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We're coming up on the two-year anniversary of Seedcast, and this week we're celebrating by re-releasing our very first episode featuring filmmaker, comedian, and poet Chad Charlie (Ahousaht First Nation/Black.) Chad, who is currently on the writing staff for Reservation Dogs, talks about his community approach to filmmaking, his journey toward activism, and what it means to him to be both Black and Indigenous. What we also get in this episode is another chance to hear Seedcast host Jessica Ramirez reflect on their own Indigeneity and what it means to them to guide you through each Seedcast story. Host: Jessica Ramirez. Produced by Jessica Ramirez and Felipe Contreras. Executive Producer: Tracy RectorBig thanks to Chad Charlie for being a part of this great episode. Keep up with Chad on Twitter and Instagram at @ChadCharlieee. Seedcast is a production of Nia Tero, a global nonprofit which supports Indigenous land guardianship around the world through policy, partnership, and storytelling initiatives.
This week we’re excited to share a podcast episode from Neisau Tuidraki, who is also a Nia Tero Pasifika Journalism Fellow. Neisau is the host and producer of Kokonati Talk, a podcast that explores Fijian stories from the homeland and diaspora communities. Season 1 explores Indigenous guardianship and what that means to the lives of creative Fijians. In this episode, Neisau talks with Meli Tuqota, a Fijian filmmaker who made the animated film, Soli Bula ,and reconnected with his own heritage and native language in the process.  Special thanks to Neisau Tuidraki for sharing this episode and to Meli Tuquota for sharing his inspiring story.  More: Listen to more episodes of Kokonati Talk. Learn more about Neisau Tuidraki and the podcast here.  Follow Kokonati Talk on Instagram. Learn more about Meli Tuqota, watch the trailer for his film, and find out where to follow his journey on his website. Seedcast is a production of Nia Tero, a global nonprofit which supports Indigenous land guardianship around the world through policy, partnership, and storytelling initiatives.
“É como se os povos indígenas estivessem segurando todo o planeta. Vai chegar um momento em que, se vocês não vierem conosco também para essa luta, a gente não vai conseguir sozinho.” — Nara Baré  Neste episódio do Seedcast, apresentamos Nara Baré, da Nação Baré. A história da Nara é de empoderamento por meio do conhecimento. Ela nos conta como, a partir de sua trajetória de educação e sua participação em manifestações estudantis, ela se aproximou do movimento mais amplo de apoio à soberania territorial dos povos indígenas em toda a Amazônia brasileira. A Nara é a primeira mulher a desempenhar o papel de coordenadora-geral da COIAB (Coordenação das Organizações Indígenas da Amazônia Brasileira). Anfitriã / Produtora: Marianna Romano. Editora de histórias: Jenny Asarnow.  Saiba mais sobre a COIAB em seu site e acompanhe seu trabalho no Instagram, Twitter e Facebook.  Listen to this episode in English. 
This week we’re shining a light on the land of the Wabanaki through an episode by our friends at the Parks podcast. The state of Maine was established on the lands of tribes including the Maliseet, Mi'kmaq, Penobscot, and Passamaquoddy, collectively known as the Wabanaki, or “People of the Dawnland.” By the time the Rockefeller Family, who’d built their fortune on the oil industry, donated land to be used to form Acadia National Park, the Wabanaki people had already been long displaced from those lands, but that did not decrease their connection to them nor their responsibility for stewarding them. In this episode of Parks, scholars Darren Ranco (Penobscot) and Suzanne Greenlaw (Maliseet) share the history of the land’s colonization and talk about the Wabanaki’s recent efforts to access these lands in order to harvest cultural materials such as sweetgrass. We'd like to thank Parks host and co-creator Marty Mathis, co-creator Cody Nelson, and story editor Taylor Hensel (Cherokee.) Seedcast is hosted by Jessica Ramirez.We want to hear from you! What is your special place, the land YOU feel most connected to? We’d love to hear your stories and may share them on a future episode. Email seedcast@niatero.org or connect with us on Instagram, Facebook or Twitter as #Seedcast at @NiaTero. Learn more: Parks podcast, Instagram and Twitter First Blade of Sweetgrass, children’s book by Suzanne Greenlaw with Gabriel Frey   Seedcast is a production of Nia Tero, a global nonprofit which supports Indigenous land guardianship around the world through policy, partnership, and storytelling initiatives.
In the Arctic Circle, Innu peoples’ relationship with caribou “is so sacred that we could become them, and they could become one of us,” says Valérie Courtois. She is a member of the Innu community of Mashteuiatsh, a forester by trade, and the Director of the Indigenous Leadership Initiative, an organization dedicated to strengthening Indigenous nationhood and leadership. Valérie has spent her life bridging traditional Indigenous knowledge and Western science. She shares stories about what it’s like to live in the Boreal, home to hundreds of species of lichen and nesting ground to billions of birds. The special relationship between caribou and people in these lands goes back thousands of years and holds lessons about caring for Mother Earth and each other. Learn more about ILI on their website and connect with them on Twitter, Facebook, and LinkedIn.Host: Jessica Ramirez. Producer: Felipe Contreras. Story editor: Julie Keck.  We want to hear from you! What is your special place, the land YOU feel most connected to? We’d love to hear your stories and may share them on a future episode. Email seedcast@niatero.org or connect with us on Instagram, Facebook or Twitter as #Seedcast at @NiaTero. Seedcast is a production of Nia Tero, a global nonprofit which supports Indigenous land guardianship around the world through policy, partnership, and storytelling initiatives.
“It's as if the Indigenous peoples were holding the whole planet. And the time will come when if you don't come with us for this fight, we won't be able to do it alone.” – Nara Baré In this episode of Seedcast, meet Nara Baré, member of the Baré Nation. Nara's story is one of empowerment through knowledge. She shares how her educational pursuits, including participation in student protests, prepared her to join the larger movement to support land sovereignty for the Indigenous peoples across the Brazilian Amazon. Nara currently serves her community as the first female General Coordinator for COIAB (Coordination of Indigenous Organizations of the Brazilian Amazon). Host: Jessica Ramirez. Producer: Marianna Romano. Story editor: Jenny Asarnow. Learn more about COIAB on their website and follow their work on Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook. Seedcast is a production of Nia Tero, a global nonprofit which supports Indigenous land guardianship around the world through policy, partnership, and storytelling initiatives.
El pueblo Achuar vive en los bosques tropicales de la Amazonía Ecuatoriana y es guardián de terreno que contiene parte de la biodiversidad más rica del mundo. Dependen en gran medida del transporte fluvial, y en años más recientes, los Achuar han comenzado una misión para reducir su uso de barcos con motores de gas hacia algo menos dañino para el ambiente. En este episodio de Seedcast, conocemos a Nantu Canelos, Luciano Peas y Oliver Utne, quienes nos hablan sobre una asociación única entre el pueblo Achuar y una organización llamada Kara Solar que ha llevado a la incorporación de energía solar a la vidas diaria de muchas personas Achuar. Este episodio incluye de todo un poco, desde jaguares hasta la interpretación de sueños, y esperamos que lo disfrute. Anfitriona/Traductora: Neyda Ortiz Sundt. Productora Principal: Jessica Ramírez. Editora de Historia: Jenny Asarnow. Listen to this episode in English: The Boat of Dreams: How the Achuar Embraced Solar PowerSeedcast is a production of Nia Tero, a global nonprofit which supports Indigenous land guardianship around the world through policy, partnership, and storytelling initiatives.
There is no singular Indigenous experience. We take a walk with five Indigenous peoples from five different regions of Turtle Island in what is currently known as the United States to hear their stories about their identities, their cultures, and their connections to land.  Guests featured are John Scott-Richardson (Haliwa-Saponi Tribe, Tuscarora lineage from Six Nations), Carey Flack (Mvskoke Creek descent, Cherokee and Choctaw Freedmen descent), Jeremy Dennis (Shinnecock Indian Nation), Lofanitani (Black, Tongan, Modoc, Klamath, and Cherokee descent), and Colette Denali Montoya (Pueblo of Isleta and Pueblo of San Felipe.)Host: Jessica Ramirez. Producer: Stina Hamlin. Story editor: Tracy Rector.  WE WANT TO HEAR FROM YOU! How is your Indigenous identity connected to land? The Seedcast team is inviting our Indigenous listeners to record your thoughts in a voice memo and send them to: Seedcast@NiaTero.org. We plan to share your voices in a future episode! Learn more: Producer Stina Hamlin: Instagram / Twitter; Projects: Remaining Native Documentary, Sonic Occupation Colette Denali Montoya: Instagram / Website; opportunities to support Ukraine, to combat fracking in Colette’s homelands, and to support Pueblo survivance. Jeremy Dennis: @jeremynative / @mashousestudio / JeremyNative.com / Ma’s House StudioLofanitani: TikTok / Instagram / WebsiteJohn Scott-Richardson: InstagramSeedcast is a production of Nia Tero, a global nonprofit which supports Indigenous land guardianship around the world through policy, partnership, and storytelling initiatives.
Hannah Bennett (Rotuman), a professional surfer based in Fiji, shares what makes the perfect wave and how the connection of surfers to the elements makes them such natural stewards of reefs and oceans. She spoke with Fenton Lutunatabua, a Nia Tero Storytelling fellow, on Beyond the Narrative, a podcast that showcases the complex and dynamic truths of everyday Pacific Islanders and those that call the Pacific home. This is part of our series of Spotlights that shine a light on other Indigenous podcasts and Indigenous stories.  Listen to more episodes of Beyond the Narrative.Seedcast is a production of Nia Tero, a global nonprofit which supports Indigenous land guardianship around the world through policy, partnership, and storytelling initiatives.
You know we love to shine a light on other great podcasts doing the good work, and this week we’re excited to share with you an episode of the Finding Our Way podcast, hosted by Prentis Hemphill. Prentis is a therapist, somatics teacher and facilitator, political organizer, writer, and the founder of The Embodiment Institute. In this episode of Finding Our Way, Prentis talks with Mohawk Indigenous seed steward Rowen White about their relationship with the natural world and healing, and how we fit into a web of relationships with beings seen and unseen. Rowen White also talks about how seeds can help us heal generational trauma.   Thanks to the team at Finding Our Way: devon de Leña, Prentis Hemphill, and Eddie Hemphill.Listen to more episodes of the Finding Our Way podcast.Seedcast is a production of Nia Tero, a global nonprofit which supports Indigenous land guardianship around the world through policy, partnership, and storytelling initiatives.
Joan Carling (Kankana-ey Igorot, Philippines) has been fighting for Indigenous peoples’ rights, social justice and sustainable development for over 30 years. As co-founder and global director of Indigenous Peoples Rights International (IPRI), Joan is keenly aware that violations of Indigenous peoples’ rights are escalating all over the world, despite international protections. She shares how she navigates dealing with those in power, why it’s essential for the survival of the planet to support Indigenous land guardianship, and how she draws inspiration from the past and the future to continue the important work she does. Host and lead producer: Felipe Contreras. Story editor: Jenny Asarnow.Seedcast is a production of Nia Tero, a global nonprofit which supports Indigenous land guardianship around the world through policy, partnership, and storytelling initiatives.
This week Seedcast is proud to shine a spotlight on another podcast we adore, How to Survive the End of the World, hosted by sisters adrienne maree brown and Autumn Brown, about learning from apocalypse with grace, rigor, and curiosity. In this episode, part of their sibling series, adrienne and Autumn interview Aurora and Ricardo Levins Morales, two legendary artists and activists in social justice movements who were raised amongst the mountains in Puerto Rico. They hold a rich ancestral history there that they envision goes back up to 7000 years. You’ll hear about the immense grief they experienced that comes with separation from their lands, and how they applied learnings from relationships with lands, animals and birds to their work within social justice movements.  Thanks to the team at How to Survive the End of the World: Zak Rosen, adrienne maree brown, Autumn Brown, and Jess Pinkham. Listen to more episodes of the How to Survive the End of the World Podcast.Seedcast is a production of Nia Tero, a global nonprofit which supports Indigenous land guardianship around the world through policy, partnership, and storytelling initiatives.
Los invitamos a escuchar el episodio en español aquíThe Achuar people living in the rainforests of Ecuadorian Amazon are stewards of land that holds some of the richest biodiversity in the world. They rely heavily on river transportation, and in recent years, the Achuar have been on a journey to reduce their use of gas-powered boats to something less harmful to the environment. Jessica Ramirez talks with Nantu Canelos, Luciano Peas, and Oliver Utne about a partnership between the Achuar people and an organization called Kara Solar that has led to the incorporation of solar power into the everyday life of many Achuar people. This episode includes everything from jaguars to dream interpretation, and we hope you enjoy it. Host and Lead Producer: Jessica Ramirez. Story editor: Jenny Asarnow.Seedcast is a production of Nia Tero, a global nonprofit which supports Indigenous land guardianship around the world through policy, partnership, and storytelling initiatives.
Host Jessica Ramirez is back with new stories about the intimate connections of Indigenous peoples caring for their communities and the entire planet. The first episode of Season 2 debuts on February 2, 2022 - that's right - 2/2/22! We can't wait to spend another year with you.Link: Seedcast at Nia Tero
Growing up in the multiracial, working class neighborhood of White Center on Coast Salish land, Sili Savusa (Samoan) learned from a young age that her role in life was to take care of her people. Now, as Executive Director of White Center Community Development Association in Seattle, Washington, she works to create places where working class communities of color can live their dreams. In conversation with an islander from the Caribbean, Seedcast’s Felipe Contreras, Sili explains how she held onto Samoan values against the “Big Mack truck of racism” and why humility is a strong element of good community development work. Guest Host and Lead Producer: Felipe Contreras. Story editor: Jenny Asarnow. Content warning: this episode contains strong language at 15:24, 19:48, 25:59, 26:24.Seedcast is a production of Nia Tero, a global nonprofit which supports Indigenous land guardianship around the world through policy, partnership, and storytelling initiatives.
At COP26 in Glasgow, Scotland, world leaders gathered to discuss the future of the planet, the need to address climate change, and the actions required to do that, but not all of the important activity was occurring in official meetings. Meet several Indigenous women who gathered, marched, and supported one another both inside and outside of the conference rooms in Glasgow. We talk with journalist, filmmaker, and 2021 Ford Global Fellow Andrea Ixchíu Hernández (Maya-K’iche’, Guatemala); Indigenous and women's rights organizer Rosa Marina Flores Cruz (Afro-Zapotec, Mexico); Coordinator for the Pacific Network on Globalisation Maureen Penjueli (Rotuman, Fiji);  Executive Director of the Indigenous Information Network Lucy Malenkei (Maasai, Kenya); and Erandy Madena (Purhépecha, Mexico). Find out what is at stake in climate talks for Indigenous peoples and why women are often found at the forefront of Indigenous climate change work. Host/story editor: Jessica Ramirez. Producers: Jenny Asarnow and Tracy Rector. 
Lisa Fruichantie (citizen of the Seminole Nation of Oklahoma) has served as a vibrant connector within her communities since she started her first business at 13. Last year Lisa put those skills to work as the new executive director for the restaurant and arts venue Alma in Tacoma, Washington, the traditional lands of the Puyallup peoples. In this episode, find out why it was important for Lisa to draw upon her Indigenous network as she expanded her team, and what it has been like to bring her dream of a Native-focused menu to life.  Host:  Jessica Ramirez. Producer: Rachel Lam. Story editor: Jenny Asarnow.Resource: Alma Tacoma
Indigenous storytelling is vital to a deeper understanding of our world as well as to addressing the climate crisis, but how do we best support those storytellers? The 4th World Media Lab does just that, supporting early and mid-career Indigenous filmmakers from around the globe. In this episode, members of the 2021 cohort - Brit Hensel, Ajuawak Kapashesit, Jared Lank, Erin Lau, Lucía Ortega Toledo, and Theola Ross - share how Indigenous-focused spaces make room for growth, why Native filmmaking is in an interesting moment, and what they envision next for themselves and those following in their footsteps. We're also joined by the founder of the lab, Tracy Rector (Managing Director, Storytelling, Nia Tero and Executive Producer for Seedcast), who shares about the generative partnerships that keep the 4th World fellowship going and what inspired the name. Hosted by Jessica Ramirez; Produced by Felipe Contreras and Michelle Hurtubise; Story edited by Julie Keck. Resource: 4th World Media Lab at Nia Tero
We’re sharing an episode of the podcast Parks, which explores the truth about the creation of U.S. National Parks, retold alongside Indigenous peoples. This, the first episode of Parks, dives into the history of Yellowstone Park with guests Lynette Saint Clair (Eastern Shoshone) and Shane Doyle (Apsáalooke Nation). They share stories about Indigenous stewardship of this land from the Ice Age to the present, and speak about the U.S. treaties made and broken with local Indigenous peoples in advance of the establishment of Yellowstone Park. We’re grateful to the Parks team – Mary Mathis, Cody Lee Nelson, and Nia Tero’s Taylor Hensel – for their great work, their transparency, and their generosity. Content advisory: This episode includes a discussion of Indigenous residential schools and colonial violence. 
Victoria Tauli-Corpuz and Jennifer ‘Jing’ Corpuz (Kankana-ey Igorot, Philippines) are policy makers and Indigenous rights advocates as well as mother and daughter. Both women share personal stories about making the shift from student activism to effecting change on a global scale with world leaders, as well as how they honor and continue a family legacy of leadership. They also share ideas for what we all can do to support policy work on behalf of Indigenous peoples and the planet. Hosted by Jessica Ramirez; produced by Jenny Asarnow; edited by Tracy Rector.
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