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Do you have questions about monkeypox? Download the season 2 finale of the Public Health Out Loud podcast to get answers. Co-hosts Dr. Jim McDonald and Dr. Philip Chan talk about the origins of monkeypox, how it’s spread, and how to protect yourself. They also talk about the JYNNEOS vaccine, and how Rhode Island is administering it. Get the facts about monkeypox from our public health experts so you can recognize misinformation when it’s circulating online.  To learn more about Rhode Island’s monkeypox vaccination strategy or to sign up for the Vaccine Interest Notification List, visit health.ri.gov/monkeypox. If you’re listening outside of Rhode Island, visit your local health department’s website for information about vaccination.  Thank you for listening to season 2 of Public Health Out Loud! Subscribe to the podcast and follow the Rhode Island Department of Health on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram for updates on season 3.  
This week’s guest expert on the Public Health Out Loud podcast is Ana Bess Moyer Bell, a drama therapist and executive director of 2nd Act. 2nd Act is a Boston-based non-profit organization that uses drama therapy to support healing and recovery for people who have experienced trauma, substance use disorder, a family member living with substance use disorder, or the death of a loved one. Co-hosts Dr. Jim McDonald and Dr. Philip Chan ask their guest about how the experience of writing, acting in, or even viewing a play about substance use and recovery can be cathartic. It can help people work through their own ideas about, connections to, or experiences with substance use disorder, and can open up a dialogue about a topic that may sometimes feel like it’s hard to address.  To learn more, download this week’s episode and visit weare2ndact.org.
This week’s guest expert on the Public Health Out Loud podcast is Dr. Patricia Cioe, an Associate Professor of Behavioral and Social Sciences at Brown University. Dr. Cioe’s current research is focused on the effects of cigarette smoking on one’s health, and the development of innovative smoking cessation interventions for people living with HIV. Co-hosts Dr. Jim McDonald and Dr. Philip Chan ask Dr. Cioe about the difference between combustible cigarettes, e-cigarettes, and vapes. They also talk about the health effects of smoking tobacco and different methods for decreasing or quitting smoking.  Quitting tobacco is a journey. Whether you’re thinking about quitting, aren’t yet ready to quit, or have already quit, the Rhode Island Nicotine Helpline can help you each step of the way. Call 1-800-Quitnow, visit quitnowRI.org, or talk to your healthcare provider about quitting smoking. 
Veterans' Health

Veterans' Health

2022-08-0529:51

This week’s guest expert is Dr. Amy Cameron, a clinical psychologist in the VA Healthcare System in Providence, Rhode Island and a faculty member of the Department of Psychology and Human Behavior at Brown University. Co-hosts Dr. Jim McDonald and Dr. Philip Chan ask her about the most common health concerns among veterans, including chronic pain and post-traumatic stress disorder, and treatment options that are available to veterans. Download this week’s episode to learn more.  Are you a veteran in crisis or concerned about one? You're not alone. The Veterans Crisis Line is available 24/7. Call 1-800-273-8255 and press option 1, or visit veteranscrisisline.net to chat online. To learn more about local resources, visit vets.ri.gov.
This week’s guest expert on the Public Health Out Loud podcast is Dr. Scott Rivkees, the former surgeon general for the State of Florida. As the state’s leading public health officer from June 2019 to September 2021, Dr. Rivkees oversaw the state’s COVID-19 response. Now, Dr. Rivkees is a professor of practice of health services, policy, and practice and vice chair of the Department of Health Service, Policy, and Practice at the Brown University School of Public Health.  Co-hosts Dr. Philip Chan and Dr. Jim McDonald ask Dr. Rivkees about his experiences leading the COVID-19 response in Florida, and opportunities for research and collaboration now that he’s at Brown University. Download this week’s episode to learn more.  
There are a lot of unanswered questions when it comes to Long Covid, which refers to the prolonged symptoms that some patients experience after an initial COVID-19 infection. People experiencing Long Covid have reported symptoms ranging from fatigue to brain fog to difficulty breathing. For some, the symptoms last a couple weeks after their initial infection with COVID-19. For others, the symptoms have lasted much longer. This week on the Public Health Out Loud podcast, find out what we do and don’t know about Long Covid, and what local researchers are doing to get more answers.  This week’s guest expert is Dr. Francesca Beaudoin, the chair of epidemiology at Brown School of Public Health and director of the Long Covid Initiative there. Dr. Beaudoin talks about who is most at risk of experiencing Long Covid, and the effect that Long Covid is having on some patients’ mental health.  Co-hosts Dr. Philip Chan and Dr. Jim McDonald also talk about local resources that are available to help people experiencing symptoms of Long Covid, including the Long Covid Clinic at Lifespan. Download this week’s episode to learn more.  
Refugee Health

Refugee Health

2022-07-1523:49

This week’s guest expert on the Public Health Out Loud podcast is Dr. Carol Lewis, a general pediatrician at Hasbro Children’s Hospital and the director of the Refugee Health Program there. Co-hosts Dr. Jim McDonald and Dr. Philip Chan ask her about pediatric health trends and common health issues among the refugee community. They also ask her about how Rhode Island has welcomed recent waves of refugees arriving from Afghanistan and Ukraine. Download this week’s episode to learn more.  
What did COVID-19 teach us about pandemic preparedness? How concerned should we be about monkeypox? Download the latest episode of the Public Health Out Loud podcast to get the answers from Dr. Jennifer Nuzzo, an epidemiologist, pandemic preparedness expert, and the director at the new Pandemic Preparedness Center at the Brown University School of Public Health.  Co-hosts Dr. Jim McDonald and Dr. Philip Chan talk about their experiences as local public health officials throughout the COVID-19 pandemic, and ask Dr. Nuzzo what Rhode Island, the nation, and the world could do to better prepare for another pandemic.  
Did you know 1 in 4 women and 1 in 7 men have experienced domestic violence in their lifetime? Listen to the latest episode of the Public Health Out Loud podcast to learn more about the patterns of behavior that can occur in abusive relationships and local resources that are available to Rhode Islanders.  This week’s guest expert is Vanessa Volz, the executive director at Sojourner House. The mission of Sojourner House is to promote healthy relationships by providing culturally sensitive support, advocacy, housing, and education for victims and survivors of domestic violence, sexual assault, and human trafficking; and to effect systems change.  Co-hosts Dr. Jim McDonald and Dr. Philip Chan ask Vanessa about the red flags that people should look out for in their relationships. They also talk about how Sojourner House is empowering victims to become survivors. Download this week’s episode to learn more.  
Why Breastfeed Baby?

Why Breastfeed Baby?

2022-06-2423:40

This week’s guest expert is Erin Bertoldi, the state breastfeeding coordinator at the Rhode Island Department of Health (RIDOH).  Co-hosts Dr. Jim McDonald and Dr. Philip Chan ask Erin about the health benefits of breastfeeding, the challenges that parents may face, and the resources that are available to support parents through their breastfeeding journey.  Why does the American Academy of Pediatrics recommend that infants be exclusively breastfed for the first six months of life? Has the national formula shortage increased interest in breastfeeding support and training programs in Rhode Island? To learn more, download this week’s episode and visit health.ri.gov/breastfeeding. 
Did you know about 10 million people a year develop an active infection of tuberculosis? Although cases in the United States are rare, tuberculosis continues to be prevalent in other areas of the world. And since there isn’t an effective, long-term vaccine, cases can be fatal. In fact, before COVID-19, tuberculosis was the leading infectious disease killer in the world.  This week’s guest expert is Dr. Natasha Rybak, the director of the RISE Clinic for Tuberculosis in Rhode Island. She describes how tuberculosis spreads, how it’s treated, and who’s most at risk. She also talks about her work with the Brown University Ukraine Collaboration, which works with Ukrainian health providers to address the challenges of the HIV/AIDS and tuberculosis epidemics for children, women, and their family members in Ukraine. How has the war impacted tuberculosis research in Ukraine? Download this week’s episode to find out.  
Ending homelessness is a public health issue. One possible solution? More housing.  This week’s guest expert on the Public Health Out Loud podcast is Karen Santilli, the CEO of Crossroads Rhode Island. Crossroads is the leading provider of housing and homeless services in Rhode Island. Santilli talks about how rates of homelessness have increased not just in the state, but throughout the country during the pandemic. She also shares stories about how something called a “housing first” model can help homeless or at-risk individuals and families get on a path to stability. Hear co-hosts Dr. Jim McDonald and Dr. Philip Chan talk about the difference between providing shelter and having a home, and how that difference can impact someone’s health physically, mentally, and emotionally.  How can we improve access to healthcare and resources for people experiencing homelessness? What is Crossroads doing to solve the housing crisis in Rhode Island? Download this week’s episode to find out.  For more information about Crossroads, visit their website at crossroadsri.org. 
This week’s guest expert on the Public Health Out Loud podcast is Dr. Andrew Saal; a family physician and the chief medical officer of the largest community health center in Rhode Island, Providence Community Health Centers (PCHC).  Co-hosts Dr. Jim McDonald and Dr. Philip Chan ask Dr. Saal about the difference between reactive and proactive healthcare. They also ask him about how transforming primary care to a team-based approach could relieve crowded emergency rooms and reduce burnout among healthcare workers.  How has PCHC implemented a team-approach to care? Download this week’s episode to find out.  
Pharmacists do a lot more than dispense medication. Pharmacies have become a major hub for people to access health care services—like testing, vaccine, and treatment—during the COVID-19 pandemic. In fact, roughly 75 percent of the country’s eligible population got their COVID-19 vaccine from a pharmacy.  How has the role of the pharmacist evolved over time? This week’s guest experts, Dr. Jeffrey Bratberg and Dr. Sabrina Silveira, will explain just that. Dr. Bratberg is a clinical professor of pharmacy practice at the University of Rhode Island College of Pharmacy, the academic collaborations officer at the Rhode Island Department of Health’s Academic Institute, and associate editor for the Journal of the American Pharmacists Association. Dr. Silveira is a newly graduated pharmacist from URI’s College of Pharmacy with experience as a hospital outpatient pharmacist.  What kind of training is required for pharmacists? What additional opportunities are there to expand pharmacists’ role in healthcare delivery? Download this week’s episode to find out.  
This week’s guest expert has been managing outbreaks, epidemics, and pandemics throughout her career. Meet Dr. Utpala Bandy, the Medical Director for the Division of Preparedness, Response, Infectious Diseases, and Emergency Medical Services at the Rhode Island Department of Health (RIDOH). Dr. Bandy gives a tour of her healthcare experiences from around the globe, including her education and the onset of her career in India, and the front-line training she received throughout the United Kingdom and America.  At RIDOH, Dr. Bandy has played a critical part in managing outbreaks and epidemics throughout the state’s recent history. Co-hosts Dr. Jim McDonald and Dr. Philip Chan ask her about a rabies outbreak that threatened Rhode Island’s domestic animals and wildlife in the 90s, a salmonella outbreak in 2010 that changed the food industry’s equipment standards nationwide, and, what many call the outbreak most comparable to COVID-19, the H1N1 virus.  Dr. Bandy has also been an invaluable  "healthcare hero behind the scenes" at RIDOH during the response to the COVID-19 pandemic. How does the COVID-19 response compare to previous outbreak responses? How long could we be living with COVID-19 as an endemic disease? Download this week’s episode to learn more.  
Trauma-informed care shifts the focus from “What’s wrong with you?” to “What happened to you?” A trauma-informed approach to health acknowledges that physicians and healthcare organizations need to have a complete picture of a patient’s life situation — past and present — in order to provide effective healthcare services with a focus on healing. This week’s guest experts are Dr. Catherine DeGood; a physician in family and addiction medicine, medical director of CODAC Behavioral Healthcare, and a physician at Butler Hospital; and Linda Hurley, the chief executive officer at CODAC Behavioral Healthcare, which is a non-profit organization in Rhode Island that has provided treatment, recovery, and prevention services to individuals and families within local communities for more than 40 years. How come some people can manage stress and trauma better than others? What are some coping skills to help manage stress so that we react in a way that’s helpful to us? Download this week’s episode to learn more.  
This week’s guest on the Public Health Out Loud podcast is an expert on housing instability, the eviction crisis, and related impacts on health outcomes. Dr. Gracie Himmelstein is a resident in internal medicine at the University of California Los Angeles with a PhD in demography from Princeton University. She has also conducted research with The Eviction Lab at Princeton University, which creates data, interactive tools, and research to help neighbors and policymakers understand the eviction crisis. Co-hosts Dr. Jim McDonald and Dr. Philip Chan talk about how COVID-19 shed light on housing instability, and what Rhode Island is doing to address it. They also ask Dr. Himmelstein about long-term solutions to promote housing stability in Rhode Island and nationwide.  Download this week’s episode to learn more.  
In July of 2021, Rhode Island Governor Dan McKee signed legislation allowing for a two-year harm reduction center pilot program in the state. This means Rhode Island will be among the first in the nation to license and establish harm reduction centers, which are places where people can go to use drugs safely.  What will a harm reduction center in Rhode Island look like? How effective have harm reduction centers been at preventing overdose deaths in other countries?  Learn more about Rhode Island’s pilot program from guest experts: Dr. Liz Samuels, an emergency and addiction medicine physician, researcher at the Brown University Department of Emergency Medicine and the School of Epidemiology at the Brown School of Public Health, and the consulting assistant medical director for the Overdose Prevention Program at the Rhode Island Department of Health; Sarah Beister, policy and evaluation lead for RIDOH’s Overdose Prevention Program; and Lauren Conkey, community program lead for RIDOH’s Overdose Prevention Program. Download this week’s episode and visit PreventOverdoseRI.org to learn more about harm reduction initiatives in Rhode Island. 
In this week’s episode, you’ll hear co-hosts Dr. Jim McDonald and Dr. Philip Chan talk about their roads to becoming doctors, and their journeys into public health. What did Dr. Chan’s time as an ambulance driver teach him about medicine? What made Dr. McDonald decide to drop his undergraduate major in photography? Download this week’s episode to learn more.  
When we think about vending machines, we imagine sugary drinks and candy bars. But in Rhode Island, vending machines are being used to dispense harm reduction tools that can help prevent overdose and reduce the spread of infectious diseases like HIV and hepatitis C. Through these vending machines, individuals can access free, sterile syringes, rapid tests for sexually transmitted infections, naloxone (Narcan®), wound care and hygiene kits, and fentanyl test strips any time of day or night.  In this week's episode, you’ll learn about this innovative harm reduction strategy thanks to our guest experts from the Rhode Island Department of Health and AIDS Care Ocean State, a local non-profit connecting adults, families, adolescents and children who are affected by or at risk of HIV infection to quality housing, case management services, medical and nursing care, and prevention resources. Our guest experts are Katie Howe, the Prevention Program Manager for the Center for HIV, Hepatitis, STD, and TB Epidemiology; Katelyn Case, a Harm Reduction Case Manager at AIDS Care Ocean State; and Vanessa Perez, the Lead Prevention Worker for AIDS Care Ocean State.  Where are these harm reduction vending machines located? How are the machines helping to link people who use drugs to critical resources and wraparound services to improve health and well-being? Download this week’s episode to learn more.  
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