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Changing Lenses: Diversify Your Perspectives
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Changing Lenses: Diversify Your Perspectives

Author: Rosie Yeung

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We believe in community and human kindness, and seek to understand the realities of people experiencing racism, discrimination and exclusion. When we change our lenses, we change what we see; so we look through their eyes to see what we’ve never known. As our blinders are lifted, new ways to live, work and relate are revealed. I’m your host, Rosie Yeung (she/her), a Chinese-Canadian immigrant with invisible disabilities, and I’m a JEDI speaker, coach and trainer. Do you also want to see social change happen? Then please join me in Changing Lenses! Each episode is hosted on colonized land that was taken from many Indigenous nations, including the Anishinaabe, the Huron-Wendat, and the Haudenosaunee Confederacy. I seek Truth and Reconciliation with First Nations, Inuit and Métis people of Turtle Island, and I call upon us all to decolonize our thinking, not just our systems. Learn more on my website, www.changinglenses.ca.
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If we see poverty as the result of financial illiteracy, irresponsibility or a lack of self-control, then the blame falls on the person living in poverty, and the answer is to find a job, spend less, and get financial training.Financial literacy education is definitely important, and these programs have their benefits. But knowledge alone does not develop capability and behaviour change, any more than knowing you should exercise leads to going to the gym.So why do the majority of financial interventions fail? To understand that, we’re Changing Lenses to see through the eyes of people experiencing financial vulnerability. Dr. Emily Heath, a senior researcher and behavioural neuroscientist, explains the cognitive biases and psychology behind financial decision-making. As we learn about the barriers to healthy financial behaviour, we also learn how racism, discrimination and other forms of oppression exacerbate the problem.In this episode, you’ll learn:The cognitive biases that derail our best intentions for saving moneyWhy low-income kids do worse in the “marshmallow test”How poverty is a tax on decision-makingThe effect of traumatic events like racism and domestic violence on financial capabilityWhat neuroscience tells us will actually help people facing financial vulnerability[Please pardon the poor audio quality due to internet recording.]Full transcript available here.Contact Rosie and find JEDI resources at:  https://www.changinglenses.ca/ABOUT DR. EMILY HEATHDr. Emily Heath is a senior researcher, consultant and behaviour change specialist with a PhD in behavioural neuroscience from the University of Sydney’s Brain and Mind Centre. Emily has been the architect of award-winning financial capability programs, which she has developed for both youth and adults. She is the author of the international report, “How do we really build financial capability? 10 Principles for financial interventions”. Emily is currently a Senior Manager, Climate Change and Sustainability Services with EY Australia, and sits on the Australian Securities and Investment Commission (ASIC) Schools and Money Working Group.You can find Emily on LinkedIn.References and resources in this episode:Article on Professor Sendhil Mullainathan’s research: https://www.harvardmagazine.com/2015/05/the-science-of-scarcityhttps://www.theatlantic.com/family/archive/2018/06/marshmallow-test/561779/https://www.financialcapability.gov.au/files/how-to-really-build-financial-capability.pdfhttp://www.shlomobenartzi.com/save-more-tomorrowMany thanks to our sponsor, SAY Magazine, which celebrates First Nations, Métis and Inuit ingenuity by sharing stories of success and resilience across Turtle Island. SAY Magazine has features on music, entertainment, education, wellness, and much more. Subscribe today and have your SAY! Visit SAYmag.com/subscribe.
We’re single, but we’re not alone. The population of singles are growing in North America – but we’re still a minority group. And like any minority group, we face discrimination and marginalization purely because we don’t have the power of the majority – even more so for single women.If you’re wondering how that could be, you’re probably married. 😊 And your single friends and family need you to hear this episode.Because singlehood isn’t a waiting room for marriage. It’s become an increasingly long-term lifestyle for people in their 30’s, 40’s and older. But our workplaces, businesses, even taxes, still centre the nuclear family as the “norm”.So in this episode, we’re changing our lens to see through the eyes of two long-term single women – me, and my best friend Jaime. We go outside our comfort zones to (hopefully) de-stigmatize an issue that can still cause women to question their self-worth.In this episode, you’ll learn about:How capitalist economies disadvantage single peopleHow parents and couples get prioritized at workWhy getting married isn’t the solutionA new worldview on the modern familyFull transcript available here.Contact Rosie and find JEDI resources at:  https://www.changinglenses.ca/Guest BioJaime Ho is a CPA, CA who’s not your stereotypical accountant. She’s a creative artist, rock climber and baker, whose amazing cakes have been featured on the Food Network. Most importantly, she’s Rosie’s best friend, and zookeeper of two dogs and a cat.References and Resources in this Episode:Unfair Tax System for Canadian Single Seniorshttps://singleseniorstax.wixsite.com/home/updates https://www.cbc.ca/amp/1.6017270Financial costs of being single:https://www.theatlantic.com/sexes/archive/2013/01/the-high-price-of-being-single-in-america/267043/https://www.wealthenhancement.com/blog/cost-of-being-singleCanadian Demographic Statistics:https://www150.statcan.gc.ca/n1/pub/75-006-x/2019001/article/00003-eng.htmhttps://www.statista.com/statistics/446168/canada-single-population-by-age-group/https://www12.statcan.gc.ca/census-recensement/2016/dp-pd/prof/details/page.cfm?Lang=E&Geo1=PR&Code1=01&Geo2=PR&Code2=01&Data=Count&SearchText=Canada&SearchType=Begins&SearchPR=01&B1=Visible%20minority&TABID=1Many thanks to our sponsor, SAY Magazine, which celebrates First Nations, Métis and Inuit ingenuity by sharing stories of success and resilience across Turtle Island. SAY Magazine has features on music, entertainment, education, wellness, and much more. Subscribe today and have your SAY! Visit SAYmag.com/subscribe.
Carissa Begonia is a Filipina-American who left a safe corporate job to start her own business.  Until I met her, the only examples I had of entrepreneurs or people following their passions were completely unrelatable for me. Because they were almost all white folks who didn’t have the same immigrant, survival-based, play-it-safe mentality that defined my world.With Carissa, I’d finally found someone who faced similar cultural barriers and self-doubts, whose story I resonated with, who was believable and relatable because we had similar backgrounds. Today, she is a sought-after speaker, coach and DEI consultant who’s been recognized by TIME Magazine (among others) for her impact, e.g. co-founding AARISE.To me, Carissa is a role model for breaking what I call the “model minority bamboo mold”. In this episode of Changing Lenses, she shares with us how she did it, and how she’s supporting BIPOC folks today to follow their dreams too.Contact me and find JEDI resources at:  https://www.changinglenses.ca/Full transcript here.In this episode, we talk about:Being a daughter of Filipino immigrants turned entrepreneurWhy we need more BIPOC coachesCarissa’s first racist experience – at Disney WorldFinding self-liberation by going against the grainDiversity, Equity and Inclusion next steps: beyond unconscious bias trainingAdvice for young racialized women today Guest Bio and References/Links About Carissa Begonia:Carissa is a first generation Filipina-American daughter of immigrants. After nearly 15 years as a successful intrapreneur and head of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion (DEI) at Zappos, Carissa decided to follow her own light and seek out sparks in others. She is a leadership and business coach specializing in helping BIPOC leaders and entrepreneurs pursue meaningful careers, build their own values-driven businesses, and design a life of purpose. Whether it’s dancing on the beach, hiking with friends, or supporting schoolchildren in the Philippines through her non-profit, Green Mango International, Carissa continues to value the connectedness and inner peace found in simply doing good. She also co-founded AARISE ( Asian American Racialized Identity and Social Empowerment) for AAPIs, a program and community focused on justice and liberation for all.Find Carissa on:AARISE (Instagram): https://www.instagram.com/aarisecommunity/Conscious Exchange: https://www.consciousxchange.com/LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/carissabegonia/Many thanks to our sponsor, SAY Magazine, which celebrates First Nations, Métis and Inuit ingenuity by sharing stories of success and resilience across Turtle Island. SAY Magazine has features on music, entertainment, education, wellness, and much more. Subscribe today and have your SAY! Visit SAYmag.com/subscribe.
Many employers are asking where to find and hire “diverse talent”. What they SHOULD be asking is how their recruitment process might discriminate against these candidates once they apply.In this episode, Safiyah Husein, a lawyer and Senior Policy Analyst at the John Howard Society, shines a light on the hidden dangers behind a widely accepted hiring procedure: the police (or criminal) background check.This episode is for you if:You think police checks make your workplace saferYour employer has done a police check on you but you don’t know what it saidYou believe police checks only uncover findings on convicted criminalsSpoiler alert: research shows that police checks don’t do what you probably think they do.Listen to the full episode to find out what they really do!Contact Rosie and find JEDI resources at:  https://www.changinglenses.ca/Full transcript available here.Guest Bio and References/LinksAbout Safiyah Husein:Safiyah Husein is a Senior Policy Analyst at the John Howard Society of Ontario (JHSO). She does research and policy development, supports its public education activities, and liaises with local offices and community partners on reform initiatives. Safiyah holds a BSc in Psychology from York University and a Juris Doctor from the University of Windsor Faculty of Law.JHSO actively advocated for reforms to police record checks, to protect public safety and human rights, leading to the Police Record Check Reform Act. JHSO conducts workshops and webinars to educate stakeholders about legal rights and responsibilities under the Act, and promote evidence-based best practices around police record checks and employment. Safiyah worked on projects related to police record check policy, and leads public education activities for legal professionals, employers and individuals navigating the job market with justice involvement.Find Safiyah on:TwitterLinkedInEmail: shusein@johnhoward.on.caReferences and resources in this episode:Police Record Hub WebsiteJohn Howard Society Ontario WebsiteYouTubeMany thanks to our sponsor, SAY Magazine, which celebrates First Nations, Métis and Inuit ingenuity by sharing stories of success and resilience across Turtle Island. SAY Magazine has features on music, entertainment, education, wellness, and much more. Subscribe today and have your SAY! Visit SAYmag.com/subscribe.
If you’re wondering what you can do in bringing reconciliation and decolonization to Canada – this episode is for you. First, we learn what colonization actually looks like. Jessica Dumas of Keeseekoowenin Ojibway First Nation shares personal stories about her family, life experiences, and tragic interaction with police that demonstrate just how effective colonization is. The goal of residential schools was to “kill the Indian in the child”, and it worked.The good news is, we can help undo some of residential school’s legacies. As Jessica learned about the true history of her people, she discovered her Indigenous identity, and began a career in restorative justice. Today, she is a sought-after speaker, coach and emcee, and even introduced Michelle Obama at an event! Jessica believes that continuous education is key non-indigenous allies to support truth and reconciliation. So as you listen to Jessica’s story, what are you learning, and what steps will you take towards restorative justice today?Contact Rosie and find JEDI resources at:  https://www.changinglenses.ca/Facebook Group CommunityIn this episode, we talk about:What a land acknowledgment means to JessicaLiving without cultural identity or sense of purposeThe first time she realized she was differentChoosing between being Indigenous or sending your child to residential schoolThe family tragedy that started her on the path to restorative justiceFinally finding her place in communityDiscrimination against her lack of university degreeMeeting Michelle Obama!Encouragement for young Indigenous womenEducation is the key to decolonizationFull transcript here.Guest Bio and References/Links About Jessica Dumas:Jessica is the President of Jessica Dumas Coaching and Training. She is a professional certified coach who specializes in speaker coaching and business coaching, helping individuals speak with clarity and confidence. She is an energetic and motivated professional who quickly gains the trust of her audience with her warm, engaging personality and professional style.Widely recognized for her contributions, Jessica is a recipient of the Manitoba 150 Women Trailblazer award from the Nellie McClung Foundation, a finalist for the Future Leaders of Manitoba and a finalist in the CBC’s Top 40 Manitoban’s under 40 for 2015. Jessica’s volunteer work also earns wide respect in Manitoba. She has served as Chairperson of the Aboriginal Chamber of Commerce and the first Indigenous Female Chairperson of the Winnipeg Chamber of Commerce (2019-2020) and continues to sit on numerous committees and boards at the executive level. She is a powerful role model and advocate for social justice, leading others to overcome challenges by developing personal strengths, vision and self-confidence.Find Jessica on:https://www.jessicadumas.com/Many thanks to our sponsor, SAY Magazine, which celebrates First Nations, Métis and Inuit ingenuity by sharing stories of success and resilience across Turtle Island. SAY Magazine has features on music, entertainment, education, wellness, and much more. Subscribe today and have your SAY! Visit SAYmag.com/subscribe.
“I started learning about residential schools. I started learning about generational trauma and that's when I realized like, okay, there's nothing wrong with us. I'm not broken. There's things that happened that caused us to be living this way. And once I realized that there was nothing wrong with me and with my people, that's when I really started to regain a lot of strength and courage."This special episode is released on National Indigenous Peoples' Day, a day to recognize and celebrate the unique heritage, diverse cultures and outstanding contributions of First Nations, Inuit and Métis peoples. So today's episode features Jill Featherstone, a wonderful Indigenous mother, grandmother, university professor, and author of the book, “The Tale of Tiger Lily”. In fact, Jill is so good, she was continuously accused of plagiarism as a student.From Jill’s story, you’ll see why decolonization is needed in our universities and schools. How can education based in brick buildings and academic papers truly value teachings from oral traditions and land-based skills?I could say more, but I’d rather let her speak for herself.  Before we hear from Jill, please be aware that we speak openly about racist events and discrimination that may be painful and distressing to you. If you are a survivor of residential schools or related trauma, and need help – please call the Indian Residential Schools 24/7 Crisis Line: 1-866-925-4419. Contact me and find JEDI resources at:  https://www.changinglenses.ca/In this episode, we talk about:Treaty status and living on reserve - rights controlled by colonizationYouthful rebellion as a response to continuous racist attacksRegaining her identity and culture that was lostRacism from university professors - fighting for her education like fighting a warRacism against Jill's little girlStrength and courage to pursue her dream of writingHelping Indigenous youth today to be proud of who they areLateral violence: a direct effect of residential schools and intergenerational traumaJill's book, The Tale of Tiger Lily, A NovelOpportunity for students and teachers to get a free author's talk from Jill!Full transcript here.Guest Bio and References/LinksAbout Jill Featherstone:Jill is a mother of 5 and step-mom to 3. She is a wife, a grandmother, an instructor at University College of the North in Northern Manitoba, and an author.  Her novel for young adults, “The Tale of Tiger Lily”, is inspired by the character created by J.M. Barrie’s play “Peter Pan”. Jill takes us into the mind of the young Tiger Lily as she comes of age, blending cultural resonance with a classic tale.Jill is also the founder of Featherstone Support Services, providing motivational workshops for Indigenous youth and young adults. To date she has helped hundreds of Indigenous youth and young adults find the motivation, courage and confidence to go back to school and enter into the workforce.References and resources in this episode:https://www.jillfeatherstone.com/ Many thanks to our sponsor, SAY Magazine, which celebrates First Nations, Métis and Inuit ingenuity by sharing stories of success and resilience across Turtle Island. SAY Magazine has features on music, entertainment, education, wellness, and much more. Subscribe today and have your SAY! Visit SAYmag.com/subscribe.
Lots of companies have been asking, “What’s the business case for justice, equity, diversity and inclusion (JEDI)?”Thomas Benjoe turns that around and asks us to think about how JEDI benefits our community and economy, not just ourselves. Thomas is a member of Muscowpetung First Nation, Chair of the Saskatchewan Chamber of Commerce, and President and CEO of FHQ developments, a business partnership owned by the 11 member First Nation communities of File Hills Qu’Appelle Tribal Council (FHQTC).In this episode, Thomas shares successful business strategies that show how you can be equitable and profitable. He explains how counter-cultural concepts like paying higher wages gets reinvested in the economy which benefits our community and ourselves.As you listen to Thomas, you’ll learn how an Indigenous worldview is not only relevant to business, it’s necessary.For more JEDI resources or to contact me, head over to my website:  https://www.changinglenses.ca/ In this episode, we talk about:Land acknowledgements: First Nations’ territories extend beyond political bordersThe unique Indigenous business program at First Nations University CanadaIndigenous worldview on money and business Balancing business and profit with equity and inclusionTheir “secret sauce”: what differentiates their business modelA broader view of ROI (return on investment)FHQ’s 3 divisions: investments & partnerships, economic development and Tokata HR Solutions – all staffed by First NationsIncreasing Indigenous representation: more than token diversityHow future business leaders can make a lasting impactJEDI allyship includes economic allyshipFull transcript available here.Guest Bio and References/LinksAbout Thomas Benjoe:Thomas is the current President and CEO an a founding board member of FHQ Developments. He is a former Commercial Banker from RBC that served the Aboriginal Market throughout Saskatchewan, and played a critical role in in the creation of the FNUniv Aboriginal Youth Entrepreneurship Camp.A graduate of Business Administration from the First Nations University of Canada, Thomas is strongly committed to Aboriginal business development, wealth generation and First Nation equity ownership in key economic sectors.Thomas serves on a number of committees and boards, including Chair of the Saskatchewan Chamber of Commerce.References and resources in this episode:FHQ Website: https://www.fhqdev.com/ Instagram: @tombenjoeTwitter: @tombenjoeLinkedIn: Thomas BenjoeFirst Nations University of Canada:  https://www.fnuniv.ca/Globe and Mail Article: https://www.theglobeandmail.com/business/rob-magazine/article-breaking-barriers-for-thomas-benjoe-Many thanks to our sponsor, SAY Magazine, which celebrates First Nations, Métis and Inuit ingenuity by sharing stories of success and resilience across Turtle Island. SAY Magazine has features on music, entertainment, education, wellness, and much more. Subscribe today and have your SAY! Visit SAYmag.com/subscribe.
“I will always be the Black girl first, before Miriam Njoku. I cannot achieve my way out of being seen with prejudice. That's how they view people like me.”In this episode, Miriam Njoku changes our lens to reveal the racism she experienced working and living in Canada and Switzerland.Does that surprise you? These two countries are probably not the first that comes to mind when you think about racism. After all, Canada prides itself on being a haven for many refugees, and Switzerland is a neutral country that hosts the United Nations.But Miriam, a Master’s graduate from the London School of Economics, who worked at the World Economic Forum and JP Morgan Chase, was still seen as a Black African girl first. She had to overcome significant prejudice to finally be seen as a qualified high calibre professional in banking and international development. When she finally started to be recognized just a little bit, she was told she’s not like the others. It’s as though Miriam was either too African or not African enough. So as you listen to Miriam’s personal story, challenge yourself. What’s your immediate visceral reaction? Have you heard similar comments from business colleagues as part of normal small talk? Are you wondering, if everyday comments have no racist intent, can they still be racist? If you do have questions, and want to discuss with like-minded people who genuinely want to understand, you’re welcome to join our free Facebook group. It’s a private online community for safe and respectful discussions about justice, equity, diversity, and inclusion.Contact me and find more JEDI resources at:  https://www.changinglenses.ca/Full transcript available here. In this episode, we talk about:[06:03] Miriam’s experience as a Black African working in Switzerland.[10:31] How reporting racism to HR can fail the victim.[11:27] Ways that workplace abuse can manifest (with or without intent).[16:50] Prejudice at the intersection of  racism and sexism.[19:32] Switzerland’s dark side.[20:57] White moms racism in Canada.[25:13] Capitalism: a driving force for exploitation.[29:00] Creating a safe work environment for people with trauma.[32:18] When the oppressed try to escape racism by becoming the Model Minority.Content warning: this episode contains references to sexual harassment, racism, and workplace discrimination which some listeners may find disturbing.Guest Bio and References/LinksAbout Miriam Njoku:Miriam is a Trauma Informed Coach, an African, a mom of three daughters, a blogger and writer.  After graduating from the London School of Economics, she built her international career in the fields of banking and international development, working for organizations such as the World Economic Forum, Lombard Odier Private Bank, JP Morgan, the Mastercard Foundation and the United Nations. She now uses her passion for psychology and dedicates her time to coaching others to free themselves from the burden of childhood trauma through sharing the knowledge she acquired on her own healing journey and storytelling. Her wish is to destigmatize mental health in black communities.FiMany thanks to our sponsor, SAY Magazine, which celebrates First Nations, Métis and Inuit ingenuity by sharing stories of success and resilience across Turtle Island. SAY Magazine has features on music, entertainment, education, wellness, and much more. Subscribe today and have your SAY! Visit SAYmag.com/subscribe.
Have you ever been told you can’t do it, or you’re not good enough for something you really wanted? What if you got that message in your whole life starting from childhood? What if abuse or racism you’ve endured created trauma that affects your work or relationships?  How do you heal wounds that you can’t see?Miriam Njoku knows the struggle all too well. The abuse that she endured as a child and teenager and the racism she experienced at school and at work caused trauma that would cripple ten people, let alone one. Yet somehow, Miriam not only survived all this, but she also found resilience and strength in herself that allowed her to succeed in the world’s eyes. What we couldn’t see was the continued damage from internal wounds that were never healed and led to her shame and even workaholism. Thankfully, Miriam found the healing she needed to be a whole and healthy mom, writer, podcaster, and African woman.Miriam left a flourishing career in banking and international development with organizations like the United Nations so she could become a trauma-informed coach, helping people free themselves from the burdens of childhood trauma. She’s also working to destigmatize mental health in black communities through activities like her podcast, Overcoming Your Story.If you’re looking for ways to heal from your past traumas, or if you want to support someone who needs that healing, Miriam shares ways we can do that using her own personal story. And if you speak French, finally, I have content for you in your language. Thanks to Miriam’s bilingualism, please stick around to the end because she has a special message for you. Content Warning: This episode contains references to childhood abuse and trauma, sexual abuse, and racism. Though not graphic, some listeners may be disturbed by the painful stories. Miriam has endured so much that we had to break it up, and she’ll talk specifically about workplace racism in the next episode.Full transcript available here.Contact Rosie and find JEDI resources at:  changinglenses.ca/In this episode, we talk about:[01:17]  Miriam as a Black African in Cameroon.[03:13]  Miriam as a Black African in Switzerland.[04:39]  Systemic racism in Swiss schools. [09:42]  Miriam’s traumatic childhood, and what happened to her mother.[16:28]  Her desire for education as a reaction to abuse.[21:06]  Hiding shame beneath a veneer of perfection.[25:50]  How we can help – indications of possible trauma in others.[28:24]  Trauma’s impact on motherhood.[30:49]  Encouraging trauma victims to ask for help.[33:43]  A message of support in French.Guest Bio and References/LinksMiriam is a Trauma Informed Coach, an African, a mom of three daughters, a blogger and writer.  After graduating from the London School of Economics, she built her international career in the fields of banking and international development, working for organizations such as the World Economic Forum, Lombard Odier Private Bank, JP Morgan, the Mastercard Foundation and the United Nations. She now uses her passion for psychology and dedicates her time to coaching others to free themselves from the burden of childhood trauma through sharing the knowledge she acquired Many thanks to our sponsor, SAY Magazine, which celebrates First Nations, Métis and Inuit ingenuity by sharing stories of success and resilience across Turtle Island. SAY Magazine has features on music, entertainment, education, wellness, and much more. Subscribe today and have your SAY! Visit SAYmag.com/subscribe.
What do you think is the business case for equity, diversity and inclusion? In business, or even not for profit, should morality or humanitarian reasons play a role? Or should it strictly be about profit and shareholder value?I have some opinions on this, which I apply in my work as an Equity, Diversity and Inclusion Strategist. But as a podcaster, I've tried to keep the focus on my guests' perspectives, until one of my guests asked to switch places with me. Ali Ahmed, whom you heard in the previous episode, wanted to hear my experiences as a recruiter, HR director and not-for-profit executive.So in this episode, Ali will host me. And I give some pretty blunt opinions about many business systems that we've taken for granted, which are structurally set up to discriminate and exclude. And it's not because they're racist or misogynist or anything related specifically to people. The sad thing is, systemic discrimination is also rooted in capitalism. If you're wondering how that happens, tune in to this episode. We'll explain how this plays out in recruiting, succession planning, even charity and corporate social responsibility.Contact Rosie and find JEDI resources at:  https://www.changinglenses.ca/In this episode, we talk about:[03:06]  A story explaining inclusivity and diversity.[09:00]  The need to decolonize and de-patronize philanthropy.[14:29]  That the donors who hold money, hold power.[18:06]  Diversity at the C-suite and Board levels.[21:03]  Discrimination in recruiting immigrants and racialized people.[27:11]  How do we make recruitment more equitable?[33:50]  A corporation is a person. What kind of person is it?[38:47]  Focus on positive change in the future, not mistakes of the past.Full transcript available at:https://changinglenses.buzzsprout.com/1759041/8526517-ep12-what-kind-of-person-is-your-corporation-the-case-for-equity-diversity-inclusion-ali-interviews-rosieGuest Bio and References/LinksAbout Rosie Yeung:Rosie is a Speaker, Coach, Strategist, and Podcaster for Justice, Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion (JEDI), specializing in intersectional diversity and Asian-Canadian identity. Her life goal is to reduce social inequity and discrimination, especially in wealth, race, and gender. Rosie loves mentoring Asian and racialized women to succeed in business as their true selves.As a Chinese-Canadian, immigrant, cis-straight female with invisible disabilities, Rosie’s intersectional identities help her empathize with diverse communities and bring compassion and kindness to her work. With over 20 years of professional and lived experiences, she holds certificates in inclusion, consulting, Indigenous history, human rights, and more.Based in Toronto, Canada, Rosie enjoys travel (except during global pandemics) and has served communities in Guatemala, Ghana, Nigeria, Rwanda, and Uganda. To de-stress, she watches movies and eats popcorn and ice cream – sometimes simultaneously!Find Rosie on:Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/rosieyeung_jedi/ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/rosieyeuMany thanks to our sponsor, SAY Magazine, which celebrates First Nations, Métis and Inuit ingenuity by sharing stories of success and resilience across Turtle Island. SAY Magazine has features on music, entertainment, education, wellness, and much more. Subscribe today and have your SAY! Visit SAYmag.com/subscribe.
Ali Ahmed is a professional designated accountant who worked for one of the Big Four international accounting firms before immigrating from Pakistan to Canada. But despite having that professional experience, he couldn't get an accounting job in Canada until he got some "Canadian experience" under his belt.As a former recruiter myself, I can verify that the prejudices Ali describes are real. I’m really glad that he's willing to share with you the unnecessary obstacles he faced in a country that supposedly welcomes immigrants and diverse ethnicities. After all, it's one thing to let people in the front door. It's another thing to let them sit at the same table with us.So as you listen to Ali's story, I challenge you to think about what you deem essential job requirements and whether they're really that essential. And if your first thought is “they're all essential,” – think again.Contact Rosie and find JEDI resources at:  https://www.changinglenses.ca/In this episode, we talk about:[04:41]  Immigrating to Canada (and challenges for his Pakistani family after 9/11).[08:34]  First impressions of Canada.[09:33]  Looking for work as an immigrant without “Canadian experience”.[20:16]  When Ali felt included at work.[21:44]  When Ali felt excluded at work.[24:41]  Having identities / labels put on him, instead of choosing his own.[26:16]  Ali’s advice for new immigrants and people looking for work.Full transcript available at:https://changinglenses.buzzsprout.com/1759041/8517680-ep11-immigrants-need-not-apply-with-ali-ahmedGuest Bio and References/LinksAbout Ali Ahmed:Ali Ahmed is a forward-looking finance leader who works with organizations to help achieve their potential by making financially informed decisions. He provides strategic direction, develops budgets, and provides useful critical financial information. Ali’s superpower is to present complex financial information simply and concisely.He is currently the Manager, Strategic Financial Management at Canadian Blood Services.You can contact Ali via LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/ali-ahmed-cpa/ References and resources in this episode:Woodgreen Community Services: https://www.woodgreen.org/ Canadian Blood Services: https://www.blood.ca/enMany thanks to our sponsor, SAY Magazine, which celebrates First Nations, Métis and Inuit ingenuity by sharing stories of success and resilience across Turtle Island. SAY Magazine has features on music, entertainment, education, wellness, and much more. Subscribe today and have your SAY! Visit SAYmag.com/subscribe.
As I reflect back on the first season of the podcast, it’s become clear to me that systemic change starts with personal change. I believe true inclusion and equity requires sacrificing some of our self-interests, like power, position, even profit. The question is – are we willing to make change happen, if it means changing and sacrificing ourselves?In this season finale, I share my thoughts on the “business case” and the costs of true inclusion, equity and diversity; why inclusion policies and training are not enough; and what’s next for Changing Lenses. (The podcast will take a short hiatus, but will be back in 2021!)In this episode:Reflecting on the journey so farThe big question: are we willing to do what it takes to change?The “business case” is the side effect, not the reason, for inclusion, equity and diversityHaving inclusion and equity in more than name only is going to cost us somethingMy personal experience of inclusion policy vs. practiceIt’s not about whether you say you believe in inclusion, equity and belonging. It’s what you do to make it happen – or not.Looking ahead to 2021 and Season TwoFull episode transcript available at:https://changinglenses.buzzsprout.com/1759041/8348858-ep10-season-finale-are-we-ready-for-real-changeMusic CreditsIntro Music:What Words Can't Describe, by Vlad Gluschenko License: CC BY 3.0: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/deed.enOutro Music:Beautiful Modern Rock Pop Guitar All Goodness Background Music, by Royalty Free MusicLicense: CC BY-NC-ND 3.0: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/deed.enMany thanks to our sponsor, SAY Magazine, which celebrates First Nations, Métis and Inuit ingenuity by sharing stories of success and resilience across Turtle Island. SAY Magazine has features on music, entertainment, education, wellness, and much more. Subscribe today and have your SAY! Visit SAYmag.com/subscribe.
“I think our greatest fear is that people are jumping into it just because it's good opportunity, or it's good PR. As opposed to knowing, and thinking, and believing that this could actually make us all better as a people.”Rev. Dr. Timothy Tang, Director of Tyndale Intercultural Ministries, shares with us what cultural competency means, how it benefits us in life and work, the challenges that practitioners face, and easy (and fun!) ways we can all grow our intercultural awareness. (No training programs required!)In this episode:We talk about:What to call intercultural _____, and what it isCultural differences in names and titlesSometimes the biggest challenge is realizing what your existing lens is (or that you have one)Applying cultural competency at work and in leadershipDiversity is skin colour, but it's not just skin colourPulling your “diversity muscle”Practical (and easy) ways to start your intercultural learningMeeting people where they’re at – through movies, food, danceFull transcript available at:https://changinglenses.buzzsprout.com/1759041/8348859-ep09-diversity-isn-t-just-skin-colour-with-rev-dr-timothy-tangGuest Bio and References/LinksReverend Dr. Timothy Tang was a pastor at East Toronto Chinese Baptist Church for over 15 years, during which time he obtained his doctorate in leadership, specializing in intercultural development. He's now the Director of Tyndale Intercultural Ministries (the “TIM Centre”), which is part of Tyndale University in Toronto.Just some of the services that the TIM Centre provides are: intercultural resources for networking, training, and research; a certificate program in ministry and organizational leadership; and intercultural assessment, training and coaching for teams and individuals. References: The websites Tim mentioned on the podcast are: http://www.timcentre.comureachtoronto.caureachcanada.caMusic CreditsIntro Music:What Words Can't Describe, by Vlad Gluschenko License: CC BY 3.0: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/deed.enOutro Music:Beautiful Modern Rock Pop Guitar All Goodness Background Music, by Royalty Free MusicLicense: CC BY-NC-ND 3.0: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/deed.enMany thanks to our sponsor, SAY Magazine, which celebrates First Nations, Métis and Inuit ingenuity by sharing stories of success and resilience across Turtle Island. SAY Magazine has features on music, entertainment, education, wellness, and much more. Subscribe today and have your SAY! Visit SAYmag.com/subscribe.
“First, in order for racism and discrimination to continue, you need silence. And the second is the 'Otherwise Good People' who won't stand up and support the target of the discriminatory behavior.”Shanaaz Gokool, human rights activist and former CEO, is fighting for freedom from workplace discrimination – for herself, and countless others whose stories we don’t know, because they have been silenced and unsupported.In this episode, Shanaaz courageously shares her personal story of discrimination, and gives practical ways that we can effect change, especially at the Board level.Shanaaz also gives three tips for people who may be experiencing workplace discrimination, and invites you to contact her for more support: linkedin.com/in/shanaaz-gokoolIn this episode:We talk about:How failing to share power, leads to failure of governanceTwo things that are necessary for racism to continue (i.e. what not to do)What happens when “Otherwise Good People” try to avoid taking sides (hint – there’s no such thing)Why anti-discrimination is the Board of Directors’ responsibility, not just HR’s, and what they can do differentlyThe kind of discrimination story we need right nowThree tips for victims of workplace discriminationFull transcripts available at:https://changinglenses.buzzsprout.com/1759041/8348895-ep08-otherwise-good-people-in-workplace-discrimination-with-shanaaz-gokool Guest Bio and References/LinksShanaaz Gokool is a life-long human rights activist and non-profit discrimination disruptor. She has been inspired to do social justice work primarily because of the rampant racism she experienced and witnessed growing up in Halifax-Dartmouth, Nova Scotia.She has held leadership roles in the private and non-profit sectors and is an emerging governance expert on workplace discrimination. As the former CEO of Dying With Dignity Canada (DWDC), she ushered in a new national movement supporting assisted dying and other end-of-life issues re-framed as human rights issues. Under her leadership, DWDC emerged as a key player in Canada on assisted dying.She currently has a wrongful dismissal, systemic racism and discrimination lawsuit pending against her former employer.You can contact and follow her on LinkedIn: linkedin.com/in/shanaaz-gokoolLinks to the court filings:Statement of ClaimDWDC DefenceShanaaz's reply to DWDCMusic CreditsIntro Music:What Words Can't Describe, by Vlad Gluschenko License: CC BY 3.0: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/deed.enOutro Music:Beautiful Modern Rock Pop Guitar All Goodness Background Music, by Royalty Free MusicLicense: CC BY-NC-ND 3.0: Many thanks to our sponsor, SAY Magazine, which celebrates First Nations, Métis and Inuit ingenuity by sharing stories of success and resilience across Turtle Island. SAY Magazine has features on music, entertainment, education, wellness, and much more. Subscribe today and have your SAY! Visit SAYmag.com/subscribe.
What happens when capital markets and individual landlords control access to a fundamental human right?A house or condo has changed from being a place to live, and a shelter for families, into a profit-making business – something to help us retire earlier.Join us as Alyssa Brierley, human rights lawyer, explains the reasons for the global housing crisis, shares real-life stories of tenant eviction and discrimination, and challenges us to put people before profit.In this episode:We talk about:Acknowledging the land we’re onHomelessness – it’s not just on the streetsTwo reasons for the housing affordability crisisWhy tenants are being evicted into homelessnessFinancialization – the business model of de-housing vulnerable peopleHow landlords legally, but immorally, coerce tenants into leavingLandlord fraud – evicting tenants on false pretensesHousing as a human right, vs. a market commodityThe privilege and responsibility of landlordship – enabling the right to lifeCERA work for tenants’ rightsFull transcript available at:https://changinglenses.buzzsprout.com/1759041/8348896-ep07-financialization-when-housing-is-a-commodity-vs-a-human-right-with-alyssa-brierleyGuest Bio and References/LinksAlyssa Brierley is a human rights lawyer and the Executive Director of the Centre for Equality Rights in Accommodation (CERA). Alyssa previously served as a United Nations advisor on the right to food, and a policy advisor to the provincial government and Ontario College of Teachers. She is currently completing her PhD in political science, and has done extensive work researching and defending various human rights, including housing and health.Contact CERA and Alyssa:Find CERA at:https://www.equalityrights.org/https://twitter.com/CERAOntariohttps://www.facebook.com/CERAOntario/https://www.instagram.com/cera.ontario/Find Alyssa at:https://twitter.com/alyssabrierleyhttps://www.linkedin.com/in/abrierley/Other resources:https://www.homelesshub.ca/about-homelessness/homelessness-101/myths-and-questions-about-homelessnesshttps://www.homelesshub.ca/sites/default/files/attachments/WithoutAHome-execsummary.pdf Music CreditsIntro Music:What Words Can't Describe, by Vlad Gluschenko License: CC BY 3.0: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/deed.enutro Music:Beautiful Modern Rock Pop Guitar All Goodness Background Music, by Royalty Free MusicLicense: CC BY-NC-ND 3.0: https://creativecommons.org/Many thanks to our sponsor, SAY Magazine, which celebrates First Nations, Métis and Inuit ingenuity by sharing stories of success and resilience across Turtle Island. SAY Magazine has features on music, entertainment, education, wellness, and much more. Subscribe today and have your SAY! Visit SAYmag.com/subscribe.
Did you know that if you don’t have private health insurance, you likely have to pay for life-saving drugs out of your own pocket? Did you know that Canada’s healthcare ranks second last out of 10 countries? Without pharmacare, Canada’s “healthcare” system is NOT universal.In part 2 of our healthcare series, Doret Cheng, a practicing pharmacist and university lecturer on global health, explains why healthcare equality is NOT equity, and how we can afford a national pharmacare program.As a bonus, I ask Doret her thoughts on how a COVID vaccine should be equitably distributed.In this episode[00:04:04]   When equality is not equity: patient discharge stories[00:13:34]   Canada’s healthcare is second worst out of OECD countries[00:16:38]   The case for national pharmacare: we actually SAVE money[00:21:08]   The government’s plan for national pharmacare – there is one?![00:27:00]   COVID vaccine – who gets it first?[00:31:50]   Doret’s lessons learned – listening to patients results in better health outcomesFull transcript available at:https://changinglenses.buzzsprout.com/1759041/8348897-ep06-it-s-not-healthcare-without-pharmacare-with-doret-chengGuest bio and references:Doret Cheng is a pharmacist with 20 years of patient care experience in community pharmacies, hospitals, and global healthcare as far away as Uganda.Doret is of Chinese ethnicity, born in Ghana, immigrated to Edmonton, Canada as a child, and now lives in Toronto, where she currently practices at St. Mike's Hospital, Academic Family Health Team. She is also an Adjunct Lecturer at the University of Toronto, teaching on global health.References:Find Doret on: LinkedInData on Canada’s ranking with OECD countries:https://interactives.commonwealthfund.org/2017/july/mirror-mirror/Canadian Government Websites on National Pharmacare:https://www.canada.ca/en/health-canada/news/2019/06/the-advisory-council-on-the-implementation-of-national-pharmacare-recommends-canada-implement-universal-single-payer-public-pharmacare.htmlhttps://www.canada.ca/en/health-canada/corporate/about-health-canada/public-engagement/external-advisory-bodies/implementation-national-pharmacare/final-report.htmlMany thanks to our sponsor, SAY Magazine, which celebrates First Nations, Métis and Inuit ingenuity by sharing stories of success and resilience across Turtle Island. SAY Magazine has features on music, entertainment, education, wellness, and much more. Subscribe today and have your SAY! Visit SAYmag.com/subscribe.
In this two-part series on healthcare in Canada, we explore (and dismantle) some myths about our “free, universal” system which is so lauded by Americans.Join us for part one, as pharmacist Doret Cheng takes us behind the scenes of a Toronto Family Medicine Clinic, putting a human face to stigmatized patients. If you think that the problems of homeless people and drug addicts are just housing and mental health – it’s time to change your lens.In this episode:[00:02:50]    Pharmacists: what you didn’t know[00:05:54]    Integrated, collaborative, holistic healthcare: St. Michael’s Family Medicine Clinic[00:08:56]    What does “vulnerable” mean? Who are St. Mike’s patients?[00:14:28]    Understanding patient hiSTORIES – opioids and homelessness[00:26:43]    Healthcare equality is NOT equityFull transcript available at:https://changinglenses.buzzsprout.com/1759041/8348898-ep05-not-so-universal-healthcare-caring-for-the-uncared-for-with-doret-chengGuest BioDoret Cheng is a pharmacist with 20 years of patient care experience in community pharmacies, hospitals, and global healthcare as far away as Uganda.Doret is of Chinese ethnicity, born in Ghana, immigrated to Edmonton, Canada as a child, and now lives in Toronto, where she currently practices at St. Mike's Hospital, Academic Family Health Team. She is also an Adjunct Lecturer at the University of Toronto, teaching on global health. References:Contact Doret: LinkedInhttps://www.stmichaelshospital.com/programs/familypractice/st-james-town.php  Music Credits Intro Music:What Words Can't Describe, by Vlad Gluschenko License: CC BY 3.0: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/deed.en Outro Music:Beautiful Modern Rock Pop Guitar All Goodness Background Music, by Royalty Free MusicLicense: CC BY-NC-ND 3.0: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/deed.enMany thanks to our sponsor, SAY Magazine, which celebrates First Nations, Métis and Inuit ingenuity by sharing stories of success and resilience across Turtle Island. SAY Magazine has features on music, entertainment, education, wellness, and much more. Subscribe today and have your SAY! Visit SAYmag.com/subscribe.
Do you feel overwhelmed, lost, and alone?Are you engaging in unhealthy behaviours to avoid the things you can’t face?Are you struggling to find the energy and motivation to make it through the day?  Or maybe, you’re too “on” and can’t switch “off”?Dave Addison and I have both been there in different ways. You are definitely not alone, and most importantly –THERE. IS. HOPE.In this vulnerable episode of the Changing Lenses podcast, Dave shares his personal battle with alcohol addiction and mental illness, while working as a corporate executive in sales, marketing, and not-for-profit. Now as a Peer Support Champion and Mental Health Advocate, he talks about how employers can be more supportive – and how sufferers can find help, and hope.For parents of children and youth going through substance abuse and mental illness (which Dave has lived through too), he also shares resources and help available to families.Dave welcomes you to contact him [on LinkedIn] for more info, to ask questions, or just to talk. In this episode:[00:03:03]  Dave’s story of alcohol abuse, mental illness, and HOPE[00:16:00]  Dismantling stigmas and debunking myth[00:26:50]  Changing the conversation[00:34:30]  Peer Support Champions and employer supports[00:43:12]  Where to get help – for yourself, a coworker or loved oneFull transcript available at:https://changinglenses.buzzsprout.com/1759041/8348899-ep04-hope-amid-darkness-with-dave-addisonGuest BioDave Addison is a Mental Health and Addiction Advocate, and Board Director with Families for Addiction Recovery.  Dave’s background includes corporate leadership roles in sales, marketing, and not-for-profit.  Now, Dave draws on his work experience and personal journey with mental health to support business leaders and people struggling with mental health and addiction.2020 marks Dave’s 10th year of sobriety – congratulations, Dave!Contact Dave: LinkedInReferences:For parents/families of mental illness patients:Families for Addiction Recovery Canada - https://www.farcanada.org/ , 1-855-377-6677 Ext. 207Family Navigation Project (Toronto) - https://sunnybrook.ca/content/?page=family-navigation-project  Are You in Crisis?If you are experiencing a mental health or addictions related crisis:Call 1-833-456-4566 toll free (In Quebec: 1-866-277-3553), 24/7 or visit www.crisisservicescanada.ca.Call your provincial helpline (numbers below)Call Kids Help Phone (Canada-wide) 1-800-668-6868Call 911Go to the nearest hospital Additional resources mentioned:“Am I an alcoholic test” (two common ones):https://canadiancentreforaddictions.org/addicted-alcoholic-take-test/ https://www.canada.ca/en/health-canada/services/substance-use/problematic-alcohol-use.html#a8Many thanks to our sponsor, SAY Magazine, which celebrates First Nations, Métis and Inuit ingenuity by sharing stories of success and resilience across Turtle Island. SAY Magazine has features on music, entertainment, education, wellness, and much more. Subscribe today and have your SAY! Visit SAYmag.com/subscribe.
“Research actually demonstrates that the two most targeted groups or communities in Canada that face discrimination are Muslims and Indigenous people.  Polls in the United States have found that…even communities of colour, including Black people and Latino people…have negative views of Muslims or have Islamophobia.”Dr. Rehman Abdulrehman, a psychologist specializing in diversity and inclusion, shares more about his personal experiences with religious discrimination, and his ideas for real allyship and change. We also chat about a surprising difference between Americans and Canadians; Colourism (even among People of Colour); and how we can be more relatable and likeable.You’ll hear about:[00:04:14]  Religious discrimination and stat holidays[00:11:25]  The “I don’t celebrate Christmas” experiment[00:18:17]  U.S. versus Canada[00:23:45]  Colourism and wanting to be White[00:27:22]  How to be a good ally (and a more likeable human being)[00:34:39]  How White people exotify People of Colour (and their lunches!) And...I (awkwardly) try to pronounce Dr. Rehman Abdulrehman’s name correctly. Thanks for your graciousness, Rehman!Full transcript available at: https://changinglenses.buzzsprout.com/1759041/8348900-ep03-i-am-canadian-part-2-with-dr-rehman-abdulrehmanGuest Bio and References/LinksDr. Rehman Abdulrehman is a consulting and clinical psychologist and public speaker, with a special focus on diversity and inclusion. He combines his significant clinical skills with his lived experience as both a person of color and an immigrant, to help people better understand microaggressions, privilege, representation, and culture.Dr. Abdulrehman has consulted with such organizations as the CBC, the Mastercard Foundation, and the RCMP, and was a speaker at the Winnipeg TedX Talks. He currently lives in Winnipeg, Manitoba, where he runs a psychology clinic, is an Assistant Professor at the University of Manitoba, and is a visiting professor at two universities in Tanzania.Dr. Abdulrehman is also a subject matter expert on unconscious bias for Google and YouTube. And if all that wasn’t enough, in his “spare time” he co-hosts a podcast about diversity and inclusion called Different People.References:Find Dr. Abdulrehman on:Winnipeg TedxTalk on YouTubeDifferent People PodcastLinkedInclinicpsychology.comleadwithdiversity.comwinnlove.caMusic CreditsIntro and Interlude Music:What Words Can't Describe, by Vlad Gluschenko License: CC BY 3.0: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/deed.enOutro Music:Beautiful Modern Rock Pop Guitar All Goodness Background Music, by Royalty Free MusicLicense: CC BY-NC-ND 3.0: https://creativecommons.org/liMany thanks to our sponsor, SAY Magazine, which celebrates First Nations, Métis and Inuit ingenuity by sharing stories of success and resilience across Turtle Island. SAY Magazine has features on music, entertainment, education, wellness, and much more. Subscribe today and have your SAY! Visit SAYmag.com/subscribe.
Dr. Rehman Abdulrehman, a psychologist specializing in diversity and inclusion, shares his personal experiences of racism and discrimination – as a child, and as professional.  We also chat about explaining privilege to White people; being accepted as Canadians; and the “false truth” of multiculturalism in Canada.In this episode: Find out about:[00:06:34]  Explaining to a White person why you want your child to have a better life[00:10:21]  The greatest privilege Dr. Abdulrehman wants for his child[00:11:39]  Discrimination from a teacher[00:14:58]  Racism in Canada today (2020)[00:19:59]  The untenable choice: freedom to be yourself, or freedom from conflict[00:21:48]  The mythology of a multicultural CanadaBonus – a piece of Canadian trivia:    What’s the provincial flower of Manitoba? If you didn’t know, now you’ll know!Full transcript available at:https://changinglenses.buzzsprout.com/1759041/8348901-ep02-i-am-canadian-part-1-with-dr-rehman-abdulrehmanGuest Bio and References/LinksDr. Rehman Abdulrehman is a consulting and clinical psychologist and public speaker, with a special focus on diversity and inclusion. He combines his significant clinical skills with his lived experience as both a person of color and an immigrant, to help people better understand microaggressions, privilege, representation, and culture.Dr. Abdulrehman has consulted with such organizations as the CBC, the Mastercard Foundation, and the RCMP, and was a speaker at the Winnipeg TedX Talks. He currently lives in Winnipeg, Manitoba, where he runs a psychology clinic, is an Assistant Professor at the University of Manitoba, and is a visiting professor at two universities in Tanzania.Dr. Abdulrehman is also a subject matter expert on unconscious bias for Google and YouTube. And if all that wasn’t enough, in his “spare time” he co-hosts a podcast about diversity and inclusion called Different People.References:Find Dr. Abdulrehman on:Winnipeg TedxTalk on YouTubeDifferent People PodcastLinkedInclinicpsychology.comleadwithdiversity.comwinnlove.caMusic Credits:What Words Can't Describe, by Vlad GluschenkoLicense: CC BY 3.0: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/deed.enBeautiful Modern Rock Pop Guitar All Goodness Background Music, by Royalty Free MusicLicense: CC BY-NC-ND 3.0: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/deed.enMany thanks to our sponsor, SAY Magazine, which celebrates First Nations, Métis and Inuit ingenuity by sharing stories of success and resilience across Turtle Island. SAY Magazine has features on music, entertainment, education, wellness, and much more. Subscribe today and have your SAY! Visit SAYmag.com/subscribe.
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