter and finding within the silence the music of bells among crow song. Join us aboard the Erica tonight as we are touched by the enigmatic qualities of bells and stillness.    Journal entry: 21st September, WednesdayDew, the smell of sheep and wet grass. Rooks jostle the lightening sky. The company of ducks hunched at the water’s edge Shake themselves awake And drop into the pool of water The colour of dawn. Episode Information:fAll field recordings made on 19.09.2022 and features the bells of St Peter's church,  Wootton Wawen. In this episode I read short extracts from:SeánStreet’s (2012) The Poetry of Radio: The colour of sound published by Routledge. Seán Street’s (2019) The Sound inside the Silence: Travels in the Sonic Imagination published by Springer.I also read two short extracts from John Betjeman.John Betjeman (1958) Introduction to English Country Churches  John Betjeman (1960) Summoned by Bells originally published by John MurraySteve Tyrell’s vlog recording his adventures on the NB Precious Jet can be viewed here: Narrowboat Precious Jet. David Keating’s Instagram account to view his photographs: david_keating.For more information about Nighttime on Still WatersYou can find more information and photographs about the podcasts and life aboard the Erica on our website at noswpod.com. It will also allow you to become more a part of the podcast and you can leave comments, offer suggestions, and reviews. You can even, if you want, leave me a voice mail by clicking on the microphone icon. General DetailsIn the intro and the outro, Saint-Saen's The Swan is performed by Karr and Bernstein (1961) and available on CC at archive.org. Two-stroke narrowboat engine recorded by 'James2nd' on the River Weaver, Cheshire. Uploaded to Freesound.org on 23rd June 2018. Creative Commons Licence. Piano and keyboard interludes composed and performed by Helen Ingram.All other audio recorded on site. ContactFor pictures of Erica and images related to the podcasts or to contact me, follow me on:Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/noswpodInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/nighttimeonstillwaters/Twitter: https://twitter.com/NoswPodI would love to hear from you. You can email me at nighttimeonstillwaters@gmail.com or drop me a line by going to the nowspod website and using either the contact form or, if you prefer, record your message using the voicemail facility by clicking on the microphone icon. 
The second of our reading this year takes back to the working-boat families of the First World War. Geoffrey Lewis’ beautifully detailed and cleverly structured tribute to the people who worked the boats through this turbulent period is a lovely and moving tribute to their hard work, sacrifices, and bravery. The Longest Trench follows the lives of two families as they work their boats and provides an intimate and carefully-researched window into their lives, charting not just the hardships, but also their joys. As such, it is a touching and heartfelt celebration on an aspect of British life that has been long over-looked. The novel is framed in such a clever way that allows Geoffrey to contrast the wide range of experiences working boaters encountered, from running multiple boats, being No. 1s (owners), different types of cargo. It also shines a light on the practical challenges that this life raised. For example, how do you conduct a courtship when the two parties are on different boats and on different routes? What happens when a young child becomes seriously ill?   Publisher’s (SGM Publishing) blurb:“Careful research and Mr Lewis’ of the canals make this novel a realistic picture of boating people in the days of horse-drawn narrowboats, and once again his characters become real people whose fortunes matter to his ardent readers: Joy and sadness meet them along the way as news from the various theatres of war is received, while the burgeoning romance between a boy and girl carries us along towards Armistice Day.”In this episode I also read as short section from Tom Rolt’s Narrow Boat. More information and bibliographic details.  Lewis, Geoffrey (2014) The Longest Trench. Kidlington: SGM Publishing.Rolt, LTC. (1944) Narrow Boat. London: Eire and Spottiswoode.I have found that the best site to locate Geoffrey Lewis’ books is at The Canal Shop.General DetailsIn the intro and the outro, Saint-Saen's The Swan is performed by Karr and Bernstein (1961) and available on CC at archive.org. Two-stroke narrowboat engine recorded by 'James2nd' on the River Weaver, Cheshire. Uploaded to Freesound.org on 23rd June 2018. Creative Commons Licence. Piano and keyboard interludes composed and performed by Helen Ingram.All other audio recorded on site. ContactFacebook at https://www.facebook.com/noswpodInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/nighttimeonstillwaters/Twitter: https://twitter.com/NoswPodI would love to hear from you. You can email me at nighttimeonstillwaters@gmail.com or drop me a line by going to the nowspod website and using either the contact form or, if you prefer, record your message using the voicemail facility by clicking on the microphone icon. 
The first of our ‘Summer’ readings this year is from Andy Griffee’s meticulously researched, fast-paced, crime thriller Canal Pushers.Set on the West Midlands canals from Stratford-upon-Avon up to Birmingham and down to Hanbury (a handy map is included at the front of the book). The detail of the canal systems travelled is beautifully captured as is life aboard a narrowboat for would-be owner Jack Johnson. I initially started the book with some slight apprehension, being drawn by the canal setting and the rave reviews. However, I was quickly hooked. If crime thrillers are your thing, you are going to love this. If canals and narrowboating are more your thing, I think you will love this too.  The publisher’s blurb provides the following synopsis:“Book 1 in the Johnson & Wilde crime mystery series, featuring ex journalist Jack Johnson, the enigmatic Nina Wilde, and a narrowboat with a top speed of 4 miles per hour… Jack Johnson is newly divorced, recently made redundant and in search of a fresh start. But when a young boy he meets on the canals turns up drowned, trouble seems determined to follow him. With the encouragement of Jack’s unlikely companion, Nina, who’s come aboard his narrowboat, Jumping Jack Flash, to help him navigate the waterways of the Midlands, Jack is soon tangled up in a police investigation that doesn’t quite add up. Is there a serial killer stalking the towpaths? Jack’s got more pressing problems too: can a canal boat outrun an organised crime syndicate and a media manhunt?” More information and bibliographic detailsGriffee, Andy (2019) Canal Pushers. Leominster: Orphans Publishing.Andy has written (to date) two further adventures featuring Jack, Nina and Eddie (the border terrier); River Rats (set on the Kennet and Avon) and Oxford Blues (based around the Thames at Oxford). More information about Andy can be found on his website: Andy Griffee.You can follow Andy on Twitter @AndyGriffee to find many pictures of the real-life Eddie!More information on all the Jack Johnson and Nina Wilde mysteries can be found by going to the Orphans Publishing website. General DetailsIn the intro and the outro, Saint-Saen's The Swan is performed by Karr and Bernstein (1961) and available on CC at archive.org.Two-stroke narrowboat engine recorded by 'James2nd' on the River Weaver, Cheshire. Uploaded to Freesound.org on 23rd June 2018. Creative Commons Licence. Piano and keyboard interludes composed and performed by Helen Ingram.All other audio recorded on site. ContactFacebook at https://www.facebook.com/noswpodInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/nighttimeonstillwaters/Twitter: https://twitter.com/NoswPodI would love to hear from you. You can email me at nighttimeonstillwaters@gmail.com or drop me a line by going to the nowspod website and using either the contact form or, if you prefer, record your message using the voicemail facility by clicking on the microphone icon. 
There’s a warm welcome awaiting you under the heavy night skies of summer’s hinterlands. Tonight we meet a very special person with a lop-sided smile and who might be able to teach us to walk with elephants.   Journal entry:30th August, Tuesday.“Day’s end. I stand up here and try to see what is Infront of me. But the future is just a confused blur of uncertainty. When I look back, I can so easily draw-out the most intricate constellations that map the chaos of my footsteps of the paths that I have walked. In them I begin to see order and meaning. Why can’t I do the same for my futures? But now, all I see is the hunch of the owl-chapelled oak, in its small bowl of nettles and the sheep whose shadows stretch long across the sunny curve of the hill. Perhaps one day, looking back from some future vantage point, I too will be able to find lines of connection and clarity. The clear path that was taken through my future uncertainty.”Episode Information:This episode is dedicated to Angela Oliver who, with her husband Roger, through extraordinary sacrifice enabled an unlikely man to continue to walk carefree and tall with elephants.For more information about Nighttime on Still WatersYou can find more information and photographs about the podcasts and life aboard the Erica on our website at noswpod.com. It will also allow you to become more a part of the podcast and you can leave comments, offer suggestions, and reviews. You can even, if you want, leave me a voice mail by clicking on the microphone icon. General DetailsIn the intro and the outro, Saint-Saen's The Swan is performed by Karr and Bernstein (1961) and available on CC at archive.org. Two-stroke narrowboat engine recorded by 'James2nd' on the River Weaver, Cheshire. Uploaded to Freesound.org on 23rd June 2018. Creative Commons Licence. Piano and keyboard interludes composed and performed by Helen Ingram.All other audio recorded on site. ContactFor pictures of Erica and images related to the podcasts or to contact me, follow me on:Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/noswpodInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/nighttimeonstillwaters/Twitter: https://twitter.com/NoswPodI would love to hear from you. You can email me at nighttimeonstillwaters@gmail.com or drop me a line by going to the nowspod website and using either the contact form or, if you prefer, record your message using the voicemail facility by clicking on the microphone icon. 
Although a little delayed, the long-awaited rain and thunder did eventually arrive. Join us tonight as we hunker down beside a young willow and enjoy, with a field full of crows, the wonder of a thunderstorm as it roars overhead and all the richness it brings. Journal entry:19th August, Friday.“An impulse forage among the brambles on a Blustery day of tall clouds and sunshine. I pick the high berries, you the lower ones. I extricate you when a bramble thorns your sleeve. Thirty-seven years fall away   And my heart melts once more, Like it did When we first met.We have done this hundreds of times before And will do again. But not like this. Never again, will it be exactly like this.  These few spontaneous moments Pouring blackberries into our bag Will somehow be the most cherished memory I take from this holiday.Both instinctively aware of its special quality A golden moment that joins us. Those few moments when we Completely filled the world with our quiet presence.” Episode Information:In this episode I read two of Wendell Berry’s Sabbath poems:XIX – ‘Some Sunday afternoon’XXI – ‘I was awakened from my dream of the ruined world’You can listen to the MIND Station using the imbedded player at Mind Station. Recording of the rain and thunder recorded on Erica: South Stratford Canal (16.08.2022).For more information about Nighttime on Still WatersYou can find more information and photographs about the podcasts and life aboard the Erica on our website at noswpod.com. It will also allow you to become more a part of the podcast and you can leave comments, offer suggestions, and reviews. You can even, if you want, leave me a voice mail by clicking on the microphone icon. General DetailsIn the intro and the outro, Saint-Saen's The Swan is performed by Karr and Bernstein (1961) and available on CC at archive.org. Two-stroke narrowboat engine recorded by 'James2nd' on the River Weaver, Cheshire. Uploaded to Freesound.org on 23rd June 2018. Creative Commons Licence. Piano and keyboard interludes composed and performed by Helen Ingram.All other audio recorded on site. ContactFor pictures of Erica and images related to the podcasts or to contact me, follow me on:Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/noswpodInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/nighttimeonstillwaters/Twitter: https://twitter.com/NoswPodI would love to hear from you. You can email me at nighttimeonstillwaters@gmail.com or drop me a line by going to the nowspod website and using either the contact form or, if you prefer, record your message using the voicemail facility by clicking on the microphone icon. 
It has been a sweltering hot week with temperatures in the 30s (90F). Join me onboard NB Erica, on a hot August night just as the heatwave is about to break, as we listen for the rolling sound of distant thunder. Journal entry:10th August, Wednesday“The last of today’s sun slowly climbs  the dolphin-backed ridge of hill, colouring the broad cluster of oaks and tawny grass with long shadows.A few hundred yards from me A barrel-roofed lock cottage,  Its red door peeling And windows now blind.My notebook lies empty beside me  While my head is filled with so many thoughts That have track of words to convey them. Bats fill my silence.”  Episode Information:In this episode I refer to the music of the jazz singer Cassandra Wilson and refer specifically to versions of Darkness on the Delta and the achingly beautiful Love is Blindness.The field recording of distant thunder was recorded by ‘sagetyrtle’ and uploaded to Freesound in October 2010.For more information about Nighttime on Still WatersYou can find more information and photographs about the podcasts and life aboard the Erica on our website at noswpod.com. It will also allow you to become more a part of the podcast and you can leave comments, offer suggestions, and reviews. You can even, if you want, leave me a voice mail by clicking on the microphone icon. General DetailsIn the intro and the outro, Saint-Saen's The Swan is performed by Karr and Bernstein (1961) and available on CC at archive.org. Two-stroke narrowboat engine recorded by 'James2nd' on the River Weaver, Cheshire. Uploaded to Freesound.org on 23rd June 2018. Creative Commons Licence. Piano and keyboard interludes composed and performed by Helen Ingram.All other audio recorded on site. ContactFor pictures of Erica and images related to the podcasts or to contact me, follow me on:Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/noswpodInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/nighttimeonstillwaters/Twitter: https://twitter.com/NoswPodI would love to hear from you. You can email me at nighttimeonstillwaters@gmail.com or drop me a line by going to the nowspod website and using either the contact form or, if you prefer, record your message using the voicemail facility by clicking on the microphone icon. 
The Scent of God

The Scent of God

2022-08-0727:44

Join me this week as we moor on a still August night, under a proud stand of poplars studded with starlight and moonlight. Tonight, we explore the evocative power of scents and smells. Journal entry: 6th August, Saturday."The sun is three fingers above the horizon and washes the bankside reeds with golden fire.Three ducks cast perfect wakes of Vs Slowly, swimming the channel of molten bronze.There is something ethereal about this light Like stepping from one world into another.The sun has always been an alchemist at heart."Episode Information:For more information about Noctule bats (Nyctalus noctula), which is the largest bat in the UK, there is an excellent article on the Woodland Trust's website: Noctule Bat.For photographs relating to this episode, please go to our website – details immediately below. For more information about Nighttime on Still WatersYou can find more information and photographs about the podcasts and life aboard the Erica on our website at noswpod.com. It will also allow you to become more a part of the podcast and you can leave comments, offer suggestions, and reviews. You can even, if you want, leave me a voice mail by clicking on the microphone icon. General DetailsIn the intro and the outro, Saint-Saen's The Swan is performed by Karr and Bernstein (1961) and available on CC at archive.org. Two-stroke narrowboat engine recorded by 'James2nd' on the River Weaver, Cheshire. Uploaded to Freesound.org on 23rd June 2018. Creative Commons Licence. Piano and keyboard interludes composed and performed by Helen Ingram.All other audio recorded on site. ContactFor pictures of Erica and images related to the podcasts or to contact me, follow me on:Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/noswpodInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/nighttimeonstillwaters/Twitter: https://twitter.com/NoswPodI would love to hear from you. You can email me at nighttimeonstillwaters@gmail.com or drop me a line by going to the nowspod website and using either the contact form or, if you prefer, record your message using the voicemail facility by clicking on the microphone icon. 
There is a spot of ground that is special to me. Perhaps you have one too. They often are not particularly attractive, but somehow they are places we can go to find quietness. Join me to tonight when we visit one of my special places as we go down to the cattle pond with the help of Wendell Berry.    Journal entry:27th July, Wednesday“Drifts of mist rise and ghost upon the water In the pre-dawn light. The air is deliciously cool.The heron is in the cow-splash down by the oaks I climb the hill And look down on dawn.   And wish for rain.” Episode Information:In this episode I read a very short extract from Simon Barnes’ excellent, quirky, and altogether wonderful, A Bad Birdwatcher’s Companion published (2005) by Short Books.  I also read Wendell Berry’s poem ‘A Standing Ground’ which can be found in his volume The Peace of Wild Things: And other poems published (2018) by Penguin Books. You can listen and watch Mary Berry read this poem here: ‘A Standing Ground.’ For more information about Nighttime on Still WatersYou can find more information and photographs about the podcasts and life aboard the Erica on our website at noswpod.com. It will also allow you to become more a part of the podcast and you can leave comments, offer suggestions, and reviews. You can even, if you want, leave me a voice mail by clicking on the microphone icon. General DetailsIn the intro and the outro, Saint-Saen's The Swan is performed by Karr and Bernstein (1961) and available on CC at archive.org. Two-stroke narrowboat engine recorded by 'James2nd' on the River Weaver, Cheshire. Uploaded to Freesound.org on 23rd June 2018. Creative Commons Licence. Piano and keyboard interludes composed and performed by Helen Ingram.All other audio recorded on site. ContactFor pictures of Erica and images related to the podcasts or to contact me, follow me on:Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/noswpodInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/nighttimeonstillwaters/Twitter: https://twitter.com/NoswPodI would love to hear from you. You can email me at nighttimeonstillwaters@gmail.com or drop me a line by going to the nowspod website and using either the contact form or, if you prefer, record your message using the voicemail facility by clicking on the microphone icon. 
The forecast hot weather has come and gone, but its psychological, as much as physical, effects feel a bit harder to shift. So join with me tonight as we gaze deeply into the mirrored dome of the night sky and its web of starlight, to discover what stories they tell and their challenge for us to begin to create newer ones.   Journal entry:22nd July, Friday“Every day shakes the kaleidoscope. Lift it to your eye. Twist the base and look.Today, three young jackdaws chase each other Through the feathery green of the ash tree In a carnival of silver rain.It calls to somewhere deep inside of us, Doesn’t it? You, me, and whatever is behind Our biggest questions And lies beyond the heathlands of right and wrong.”Episode Information:In this episode I quote a section from Jack Johnson's song ‘Constellations’ which was released on his album In Between Dreams on Bushfire Records in 2005. You can listen to it here: ‘Constellations’.   I also read an excerpt from Susan Hanson’s essay ‘Deep in the Heart’ found in Let There Be Night edited by Paul Goodard (2008) published by Uni of Nevada.John Moriarty talks about the impact of western mythology on the psyche and culture of western civilisations in many of his books; particularly, Nostos, An Autobiography (2001) and What the Curlew Said: Nostos Continued (2007). The best introduction to John’s writing is the excellent John Moriarty: Not The Whole Story (2018) written by Mary McGillicuddy. All these books are published by Lilliput Press. For more information about Nighttime on Still WatersYou can find more information and photographs about the podcasts and life aboard the Erica on our website at noswpod.com. It will also allow you to become more a part of the podcast and you can leave comments, offer suggestions, and reviews. You can even, if you want, leave me a voice mail by clicking on the microphone icon. General DetailsIn the intro and the outro, Saint-Saen's The Swan is performed by Karr and Bernstein (1961) and available on CC at archive.org. Two-stroke narrowboat engine recorded by 'James2nd' on the River Weaver, Cheshire. Uploaded to Freesound.org on 23rd June 2018. Creative Commons Licence. Piano and keyboard interludes composed and performed by Helen Ingram.All other audio recorded on site. ContactFor pictures of Erica and images related to the podcasts or to contact me, follow me on:Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/noswpodInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/nighttimeonstillwaters/Twitter: https://twitter.com/NoswPodI would love to hear from you. You can email me at nighttimeonstillwaters@gmail.com or drop me a line by going to the nowspod website and using either the contact form or, if you prefer, record your message using the voicemail facility by clicking on the microphone icon. 
The Dog Days of Summer

The Dog Days of Summer

2022-07-1724:11

These are the long days. The days of heat and dust. The days of quiet skies and dulled colours. Days of eclipse and renewal. These are the dog days of summer.Journal entry:23rd July, Saturday [Should be 16th July - blame the heat!!]“Martins twist and flit around the large ash,  Clustering in the branches like cockney parakeets.  En masse they drop, forking down to the water surface,  Swimming the air with dolphin-like grace.We slip the mooring ropes and leave.”Episode Information:In this episode I read two short extracts from Miles Hadfield’s (1950) An English Almanac published by J.M. Dent and Sons.Soundscape of dusk, recorded at Wilmcote (South Stratford upon Avon Canal) at 21.15 on 16th July 2022.For more information about Nighttime on Still WatersYou can find more information and photographs about the podcasts and life aboard the Erica on our website at noswpod.com. It will also allow you to become more a part of the podcast and you can leave comments, offer suggestions, and reviews. You can even, if you want, leave me a voice mail by clicking on the microphone icon. General DetailsIn the intro and the outro, Saint-Saen's The Swan is performed by Karr and Bernstein (1961) and available on CC at archive.org. Two-stroke narrowboat engine recorded by 'James2nd' on the River Weaver, Cheshire. Uploaded to Freesound.org on 23rd June 2018. Creative Commons Licence. Piano and keyboard interludes composed and performed by Helen Ingram.All other audio recorded on site. ContactFor pictures of Erica and images related to the podcasts or to contact me, follow me on:Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/noswpodInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/nighttimeonstillwaters/Twitter: https://twitter.com/NoswPodI would love to hear from you. You can email me at nighttimeonstillwaters@gmail.com or drop me a line by going to the nowspod website and using either the contact form or, if you prefer, record your message using the voicemail facility by clicking on the microphone icon. 
 Old stories can lift an unfamiliar mirror up to our lives so that we see ourselves anew and as we really are. Tonight, I will tell you an old story. It’s a story about a silvery day of sea fret (mist), rolling ocean waves, empty fishing nets, and a solitary herring. Journal entry:6th July, Wednesday“I sit on the bank, one leg hanging down.  A drake mallard in eclipse, treads water,  with slow, lazy strokes of his feet.He watches me.  I watch him.      We are both waiting for something...                      but what?I smile, but it means nothing to him. He softly chuckles, but I hear only sounds and intent, But not what that intention is. He could be Penny - a little soul staring at each move I make. Trying to read me, as I try to read him, Or the sheep in the neighbouring field. Or the horses, frozen,                 on the dolphin-backed curve of the hill.I want to tell him 'it'll be alright'. But we both know, it isn't. But that is the point, isn't it?Neither of us live in a world of fairy tale endings. We're just trying to find our ways in a crooked world. Not so that others will follow the paths we make,But that they may hear our songs (you, duck, and me) and  Know that they are not on their own.”Episode Information:In this episode I read a very short extract from Roy Vickery’s (2019) Vickery’s Folk Flora, published by Weidenfeld and Nicolson.  I also refer to Sharon Blackie’s (2019) Foxfire, Wolfskin and other stories of Shapeshifting Women, published by September Books where you can read her (much briefer) version of the story of the herring and the fisherman. Field recordingThe waves on a shingle beach was recorded by ‘ermine’ at Felixstowe (14/10/2006) and can be found here. The herring gull was recorded in Scheveningen, the Netherlands (05/10/2020) by ‘Canardo55’ and can be found here.General DetailsIn the intro and the outro, Saint-Saen's The Swan is performed by Karr and Bernstein (1961) and available on CC at archive.org. Two-stroke narrowboat engine recorded by 'James2nd' on the River Weaver, Cheshire. Uploaded to Freesound.org on 23rd June 2018. Creative Commons Licence. Piano and keyboard interludes composed and performed by Helen Ingram.All other audio recorded on site. ContactFor pictures of Erica and images related to the podcasts or to contact me, follow me on:Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/noswpodInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/nighttimeonstillwaters/Twitter: https://twitter.com/NoswPodI would love to hear from you. You can email me at nighttimeonstillwaters@gmail.com or drop me a line by going to the nowspod website and using either the contact form or, if you prefer, record your message using the voicemail facility by clicking on the microphone icon. 
With apologies for sounding like an asthmatic badger, tonight we explore the special qualities of an unremarkable dusk and why we can feel so at peace with it and the darkness it can bring.Journal entry:28th June, Tuesday.“I stop work to breathe in the storm-wind And bathe in the whirlpool of its noise.My shoulders feel heavy       As If I alone am holding               up the blanket clouds       That sag grey above my head.The water hose, snakes and hisses around my feet.Head upright, neck relaxed, the cob swan pushes towards me, Lazily, doggy paddling a V of disturbance on the water’s surface.My day begins to smile.” Episode Information:In this episode I refer to an interview with John O’ Donohue recorded by Krista Tippett (2008/2022) ‘The Inner Landscape of Beauty’ on the On Being podcast. I also read a very short extract from John O’ Donohue’s (1999) Anam Cara: Spiritual wisdom from the Celtic world published by Penguin Random House. I also refer to Robin Wall Kimmerer’s article ‘Nightfall’ published in Paul Bogard’s (2008) Let There Be Night: Testimony on behalf of the dark published by University of Nevada Press. I also refer to the following works:Matthew Beaumont (2016) Nightwalking: A nocturnal history of London published by Verso Books.Roger Ekirch (2004/2013) At Day’s Close: Night in times past published by Weidenfeld and NicholsonThe episode finishes with a reading of Tom Hennen’s short poem ‘Summer Night Air’ from his Darkness Sticks to Everything: Collected and New Poems published (2013) by Copper Canyon Press. General DetailsIn the intro and the outro, Saint-Saen's The Swan is performed by Karr and Bernstein (1961) and available on CC at archive.org. Two-stroke narrowboat engine recorded by 'James2nd' on the River Weaver, Cheshire. Uploaded to Freesound.org on 23rd June 2018. Creative Commons Licence. Piano and keyboard interludes composed and performed by Helen Ingram.All other audio recorded on site. ContactFor pictures of Erica and images related to the podcasts or to contact me, follow me on:Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/noswpodInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/nighttimeonstillwaters/Twitter: https://twitter.com/NoswPodI would love to hear from you. You can email me at nighttimeonstillwaters@gmail.com or drop me a line by going to the nowspod website and using either the contact form or, if you prefer, record your message using the voicemail facility by clicking on the microphone icon. 
It is funny how, looking back, distinct paths and interconnections can be found. It is, sometimes, tempting to see them as clear paths that we are destined to follow. However, sometimes, they are coincidence or simply a case that one can spot significance after the event. But they can also be 'love letters written in canal water'. Journal entry: 21st June, Tuesday, Summer Solstice.“Mist burns off the water, baptising the canal in red and gold.Three newly hatched moorhens, a chaos of fluff and bald-headed,       walk on water on a broken iris leaf. On the opposite bank, a smallish carp, asleep in death,       lies in the middle of the towpath,             light flecking off the lively scales. Just down from here the body of a vole floats on the listless current. How do I make sense of all this?        Can I really live kindly and with joy on this earth?Those three moorhen seem to know.  They walk on water.”  Episode Information:For those wanting to watch Steve Tyrell’s wonderfully soothing and informative cruise click this link: Cruising the Ashby Canal!!! The sound of a Gardner 2LW. You can see more of Steve’s videos on his YouTube channel: Narrowboat Precious Jet. It is well worth a look if you are interested in the more practical aspects of boat-life (which I tend to stay away from!).I also refer to the lyrics of ‘Society’ written by Jerry Hannan and, probably, most famously sung by Eddie Vedder as part of the OST for the film Into the Wild. There are numerous YouTube videos of this song. The official version is: ‘Society’ OST. A version featuring the lyrics (with rather idiosyncratic spelling) is: ‘Society’ with Lyrics.For more information about Nighttime on Still WatersYou can find more information and photographs about the podcasts and life aboard the Erica on our website at noswpod.com. It will also allow you to become more a part of the podcast and you can leave comments, offer suggestions, and reviews. You can even, if you want, leave me a voice mail by clicking on the microphone icon. General DetailsIn the intro and the outro, Saint-Saen's The Swan is performed by Karr and Bernstein (1961) and available on CC at archive.org. Two-stroke narrowboat engine recorded by 'James2nd' on the River Weaver, Cheshire. Uploaded to Freesound.org on 23rd June 2018. Creative Commons Licence. Piano and keyboard interludes composed and performed by Helen Ingram.All other audio recorded on site. ContactFor pictures of Erica and images related to the podcasts or to contact me, follow me on:Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/noswpodInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/nighttimeonstillwaters/Twitter: https://twitter.com/NoswPodI would love to hear from you. You can email me at nighttimeonstillwaters@gmail.com or drop me a line by going to the nowspod website and using either the contact form or, if you prefer, record your message using the voicemail facility by clicking on the microphone icon. 
The heat of the past few days has broken with sweeping skies filled with rain and lowering clouds. Join me tonight, as we reflect on life on water in the heat of summer, listen to the poetic words of one of our listeners, and discover the wisdom of making bread through the words of another listener and Robin Wall Kimmerer.  Journal entry: 14th June, Tuesday.“The day starts fresh with clean skies and grasses that glitter with rainbows. Beneath the rushes, a moorhen fusses. The air is scented with summer wine.”Episode Information:This episode features the writing of two listeners; Margaret Jacobson and Sue ‘Breadlady’.I read the poem ‘The Colour of Water’ by Margaret Jacobson and a post by Sue on her love of bread. I also read a small extract from:Robin Wall Kimmerer’s (2020) Braiding Sweatgrass published by Penguin Books. I also refer to a video created by boat vlogger 'CountryHouseGent' that features the soothing sound of a vintage canal boat accompanied by video of a cruise along a canal. The video cn be viewed on YouTube and is titled: Relaxing Vintage Engine Sound Canal Boat Sleep ASMRFor more information about Nighttime on Still WatersYou can find more information and photographs about the podcasts and life aboard the Erica on our website at noswpod.com. It will also allow you to become more a part of the podcast and you can leave comments, offer suggestions, and reviews. You can even, if you want, leave me a voice mail by clicking on the microphone icon. General DetailsIn the intro and the outro, Saint-Saen's The Swan is performed by Karr and Bernstein (1961) and available on CC at archive.org. Two-stroke narrowboat engine recorded by 'James2nd' on the River Weaver, Cheshire. Uploaded to Freesound.org on 23rd June 2018. Creative Commons Licence. Piano and keyboard interludes composed and performed by Helen Ingram.All other audio recorded on site. ContactFor pictures of Erica and images related to the podcasts or to contact me, follow me on:Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/noswpodInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/nighttimeonstillwaters/Twitter: https://twitter.com/NoswPodI would love to hear from you. You can email me at nighttimeonstillwaters@gmail.com or drop me a line by going to the nowspod website and using either the contact form or, if you prefer, record your message using the voicemail facility by clicking on the microphone icon. 
This week has been one of extremes that encompasses the splendour of solitude and an onboard visit by three very enthusiastic police dogs (and a puppy)! Alongside all this, we took time to listen to some bats, watch the cygnets as the grow ever stronger and contemplate the hidden depths of the most surprising people.  Journal entry: 8th June, Wednesday"The wind is kicking up among the branches of the ash and oaks while clouds as heavy as wet blotting paper begin to gather. There is that excitement in the air that portends change though the barometer stays level. The rooks are playing up and large spots of rain fleck the towpath. It is the time to stride across the ridgeways and old greenways in seven-league boots and drink in every second of the howling night... it is the time to close the hatches and listen to the rain as it rakes the cabin roof and batters on the window by my bed." Episode Information:I am planning to feature bats more fully in a future podcast. However, if you are interested in finding out more about bats, there is a very good introductory guide to (British) bats on the Woodland Trust website: Bats.The bat sounds featured in this episode were a type of pipistrelle. We are not too sure which, but most probably (through population size) they were Common Pipistrelle. For more information: Common Pipistrelle. The recoding was made using a Magenta Bat5 bat detector and a Edirol R-09HR sound recorder.For more information about Nighttime on Still WatersYou can find more information and photographs about the podcasts and life aboard the Erica on our website at noswpod.com. It will also allow you to become more a part of the podcast and you can leave comments, offer suggestions, and reviews. You can even, if you want, leave me a voice mail by clicking on the microphone icon. General DetailsIn the intro and the outro, Saint-Saen's The Swan is performed by Karr and Bernstein (1961) and available on CC at archive.org. Two-stroke narrowboat engine recorded by 'James2nd' on the River Weaver, Cheshire. Uploaded to Freesound.org on 23rd June 2018. Creative Commons Licence. Piano and keyboard interludes composed and performed by Helen Ingram.All other audio recorded on site. ContactFor pictures of Erica and images related to the podcasts or to contact me, follow me on:Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/noswpodInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/nighttimeonstillwaters/Twitter: https://twitter.com/NoswPodI would love to hear from you. You can email me at nighttimeonstillwaters@gmail.com or drop me a line by going to the nowspod website and using either the contact form or, if you prefer, record your message using the voicemail facility by clicking on the microphone icon. 
Caught in a Rhyme

Caught in a Rhyme

2022-06-0532:07

On the week that the cygnets of our swan pair hatched, we explore the rather contradictory nature of the canal through the eyes of poets Jo Bell, Nancy Campbell, and Ian MacMillan. We find romance amidst the unromantic and beauty in the unbeautiful.  Journal entry: 1st June, Wednesday"Heron, streak of grey light,  Standing on the bank,  Coverletted in Moon's-Eye And the first flush of poppies of the season.Rain falls as needles of sunlight.  The heron preens for a while And then is gone."Episode Information:In ‘News from the Moorings’ I refer to Mark Nicolaides’ beautiful and exceptionally informative website on the swan: Swan Life. You can read more about swans’ nesting and hatching behaviours in the section: Incubating Eggs.There is a very good collection of canal-themed poetry on the Poetry Society’s website where, in conjunction with the Canal and River Trust (CRT), there is a section that includes works from past and present ‘Canal Laureates’: Waterlines.In this episode I read the following poems:Jo Bell - ‘How to Live on a Boat’Jo Bell – ‘Frozen In’Nancy Campbell (2018) – ‘Recipe for a Towpath Garden’Ian MacMillan – ‘Canal Life’For information about Pete Tuffrey’s paintings see his Etsy page.I am not sure how current Pete’s Etsy page is as most of his more recent artwork appears to be on his Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/TuffreyArtist.You can also follow Pete on Twitter: https://twitter.com/PeteTuffrey For more information about Nighttime on Still WatersYou can find more information and photographs about the podcasts and life aboard the Erica on our website at noswpod.com. General DetailsIn the intro and the outro, Saint-Saen's The Swan is performed by Karr and Bernstein (1961) and available on CC at archive.org. Two-stroke narrowboat engine recorded by 'James2nd' on the River Weaver, Cheshire. Uploaded to Freesound.org on 23rd June 2018. Creative Commons Licence. Piano and keyboard interludes composed and performed by Helen Ingram.All other audio recorded on site. ContactFor pictures of Erica and images related to the podcasts or to contact me, follow me on:Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/noswpodInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/nighttimeonstillwaters/Twitter: https://twitter.com/NoswPodI would love to hear from you. You can email me at nighttimeonstillwaters@gmail.com or drop me a line by going to the nowspod website and using either the contact form or, if you prefer, record your message using the voicemail facility by clicking on the microphone icon. 
May slowly rolls into June, but is summer really here? The towpaths and hedgerows are garlanded in summer colours and the ducks (and swans) are beginning to move into their time of eclipse. Some of the mallard drakes are beginning to look very travel-worn! Meanwhile, days like these seem to bring a lot of childhood memories to mind.    Journal entry:27th May, Friday"Two hours until sundown and a stillness already settles. Shadows creep low and long through the sedge and long grasses on the bank. The swan stretches in her nest under an alder that shimmers with blackbird song.Later the peace will be disturbed and the sky explode with shouts and light. But not now.  Now all is still." Episode Information:All birds moult (‘molt’ – US spelling) or go into ‘eclipse’. You can find more information about the eclipse or moult that ducks and swans experience on this site: Understanding Waterfowl: The amazing molt. More information can be found here: What is eclipse plumage?For more information about Nighttime on Still WatersYou can find more information and photographs about the podcasts and life aboard the Erica on our website at noswpod.com. It will also allow you to become more a part of the podcast and you can leave comments, offer suggestions, and reviews. You can even, if you want, leave me a voice mail by clicking on the microphone icon. General DetailsIn the intro and the outro, Saint-Saen's The Swan is performed by Karr and Bernstein (1961) and available on CC at archive.org. Two-stroke narrowboat engine recorded by 'James2nd' on the River Weaver, Cheshire. Uploaded to Freesound.org on 23rd June 2018. Creative Commons Licence. Piano and keyboard interludes composed and performed by Helen Ingram.All other audio recorded on site. ContactFor pictures of Erica and images related to the podcasts or to contact me, follow me on:Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/noswpodInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/nighttimeonstillwaters/Twitter: https://twitter.com/NoswPodI would love to hear from you. You can email me at nighttimeonstillwaters@gmail.com or drop me a line by going to the nowspod website and using either the contact form or, if you prefer, record your message using the voicemail facility by clicking on the microphone icon. 
The Colour of Water

The Colour of Water

2022-05-2236:37

I want to describe to you what I saw today, but I can't. We have so many words to describe and represent the most complex of concepts. Why then is it almost impossible to describe something so simple and ordinary as the colour of the water earlier today? Kathleen Jamie and Thomas Merton (with a little excursive with Hana Videen) help us to find some answers. Journal entry:17th May, Tuesday"The hills are painted a dusty grey and the world is filled with the quietness of sheep, the cry of distant crows and drip and splash of rain upon young oak leaves. The warm touch of bark beneath my hand and the shiver of a silvery mist. A perfect way to watch the slow dance of dawn."Episode Information:In this episode I cite or read extracts from:Kathleen Jamie’s (2004) Dublin Review article ‘Sabbath’ (open access), which can also be found in her (2005) book Findings published by Sort Of Books.Hana Videen’s (2022)  The Wordhord: Daily Life in Old English published by Princeton University Press. Thomas Merton’s (2015) When the Trees Say Nothing: Writings on nature published by Ave Maria Press. For more information about Nighttime on Still WatersYou can find more information and photographs about the podcasts and life aboard the Erica on our website at noswpod.com. It will also allow you to become more a part of the podcast and you can leave comments, offer suggestions, and reviews. You can even, if you want, leave me a voice mail by clicking on the microphone icon. General DetailsIn the intro and the outro, Saint-Saen's The Swan is performed by Karr and Bernstein (1961) and available on CC at archive.org. Two-stroke narrowboat engine recorded by 'James2nd' on the River Weaver, Cheshire. Uploaded to Freesound.org on 23rd June 2018. Creative Commons Licence. Piano and keyboard interludes composed and performed by Helen Ingram.All other audio recorded on site. ContactFor pictures of Erica and images related to the podcasts or to contact me, follow me on:Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/noswpodInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/nighttimeonstillwaters/Twitter: https://twitter.com/NoswPodI would love to hear from you. You can email me at nighttimeonstillwaters@gmail.com or drop me a line by going to the nowspod website and using either the contact form or, if you prefer, record your message using the voicemail facility by clicking on the microphone icon. 
The Greek myths tell us that there are times when the gods come down from Olympus to walk amongst mortals. We had a very similar experience when, on a sunny day in late March, David Johns came to visit us and record an episode for his canal-based vlog Cruising the Cut.  Journal entry:11th May, Wednesday “The carp are spawning! May rain casting rings on thrashed water,  The flash of fin,       And a watery thunder            That rumbles along the side of the hull.I lie in the half-light of dawn,       Suspended above the silty jungles           Filled with so much life.”  Episode Information:Cruising the CutDavid Johns’ canal-based YouTube channel is Cruising the Cut.You can view David’s episode on Nighttime on Still Waters (via YouTube) here: 265. Evoking the spirit of pirate radio - on a canal.Wooden Writer's BoxFor information about the wooden writer’s box: Blue Star Crafts. I have the smaller A5 version of the Messenger Wood Box. There are a number of companies producing this type of box. Another popular maker is: Galen Leather and their Portable Writer’s Box and Desk.For more information about Nighttime on Still WatersYou can find more information and photographs about the podcasts and life aboard the Erica on our website at noswpod.com. It will also allow you to become more a part of the podcast and you can leave comments, offer suggestions, and reviews. You can even, if you want, leave me a voice mail by clicking on the microphone icon. General DetailsIn the intro and the outro, Saint-Saen's The Swan is performed by Karr and Bernstein (1961) and available on CC at archive.org. Two-stroke narrowboat engine recorded by 'James2nd' on the River Weaver, Cheshire. Uploaded to Freesound.org on 23rd June 2018. Creative Commons Licence. Piano and keyboard interludes composed and performed by Helen Ingram.All other audio recorded on site. ContactFor pictures of Erica and images related to the podcasts or to contact me, follow me on:Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/noswpodInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/nighttimeonstillwaters/Twitter: https://twitter.com/NoswPodI would love to hear from you. You can email me at nighttimeonstillwaters@gmail.com or drop me a line by going to the nowspod website and using either the contact form or, if you prefer, record your message using the voicemail facility by clicking on the microphone icon. 
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