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Pastor Dirk's Sermons

Author: Pastor Dirk Rodgers

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Weekly reflections on the scriptures from our Worship Services at Roser Church, Anna Maria, Florida.
18 Episodes
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Reflecting on perhaps the most famous version of the Bible. Jesus, the Son of God, sent to save us. How do we experience the power of God's love.
Last Sunday we reflected Jesus as Lord, clearing the temple and describing His body as the temple. In this devotional, we see Jesus in the heavenly temple, in John's book of Revelation.
When Jesus clears the temple, He reveals Himself as the Lord of His people. He calls God's people to change as they recognize His holy presence among them. In His death and resurrection, Jesus makes it possible for us to change, if we are willing to change.
On Sunday, we examined John's gospel which describes Jesus as both fully God and fully Man, who comes to make us fully human. In this devotional, we examine Paul's letter to the Colossians, chapter 1, in which the apostle expands this thought.
Is Jesus a moral teacher, a religious leader, a myth? John opens his story about Jesus by declaring that He is both fully God and fully human. Sermon Notes and Discussion Guide are available at: https://dirks-corner-public.s3.amazonaws.com/WhoIsJesus-2021-SermonNotes-Week1.pdf. For more information visit https://dirkcorner.com
David's cry for mercy exposes our need for the Father, Son and Spirit, threads of truth that are woven together more closely in the New Testament.
The God Who is beyond us is also with us. He knows us better than we know ourselves, and He will find us no matter how lost we might feel.
How can we know a God who is Beyond Us? King David gives us an answer to this question in his hymn of praise.
While Caesar flexes his tyrannical muscle, God reveals a new, powerful phase in His heavenly kingdom. The new king is announced to lowly shepherds because He would be a different kind of ruler. His humble beginnings merely highlight His power. He comes for all people. He brings joy to everyone, not just those in power. Hope gives us this power to rejoice, even in troubled times.
To those living in Israel, the coming of Jesus made sense. God had promised a king in the line of David, and now He had arrived to assume His throne. But what does His coming mean to those outside of Israel, who were not yet part of Israel’s story? Then mysterious visitors appear from a distant land, because the heavens have told them of this glorious birth. God has summoned them to find in Israel the child that would reign over all the earth. Their presence reminds us that this hope has power to reach every seeking soul.
Two faithful servants wait for God to answer prayer, and God comes through in an epoch-changing way.
On Sunday we reflected on the hope that God reveals through a troubled father named Joseph. This got me thinking of another Joseph who lived some 1700 years earlier. Both these Josephs share something in common, with each other and with us.
While God works through His Spirit to bring His Son into the world, the couple chosen to raise this child face a crisis that threatens this plan. God, however, will not give up on His plan. Joseph learns that God is both beyond us and with us.
On Sunday we heard the angel reveal an astounding message to a young woman, named Mary, that she would become the mother of God' Son born in human flesh! In our reflection this morning, we reflect on her song of praise in response to this revelation.
While a young woman in Nazareth prepares for her wedding, she receives a stunning message. She would soon be the mother of the new king of Israel, and His kingdom would never end. This was no ordinary child; He would be the Son of God. For a virgin, this news seems impossible, but, for God, this challenge only demonstrates His glory and invincible will. Hope gives us this power to believe and engage in God’s sovereign plan.
Throughout this pandemic, we have seen many health care workers step into the breach, risk the danger, and work toward our healing. This week we look at a Healer unlike any other, with power and authority that we had never seen before.
As our world remains fractured and divided on so many levels, God reveals His Good News, that He has sent His Son to bring us together into a new community. Mark 1:9-20.A handout for this sermon is available at https://dirks-corner-public.s3.amazonaws.com/TimeforGoodNews-2020-SermonNotes-Week2.pdf
In 2020, our culture has endured its share of bad news, including a global pandemic, inflamed racial tensions, and intense political fractures. So, we can all use some Good News, and Jesus brings us the best news ever – for all people in all times, even troubled times like ours. The Gospel of Mark tells us about the “beginning” of this Good News, and we will explore it in this week's episode.
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